About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes
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True North by Tandem Design Studio

When architects design their own home it’s an opportunity to push their boundaries and test their ideas. This house is the new family home of architect Tim Hill of Tandem Design Studio. Completed in 2016, it was a chance for Tim to experiment and innovate and to create a house that reflected and expressed his interests: how it contributes to the visual language of the neighbourhood, integrates pocket gardens, encourages different readings of meaning and minimises the environmental impact of its design. It also demonstrates how constraints spur creativity as the awkward block of land gives rise to a form that evokes a variety of imaginative descriptions. Faced with an irregular, triangular site, Tim designed the footprint of the house to somewhat mimic the shape of the block as it narrows in the rear, while its curving lines depart from its geometry and create fuller interior spaces. With dips and turns and dimples, the forms and volumes of the house, which remind Tim of a “coral bommie,” makes way for sunlit gardens and entrances. Tanden Design Studio kitchen The house is clad in a pleated steel façade with a pearlescent metallic finish that enhances its sculptural form, “and looks like a whirling dress,” says Tim. The triangular ribs cast constantly changing shadows, and from a practical point of view they create diagonal bracing, stabilising the curving, asymmetric form. They also capture a layer of still air adding to the thermal performance of the envelope. Windows with deep rusted steel hoods pierce the façade and create private portholes. Inside, the ground level is one large and open area with a double-heighted atrium. The family come together to cook, socialise, play and eat in the sunken lounge, kitchen and dining area, while upstairs the bedrooms and bathrooms are contained within three pods accessed by a staircase and bridge that hovers about the atrium. Tanden Design Studio living room The interior spaces are as just as sinuous and curving as the exterior of the house as they push against each other. “The house is an integrated solution; every bit of it hinges on every other bit, from the way the interiors press and bulge to the built-in furniture I designed to fit the shapes that emerged,” Tim explains. “Visitors have expressed that it looks like a boat, and being inside is like looking out through a water drop, or hiding inside a musical instrument. The form encourages many different readings and people can find their own meaning in the work, rather than prescribing one.” Tandem Design Studio tandem-studio.net Photography by John Gollings Tanden Design Studio aerial Tanden Design Studio bedroom Tanden Design Studio interior Tanden Design Studio staircase Tanden Design Studio study Tanden Design Studio interior Tanden Design Studio street front Tanden Design Studio street exteriorabc
Design Products
Furniture

The Time is Nau – All New Design from Cult

Offering furniture, lighting and accessories by a range of Australia’s most exciting design mind, Nau is a celebration of the local design movement. Original by necessity, Australia’s design culture stems from our unique place of geographical isolation. Our influences are unique from the rest of the world, and lacking the design ancestry of our European counters, we are free to immerse ourselves amongst the extreme natural landscapes and unique materials of our broad, burnt land. Nau is the embodiment of this fresh thinking, uniquely Australian and broad-spectrum approach. Contemporary furniture, lighting and accessories alike will see release under the Nau label, driven by a collective of Australia’s most spirited designers including Adam Cornish, Adam Goodrum, Gavin Harris and Jack Flanagan. The designs seen under Nau will suit residential and commercial spaces alike; from elegant lounge furniture, to modular shelving, to striking luminaires, the NAU collection is reductive in form, honest in materiality and timeless in style. With over 20 years of history, Cult’s first major steps towards Nau were in 2014, when they launched the first exclusive collection of Australian furniture under the brand; the AG x Cult capsule, by Adam Goodrum. Since then, Cult’s product development has grown and grown, and this is where Nau is born. Nau launches internationally at ICFF in New York (21-24 May) and locally at DENFAIR in Melbourne (8-10 June). Following these tradeshow launches, the NAU collection launches with a series of retail and media launches at Cult showrooms across Australia and New Zealand in late June. The full NAU collection will be available exclusively from all Cult showrooms in Australia and New Zealand from June 2017. Go check it out now! CULT-Feb-201720-3382_Final CULT-Feb-2017406-3427-Stack CULT-Feb-2017398-3426 CULT-Feb-2017111-3392_Final CULT-Feb-2017102-3389_Final CULT-Feb-201761-3387_Final CULT-Feb-201736-3386_Finalabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Breaking the Mould: A History of Innovation

