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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Accessories

An Itty Bitty Bit Part With A Mighty Impact

The Bit Part collection is one of sustainable, beautiful hardware that refocuses our attention on these small pieces as the point of sensory engagement. They play a cameo role in a play, a small piece of the action vital to the narrative, colour and movement of the production. These cameo roles have special significance. While small in relation to the whole they stand out and matter deeply. Despite their delicate aesthetic, there’s a fair bit of weight behind each Bit Part. Concentrating on pure materials – marble, brass, stainless steel and bronze – these bits and parts have minimal moving parts and are weighty and durable with a sense of timelessness, of permanence. Bit Part | Habitus Living Designed and made locally, there is a great deal of pride in the manufacture of Bit Part. There is no artifice as these pieces are unfinished and will tarnish through touch and build up their own history. While the core of the collection is solid marble and brass there is opportunity to play at the edges. Painted back plates in pink, blue and red, alongside the monochromes and metals, take on a charming geometry. Refined and monumental in their own small way, each piece in the Bit Part collection is a singular object of beauty. Bit Part bitpart.com.au Bit Part | Habitus Living Bit Part | Habitus Living Bit Part | Habitus Living Bit Part | Habitus Living Bit Part | Habitus Living Bit Part | Habitus Livingabc
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Happenings

The Asia Pacific Architecture Forum

Tomorrow marks the first day of the annual Asia Pacific Architecture Forum. An initiative of Architecture Media and State Library of Queensland, it will run in Brisbane, Australia, from 18-31 March. There will be a range of free and ticketed events including exhibitions, installations, symposia, lectures and workshops, to engage architecture and design professionals as well as educators and enthusiasts. “We are delighted that the Forum has become a vehicle for attracting high calibre international architects and designers to State Library,” said Vicki McDonald, State Librarian and CEO. “We are excited to again host this world class event and facilitate the critical discussions occurring in contemporary architecture.” The full program can be view here But here are some highlights: Scenes-of-our-City Scenes of our City Exhibition A selection of works from the Museum of Brisbane Collection, presenting urban scenes inspired by the city’s architectural history. The twenty-one featured artists include Vida Lahey, Noel McKenna and Margaret Olley. 3 March - 16 July 2017 aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/scenes-of-our-city     Tapestry-Design-Prize-Exhibition Tapestry Design Prize Exhibition The Tapestry Design Prize for Architects is a platform to strengthen the connection between architects and the tapestry weaving practice. View the 2016 finalists’ designs including the winning design by Justin Hill from Singapore. 14 March - 1 April 2017 aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/2016-tapestry-design-prize     Ancient-Architecture-of-the-Asia-Pacific---John-Gollings Dead Cities of the Asia Pacific A world-first preview of a selection of awe-inspiring images of abandoned cities in the Asia Pacific as part of John Gollings’ new exhibition The Dead Cities of the Asia Pacific. 18 March - 16 April 2017 aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/the-dead-cities-of-south-east-asia     GOMA-Architecture-Walking-Tour GOMA Architecture Walking Tour The GOMA building celebrates its tenth anniversary in 2017. Join this walking tour and go behind the scenes with the architects involved in the design and building process. 18 March 2017 | 1.30 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/goma-architecture-walking-tour-and-discussion     Gap-Filler-Christchurch-Workshop Gap Filler Christchurch Workshop Learn how Gap Filler’s practice matured from a creative and grassroots disaster response initiative, into a thriving organisation working on large-scale and long-term city-making projects. Gain an in-depth understanding of their approach and methods for urban problem solving. 23 March 2017 | 9 am - 12 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/gap-filler-christchurch-linking-urban-tactics-to-strategy     Mobility-Matters Mobility Matters Colloquium + Exhibition Thomas Daniell, visiting scholar from the University of St Joseph in Macau, Paul Henry, Populous senior principal and CEO of the Asian region, together with Manu Sobti and Pedro Guedes, both academics of the UQ School of Architecture, discuss mobility as a historic practice and a contemporary condition. 23 March 2017 | 4 pm - 7 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/mobility-matters-colloquium-and-exhibition     Architecture-Symposium ArchitectureAP Symposium Eleven of the Asia Pacific’s most lauded, experimental and socially conscious practitioners explore innovative thinking and transformative projects that are creating new world cities for the emerging Asian century. 24 March 2017 | 9 am - 5 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/architectureap-symposium-2017     Brisbane--Open-House-Unplugged2 Brisbane Open House Unplugged: Houses Tour Open House will lead a guided tour of three inspiring architecturally designed homes: Liam Proberts’ new family home; Michael Rayner’s (Blight Rayner) Hill End House; and Caroline Stalker (Archipelago) and Bruce Carrick’s (LookOut Design) home. 25 March 2017 | 2.30 pm - 4.30 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/brisbane-open-house-unplugged-houses-tour     The-Least-House-Necessary-workshop The Least House Necessary A sustainable design workshop that challenges participants on low-energy design and House Necessary considers housing sustainability from an environmental, social and economic perspective. 28 March 2017 | 12 pm - 4 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/the-least-house-necessary     Garden-Variety Garden Variety Garden Variety is a talk series curated and hosted by Brisbane architects Vokes and culture through the stories of inspired thinkers and makers. 30 March 2017 | 6.30 pm - 8.00 pm aparchitectureforum.com/2017/event/garden-variety-talk Asia Pacific Architecture Forum aparchitectureforum.comabc
Architecture

