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Happenings
What's On

A Tale of Two Cities

I will never forget the first time I saw the Palace of Versailles. It was a cheerless, drizzly Sunday, sultry with that December heat which tends to convulse under heavy clouds. Rain had persisted for days and, ascending the gallery steps, I could see the footprints left by hundreds of Francophilic pilgrims. I brushed a drenched forelock off my brow, passed below a gilt antechamber (where did that smell of orange blossom come from?) and stopped dead. Heat travelled up the back of my neck, spread across my face and plummeted southward from my shoulders making it impossible to tell rain and sweat apart. Thorough awe. – Hall of Mirrors (Courtesy of the Palace of Versailles)   Everywhere in glass displays were relics of another time, another world. Everywhere: tiny gold watches covered in enamelled camellia sprays; tables with legs drastically scrolling away in a camouflage of lions’ claws, fig leaves and sunbursts; and imperious courtiers with baguette-thick curls glanced out from their finery along every wall. But this wasn’t France. On the opposite side of the world in a city planned not dissimilarly to Versailles – laid out like a bursting star and punctuated by dramatic lakes, fountains and other feats of decorative hydraulic engineering – I was seduced by a world of power, passion, luxury and tragedy. I was in Canberra at the National Gallery of Australia’s Versailles: Treasures from the Palace. Boasting more than 130 paintings, tapestries, gilded furnishings, immense statues, fountains and personal objets d’artes, the NGA’s current exhibition evokes the reigns of three Kings, their Queens and the tumultuous life of courtly France on the brink of modern history. – 'Duke of Penthièvre and His Family', by Jean-Baptiste Charpentier c.1768 (Courtesy of the Palace of Versailles)   Underscoring what is undeniably a coup d’état for Australia’s design and architecture devotees, Catherine Pégard – President of the Palace of Versailles – reminds me that “[t]hese treasures have travelled far to make this ground-breaking exhibition accessible to all Australians. We are very proud to be launching this exhibition with the NGA”. Representing the very first time any of these artefacts have travelled from France, the collection contrasts the minutely delicate (such as the miniature glittering reliquary belonging to Louis XIV’s mother) with the colossal (for instance, the 1.5-tonne fountain centrepiece Lantona and Her Children that once stood at the epicentre of the Sun King’s garden, allegorising his mythic namesake, Apollo). – 'Lantona Fountain', Palace of Versailles (Photography: Kiev Victor)   “Every object,” says Gerard Vaughan, NGA’s Director, “tells a story – evoking the lives, loves, taste and ideas of the kings, queens, mistresses and courtiers who live at Versailles through so many great moments in French history”. Steering through the various rooms, mouth agape, I stopped at a portrait by Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, terrified to familiarise myself with the face of its sitter – Marie Antoinette. Painted a mere six years before her execution, it is heartrending and magnificent. Her gaze commands all that lies out before her, accusatorially defying me to question the fripperies and extravagances that surround me. – 'Marie Antoinette' by Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun. (Courtesy Palace of Versailles)   And, I can’t. I wouldn’t dare. But, I don’t know exactly why I hesitate to baulk or dismiss such profligate excesses of gold, silk, crystal, precious gems and marble. This world was famously cut short – these people, too. While the nation starved, they (apocryphally) gorged on cake from a golden fork. And yet, looking into Marie Antoinette’s eyes, I can’t bring myself to condemn the irresponsibly unfeeling pomp of it all. This world may have needed to come to an end. But, glancing around the exhibition it is clear that its attitude has endured: the seductive, powerful romance of design. – Louis XIV Gilt Armchair (Courtesy of Palace of Versailles)   Yes, by the shore of 2017 Lake Burley-Griffin is a long way – over 355 years and more than 15,201 kilometres – from the obscure marshes where Louis XIV erected his vast, devastatingly glamorous fortress in 1662. But it’s a lot closer to home than we might think. As I leave Versailles and step back out into the Canberra rain I walk past a wall inscribed with quotations of our country’s earliest settlers. Reading their words, I’m reminded of others. I am reminded of a single, broken line in one of Marie Antoinette’s final letters. “We had a beautiful dream. And that was all…” – Exterior, Palace of Versailles (Courtesy of the Palace)    National Gallery of Australia Versailles: Treasures from the Palace    Versailles: Treasures from the Palace is currently at the National Gallery of Australia until 17 April 2017.   Words by David Congram. Previously published in McGrath Magazine 4.2.2017abc
Design Hunters
People