Knowing when and where to push the boundaries is one of the hallmarks of successful design. In saying that, Gaggenau, now entering their 334th year and as the oldest kitchen appliances company in the world, might be considered to be somewhat of a gold-standard. However, what does pushing the boundary really mean, and how can it be understood across centuries of vast technological development? Can one push the boundary for the sake of boundary-pushing alone and still be considered constructive?
In truth, innovation for innovation’s sake is rarely conducive for success. The term ‘innovative’ wasn’t even given as a compliment up until 1939 or so. However, with our current understanding of the term, the best cases of innovation happen as a result of a shifting context such as new and evolving demands, or reconsidered values. Being able to recognise those changes and adapt is what defines successfully pushing boundaries.

1683-1883: While the Iron’s Hot 

Gaggenau was originally set up as an ironworks in a small German village of the same name in 1683, with founder Margrave Ludwig Wilhelm von Baden hoping to bring new economy to the area. Increased industrialisation throughout the 17th century saw the company expand in to the manufacture of agricultural machinery and tools before seguing into the cooking sector; the result of a burgeoning middle class requiring better cooking appliances in the domestic sphere and Gaggenau’s winning recipe for robust oven enamel.

1883-1983: Kitchens of/for The World

This period saw Gaggenau become the worldwide leading luxury brand for home appliances as crowned/named by Wirtschaftswoche (the most renowned weekly business magazine in Germany). How? By playing an integral role in rebuilding the new concept of ‘home’ and ‘domesticity’ in the 20th century. For, as Graham Crow says in The Post-war Development of the Modern Domestic Ideal “It is in this period that the modern domestic ideal of an affluent nuclear family living in a place of their own and enjoying the benefits of leisurely home life took shape.” With Gaggenau being an early innovator in the electricity space, they were able to capitalise on this and play a significant role in what that new domestic ideal looked like. In 1948, at a time when coal and natural gas were in short supply, the company manufactured the first electric ovens with its Favorit and Futura models appearing on the market. Not long after, Georg von Blanquet took the helm at Gaggenau and the world’s first built-in appliances appeared – an innovation that propelled the brand further onto the global stage. Today, as the world and its cuisines are drawn ever closer with faster travel and the Internet, Gaggenau continues to question how kitchen appliances can push onwards by developing appliances outside of their traditional contexts: now you can have the best in German engineering to create masterpieces of, say, Japanese gastronomy all in the comfort of your Australian home. However, innovation is a narrow line to walk. Tread too far to either side and you risk alienating your base, or simply being forgotten. Despite that, Gaggenau has embraced the avant-garde as a design philosophy in order to lay a resilient path for ongoing innovation. In doing so, they have come to be the most widely distributed appliance brand in the world, pairing centuries of experience with a willingness to embrace technological changes as they have come (and even developing some of them on their own, such as in the case of their highly valued enamel recipe).

The Last 30 Years

Their 400 Series built-in ovens expand on the developments made over the course of Gaggenau’s long history, namely their token blue enamel, which was initially developed in the 1880s, and the advent of built-in appliances in 1956. Paired with an understanding of the effect that the handle-free oven has upon the kitchen – increasingly being recognised as the centre of the home – and the consistent use of high-quality materials, the 400 Series has been built to stand the test of time in terms of both durability and design aesthetic.
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Architecture
Places