It’s All Greek To Me

Irek passes me a cocktail and speaks with a quiet anticipation, “welcome to your Greek adventure.” I casually ask him where his accent is from; he pauses and replies, “Poland”. Dressed head to toe in black, Irek – easily the world’s suavest bar manager – warmly welcomes me to the establishment, "this way, Sir". We turn left at the restaurant's main desk and slide up a hidden staircase. _MG_7668_F The first thing I notice is the high ceiling, with exposed brick and concrete aligning the walls. While climbing the stairs, natural light begins to flood the space and I'm not quite sure where this warm radiance is coming from until I reach the top. That's when I clock the beautiful, tall and original window frames. It's an aesthetic statement that forces you to change conversation, tact and mood. In short, it’s an architect's way of saying, “now you’re somewhere different.” Situated above the celebrated restaurant, Alpha, Beta Bar is a stunning new cocktail lounge and gallery space at 238 Castlereagh Street in Sydney’s CBD. BetaBar_138_F Designed by DS17’s Paul Papadopoulos, the bar achieves a delicate balance between the original classic heritage building and contemporary design. “We’ve done a lot to keep the history while giving it a modern touch,” Irek tells me. And, of course, this is a history you wouldn’t want to throw away. The sheer natural beauty of raw brickwork coupled with elegant arches forging vestibules (accented with soft metallic touches) is well worth the visit alone. BetaBar_183_F Irek informs me that the building previously housed the Hellenic Club, and prior to that stood as the headquarters for the Workers Union. But it’s hard to imagine it now with the transformation. We find a seat in the middle of the room. Furnished by Italian-Danish design brand GamFratesi. The light grey and teal couches add a touch of colour to the otherwise muted surroundings. Above me, are brass pendant light fittings from Greek designer Michael Anastassiades. Sporadically dispersed, they acquit themselves with the cavalier smoothness one requires to ‘change the mood’ once the sun goes down. BetaBar_270_F An attractive young regular sits next to me; she looks right at home as the bar staff greet her by name – Lara. She tells me, “I’m here all the time, I love the European flavour. Plus, I’m half Greek”. "It's somewhere different, in the middle of the city," she said. I glance at Lara’s drink and begin to gather a thirst; so I ask Irek to order for me, and he doesn't hesitate. When my first cocktail arrives – the everywhere-emphasis on Greece starts to make sense, right down to the tiniest detail. With a wry, good-humoured smirk I’m presented with a Martini glass … but this one stands on a marble column (almost Doric in shape). BetaBar_211_F Glancing up, I note the same cut of marble as the tables in front of me, and the candleholders behind me. I suppose that a Greek bar without marble is like the beach without any sand, or Nana Mouskouri. My cocktail is named the Spartan Rose, and for a good reason; Vodka, Apricot liqueur, Rose Water finished with a speared Rose flower garnish. An indelicate flavour that doesn't hold any punches – much like its infamous namesake. Next is my favourite, the Aviation. Also served in a Martini glass with a Carrara marble base. Gin based with Rhubarb and hints of Vanilla. But finally, I end on the perfect digestif, Mastika. A liqueur that's produced on the Greek island of Chios, seasoned with Mastic, a resin gathered from the Mastic tree. Served on chipped ice with a Lemon twist. Beta is a consummate execution of historical and modern coming together – a hidden away pocket of Ancient Greece right in the heart of a bustling metropolis. It may not be as loud as a Dionysian romp, but rather Apollonian, softly spoken whispers – always with an unmistakable a Greek inflection.   Words by Camden Chan Photography courtesy of Beta Bar This article was originally published in McGrath Magazine 25.2.17abc
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Fixed & Fitted