In Conversation With… Maurice Terzini

Owner of Bondi Icebergs, The Dolphin and now DaMaria (Bali) Maurice, you’ve operated Bondi Icebergs for fifteen years, last June you opened the new look Dolphin Hotel in Surry Hills and then in November you launched Da Maria in Bali. I’m also hearing noise of a Bali beach club and maybe a hotel. Is it fair to say that today you’re more of an entrepreneur than a restauranteur? Mate, I made that decision five years ago, probably even longer. I was taught by my father that one of the most important skills that a waiter should have is patience. I lost that skill because when I was on the floor I was thinking about other things and so my patience was lost. I realized that, having been a waiter since I was eleven, it was time to move on and today my inspiration comes from people like Ian Schrager. I’ve spoken with Carl Pickering (the architect of Icebergs and Da Maria) on numerous occasions about doing Hotel Terzini which is possibly my ultimate goal. We talk often about where it should be, about what it could be, if it should be one or perhaps many. What I do know is that it will be a mix of hotel, restaurant and bar, that is something I am striving for. The other goal, perhaps more personally, is to get to a point where I am able to run multiple venues really, really well. I know I can run one – with my eyes closed, my hands tied behind my back and thrown into a cupboard. None of your establishments look the same, they’re not playing to some kind of brand identity No two of my restaurants ever need be the same since they each have my DNA. So we can have Da Maria, Da Luigi, Da Mario, for instance. All these tongue-in-cheek, really woggy names. I love that, it’s an idea that could travel. Right now we’re looking at opening a really low-fi pizzeria in Chiangu, Bali, with everything in paper cups and boxes, a surfer-punk vibe, everything black and white, very Newcastle. And yes we’ve also been looking at another site for a beach club. We had a site, but that fell through because of the developer. Long story. So now we’re looking at a site in Seminyak, Bali. I’ve thought about an Icebergs pool club in L.A. We’ve looked at a site in Mykonos, we’ve considered Ibiza. Basically, the idea with Icebergs expansion is that we get to go to places we really want to hang out. Are you fleeing Sydney’s lockout laws? While you were away in Bali last time, Mike Baird resigned. To be honest, the lockout laws don’t affect our business since we close at midnight anyway. So my vocal support for the Keep Sydney Open movement is not a business decision, it’s a matter of principle. I think back to the days when I worked with my father, the way our relationship after work was based around going out. Once I’d reached drinking age we’d go out after work to bars and clubs and spend a lot of father-son time, going over the events of the day, debrief the service, meet up with other restauranteurs, other waiters. I learnt so much in those hours after work, and now it’s been taken away from so many people. It’s incredibly frustrating that they didn’t look for alternatives. Especially when you consider that a city like Melbourne which is only an hour and a half away manages to have an incredibly vibrant night life, that stays alive and thrives 24/7. In a sophisticated city, in an educated society, there has to be an alternative. Your architect of choice is Rome-based Australian Carl Pickering of Lazzarini Pickering. So, a Sydney entrepreneur working with an architect in Rome on a site in Bali – and perhaps in Los Angeles or Mykonos. Talk me through that. Basically, after all these years working together – Carl began designing Icebergs in 2000 – we have such a good working relationship, it’s gone past careful introductions and baby talk. We can get straight to the point. We don’t need to hang out together and get to know one another’s likes and dislikes because we worked that all out years ago. That’s a very important part of the process when you start working with an architect. I want to know what they wear, what they eat, what music turns them on. We’re in the business of selling a lifestyle so I want to know the person who is designing the lifestyle I’m trying to sell. We’ve got incredibly similar tastes. Carl likes all the daggy old Roman trattorias I like, so it just works between us. For us, daggy can be really cool. Neither of us likes design which is really over the top. We usually start with a thousand ideas, but the goal is always to reduce them to one. When I start to work with Carl on a gig, we start by talking about the food and the wine before we begin discussing the design. The design is there to enhance the concept, not the other way around, Interview by Stephen Toddabc
Architecture
Places