Legendary Hospitality at the Jackalope

The jackalope is a mythical beast, a horny hybrid of jackrabbit and antelope unleashed on unsuspecting Wyoming prairies in the 1930s by a hunter with a gift for taxidermy and curious wit. Its namesake hotel on the Mornington Peninsula is no less exotic, although very much more real. Designed by Melbourne’s Carr Design Group in collaboration with the multi-disciplinary Fabio Ongarato studio, the Jackalope is a slick black box perched atop a valley of tumbling vines. Monolithic, almost brutal, the metal-clad structure resets the template of the boutique hotel experience at the same time as revolutionizing the cellar door. Jackalope mornington peninsula vineyards “The client wanted us to encapsulate notions of alchemy and transformation, the essence of wine making,” says Sue Carr. “It’s rare to be pushed so much by a brief, and for a while there we were wiggling about, trying to make sense of a highly abstract concept.” Sue made sense of that abstraction by creating a hermetic space in which the decor could snap, crackle and pop. In the main dining room, an 8x10 metre chandelier by Melbourne designer Jan Flook is composed of 10,000 exposed filament bulbs that ripple with the electric current, evanescent. In the lobby bar, bright white neon tubing snakes its way across the ceiling, illuminating rows of bubble shaped flasks which riff niftily off the alchemy theme. Furniture includes golden leather pelt ‘Barbarian’ chairs by the Campana brothers for Edra, antler and oak benches by Rick Owens and a scattering of elegantly crafted classics by Melbourne design group, Zester. Plaster busts feature anonymous agate faces, surreal. Jackalope mornington peninsula bedroom Jackalope mornington peninsula bedroom The 46 rooms are conceived as ‘lairs’ and accessed via a dimly lit passageway, creating a sense of anticipation and intrigue. Airy, and open to the vineyards, the charred timber interiors evoke the inside of wine barrels and are equally as intoxicating. “We composed them as a coherent sequence from waxed black resin bath tub to dark timber workspace to sleeping area,” says Sue. Joinery is seamlessly integrated, all fittings are copper, brass or bronze. “We know from experience that if you get the built form right, you don’t have to work too hard after that.” With sweeping views across the 30-metre black infinity pool out across lush grapevines the rooms are incredibly meditative, the mood shifting along with the foliage according to the season. “We wanted to create a sense of indulgence and comfort within a rigorous environment that would reflect our studio’s aesthetic,” says Sue. And it’s in the balance of structure and whimsy, of rationale and emotion, that the strength of the Jackalope experience resides. Jackalope jackalopehotels.com Jackalope mornington peninsula front exterior Jackalope mornington peninsula lobby Jackalope mornington peninsula bathroom Jackalope mornington peninsula diningabc
Design Hunters
People

Meet The #Salone17 Speakers: Todd Hammond

Who is Todd Hammond?

  Fomerly Practice Director of BVN Donavan Hill and Head of Interiors at Woods Bagot, Todd Hammond is one of Australia’s most highly regarded design leaders. Hammond has worked on many award-winning projects over the past fifteen years. This ranges from creative agency fitouts and strategies workplaces for large professional service firms, through to hospitality venues and private residences. Most recently, he worked on the Macquarie Bank workplace in Sydney, the Virgin Active Health clubs in both Sydney and Singapore, as well as Herbert Smith Freehills, Sydney. Hammond’s design approach combines vision, attention to detail and an ability to truly understand and deliver on each client’s brief, working across a set of diverse sectors including workplace, education, health, hospitality and retail.

The deets:

The Indesign x Habitus x LightCo #Salone17 Review

WHEN: Thursday, May 18 2017 at 6pm for a 6:30pm start

WHERE: Hosted at the LightCo Showroom, 100 Collins Street, Alexandria

PANEL HOST: Stephen Todd

FEATURING: Adele Bates, Todd Hammond, Henry Wilson, Roy Doron

Click here to grab your tickets!

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Design Hunters
Conversations

