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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
Conversations

In Conversation With… Guilio Ridolfo

Guilio, you’ve an impressive client list including Vitra, Fritz Hansen, Maharam and Kvadrat – and you live and work in Udine alongside Moroso. Obviously, your eye is trusted. How much is your work based on learning, how much on intuition? I am not an academic, nor a pharmacist but I am able to understand colour. My background is as a painter, and that’s where I first began to learn about colour. I’d say that my work method is somewhere between intuition and anthropolgy. So you studied as a painter? No, I studied as a fashion designer in Milan at the Domus academy and then I worked with Gianfranco Ferre for two years then I went on a trip to India which is where I really began to learn about colour. The Indian use of colour can appear so exuberant, even extravagant or gaudy to Western eyes, but it is in fact highly nuanced. But my interest in cloth really began at an early age, when I got a job in a very beautiful boutique in Udine where I gained hands on knowledge of texture and colour, the interaction of the two elements. Is a day without colour simply drab? I’m not obsessed by colour. I am certainly not chromophobic, but I’d confess to being chromophiliac. That said, it’s not as if I have to be surrounded by colour 24 hours a day. Is texture still important? I can’t develop a sense of colour in isolation from texture. It’s just not possible – at least not in the furniture business – to work colour without texture. It is of course possible if one is a painter, but even then the sense of texture of the paint itself has a role to play in the finished work. I can imagine texture and fabric is extremely important when working with Patrizia and the team at Moroso. Very. When Patrizia and I begin to consider upholstering a new design, first we meet the designers and the Moroso team members who will be involved in the manufacture. The designer walks us through his or her concept, and my role along with Patrizia is to create a skin for the project. I love working with people who have strong personalities – and Patrizia is definitely one such person! Elaborating a piece of furniture is a dialogue the result of which is to ‘dress’ the design and get it ready for its admirers. When you approach a new furniture project is your agenda to push your new colour palette to the fore? No, never. It’s not about me pushing a certain idea of colour I may have to the foreground. It is about proposing the appropriate colour or colours for a particular piece. Sometimes a company will apply certain colours to certain designs to which they’re really not appropriate, just as a means of capturing the attention of the media. You see a lot of this at the Salone del Mobile in Milan. The furniture industry doesn’t adhere to a strict seasonality in the way the fashion industry does. How do you organize your timing in order to respond most efficiently to market requirements? I work incessantly! No, seriously, in my job you can never switch off, ideas and influences are all around, every day and a big part of my success is the fact that I am extremely attuned to the many varied forms of input on a daily basis. My goal is normally to create an ongoing colour scale. An ‘ongoing colour scale’ is intriguing. Tell me about that. Okay, so if you consider Chanel for example, compare bottles of Chanel Nº5 from the past 20 years you will see very slight changes, gradations of the house style which enable the graphic design to always be contemporary whilst retaining its classic allure. Our perception of colour and form is constantly evolving so the things around us need to change slightly too in oder to continue to intrigue us. What if a client asked you to create an entire collection in white? I would be delighted! The shades and nuance of white are many and varied. It’s not al about blaring, vomit colours all the time. Guilio Ridolfo was In Conversation With… Stephen Todd Portrait by Charlie Kinrossabc
Architecture
Around The World
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Mixing Materials in Fujian, China