The Art of Storing and Serving Good Wine

The big three things when it comes to the storage of wine are light, humidity, and temperature. Strong light, too much or too little moisture in the surrounding air, and too hot or too cool an environment, and that precious stored bottle saved for a special occasion could be ruined. The Gaggenau wine climate cabinets are the ultimate in wine storage – coming in a variety of sizes, all with light-up showcase areas and multiple climate zones to ensure the right temperature for a range of wine varieties. These cabinets are designed with the full suite of intelligent technological flourishes for the discerning wine lover: the bottles are shielded from the vibration of the motor whilst extendable beech and aluminium shelving protects wine from any errant aromas. Conveniently, the multiple temperature zones allow you to store wines of different types at the same time, while you bring other wines to drinking temperature. The Vario wine cabinet RW 464 offers space for up to 98 bottles, while the RW 404 houses a more modest collection of 34 bottles. Both have been designed with luxury apartment and designer living in mind, suiting prize placement in the kitchen itself, a butler’s pantry, or even an outdoor terrace. The under bench RW 404 wine climate cabinet offers two independent climate zones, with exact temperature control, UV protection, LED lighting, stainless steel framed glass and lockable door. The smaller unit makes a design statement on its own, drawing the eye to the full-bodied collection within. This fully integrated, built-in, modular family of climate control cooling appliances from Gaggenau, is complemented by Vario refrigerators and freezers; all of which can be partnered in countless ways in a contemporary designer kitchen. With multiple controllable climate zones, different food and drinks are kept fresh, and healthier, for longer. Gaggenau offers exact degree cooling technology that leaves nothing to be desired. It’s the aesthetic design, solid aluminium door racks, LED light pillars and ceiling spot lights that set the Vario 400 series apart from the pack. Gaggenau gaggenau.com/au Refrigeration-in-situabc
Furniture
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Accessories

Swedish design by way of Indonesia

IKEA has revealed its latest collection – JASSA. In stores from March 17, the Indonesian and South East Asian inspired collection is of a very limited edition, available only until sold out. JASSA is the result of five unique designers bringing their creativity together. Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek, and IKEA in-house designers Nike Karlsson, Iina Vuorivirta and Paulin Machado were guided and coordinated by Creative Leader, Karin Gustavsson in the creation of JASSA. The design of the range saw Indonesian and South East Asian design traditions as influences, which had the five designers work together with local craftspeople, combining modern design, natural materials and traditional craft methods. PH140254 Being handmade, each individual piece in the JASSA collection is different in its own way, with the raw materials, such as rattan, bamboo, water hyacinths, sea-grass and cotton, having their own marks and flourishes. Lounges, chairs, room dividers, rugs, baskets, decorative vases, ceramics, fabric, floor cushions, lamp shades and more, all have their own unique look. To create this collection, the JASSA designers immersed themselves in the world of traditional Vietnamese and Indonesian handicrafts while working alongside skilled local craftspeople. “The way the JASSA patterns are built up visually, is very much like the traditional techniques of batik or ikat to colour cloth,” says textile designer Paulin Machado “There are lots of competing colours, pinks and yellows and blues and greens. To begin with, you wonder how they can possibly work together, but in the end they just do.” Tiffany Buckins, IKEA Australia Interior Design Manager says “The intricate details of JASSA command attention on their own, but combining various pieces for bolder statements is where the magic happens, infusing a relaxed vibe into any home.” JASSA will be available in Australian stores from 17 March 2017, until sold out. IKEA ikea.com/au Words by Andrew McDonald PH140250 PH140244 PH140255 PH140243 PH140246 PH140260abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Whet Your Appetite with Fresh Looking Design