Take a Trip to Little Sicily – Destination Sydney

Olio Kensington Street is the new Sydney restaurant designed by Chris Bosse of LAVA. It’s Sicily’s classic passeggiata, or leisurely walk, and extra virgin green olive oil that serve as the two aesthetic launching points of the space; perfectly married in the 19th century Old Rum Store. “Sicilian-born award-winning chef Lino Sauro is bringing his cuisine, based on traditional recipes from his family, newly interpreted, to Sydney. He uses very few ingredients and wants each ingredient to be visible and detectable. Our architecture has the same goal,” explains Bosse on the Olio design. “We created a passeggiata using Sicilian tiles, that flows through the restaurant and connects the kitchen, bar, dining and rooftop areas. This circulation system subdivides the space, separating serving spaces and served spaces. This is also expressed in the ceiling where a layered green ribbon reflects the floor layout.” “We introduced two pieces of ‘furniture’, free flowing joinery elements for kitchen and bar. Soft, dripping, LED-lit lines on the joinery interpret the idea of flowing oil.” The interior of Olio features a natural colour palette of light oak timber and concrete tabletops, playfully set off with hints of Mediterranean blue and olive green. Fit out with the elegant and relaxed aesthetic of the Gubi Chair, the result is a space that allows the food to be the heor, while still working as a visually arresting design area. “We overlaid these new elements onto the fantastic bones of the old rum store – exposed brick walls, timber rafters, steel structure, rustic timber doors, loft-style steel windows. The original elements were cleaned up and showcased as existing.” Diners are also free to enjoy an aperitivo or two on the olive tree-lined rooftop terrace, overlooking Sydney’s Chippendale. Lighting design, handled by Light Practice, includes a series of bendable LED strips, lining the joinery and ceiling, as well as dimmable spotlights to create a moody and romantic atmosphere in the low light evenings “We had a mix of tradition and innovation to work with – an old building and Sicilian tradition; with a new fit-out and Lino’s modern take on Sicilian dishes. Our design complements the quality produce and strong connection to Sicilian roots. Simple and legible.” LAVA l-a-v-a.net Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Brett Boardman cb-2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-008 cb-2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-018 cb-2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-036 cb-22017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-008 cb2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-002 cb2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-022 cb-2017-brett-boardman-olio-kensington-045  abc
Architecture
Homes

How can a home adapt to a lifestyle constantly in flux?

It’s the age-old conundrum with which young families are forever faced: the perfect house, the perfect location, and the perfect partner. And before you know you’ve got a growing family and decision to make. For the residents of this single-storey, Federation-style bungalow home in Glen Iris, Melbourne, they decided to grow out, not move out. The brief given to Neil Architecture was to renovate and extend the space without creating the need for a second storey. The pre-existing central hallway was retained yet modernized to encourage/reflect a natural transition from the existing bungalow, at the front of the house, to the new extension towards the rear. Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living A generous living space – one that allows for cooking, dining and lounging – spills out into the courtyard which can and is also used for entertaining. Floor to ceiling windows and sliding door not only make the connection feel seamless but allow plenty of natural light inside. Natural light and a connection to the garden outside is a feature throughout the entire home. Timber windows frame curated garden views bringing warmth to the interior spaces and a large skylight punctuates the aforementioned hallway. Neil Architecture neilarchitecture.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Hilary Bradford Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living13 Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus LivingNeil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Living Neil Architecture Elizabeth St | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