How can you construct a modern marvel in a site that is encrusted in a long evolving cultural aesthetic? Do you quash your idealised design dreams to ensure continuity, seeing the context as greater to the site? Or do you abandon historical example, flying a flag of difference and identity? Or, could it be possible to adhere to both? The Captain’s House, by Beijing-based Vector Architects, is an eloquent example of architecture reaching over into the fragile realm of modern design in a starkly traditional fishing village. The site is a renovation of a previous build that has suffered at the hand of the damp and erosive seaside location. The fundamental concern for the design was to ensure that the house would be protected from water leakage, enabling safety and longevity. To counter this, the architectural team capped the home with structural vaults on the third floor directing water downwards. Not only for its practical use, this wide curve gracefully delineates the house from its neighbours, rising and falling in a quietly proud stance. Vector Architects Captains House exterior Due to limited access via transport, the concrete vaults were poured on site into a brick-like surface, giving incredible texture all the while mimicking the tiled roofs typical to its neighbours. It is this slight adaptation of contextual features that successfully marries the building into its surrounding world. The concrete and coated masonry continue the raw, ash tones of the other buildings. Yet the inclusion of timber detailing on the windows, doors and slate shading offers a slight warmth to the otherwise cool exterior. This timber visually alludes to the inside spaces, providing a sense of continuity into the heavy timber-wrapped interior. Soothing oak clads the majority of the floors, ceiling, walls and staircase. The use of timber – a familiar and natural material – creates a sense of comfort and respite. While neat grid shelving, also in timber, establishes a sense of fragility and quietness, a welcome embrace from the severity of the external façade. Vector Architects vectorarchitects.com Words by Ella McDougall Vector Architects Captains House kitchen Vector Architects Captains House living room Vector Architects Captains House living room Vector Architects Captains House living room Vector Architects Captains House staircase Vector Architects Captains House window Vector Architects Captains House bedroom Vector Architects Captains House balcony Vector Architects Captains House balcony Vector Architects Captains House kitchen Vector Architects Captains House peninsula Vector Architects Captains House peninsula  abc
Design Hunters
Design Stories
DH - Feature

Exploring Perspectives on Place

Titled looking at me through you, this new exhibition includes 12 new research based works from a list of 12 Australian artists and artist collectives. As part of the Campbelltown Arts Centre’s rich yearly program, the exhibition hopes to canvas various perspectives on the locality. Based on Deloitte data sets charting social and economic change in the area – the exhibition unveils what Campbelltown might mean to local artists, to locals themselves, and the wider world surrounding it, both now and in the future. “Like many other places it has a really rich and diverse past, but this also comes with a lot of negative stigmas and tragedies in its short history,” explains exhibition curator Megan Monte. And like other regional areas, there’s been a gradual, sliding shift in Western Sydney’s social and cultural profile too. According to the statistics used in looking at me through you, Western Sydney is becoming a blueprint for future living, with 10 per cent of Australia’s population and 30 per cent of Sydney already residing in its diverse suburbs. Artists were chosen specifically to map out a varied picture of perspectives. “Some artists used to live here, or they still live her, so they know it really well, others have never been here before,” says Megan. “It was important for us to create these layers of engagement with Campbelltown.” Artists with a firsthand account of the region’s rapid transformation include Western Sydney based Tom Polo, Andrew Christie, Keren Ruki, James Nguyen and Mona Ibrahim. Tom Polo – who won the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship in 2015 and has exhibited widely throughout Australia – spent a great deal of time developing his work alongside shop owners on Campbelltown’s main drag, Queen Street. From there, Tom has painted a large 6x4-metre mural, exploring notions of local retail or business success. “He’s borrowed shapes and lettering from various shop signs, and parts of conversations overheard or said directly to him” Megan says. The resulting elaborately coloured, poetic piece reads ‘You and mine and all of everything still just here’. Other artists have taken a more analytical approach, funnelling Deloitte’s hard facts and statistics into art. Pieces in the exhibition include short films, models, portraits and a communal herb garden installed within Campelltown Arts Centre’s amphitheatre. The exhibition runs from 27 May to 23 July, 2017. Campbelltown Arts Centre c-a-c.com.au/looking-at-me-through-you Universal Power House courtesy Sonia Leber and David Chesworth Cover image and above: Universal Power House courtesy of Sonia Leber and David Chesworth Tom Polo Tom Polo courtesy the artist Abdul Abdullah, Through you, 2017 Abdul Abdullah, Through you, 2017 courtesy the artistabc
Happenings
What's On