“Healthy, take away, fusion cuisine.” That was the brief given to New York-born multidisciplinary design practice Lim + Lu for their latest project, Kasa, in Hong Kong. Located in the bustling central district, Kasa makes the latest edition to a street full of food options catering to the busy lunch-hour rush. Freshness, by extension, was key to their design concept and subtle cues hint at it throughout the restaurant. For example the pendant lights hanging from the roof mimic those found at the nearby wet markets; a huge part of Hong Kong culture they’re full of fresh seafood and local produce. Above the kitchen floats a neon sign reading “healthy eating” in Chinese which both reiterates the brief while mirroring the neon signs characteristic of the Hong Kong streets. Kasa | Habitus Living The colour palette, a bold contrast between green pink, also helps to drive home this all-important concept of freshness as and youth. Both Vincent Lim and Elaine Lu have ties to Eastern culture as well as Western (they were born and raised in the East while educated and practice in the West) so their work tends to present a fusion, a perfect fit since the owner were after fusion cuisine. Just as the colours do, the materials used were specifically chosen to play off one another while elements emblematic of a traditional Chinese restaurant are amongst those typically found within a western dining room. Lim + Lu limandlu.com Words by Holly Cunneen

Photography by Dennis Lo, Nirut Benjabanpot

Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Living Kasa | Habitus Livingabc
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People

