About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Design Hunters
Design Stories
Homes

Modular-designed, Mid Century-inspired

In the 1960s and 70s, Australian suburbs flourished with project homes: simple, functional and affordable architect-designed houses with modern lines and a clever use of space. By taking a rational approach to architecture, companies such as Pettit+Sevitt and Merchant Builders reconfigured series of standardised designs to suit client needs and site conditions. In Western Australia, architect Marcus Browne is taking a similar approach and utilising the potential of modular design. He has developed “mishack,” a range of mid-century and modernist-inspired homes configured with a system of zones and solar passive design. mishack | Habitus Living While Marcus has been developing the underlying concept of the modular homes since the mid-to-late 1990s, mishack, itself, came into being in 2009 when the market became increasingly price conscious after the GFC. “I wanted to develop a system that could combine architecture and construction costs in a simple format, and from which we could quickly develop project feasibilities and budgets, knowing good aesthetic outcomes would be achieved,” Marcus explains. “Mishack is an effective balance of aesthetic and spatial experience tempered with cost-conscious selections and uncomplicated construction methods”. So how does mishack work? The first step (“map it”) is the configuration of a site-specific floor plan comprised of a series of zones: outdoor, wet, social, access, multi-purpose, sleep and utility. The interior layout of each zone is then chosen (“zone it”) to optimise the form, function and flow of the floor plan. Solar passive design aspects (“style it”), such as eaves, insulation, ventilation and glazing, are then considered, after which clients choose from a pre-selected range of fittings (“pimp it”) that ensure an effective balance of cost, style, availability, sustainability and practicality. mishack | Habitus Living Mishack is built with concrete floors, light timber framing and a combination of cement-based and metal sheet cladding and are designed with either a mid-century (Wave Shack) or modernist (Flat Shack) aesthetic. “I never started out with the idea of producing mid-century inspired homes; I have however always been drawn to early modernist and mid-century architecture. I love the simplicity and well-considered layouts and that certain ‘shazam’ quality that comes with breaking new ground and driving new frontiers,” Marcus says. Mishack is also, as Marcus explains, “born and bred in the reality of the ‘down-south dream’ of Margaret River.” In fact he describes his mishack as the “ultimate surf shack”, perfectly suited to the lifestyle and beauty of the region. mishack | Habitus Living Mishack is not only intended to simplify (and speed up) the design and construction process, but – similar to the architect-designed project homes of the 60s and 70s – to provide the benefits of an architect-designed house at a more affordable cost. “A good architect cares about the space you live in and the aesthetic legacy they leave in the built environment,” says Marcus. “It’s about creating a form that you can live in comfortably but also one that enhances your daily living experience.” mishack mishack.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross Photography by Ange Wall mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Living mishack | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Accessories

COS celebrates 10 years with a capsule collection that produces zero waste

Since opening their doors onto London’s Regent Street in 2007, the COS fashion label has stayed true to their founding principals of re-inventing classics with modern, timeless, functional and tactile designs. In the ten years since, they have created a global presence and appeal; forged strong connections with the art and design world; and remained at the forefront of social initiatives and industry innovation. “We are proud of how the brand has grown over the last ten years. We are pleased and humbled that our customers have continued to appreciate our approach and engage with our collections, stores and collaborative projects with the art and design world,” says Marie Honda, COS Managing Director. To celebrate their decade-long anniversary they have released a 10-piece capsule collection of mens- womans- and childrenswear. Uniquely, each garment’s pattern is created like a jigsaw puzzle using the full width of the fabric roll, one shape deciding another, limiting any excess. The clean and considered collection is in line with the now iconic COS aesthetic. This then begs the question should the architecture and design community be taking notes from the fashion industry? Can we do something similar? Can we at least try? Surely this wasn’t easy but an ingenious team of designers behind the COS label prove it’s far from impossible. Would it be possible to create furniture without creating waste? That may seem feasible on an individual, bespoke level, but what about mass production for the masses? After all that’s exactly where the majority of waste comes from. COS did it. Let’s take it a step further to architecture. Can we look towards building homes, apartment complexes, hospitality and retail spaces – from the outside in – without leaving behind offcuts and wasted materials? How can we repurpose this amazing and thoughtful initiative? COS cosstores.com The capsule collection will be available from 24 March 2017 Words by Holly Cunneen COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Living COS | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Accessories