Roll Up! The 2017 Intergrain Timber Vision Awards Entries Are Now Open

Architects, landscape architects, specifiers and design professionals across Australia and New Zealand are invited to enter any residential, commercial or landscape projects in the awards, which are looking for those special projects that demonstrate distinctive and visionary use of that most versatile of materials, timber. Following a record number of entries in last year’s competition, Intergrain Senior Brand Manager, Sonia Tousis is expecting 2017 to the biggest year yet for the awards, “It’s an exciting time for the industry. Timber continues to be a preferred material for design professionals with an ever-evolving breadth of solid, modified and engineered timber options. The change to the building code in Australia represents a new era for timber in construction, so it will be fascinating to see how this starts to manifest with respect to design innovation” This year’s judging panel will again be made up of esteemed industry professionals who will award winners across 5 categories – Residential Interior, Residential Exterior, Commercial Interior, Commercial Exterior and Landscape. Each category winner will receive $2,000 cash plus up to 100L of Intergrain Timber Finishes. For project entries finished in Intergrain Timber Finishes, the most outstanding entry will be awarded the ultimate prize of a $15,000 Travel Bursary. Entries are now open and close on Sunday 9th July. A shortlist will be announced with winners awarded at the Intergrain Timber Vision Awards Breakfast to be held in Melbourne in September. Bento-Box-1abc
Happenings
What's On

The Return Of The LiveLife Seminars

The Sydney Indesign seminars are brimming with as much spirit, reflection and adventure as the inquisitive world of A+D requires. Butting in on the design discussion across Asia Pacific, these lively and heated industry debates put a spotlight on A+D in a wholly new way. Surrounding topics relevant to the disciplines and professions of A+D today, the focus may be Australian but the insightfulness is valid worldwide.   The LiveLife Seminar Series Habitus presents the LiveLife series. These showroom based discussions will champion an emphasis on Residential and Consumer-based design issues with a range in focus from defining a so-called Australian design identity, the response to a resurgence of multi-generational living and keeping urban developments culturally respectful. Indesign Media Asia Pacific has been bringing design to the global stage for over a decade and the LiveLife talks, hosted by members of the Habitus editorial team and industry heavyweights, at #SID17 will be no exception. Talking About Your Generation:
 Intergenerational Cohabiting and Residential Design Throughout the world, two things in particular are forcing us to live in a radically different manner than heretofore: (1) the ever-rising overheads of a voracious property market, and (2) our ever- increasing life expectancy and ageing population. How has the design world approached re-thinking the residential environment to accommodate the multiple needs of many generations in the single domicile? Design Identities of Australia: Communities in Design Identity is a hotly contested philosophical arena – and, rightly so. But especially for our creative community, expressing identity through design carries a significantly broad array of integral stakeholders
we need to consider. Across Australia, the Indigenous design world is leading the charge for reconsidering the role design plays in expressing the identity of communities. Size and the City: Our Developers Have Some Explaining To Do Every year we are informed that urban density across the entire
Asia Pacific region has reached a record high. While our collective population continues to increase alongside the growing strain on our urban environments, we look to our developers and urban planners to provide solution. Whether you call it ‘small living’, ‘slow living’,
‘low density’ or ‘high sprawl’, where does the urban planner t within the A+D community? And, more pointedly, what can we learn from development experiments around the world?   WorkLife Seminar Series Indesign Media Asia Pacific has been the premier name in Australian and Asia Pacific design for over a decade, and at #SID17, we’ll be showcasing why. The sell-out success story of the last few years – our WorkLife seminar series – will once again see a range of global design trailblazers, thought-leaders and brands to share their knowledge, experience and journeys with our visitors as part of a program of seminars and discussions. Indesign magazine presents the WorkLife series of showroom-driven seminar discussions zero-ing in on a wide range of issues in architecture and design. The talks, hosted by members of the Indesign editorial team also showcase prominent members of the design community. WorkLife will take place on Friday 11 August. Architects, designers, developers, builders, end users and more are in for a real treat! All WorkLife seminars will be ticketed events, with substantial discounts applying to members of key organisations in the architecture, design, property and construction sectors. +Ticket holders will receive 1 X CPD point towards their professional accreditation. Hot Enough to Hashtag: A+D in the Social Media World As the marketing and media landscape continues to change
every day, never has building and sustaining brand equity been harder. But, while this is the case, there’s a strong argument being put forward for investing our marketing activities in new channels. The word ‘influencer’ seems to be thrown about a little too recklessly – but is there a lesson or two the A+D community can take from the world of avant-garde social media? Here we get to grips with the politics of ‘likes’, alternative marketing, and prolonging the reach of our digital presence through social media. Mobile-working is the New Agile: How to Design for an ‘Out of Office’ Workforce Thirty years ago ‘going to work’ meant going to an office to complete set tasks. Today it means going to ______ to work. Between the two redefinitions lies a social, cultural and grammatical change: ‘work’ is no longer a noun, no longer a ‘given place’. As a result of mobile working options, the commercial sector is being revolutionised by other aspects of our industry: including hospitality spaces and residential environments. Is this the end of the ‘Office’? Or is it simply the end as we know it? Kitsch, Please: How our Industry Can Disrupt and Experiment Without Getting Naff Today, our workplaces are diverse hubs of design politics. Everything from agility to ABW to cubicles and change management carries enormous political clout. There is, however, a growing trend in this space to investigate the truly unique working models and design solutions, which govern extreme workplaces. Whether in outer-space, the deep sea, on the road or in the sky, how has design-thinking and engineering innovations in the commercial sector embraced its inner-weird. Sydney Indesign indesigntheevent.com/sydney Words by Amelia Goldieabc
Architecture
Around The World