IN CONVERSATION WITH… TIM GREER

Principal of Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Tim, TZG is extremely active in the heritage/cultural space. What’s the attraction? Being active in the heritage space allows us to engage with architecture in ways that are more than just about buildings. To some extent, it allows us to be architects in the fullest sense because it’s about the cultural values that formed the buildings in the past, and it’s about the values that underline the context in which our new buildings are sited. We think of our work as reflecting a broader approach to urbanism, and we would hope that our buildings crystallize community values of their time. Not only at a physical level, but at the level of the philosophies and values that underscore them. And that makes us question our own philosophy and values to make sure that they’re just as resilient. The first wave of Sydney’s industrial buildings are reaching the end of their use-by dates. When you develop a new structure do you intend for it to live as long? We’d love to think that the new building matches the existing building that we have inherited but of course that’s a little optimistic because we don’t build as well as they did 120 or 150 years ago. By and large, if you’re repurposing a building of the past what’s left is the really good stuff because time has washed away the not so important stuff. What’s really interesting is looking at the city as a continuum, as an organism that’s thriving and dying, receding and regenerating. The places where industry was (in Sydney anyway) were along that western arc that goes through Alexandria and Marrickville and have been abandoned by that industry. There were car factories in Alexandria but nobody manufactures cars in Australia anymore. As that land becomes available it becomes a generator of change. What was previously determined by industrial capital is reborn as cultural capital and it’s this cultural capital that instigates change. We’re really seeing that in a wholesale way in the southern sector of Sydney. It has become highly desirable to recycle the fabric of a city, to repurpose it for the immediate and perhaps even long-term future. It seems obvious now, but that wasn’t always the case. For a long time people were very anxious about the idea of adapting buildings, but increasingly they see the benefits at a commercial as well as cultural level. Actually, it’s kind of amazing how well accepted adapted buildings have become. Part of the reason is that the memories we associate with buildings are retained and the ability for us to move around inside this accumulated history. You get the best of both worlds, this beautiful new shiny thing, this symbol of where we are now, and at the same time you get this anchor to what was. It becomes a really gratifying urban experience. TZG are the renewal architects charged with revitalising the Sydney Opera House as part of its Renewal program. Tell us about that. The Opera House is almost 40 years old now, and Sydney has evolved quite a bit in those 40 years. People’s expectations when they go to the Opera House are in large part different to what they were 40 years ago. As Louise Herron (Director of the Sydney Opera House) puts it, they want all the things that they do in the Opera House to be as bold as the original concept of the Opera House was in its time. What’s really fascinating with the renewal is the way the public is being allowed to engage with the Opera House. A whole lot more of the building is being opened up that was previously only in a professional or processional context. Under the main staircase, for instance, now that the car and truck access has all been moved underground will become a three and a half thousand square-metre new undercover public space, a forecourt. It’s a really exciting initiative to enhance public access by extend the extremities of building out and towards the city. We’ve conceived of the work as a kind of architectural continuum embedded in the icon but extended out towards Sydney’s future. We’re using Utzon’s Opera House Principals to distill a relevant contemporary use rather than try to replicate what Utzon was thinking. Which is not only an impossible task, but it also wouldn’t take into account the extent to which Sydney has changed over the past 40 years. We have access to processes today that Utzon could only have dreamed of in terms of building composite shapes, for instance. What lesson’s have you drawn from working on the Opera House? More than anything, working on the Opera House has taught us to be interested in the ideas that sit beneath building typology. In architectural terms the Opera House is a performing arts venue. Yet its form speaks to so much more than its function, which is to a large extent why it has been so embraced. I think typology is a contemporary obsession. People always ask, ‘Do you do apartment buildings? Do you do office blocks?’ and so forth. But what we’ve realized is that typology is a furphy. Buildings are about human experience and expectation. Ultimately, we’re designing for people and the Opera House is extraordinary in that so many people go there to experience the building at the harbour’s edge. As a practice, we realized that we don’t want to be apartment architects, or office building architects – we actually just want to be architects who make buildings for people because that is the key human condition. Interview by Stephen Toddabc
Architecture
Homes

Archiblox is Proving You Can, Indeed, Have it All

Cost effective and customised. These two requirements are usually at opposite ends of the scale, but Bill McCorkell of Archiblox has created a housing solution that delivers both. Archiblox is a prefabricated modular building system that streamlines the design and construction process, providing cost-effective and customised architect-designed homes. “I’ve always been interested in technology and innovation and doing things differently,” says Bill, who comes from both a construction and architecture background. “We wanted to make architecture affordable and accessible and control the client’s journey from contract through to completion.” Archiblox | Habitus LivingPhotography by Tom Ross The Archiblox system is like solving a puzzle for a particular site, brief and lifestyle. There are essentially 50 different modules that are configured to create the floor plan and volumes of the house, which can then be customised further. With each home able to be designed, delivered and built in 12 to 28 weeks, lightweight materials for ease of construction, minimising waste (materials and labour) and high-quality design are of primary importance. The façades of each module are based on the idea of breaking down the barriers of external and internal space. “We’ve tried to resonate the Australian honesty of materials in the buildings to create a seamless flow from inside to outside,” Bill explains. Each also has a strong focus on sustainable design principles, creating a place of active refuge rather than passive occupation. “The most sustainable house is one that requires interaction from the client. It’s not about passive life, it’s about active life so our clients are quite active in what they do.” Archiblox | Habitus LivingPhotography by Tom Ross While the houses are built from a set of prefabricated modules, each is realised quite differently. One of Archiblox’s recent projects is in Avalon, Sydney, where a two-bedroom house is situated on a sloping site. Elevated on structural posts, the module touches the earth lightly while a green roof merges its form with the landscape. Similarly, in Clydesdale, Victoria, a two-bedroom house, with a main living module and guest pod, blends with its rural surroundings and takes advantage of 270-degree views. Bill also incorporated a module to extend his family’s Victorian weatherboard home in Balaclava, Melbourne. Combining the module, existing home and a site-built addition, the modern two-level extension is a seamless integration of indoor and outdoor space and new and existing architecture. Archiblox is working on a ream of new houses to be realised in the next 6 to 12 months that are different still to those already completed. “I’m really confident the next round will continue to surpass what we’ve already done,” Bill says. Archiblox archiblox.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross Archiblox | Habitus Living Archiblox | Habitus LivingPhotgraphy by Tom Ross Archiblox | Habitus LivingPhotography by Tom Ross Archiblox | Habitus LivingPhotography by Tatjana Plitt Cover image by Tatjana Plittabc
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Happenings