These rugs are NOT for the faint of heart

Collaboration with iconic Australian fashion houses and design labels is not a new world for Designer Rugs. In the past they’ve joined forces with the likes of Akira Isogawa, bernabeifreeman, Dinosaur Designs, Emma Elizabeth, Easton Pearson and Hare & Klein to a highly successful effect. But it’s their latest venture with Anna Plunkett and Luke Sales of Romance Was Born that’s got people talking. “The rugs are showstoppers, and like an artwork will create wonderful centrepieces,” says Lia Pielli, Senior Designer at Designer Rugs. “They would be equally at home in an eclectic interior with layers of pattern, finishes and colour, or a minimalist space where the designs can sing.” RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Since founding Romance Was Born in 2005, Anna and Luke have been on the lips of many. Their once newfound and fresh-faced success has anything but dissipated, season after season they continue to push the boundaries of their industry with highly conceptual, highly experimental and all-out extraordinary creations. Their Ready To Wear collections consistently hint at a sort of haute-cum-costume couture and blur the lines between art and fashion. And while their collection for Designer Rugs may be on a different medium, the message is very much the same. “Anyone who has a love of artful fashion and vibrant colour and pattern will be drawn to this collection,” says Lia. “They pack a punch in a fantastical way.” Designer Rugs x Romance Was Born designerrugs.com.au Romance Was Born romancewasborn.com Words by Holly Cunneen RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Living RWB x Designer Rugs | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Zaha Hadid’s estate worth over £70 million

Leaving much more than a catalogue of ambitious works and a mourning global profession in her wake, documents recently secured by the Architect’s Journal have now put a figure to Zaha Hadid’s sizeable estate. At the time of her death, the influential architect was worth a staggering £70.8 million, a sum dented by more than £3 million owed in debt. Among the executors of Hadid’s will are artist Brian Clarke, her niece Rana Hadid, former Serpentine Gallery chairman Peter Palumbo and the provocative ZHA director Patrik Schumacher, who has been gifted a cool £500,000 from the estate. Following his appearance at the 2016 World Architecture Festival, Schumacher has become a divisive figure in the public eye. His recent comments advocating the abolition of social housing and public space in London have brought a maelstrom of heated criticism, including from his own team. The practice published a statement condemning their current director’s views, reading, "Patrik Schumacher's 'urban policy manifesto' does not reflect Zaha Hadid Architects' past – and will not be our future," in the open letter signed on behalf of the ZHA office. Rana Hadid, Brian Clarke and Peter Palumbo have also come out in opposition of Schumacher, stating that, "The views recently expressed by Patrik Schumacher regarding the closure of art schools, the abandonment of social housing and the building over of Hyde Park are his personal views and are not, in any way, shared by us.” The Zaha Hadid Foundation as well as the architect’s companies and family members are the remaining beneficiaries of the will. Zaha Hadid Architects zaha-hadid.com Words by Sandra Tan Zaha Hadid | Habitus Livingabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Introducing the Zip HydroTap Platinum Design Range

The HydroTap Platinum Design Range features 8, on-trend colours, ready to fit any kitchen style, from the traditional to contemporary. The range has been designed to let users enjoy irresistible instant boiling, chilled and sparkling filtered water, with premium style in finishes including rose gold, brushed rose gold, gold, brushed gold, platinum, gunmetal, brushed nickel and nickel. Zip has been perfecting its MicroPurity water filtration technology for decades. The result of that research is delicious, crystal clear, pure tasting water at the touch of a button. For its design update, colour trends have been matched with Zip's innovative technologies. This includes Zip's ground-breaking 0.2-micron filtration system, which removes contaminants as little as 1/5000th of a millimetre, chlorine taste and unpleasant odours whilst retaining fluoride. Zip’s mission has always been to revolutionise the way we drink water, and with the introduction of the Design Range, inspired by the architecture and design community, this is now done with style and eye catching grace. Zip HydroTap Platinum Design Range also meets the highest standards of environmental responsibility and sustainability. With advanced energy efficiency and best in class cooling technology, the air-cooled ventilation system uses up to 53% less energy than previous models so water is never wasted. Zip Hydrotap zipwater.com Still-Hydro-Arc-Rose-Gold.White.ret1 Hydro-Design-Cube-Matt-White Hydro-Design-Cube-Chrome-White Hydro-Design-Arc-Chrome-White.ret1 Hydro-Design-Arc-Brushed-gold.White.ret1  abc
Design Hunters
People