What A Camera Can’t Capture

The Sri Panwa luxury resort, located across the south-eastern tip of Phuket, is championed by – and envied for – its proudly indigenous inspired architecture. The resulting experience is one that simultaneously draws on the beauty and culture of its tropical location. The resort boasts an impressive array of lodgings with 37 suites and penthouses, 45 villas and seven private residential villas. Each is formed in a romantic terracotta that lends itself to the warm and earthy surroundings. This contextual relationship is extended through the inclusion of stone, wood and clean lines to emulate the contours of the natural vista. The natural scape is paramount to the design, with each guest’s living space arranged around the surrounding forest, saving the ancient trees and giving greater privacy. Each villa in the resort enjoys ocean views and floor-to-ceiling glass doors opening onto an Olympic size infinity pool facing towards the sea. The recent addition of the Habita precinct continues the tropical design philosophy of the resort. Incorporating indigenous architecture, the feature roof of the building follows the elegant arching of a leaf, visually referencing the natural beauty of the site. While the design follows the organic movement of the outside scape, Sri Panwa offers an international experience via their six food and drink venues. From traditional Chinese, pool-side Mediterranean to sushi and tepanyaki, enjoy the flavours of the world in the exotic and lush Thai locale. Sri Panwa sripanwa.com Words by Ella McDougall Sri Panwa Phuket poolSri Panwa Phuket pool Sri Panwa Phuket lounge Sri Panwa Phuket bedroom Sri Panwa Phuket bathroom Sri Panwa Phuket aerialabc
Architecture
Homes