At Home Amongst the Trees

The great Australian Dream of home ownership is becoming harder to obtain as property prices increase and property sizes decrease. But with satellite cities such as Ballarat growing, hopeful homeowners not only have a more affordable opportunity to buy or to build but to experience the Australian landscape. This house in Invermay, just outside of Ballarat, is home to a close-knit family of six who moved from Ireland to Victoria via San Francisco and Canberra. Designed by Mick and Jules Moloney of Moloney Architects, the house takes advantage of the tranquility, nature and wildlife of the Australian bush, providing plenty of space while still being only a 10-minute drive to town. Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living The house cantilevers over the steeply sloping block and has been designed for cold winters, hot summers and a BAL-29 bushfire prone area. Its long rectilinear form ensures every room has access to northern sun; the floor slab and internal concrete provide thermal mass and help regulate the internal temperature; and batten screens on the north and west façades provide sufficient shading. The façade itself is composed of horizontal and vertical volumes that are an expression of the interconnected spaces within; and clad or formed with timber, concrete (poured in-situ) and glass, they reflect the tones of the surrounding bush landscape and reinforce the geometric composition. “The monolithic textured concrete wall that wraps around the entry and stair acts to visually anchor the double-storey cantilever back to the hillside,” Mick explains. Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living And if the outside of the house is designed for the family to connect with the landscape, then the inside of the house is where they connect with each other. “The configuration of the internal spaces had an emphasis on connection, flow of movement and non-obtrusive doors and window,” Mick says. To this extent, exposed and recessed sliding panels have been used in place of standard hinged doors, and wide sliding glass doors provide access to the cantilevered viewing decks. The living spaces on the ground floor are connected to the bedrooms upstairs via a central timber staircase. “Unusually, the upstairs master bedroom opens to the void above the lounge room, which was done to improve communication and airflow between the levels,” says Mick. The materials inside also reflect those outside, with a raw board-marked concrete wall, American white oak lining boards and burnished concrete floor. Not only has this family secured the Australian Dream of home ownership, but they’ve built their dream house where they live amongst the tranquility of the Australian trees. Moloney Architects moloneyarchitects.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross Photography by Michael Kai Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living Invermay House | Habitus Living  abc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

The NikolaTesla – Home Cooking Inspired By Genius

Fusing hood and cooking surface into a single domestic appliance, the NikolaTesla induction cooktop acts as a fully integrated cooking and suction system. With the fan and cooker hood perfectly integrated into the cooktop itself, the appliance guarantees high performance in terms of fume capture, silence and energy efficiency, all while being housed within an aesthetically uniform design. Centre to the design is the unique Elica technology, which ensures high cooking performance through induction technology and a constantly improving air quality. It’s this Elica technology that separates the NikolaTesla from its competitors, and no groundbreaking technology would be complete without a matching design aesthetic. The design seamlessly combines the functions of two essential appliances, hood and cooktop. The cooker hood is positioned at the centre of the hob, directly communicating with the induction cooktop and able to receive information from the cooking zones, automatically adjusting aspiration power and speed. When using the NikolaTesla, food preparation and cooking is an easy and clean process, with no need for concern about fumes or bad smells – Elica will take care of the air quality. Through the use of innovative technology, the NikolaTesla aspiration hob allows precise cooking, improved air quality, ease of use and facilitated cleaning, silent functioning and energy efficiency, truly earning the use of its genius namesake. The NikolaTesla induction cooktop is available in Australia through Residentia Group. Residentia Group residentiagroup.com.au Tesla-generale NikolaTesla-Generale-versione-Top Nikolatesla_exploded-view Tesla-zoom-comandi-interi NIKOLATESLA_01_04_2016_HP_whiteabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Australian Design is Doing Fine