Luxxbox Lights Up the Room

2017 marks the ten-year anniversary for Luxxbox, and there’s no greater way to ring in this milestone achievement than for Creative and Managing Director Jason Bird to showcase at Salone del Mobile design week in Milan this April. Bird and Luxxbox have been honing their design art for a decade now, and their 2017 launch, the Flotte Lantern, is another step forward. The Flotte Lantern, whether suspended in trees, along trellises, or lighting internal walkways, is a striking yet natural lighting element. Emitting a soft, delicate white glow, the lantern takes a sensual curved design recalling the design of paper lanterns. Elegantly embedded into the durable, blown polymer, Flotte is held together through a crosshatched pattern that adds a delicate touch, juxtaposed against the heavy-duty polymer. The pattern and curve of each pendant softens the robust design, the result of which is a luminaire suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. Luxxbox is the only Australian designer chosen to exhibit as part of sense-me at Exhibition SBODIO 32 in the Lambrate district, which is where the Flotte Lantern will be formally unveiled and launched to the international market. Congrats to a great local designer on this honour, and here’s to the next ten years! Luxxbox.com luxxbox.com The Flotte Lantern Luxxbox | Habitus Living Luxxbox | Habitus Living Luxxbox | Habitus Living Luxxbox | Habitus Livingabc
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Dissecting Migration: Mehwish Iqbal’s exhibition ‘FLUX’ opens in Sydney at .M Contemporary

Sewing, scratching and scraping, artist Mehwish Iqbal applies the patience of a surgeon to her work. Using a scalpel, or a needle and thread, she engraves stories onto fragile surfaces of porcelain, charcoal and paper. Enigmatic and powerful, her work is underpinned with strong themes of assimilation, mass migration and transformation. An Australian artist born in Pakistan, the world is now awaiting Mehwish Iqbal’s next move. Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living 2016 was a big year for the artist. First she won a residency at Parramatta Artist’s Studio and then became a finalist in 64th Blake Prize. This year, she will travel to Brooklyn NY for another residency and show her work at Art Central in Hong Kong. We caught up with her gallery .M Contemporary, to learn more about the themes explored in her solo show FLUX. Arguably the most arresting work is a minimalist sculpture entitled, Forcefield of Complex Journey. It’s a series of human sized porcelain legs that are inscribed with patterns and stories. Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living “Creating art in porcelain had a sacred value for me, because it was such a laborious process,” explains Iqbal. “Even passing it thought the kiln, the fire is so unforgiving it can destroy the piece. In this way, the process parallels the human migrant experience,” Iqbal says. The porcelain legs, which will be sold individually, are Mehwish’s own left leg, which she cast as a reminder of the migrant journey, often made on foot. “I wanted to convey that fragile state of travel and the vulnerability of humans. The uncertainty of not knowing where you are heading,” she explains. Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living The Last Prayer is another sculpture comprised of 5000 sculptures of date seeds. Each one is like an individual drawing that has been cast and engraved in porcelain by hand. This work references the tradition at the end of Ramadan of eating three dates to break the fast. The seeds are engraved to look like female genitalia in an additional reference to the ongoing labour of migrant women trying to assimilate into another culture. Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living Mehwish’s more literal works use motifs of insects, birds, maps and women carrying children to talk about the migrant experience. These works are sewn onto fragile garment paper and embroidered with layers of bright thread. The thread is responsible for clear mark making, she says taking the place of ‘muddy’ paint strokes. “There are maps. And you can see the grim imagery of insects going on too – so maybe in the distance you might see them as very beautiful, but on closer inspection you can see the grim seriousness of the work,” Mehwish explains. Mehwish Iqbal’s solo show FLUX can be seen at .M Contemporary from 9 -25 March 2017. Words by Belinda Aucott Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Living Mehwish Iqbal | Habitus Livingabc
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Sunbrella – where design meets performance