A Very Technical Build By Alexandra Buchanan Architecture

If doctors make the worst patients, lawyers the worst clients, and teachers the worst students… what happens when a couple of graphic designers engage an architect to help create their perfect retreat from the city, their “dream house in the bush”? Are their professions closely enough related that they’d be helpful, knowledgeable and articulate in briefing the architect, yet distant enough to know when to silently step aside and leave things to the professionals? In the case of husband and wife duo Courtenay and Mark, teaming up with Alexandra Buchanan of Alexandra Buchanan Architecture, that’s exactly how things panned out. Contemporary life and life in the country don’t necessarily go hand-in-hand, in fact at times they can feel mutually exclusive. However marrying the two formed the crux of Courtenay and Mark’s brief. Geographical and atmospheric separation from an urban lifestyle was a non negotiable. Yet raising a young family, working remotely and a love for entertaining family and friends meant that a modern home was imperative – they wanted separation not isolation. Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte living Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte living Their new home, sitting amongst the treetops in North Warrandyte, has a strong sense of open space; seamlessly blending the indoors with out; and offering plenty of areas in which to play, entertain or relax. “With a steeply sloping site that falls to the Yarra River and a large number of existing trees the client was keen that a balance between the natural ‘rugged’ landscape was to be achieved, set against practical leveled areas for entertaining and children to play safely,” says Alexandra. Obstacles, constraints and “considerations” were far from lacking yet the architects and clients worked closely to work through them. Perhaps one of the bigger challenges was the steep nature of the site. “The builder recently described this house as being a very technical build, not so much due to obstacles but rather the access, topography and three-dimensional nature of the design,” remembers Alexandra. Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte dining Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte living Another major consideration for Mark and Courtenay was the subtle balance between capitalizing on native bush land, rolling hills and enviable views and a desire for privacy. Particularly given the site is within close proximity of neighbours and clearly visible from the river and bridge – a main arterial road. “The sliding of the plan and the deliberate solidity of east and west walls to neighboring boundaries allows for this sense of openness and also for practical private or service areas that free the remaining space to be relatively wall-less and open to the view and the sky,” says Alexandra. This unique instance in which architect and client were instantly on par, has resulted in a home that offers flexibility, growth and practicality. Alexandra Buchanan Architecture alexandrabuchanan.com Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Debra McFadzean and Robert Hamer Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte bathroom Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte living Alexandra Buchanan Architecture North Warrandyte outdoorabc
Design Products
Furniture

Oh Boyd! New Designs By An Architecture Legend

The iconic Walsh Street House has surely seen its share of convivial occasions, and this week, it formed an ideal setting for the launch of exclusive new works by its master architect, Robin Boyd. Upon arrival, guests were welcomed into a sitting room decked out in vibrantly upholstered Boyd Collection lounges. In an age where everything old is new again, the furniture, made to Boyd’s exact specifications, projects a uniquely timeless sensibility. The Boyd Collection includes a generous single seat, which comes in a lounge form, as well as a dining and coffee table, both inlaid with tactile cork tile. The range is made from Australian hardwoods and Australian wool fabrics, lending a truly local appeal. Alongside original pieces by his contemporaries, Featherston and Snelling, Boyd’s newly-launched pieces appear completely at home. Of course, in every sense, they are. Presented by KFive and the Boyd Foundation, with Boyd’s granddaughter in attendance, the evening unfolded in an enlightening conversational tour through the architect’s enduringly influential body of work. Decked in masses of native Australian flowers and superbly catered by the able team at Cutler & Co., the occasion was carefully crafted to reflect the importance of locality, in homage to one of our nation’s most brilliant creative talents. Words by Sandra Tan Robyn Boyd KFive Robyn Boyd KFive Robyn Boyd KFive Robyn Boyd KFiveabc
Design Hunters
Conversations