In an industry that can at times feel flooded with uninspired, mass-produced, predictable pieces, it's a breath of fresh air to find ourselves in the presence of people as passionate about design as we are. For almost 20 years husband and wife dream duo Joe and Katy Farage have been designing delicate suits and handcrafted shirts under the guise of their eponymous label, Farage. And despite their continued and expansive success, the company is still 100 per cent family owned and operated. While the materials they used are sourced from Europe for their enviable, and inimitable, quality, the designs are envisioned and brought to life in Australia. Joe and Katy are adamant in their support of the Australian manufacturing industry. Too this effect all their shirts are made in their in-house shirt factory just around the corner from Habitus HQ, in Surry Hills, Sydney. In the end, you get the best of both worlds: local design with an international affect. Greg_Natale_Farage_HabitusLiving2 Their latest success story is the opening of their new Sydney flagship store in Martin Place in the CBD. Fittingly, the Heritage building has been stripped back to revel in the raw beauty of the site. Teaming up with yet another Australian doing great things for the design community, it was Greg Natale who saw to the interior design. Vaulted heritage ceilings, grey marble flooring, ornate lighting and bronze detailing create a warm and luxurious environment for staff and clients. To complement made-to-order shirting and suiting, full menswear and womenswear ready-to-wear collections, and an in-house monogramming service for shirts is denim from J Brand and accessories from Lanvin and YSL. “We’re excited to continue to expand our own collections and offer our customers sophisticated style based on a heritage of quality and craftsmanship,” says Joe Farage. We’re excited to follow them on their journey. Farage farage.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Greg_Natale_Farage_HabitusLiving6 Greg_Natale_Farage_HabitusLiving4 Greg_Natale_Farage_HabitusLiving5 Greg_Natale_Farage_HabitusLiving1  abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Feelin’ Pretty Fonda you: Mexican hospitality in Collingwood

Founded in 2011 by David Youl and Tim McDonald, Fonda has steadily become a feverishly popular fixture on the Melbourne foodie scene. But while hungry fans queue to snap up tables on busy weekends, the true concept of a ‘fonda’ in the original Mexican sense is anything but exclusive. In its native country, a fonda is the name given to any house which welcomes passers-by to eat home-cooked meals. Hailing from completely incongruous fields – David was a fireman, while Tim has a legal background – the pair built their understanding of the hospitality industry gradually, with few assumptions predetermining their business model. “What we found was that so many people have a terrible time of working in hospitality – getting bullied and hidden in dirty kitchens out the back,” says Tim, who speaks from personal experience. “We wanted to scrap that and build an inclusive, fun culture for everyone.” Fonda | Habitus Living To extend the good vibes from back-of-house to front and centre, at the core of every Fonda is a sizeable open kitchen, which creates an easy dialogue between staff and diners. ST Style were brought on board to design the Collingwood site, along with WildHen Design who had worked closely with Fonda to develop their branding and distinctly playful colour scheme. Steve Mooney, Creative Director at ST Style, says, “It was important to all of us that it took shape as a genuine Collingwood-style venue. There was a lot of research done into the history of the area before we arrived at the final look and feel of the place.” It was a tricky site, spanning two tenancies, including a dated barber shop beside a notoriously dilapidated cheesecake factory. Complete with rooftop, the new space is inviting and bright, with quirky angular geometry in timber against exposed brick of the heritage building. A fresh addition to neighbouring Collingwood street art, the two-storey building is wrapped in a vibrant mural by local artist Vivid Deams – its palette an homage to the pink cheesecake factory of old. Fonda | Habitus Living Though Mexican cuisine has made a big impact overall in recent years, Fonda’s particular recipe of casual, healthy food in a design-lead, Insta-worthy setting is one that Melbourne has certainly developed a taste for. Fonda Mexican fondamexican.com.au ST Style ststyle.com.au Words by Sandra Tan Fonda | Habitus Living Fonda | Habitus Living Fonda | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Aesop in L.A.