In Conversation With… John Wardle

John, your Coincidences exhibition is an incredibly thoughtful, almost painstaking demonstration of the power of architecture to transform the urban landscape. What value does such an exercise create for a practice such as yours? We thought very carefully before undertaking the exhibition and were determined that it not take the form of a conventional architecture show. So we examined our own methodology as a practice and decided to as much as possible expose the inner workings of the studio, the broad coalition of the many people involved, we are fundamentally a collaborative practice. Particularly, we wanted to open up our work to stimulate an engagement with others. What started as a small idea turned into commissioning twelve remarkable photographers to each take one photo of two of our buildings, encouraging them to find some kind of narrative operating between the two. It’s important when briefing other creative professionals to not over-prescribe. As a practice you engage with many typologies. Is this breadth of practice strategic? No, it’s in fact evolved in a very organic manner. It’s more often than not the intrigue of the commission that moves us in one direction or another, that allows us to keep the practice broad. We’ve done quite a fleet of bridges, six infact, and we are determined not to become known as bridge specialists. We’ve done about 11 libraries, three art galleries. But none of these projects, at least to our way of thinking, make us specialists in a particular typology. What are the core values of John Wardle Architects? More and more we’re finding that one of the primary values we have as a practice is a genuine cross-pollination. We find that a lot of workspace projects can benefit from what we’ve learnt working in the academic space, for instance. We can transpose experience gained from working on a massive student development to the needs of a retail precinct. Many of the drivers of apparently disparate projects are in fact the same. It’s the things that actually incite human beings to be drawn into civic behaviour that interest us as a practice. JWA is an established practice with a hefty client list, yet it seems to me that as a practice you are extremely youthful. Is that something you consciously cultivate? We are constantly looking for ways to invigorate ourselves and our modes of practice. I am very inquisitive by nature, and this possibly helps in maintaining a sense of freshness. In fact, I’d say I have an almost fanatical curiosity which can’t help but affect the way the studio works. I think that even in a practice of maturity such as our is, the heart of our culture is still that of a small practice. Tell me about your place on Bruny Island. Obviously it’s a retreat but it also seems to function as a kind of laboratory, a testing ground for your projects on the mainland. It started off as a very simple idea, and gained ambition as things progressed. It was originally intended as our family hide away, the antidote to our busy city existence. This estate a state away, on the edge of Tasmania. But like a lot of things our personal life is integrated into our work life and vice versa. It’s all a great whirling process with little in the way of boundaries. We’ve undertaken a massive environmental campaign, we’ve rehabilitated six kilometres of coastal edge, we’ve planted 9,000 trees. The majority of this effort was expended by my staff coming down to stay. But after a while they got sick of planting trees in the depths of winter and so we devised the idea of designing a bird observation platform. But in the months preceding the undertaking the idea grew to the point where eventually I engaged two carpenters, a steel worker, an arborist, a chainsaw operator, and stone mason and we built a series of things along the coastal edge. As more staff kept coming – last time we had 25 all up – we added steel fabricator and furniture maker to the list of trades engaged at the Bruny property. How often do you get down there? Rigorously and religiously every month. John Wardle was In Conversation With... Stephen Todd John Wardle’s Coincidences exhibition is at the Tin Sheds Gallery, University of Sydney until June 26th 2017.abc
Architecture
Homes

Live, Work, and Play by the River Yarra’s Edge

While the modern working world has largely moved away from a 9-5 system in favour of a more mixed use timetable, the world of housing design is yet to catch up – which is where the Cargo Home concept come in. a In today’s complex world of mixed work-play-rest time, for some, the ideal solution would be to combine the spaces in a smart, designer solution. Mirvac’s Cargo Homes at Wharf’s Entrance is a boutique range of luxury residences that blur the line between office and home – perfect for the franchise or small business owner with a penchant for the designer side of life. Located at Yarra’s Edge, the homes have been designed with such architectural ingenuity so as to afford areas for focus, free from distraction, as well as relaxation – equally freed from the burdens of typical workplace disruption. Nestled among the nearly complete Forge apartment tower and grand waterfront Wharfside Residences, the flexible homes offer home office space on the ground floor, with living areas situated on the top two floors, where balconies have been provided to take advantage of the city views. Named to honour the history that helped shaped Melbourne’s waterfront, the Cargo Homes reflect the local heritage through both their rugged architecture, and the use of raw materials such as brick, zinc, copper, raw concrete and timber, harking back to the industrial past. “The materials are designed to reference the site’s heritage, with a textural organic rawness juxtaposed against more modern finishes of steel and glass,” says Mirvac Design Director, Michael Wiener. Mirvac_Cargo-Homes_Exterior Internally, carpet flows throughout the interiors, with tiles selected for the kitchens which have been designed with minimalist utility in mind – reconstituted stone benchtops, chrome tapware, glass splashbacks and SMEG appliances complete the cooking spaces. Bathrooms throughout the Cargo Homes feature vitrified flooring, full-height wall tiles, generous vanity units, reconstituted stone benchtops and metallic feature walls. The office spaces of the ground levels feature generous floor plans alongside convenient kitchenette and a bathroom spaces, as well as a large linen cupboard for additional storage. “Carefully considered elements and details are brought poetically together, from the Cargo Homes’ façades through to the elegant interiors, providing a modern, liveable and adaptable home,” Mr Wiener says of the spaces. Check out the Cargo Homes and see if this is the modern, designer solution for your life here! Cargo_-3 Cargo_-29 Cargo_-42abc
Design Hunters
People

Meet The #Salone17 Speakers: Henry Wilson

Who is Henry Wilson?