Cooking And Design From East To West

How design holds the power to impact every element of our personal lives today is a question that the INDE Living Space Award for 2017 seeks to uncover. German brand Gaggenau – the Living Space Official Partner – poses an answer. As globalisation opens up previously closed markets and exposes local cuisine to international influence, exposure to an enormous array of new ingredients, cooking methods, technologies, and traditions inherent in our daily lives have often undergone change. As a mainstay to social and cultural identity, one cannot underestimate the importance of food and the delicate position it maintains in our daily lives: always adapting to new forces, constantly responding to a world of inspirations and serving as the stimuli for many aspects by which we commune. Of course, design has a large say in how we approach such a personal aspect of our lives. From the discovery of fire to the first simple ovens used to make bread and other baked goods, the design of cooking technologies has always had a direct impact on the food that we produce and the day-to-day traditions we partake, as a result. Germany: 1944 In 1944, the factories of the already centuries-old company Gaggenau were bombed. With the Germany currency under reform in the post-war period, and with gas and coal under strict ration, Gaggenau recognised the need for a more economical oven. In rebuilding, a team of designers, engineers and industrial specialists sought to reimagine the way in which design could help the German public emerging from the ravages of war, and started to produce ovens that were more efficient in their use of natural gas and coal. This development cannot be understated in its significance. Before also introducing electric ovens to the German public for the first time in 1948, the characteristic forward-thinking attitude of Gaggenau’s creative and development teams attempted to create more culinary autonomy for all end-users in post-war Germany, to re-imbue dignity and ease back into their everyday, despite the circumstances of their continued hardship. Japan 1945 Meanwhile, in 1945 Japan, Shigeji Fujioka was establishing Teppanyaki Misono: the first restaurant to cook food in the now infamous teppanyaki style on an iron griddle. The restaurant proved a turning point for post-war Japanese culture, with the fast, theatrical style of cooking proving popular with Western soldiers stationed in the region, despite not being met with initial enthusiasm from the local population. Teppanyaki has since spread around the world, combining recognisably Japanese ingredients with a brash cooking method unfamiliar to the Japanese at the time. Both of these historical happenstances speak strongly to the curative and transformative power of design in our personal lives – as individuals and communities – and display a particularly touching degree of what often goes unremarked in A+D creative practice: bravery and compassion. An East-to-West Connection: 2017 Now, some 70 odd years later, teppanyaki is still cooked on cast iron, but more and more chefs and kitchens alike are turning to stainless steel for its material advantages. And for the first time, Gaggenau and teppanyaki have come together, with the German brand recently introducing an in-built stainless steel teppanyaki cooktop in the form of their Vario Teppan Yaki 400 series. Having expanded well beyond Germany into 50 countries across the globe, the developments made by the oldest appliances company in the world are no longer restricted to one part of the world, nor are they restricted to innovating for an isolated context. Your kitchen isn’t restricted to one part of the world, either. Gaggenau gaggenau.com Words by Felicity Borthwick We're proud to have Gaggenau join us on our question to find the most inspiring Living Space in the Asia Pacific region.abc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted
Furniture

From Inspiration to Reality at Rogerseller

There is an undeniable excitement that springs from the moment you decide to make a change in your home. Inspirational ideas turn into sketches, swatches are pored over and debated, and before long, you are immersed in the potential of a new space tailored to your exact requirements. ss Working with clients to navigate their journey from that initial spark towards a masterfully executed project, Rogerseller’s experienced showroom consultants draw on a sound technical knowledge of product as well as problem solving. Design-by-Sarah-Trotter---Hearth-Studio_Photography-by-Ross-Tonkin While having added a suite of exceptional living, bedroom and kitchen solutions to their impressive portfolio over the years, Rogerseller are renowned foremost for their skills in bathroom design – a complex space for first-time renovators to tackle. Rogerseller But with a dedicated team guiding design hunters through an array of finishes, fixtures and fittings, Rogerseller invites clients to tap into the support available, to achieve their dream space. “In addition to our consultants’ insightful knowledge, our product images, CADs, technical overviews, installation instructions and care and maintenance information provides clients with all the information they need to make informed decisions,” says Rogerseller’s Managing Director, James Edmonds. Design-by-Rogerseller_Photography-by-Ross-Tonkin Established in Melbourne in 1895, and with expertise gleaned from 120 years at the vanguard of design, Rogerseller is uniquely positioned as a local tastemaker for design in the home, with the client’s needs always at front of mind. “We’ve always looked for products that are innovative, design-led, timeless, and of a high quality. By using Rogerseller, you are using a brand that is trusted, that will bend over backwards to ensure that we deliver on our promise,” says James. Architecture-and-Design-by-Anthony-Solomon-from-Connor-and-Solomon-Architects_Photography-by-BresicWhitney Appointments with Rogerseller’s Showroom Consultants are currently available in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth. Click here to make an appointment. Rogerseller rogerseller.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes
Primary Slider