On the other side of the Pacific Ocean, Melbourne-born speciality skincare label, Aesop, has opened its doors to their latest shopfront on the traditionally “fashionable” streets of Downtown L.A. As tends to be the case for the majority of their retail spaces, the overall design has specific ties to its particular location. This time in L.A, the interior of the store is made entirely from natural paper, the manufacturers of which are located less than a mile from the site. The desired effect is to create a natural, warm and soothing atmosphere to much like the intended effects of the products themselves. AESOP LA | Habitus Living The walls, doorjambs, countertops, cabinets, a custom pendant light and shelving are all made from the recycled paper treated with a special fire retardant coating for fire protection, durability and added strength. The aforementioned shelves and the countertop are made from cross-laminated paper with a thickness of just 3/8-inch. Yet they’re able to support the weight of the products and withstand constant wear. The visually simple and understated interior – being the use of one singular hero material to anchor the space – mirrors the elegant simplicity of the brand’s products and packaging. Aesop aesop.com Words by Holly Cunneen AESOP LA | Habitus Living AESOP LA | Habitus Living AESOP LA | Habitus Living AESOP LA | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

IN CONVERSATION WITH… ADELE WINTERIDGE

At Foolscap, you’ve been enormously successful in the hospitality sector. Why do you think F&B a such a big driver of Australian interior design? We prefer to think that we create 'social spaces’ – not just hospitality and retail design – for a broad range of projects, and we are looking to impact other sectors outside of hospitality in a big way. Workplaces, public space and cultural projects, residential communities and mixed use precincts are benefiting from this perspective and knowledge base, and the vitality that social spaces bring to projects is becoming the focus of our work. That said, hospitality is growing along with the massive global obsession with food and all the markets connected to food. The industry is realising that the principles and behavioural understanding that applies to traditional hospitality is ultimately universal. We’re about designing great social places where people interact – so we bring that to the table to get better results for community building and placemaking, whether its within a small footprint project or for one of the many urban precincts that we are currently working on. Hospitality in Australia does pioneer a lot of creative thinking in a really competitive business context. It’s fast-moving and our restaurants are now internationally recognised, so it’s a different food and culinary landscape we are working in. What are the negative aspects of working in hospitality? You get pigeon-holed quite easily when you’ve worked on a lot of hospitality projects. My background is in high end commercial built environments and our team are really diverse and we are now breaking through that mold and working on a real variety of projects at much lager scale. The continuous thread being creating places where people come together, whether it’s to work, to share ideas, live, eat, drink or socialise. It’s all about how people connect with the design at the end of the day. Being so active in the ‘social spaces’ sector means you must deal with a lot of different developers. How do you navigate those relationships? We place a lot of importance on our relationships with our clients. These are usually long lasting as we are in some cases working on three- to five-year projects where everyone must be on the same page, while being open to change. The success of the relationship is ultimately the success of the project, where the designer can communicate the potential to explore new ideas in design and the associated value in doing so. We can no longer rely on past models when it comes to designing these experiences, so in many cases the biggest risk is to repeat what has been done before. Developers have a multitude of factors which affect their projects and together with Relative (relativeprojects.com), our strategic design partners, we develop design concepts and strategies around the larger projects to address these issues on many levels. This thinking helps us to understand all the opportunities and to design towards realising these. What I mean by this is, if you can develop concepts with a broad collaborative team who understand the multitude of forces, you can better guide the design process to create an end result that people will connect with, and which will stand the test of time. Compared to other industries, hospitality attracts a great range of strong personalities and passionate people who are all about creating and inspiring people. So it’s more unique and personally invested. Where do you see Foolscap in five years' time? Larger precinct scale mixed use projects that are currently in the pipeline will be finishing up, as some of these will take three to five years to be completed. Our office in Sydney will be further established and we will be looking to expand our input further afield. Working with a greater number of inspiring local and international clients on projects where our approach will add a new perspective and value, where our impact at small and large scale can be taken to cities abroad. More of our own partnership ventures (such as Uncle restaurant Collins St) and more of our own projects, such as Foolscap Furniture range. In five years the dream is also to be able to do more socially inspired work at scale. A major challenge for us now and in the future is to broach sustainable hospitality spaces, and this is going to entail cultural change within the organisations we are working with. Foolscap Studio foolscapstudio.com.au Interview by Stephen Toddabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