Henry Wilson a designer living and working in Sydney. He studied at the Australian National University School of Art in Canberra, graduating with first class honours in visual arts, specialising in woodwork. During his time at ANU he went on exchange to Rhode Island School of Design. He then moved to Europe to complete his Masters at the Design Academy Eindhoven before returning to Sydney to set up his eponymous studio in 2012. Wilson designs furniture, lighting, accessories and components, working together with a range of suppliers and manufacturers. In particular, he has built a close relationship with a local foundry for cast elements in bronze and aluminium. He sell’s his work directly and in a number of design showrooms around the world. In addition, Wilson has designed the interior for two Aesop stores in Sydney. Wilson’s work combines a rational, democratic utility with an element of sculptural expression. There is a clear form and function in my products, but it’s important they also have feeling. He is interested in the awkward beauty that comes from something made by hand. He likes to explore how imperfection can be introduced into an industrial process, to make something at scale that retains a sense of individual charm. During his time in Europe Wilson was fascinated by the flea markets in the Netherlands and Germany. Discovering well-made things from the past was like tracing ancestors of contemporary design. He talks about the anthropology of design, recognising that it has a linear narrative and that ideas today are developments of those that have come before. He also understands design to be an evolutionary process of refining, learning and improving. Well-made things last. Wilson believes this is one of the simpler forms of sustainability that we can hope to achieve as designers today.

The deets:

The Indesign x Habitus x LightCo #Salone17 Review

WHEN: Thursday, May 18 2017 at 6pm for a 6:30pm start

WHERE: Hosted at the LightCo Showroom, 100 Collins Street, Alexandria

PANEL HOST: Stephen Todd

FEATURING: Adele Bates, Todd Hammond, Henry Wilson, Roy Doron

Click here to grab your tickets!

abc
Happenings
What's On

Meet The #Salone17 Speakers: Adele Bates

Who is Adele Bates?

With over 12 years of experience as an Interior Designer, Adele is recognised for her passion and innovation by her clients and industry peers. Adele is an active member within the design community and a council member within the Design Institute of Australia. Her experience lies in many project types from residential, multi-residential, hospitality, retail, workplace and education. As the director of her eponymous practice she has created, she continues to create a truly collaborative and approachable environment for the team, clients and aligned consultants. Adele believes in continually being inspired and approaches each project uniquely, ensuring it is well considered, well crafted and designed with purpose. Creating high quality design with longevity is the aim of the practice.  

The deets:

The Indesign x Habitus x LightCo #Salone17 Review

WHEN: Thursday, May 18 2017 at 6pm for a 6:30pm start

WHERE: Hosted at the LightCo Showroom, 100 Collins Street, Alexandria

PANEL HOST: Stephen Todd

FEATURING: Adele Bates, Todd Hammond, Henry Wilson, Roy Doron

Click here to grab your tickets!

abc
Architecture
Homes

Out of Tragedy Comes Opportunity

Look for the silver linings. It’s a lot easier said than done and yet often the harder these silver linings are to find the more important it is to do so. Back in 2009 during the infamous Black Saturday fires that wreaked havoc through Victorian bush land, Jonathan and Jane ­– a Melbourne-based professional couple and two heads of a young family – lost their Marysville home away from home in the Yarra Ranges. Without minimising or diminishing the loss they suffered ­– their old house completely burnt to the ground – from tragedy came an opportunity to create something spectacular. Steffan Welch House Living RoomWith an existing relationship with Damien Thackray of Steffen Welsch Architects who had worked with the couple in the past, they once again enlisted the help of the studio to re-build their house from the ground up. “Sunlight and exploring its different qualities was vital to the project, before we started designing we camped on the site and observed the path of the sun throughout the whole day,” says Steffen Welsch. “In winter the afternoon sun penetrates deep into the room and warms up the space,” he continues. But there were also ideas and elements brought up in the initial planning stages that were later thought better of. For example the idea for a two-storey house, “nestled into the sloping site,” that would maximize views and space soon seemed rather elaborate and led the residents and architecture team to re-consider what they wanted to build, and how they wanted it to function. Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living “We opted [instead] for a simple box with a collective dining/living area, a small kitchen, hidden bathroom and a mezzanine with a sleeping platform overlooking the living space. [The] laundry and additional storage were located externally. "This simple timber box gave us the opportunity to place doors and windows to frame views, allow easy access to outside and play with sunlight as it hits the building during the day,” says Steffen. And to encourage time spent outdoors, the timber deck outside is actually bigger is space than the living area inside. That was one of the most important directions given within the brief, the new home was to embrace nature and respect its setting in the bush. Gracefully, it does so. Steffen Welsch Architects steffenwelsch.com.au Photography by Brendan Finn Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Living Steffan Welch House | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Meet The #Salone17 Speakers: Roy Doron