The Mental Health House by Andrew Maynard

Like a chef who never cooks at home, Andrew Maynard got used to living above the Fitzroy practice of Austin Maynard Architects in a classic double storey terrace so dark and internalised he’d check the Bureau of Meterology website to find out what kind of day it was outside. After five years, his partner said: ‘enough’. Their 13-year-old son agreed. Years before, Andrew had swapped the punishing hours of a large commercial practice to start his own small residential outfit in the quest for a healthier, happier work–life balance. Over time, though, the house took its toll. Stress and anxiety drove the couple to their respective doctors. Maynard’s told him about the spike in mental health patients he sees each winter, explaining the importance of sunlight and Vitamin D in maintaining mental health. Mental Health House living Like 80 per cent of Australians, Andrew and his partner Kylie were Vitamin D deficient. “There’s solid research that shows that the quality of the spaces you inhabit directly affect both your mental and your physical health,” Andrew says. “All three of us were suffering because of the spaces we were occupying.” He responded with an experimental ‘mental health house’ he’d never get past regular clients. “Kylie had her brief, which was a lot more open space that interconnects with the backyard,” he says. “But apart from that she sort of went, ‘Just do it, I know you want to have fun’.” That he did. The extension is a “bright, elaborate greenhouse” with a transparent polycarbonate roof (shaded in summer by an external canvas blind), bright yellow floors, stairs and fittings, and a massive glass wall connecting rear kitchen-dining area with revamped garden. A central ‘box’ contains the kitchen, bathroom and a concealed storeroom. It’s topped with a balustrade-free mezzanine lounging space “that freaks people out”, Andrew laughs. “I’ve got this net I can string across when I’m having a party or if a bunch of my son’s mates are over.” It’s an unconventional tiered space that wouldn’t work for everyone. “But … we love that we’ve got this cliff we can hang on top of,” he says. Mental Health House kitchen The project is less thermally efficient than Maynard’s regular designs, despite a hydronically heated slab and concrete block walls. The family occasionally dons sunnies inside. But they adore their new play space, and two hours’ extra sunlight a day. “We’re definitely happier and we’re getting along better too,” Maynard says. “The environmental strains you get you often take out on the people closest to you.” However, it’s no panacea for a stressful lifestyle. “Health is complex,” he says. “I’m worried that people might see this house as saying, ‘If you up your Vitamin D then you’ll feel better’. And it’s not that simple. Probably the most important part (of recovering from his corporate world stress and anxiety) was getting my nine-to-five life right. I couldn’t help but sit there going, ‘I am selling my daylight hours. Especially during winter. And I need them to be more meaningful’.” Austin Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com Photography by Tess Kelly Mental Health House Mental Health House exterior Mental Health House studio Mental Health House corridor Mental Health House staircase Mental Health House bathroom  abc
Happenings
Parties

The #Salone17 Review

Milan is arguably the design industry’s most significant event. Being at the Salone del Mobile, means becoming part of a community that is now the undisputed international point of reference for design. Hosted by Habitus Features Editor, Indesign X Habitus X LightCo brought Milan back to Oz with an illustrious panel of key industry insiders to share their thoughts and ideas from this year’s fair. Featuring Adele Bates, Todd Hamond, Henry Wilson, Stephen Todd, and Roy Doron, the group edited down exactly what you needed to take away from this year’s Salone, covering off topics including: Technology & Innovation, Design Language, Colour & Materiality, Euroluce & Lighting, Best Stands, What Matters To Oz A+D? The Indesign and Habitus team would like to say a huge thank you to our wonderful showroom hosts, LightCo and our panelists for sharing their ideas on Milan 2017. [gallery ids="58312,58314,58315,58316,58317,58318,58319,58313,58320,58321,58322,58323,58324,58325,58326,58327,58328"]abc