A new approach to the Sunbrella brand – one that showcases the design appeal of the iconic performance fabric – is set to launch globally this year. “Textiles are an important ingredient in great product design,” said Hal Hunnicutt, Vice President of marketing for Glen Raven, the makers of Sunbrella. “Sunbrella has evolved to combine our advanced performance features with globally inspired designs that are quite surprising if you’re still thinking of us as strictly solid and striped canvas.” Sunbrella began in 1961 as a trusted brand for the awning industry, with unmatched fade and mildew resistance as well as easy cleanability. It soon extended to the marine and outdoor furniture markets. But it’s the advances in technology and design-centric product development in recent years that have resulted in an inspired palette of colours, styles and textures allowing consumers, designers and architects alike to create extraordinary environments indoors and out. “Our investments in design, R&D and manufacturing capabilities have made tremendous advances over the last 15 years,” says Hal. “Our design team travels extensively to understand the market and stay on ahead of colour trends. [They have] been instrumental in how this story reflects the romance, beauty, comfort and performance achievable with Sunbrella.” Sunbrella sunbrella.com

We are proud to announce that Sunbrella have joined the INDE.Awards as 2017's Gold Partner.

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Bring Some Warmth to Winter with Carnival Textiles

The spirit of the Carnival is where the new Arent&Pyke collection takes its name, and where its design journey begun. Having a long-held love of texture, prints, natural materials and the desire to inject joy into the everyday, it makes sense that Kate & Kate, along with Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke, would launch a range like Carnival. The collection features a range of cotton and alpaca blankets, playful throws, linen napery, leather cushions, and hand woven bedspreads. In the mix is a collection of classic geometric shapes, relaxed stripes, and painterly prints, created in a contemporary palette of muted pinks, olive, navy, charcoal, burnt orange and black and white too. “Our mutual love for textiles, print and colour has always connected Juliette & I, and really became a foundation of the Arent&Pyke aesthetic from day one,” says Sarah-Jane. “We talk a lot about layering in our interiors, and the softness of beautiful fabrics is always so key to achieving depth in any scheme.” kk-campaign-alpaca--picnic-green-grey-2 “The aesthetic and tactile experience of our everyday life is inextricably linked to fabric,” says Juliette, “the clothes we wear, the place we rest our head, the furniture that we lounge on. To work with the “Kates” was such a wonderful experience – we were given creative freedom to explore bold print, delicious colour combinations and beautiful yarns that would bring joy into people’s homes.” The design of the range was driven by the delights of a shared table, a picnic outdoors in the sun, the gathering of family and friends, the comfort of daily rituals, and more. All these things came together for the designers who looked to articulate the way we can be inspired to live a beautiful. With names such as Floss, Festive and Fireworks, the ‘Carnival’ spirit is deeply woven throughout the collection. “I love the tactility of textiles that are made from natural fibres – wool, silk, cotton, linen, cashmere” says Juliette. “Our studio is known for its use of bold print and colour in projects, but with Carnival we incorporate the wildly expressive Fireworks print (seen on cushions, linen throws, tablecloths and napkins) in monochromatic black and white to dramatic effect. This paired with the cotton and alpaca blankets is the key to the collection – which expresses a mood of both whimsy and sophistication.” Kate & Kate kateandkate.com.au Arent&Pyke arentpyke.com kk-campaign-baby-jester-pink kk-campaign-cushion-1 kk-campaign-blanket-picnic-black kk-campaign-cushion-fireworks-pink kk-campaign-cushions-black-3 kk-campaign-linen-black-6 kk-campaign-linen-pink-3 kk-campaign-napkin-festivetwist-black kk-campaign-teatowel-pompom-black-4 KK-campaign-about-arent-pikeabc