Who is Roy Doron?

Roy Doron began his career in 1996 in the retail lighting sector in Johannesburg, South Africa. A few years later he went into partnership with an interior architect firm where his natural spacial and design skills flourished. Working on projects in the casino, telco, hospitality, retail, commercial and residential sectors, he was soon regarded as one of the top lighting designers and specifiers in that market and this was evident by the prestigious projects awarded and completed. In 2004 Roy immigrated to Sydney. It was within a few weeks of arriving that a Victorian based company hired and entrusted him to set up and run their first office outside of Melbourne, specialising in professional grade landscape lighting products and services. After 2 years, and having helped to establish a stable, industry recognised and profitable business, Roy felt it was time to start his own venture, and in 2006 LightCo was born. At first, LightCo specialised in importing and distributing exterior only lighting products and wholesaling to retail stores across the country. A few years later, both the products and brands diversified to include interior and exterior decorative lights. In 2011, Roy opened his first Sydney showroom where he again diversified the business and started representing his products to the A&D community across Australia. Exhibiting nationally at numerous design based trade events, it was clear that LightCo had found its way, and with the A&D industry quickly demonstrating trust in the company, Roy began to build brand LightCo. In 2012, Roy (as chief designer) founded his own boutique lighting brand, Lighting Republic. Today LR is a collection of timeless styles and exceptional quality products produced by artisan manufacturers across Asia. Lighting Republic currently sells in Australia and internationally. In 2016 Roy created a 220m2 flagship lighting showroom in the heart of Sydney’s burgeoning design precinct – Alexandria’s Collins Street. This space dramatically showcases LightCo’s extensive brand and service offerings to both wholesale and design clients alike.  

The deets:

The Indesign x Habitus x LightCo #Salone17 Review

WHEN: Thursday, May 18 2017 at 6pm for a 6:30pm start

WHERE: Hosted at the LightCo Showroom, 100 Collins Street, Alexandria

PANEL HOST: Stephen Todd

FEATURING: Adele Bates, Todd Hammond, Henry Wilson, Roy Doron

Click here to grab your tickets!

abc
Happenings
What's On

WORKSHOPPED 17 Entries Closing SOON!

WORKSHOPPED 17 applications are still open and closing soon!

This year they're asking designers "Does your design demand attention and is fit for purpose?" 

In association with the AUSTRALIAN DESIGN CENTRE, WORKSHOPPED 17 will be the fifth WORKSHOPPED event hosted by presenting partner SUPA CENTA MOORE PARK. 

The annual WORKSHOPPED exhibition has presented the work of over 450 Australian designers through 16 exhibitions and been viewed by over 650,000 people. 

WORKSHOPPED exhibitions continue to provide an important platform for Australian designers to reach national and international manufacturers, retailers and consumer audiences.

Enter now. Applications close Sunday the 16th May at midnight.

 

WORKSHOPPED SALON, featuring new work from the alumni of past WORKSHOPPED exhibitors and open to all designers.

WORKSHOPPED EMERGING DESIGNER, the young guns of Australian Design.

WORKSHOPPED STUDENT, the next wave of Australian design. 

APPLY HERE

 

FOR THE DIARY:

VIP OPENING NIGHT August 9th, 2017

Exhibition continues until 27th, August 2017

Applications Close: 14th, May 2017

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