TICKLED PINK: Lucy Folk is back on the Streets of Sydney

It’s nice to be surrounded by creative people. It’s even nicer when you can join forces. Just ask Lucy Folk and Habitus #34 cover star Tamsin Johnson of Tamsin Johnson Interiors. Friends since childhood – “We grew up basically next door to each other,” says Lucy – they joined forces, brought their individual but complementary styles and talents together and have brought us PLAYA by Lucy Folk, located mere moments from Bondi iconic beach on Gould Street. Lucy was in Europe at the time she acquired the store and although that meant she and Tamsin had to work remotely it also meant there are subtle design nods to European design concepts throughout the store. “But in our own way,” she’s quick to point out. And she’s made a considered effort to reinterpret her points of inspiration for the new setting, so that she’s not producing a carbon copy of anywhere else. And if the colour palette looks familiar, it should: “When we’re describing the shop we always say Barragan pink,” says Lucy. “He’s such a huge influence, I’ve always loved his architecture.” PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living A lot of the design cues within the store directly reference her previous work and design history. The taco-shaped drawer handles and doormat reference a once reoccurring silhouette while the clothing racks provide copious amounts of texture – as do the concrete walls – with their beaten copper framework to reference her more current pieces. Fun-size sculptures are cased within seemingly floating cabinets, on and around which much of Lucy’s jewellery is displayed. The sculptures are raw yet refined to complement her finer pieces as much as the louder ones – and really let them be the hero. The floor itself is quite impressive, made up of layer upon layer of resin, a little bit of sand (referencing the store’s location as well as bringing texture underfoot) and a final finishing coat. Look down and you’d be forgiven for thinking you’re standing on a glass floor above the turquoise sea. PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living Perhaps the biggest obstacle – one that turned into an equally impressive design note – was a low ceiling in an already spatially challenged site. A linen-lined ceiling was agreed upon as a result. It doesn’t quite extend to the corners leaving just enough room for strip lighting to be tucked behind and allude to a floating ceiling. “We wanted to soften the space because there are a lot of hard surfaces,” adds Lucy. PLAYA by Lucy Folk lucyfolk.com Tamsin Johnson Interiors tamsinjohnson.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Felix Forest PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Living PLAYA by Lucy Folk | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Diversity + Community Conference 2017, Melbourne

An enviable speaker list and an excited program of events and social engagements await delegates to the upcoming Diversity + Community Conference in Melbourne. Hosted by the Architecture Foundation Australia, Diversity + Community 2017 presents a unique opportunity to members of the architectural profession to engage with some of the leading architects of the world as they discuss the challenges and emerging opportunities for responsive, culturally and socially engaged architecture. Niall McLaughlin, recipient of the 2016 RIBA Charles Jencks Award, and Marina Tabassum, recipient of the 2016 Aga Khan Award for her Bait Ur Rouf Mosque in Dhaka, will be the keynote speakers at the event. The architecture conference also features 10 Murcutt Master Class alumni as speakers with their inspirational talks expected to initiate discussion on the role of architecture as a positive force in uncertain times and its ability to empower diversity and community. Hosted by – and developed in partnership with – the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), Melbourne, the Diversity + Community Conference will be held from 10-12 February. The event is supported by the National Gallery of Victoria as part of the Victorian Design Program. Social events Friday 10 February, from 6.00pm Open night at the NGV for all conference participants with tickets booked and paid for by the organisers. Event highlights include a live band ’No Zu’, entry to the major David Hockney Exhibition, and an exhibition of Fashion Art by Viktor&Rolf. Saturday 11 February, evening Closing party at the University of Melbourne Boat Club, overlooking the Yarra River in Alexandra Gardens, and a short walk from the NGV. Sunday 12 February, morning Visit to the Australian Islamic Centre Mosque with a guided tour provided by architect Glenn Murcutt, collaborating architect Hakan Elevli, and the main contractor Mohammed Haddara. Diversity + Community 2017 ozetecture.org/melbourne-conference NGV FRIDAY NIGHTS ngv.vic.gov.au Book hereabc