In Conversation with… Brian Parkes

Welcome to the first in a series of weekly conversations between Stephen Todd and Design Hunters from around the country. Join us as we learn what makes them tick, how they got to where they are, and where they’re going.   Director, Jam Factory creative hub, Adelaide The Jam Factory was an initiative of the Don Dunstan government, back in the heady Labour years of the early 1970s. How true is the Jam today to Dunstan’s original vision? From the reports I’ve read, the kind of vision Dunstan had was actually quite a lot broader than what the history of the organization is focused on. He was certainly interested in providing a mechanism to support craft practice – a place to make, exhibit and make craft available commercially. But he was also interested in the way the Scandinavians brought together their craft history with industry and the primary resources those countries had. Key case studies were companies like Iittala, Artek, Kosta Boda. He thought that the value add that craft-based design and manufacture could provide to primary resources like copper and wool which were really strong in South Australia, might be worth exploring. Also that it would have impact both culturally and economically. Discovering that early Don Dunstan drive played nicely to what I see as current opportunities, given the shifting nature of manufacturing in South Australia specifically but in Australia generally and the increased interest in Australian design from the architecture and design community and, importantly, from their clients. Over the past month or so, I’ve heard a lot of people in the industry talking about the importance of developing a culture of private commissions in Australia. That this is a sector which could really drive a viable design industry. What are your thoughts on this? At the Jam we actively encourage young designers to consider the private commission as a viable component of their practice. But it’s not just about teaching them how to run a business, it’s also about teaching clients how to become more confident with commissioning. The more people do it, the more it is seen, the more other people will gain confidence not just in the process, but in their own ability to commission. They need to understand that it may not in fact be more expensive than an off-the-shelf piece – but also that if it is, there is added value to that as well. Commissioning product has become something of a driver in the hospitality sector, a novel means of differentiating an establishment from its competitors. Increasingly, what we find is than in fact clients – and not just architects and interior designers, but end consumers – are very keen to have the emotional become a part of the narrative that they are purchasing. Rather than just buying off-the-shelf furniture or tableware, there’s an added value to being able to tell the story about this person who is based in Adelaide who has made this thing. Increasingly, people want to know more. It parallels the food industry, where it’s no longer about beef, it’s about beef that’s been fed a certain kind of thing and raised in a certain valley. That same kind of informed participation in the provenance of a product is starting to gain traction in interior design. Would it be strategic for Australian designers to specialize in small batch production of very beautifully crafted quality products rather than trying to compete with cheap mass-produced imports from China? We try to instill in the people we train, this idea that designers need to be competing on value, not on price. The market is flooded with products of reasonable quality at accessible prices, driven by high volume turnover. And there’s also a lot of crap out there. Either way, the cost of entering market places with that kind of production is incredibly high before one can profit from any sort of economy of scale. But if you’re competing on value, that’s something else. The work of Khai Liew for Judith Neilson’s home Indigo Slam is a great example: the highest quality luxury brand could be engaged on a project like that, purchasing across all the sectors in which it is active and create an extraordinary showcase for its expertise. But the greater value is in the story of artistic vision and the commitment to artisanal quality that comes only from bespoke. That’s not to say that there shouldn’t be ambition for Australian designers to manufacture at large scale, and there are increasingly good examples of that happening. But the backbone of genuine success has been among small to medium run batch production with local manufacturers or working to the designer-maker model. Jam Factory jamfactory.com.au Interview by Stephen Toddabc
Design Products
Furniture

The Habitus Hottest 100 – The Final Call!

  cover image: Tate dining table by J.D.Lee Furniture Welcome to the third and final installation of the 100 Hottest moments of design from 2016. (FYI the other two are here and here) Hindsight can be a powerful thing but in this case we're feeling pretty warm and fuzzy not to mention proud of the company we keep. Make sure you stick around this year as we learn from the last. Here's to 100 more moments of great design! Holly Cunneen Deputy Editor Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Edra Essentials sofa from Space Furniture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Baker Extension table by DesignByThem Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Tuscan Dawn surface from Caesarstone CGemmola_AnacaStudio_June_39999 Emi Pods from Anaca Studio Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living T Chair and Stool by Maruni of Japan from SeehoSu Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Frame daybed by Neri&Hu from Spence&Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Beaubien Wall Double Shade by Lambert et Fils from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Dekton XGloss Natural Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Vitra Soft Modular Sofa from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Collage Chair by Gemla from SeehoSu Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Marcel chair by Ritzwell from Stylecraft Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Gufram Softcrete from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Bai swivel chair (right) from AJAR Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Botanical Graffiti from the Kerrie Brown collection for Designer Rugs Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living LP dining chair from Fanuli Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Turns pendant from Dezion Studio Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Crono sofa from Fanuli Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living White Attica surface from Caesarstone Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Rima dining table by TIDE Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Sideboard by Knock on Wood from the Forest Collection Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Mellow Sofa designed by Océane Delain for Bernhardt Design from KE-ZU Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Objects by Fritz Hansen from Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living In The Tube light from Spence&Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Kuri bed from TIDE Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Ring Light designed by Lee Broom from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Scaltra Ladder Light by Mingardo from HUB Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Caldera by Rogerseller Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Veil Intelligent Wall Hung Toilet from Kohler Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Centro table by Mingardo from HUB Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Element Fire Pit designed by Adam Goodrum for TAIT Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living BI-TRACK bike rack by Mingardo from HUBabc