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Architecture
Around The World

Nick Leith-Smith in Ginza Six, Tokyo

In an interview, Nick Leith-Smith once said: “interiors are […] about creating memorable, unique experiences”. The London-based architect and interior designer grew up in Hong Kong, trained in Glasgow, and now splits his time between projects around the globe. His latest work not only echoes this sentiment but marks yet another retail space he’s worked on with long time collaborative partners Manolo Blahnik. This time the venue was an impressive 60-square-metre flagship store for the designer shoe boutique in the highly anticipated Ginza Six shopping mall in Tokyo. The mall itself has been heralded as the coming together of art, architecture and a luxury shopping experience. Yoshio Taniguchi was the lead architect on the project, and was a fitting choice given the Japanese-born architect shot to international acclaim in 1997 when he secured his first international commission for the expansion of The Museum of Modern Art in America. Manolo Blahnik does a good job of representing Ginza Six’s vision on its own accord but Nick et al.’s design also reflects a strong sense of local identity. Quality materials and unique craftsmanship champion the message. Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living The focal element is the timber installation that runs through the entirety of the store. Referencing iconic Japanese joinery, the interlacing wooden slats traverse across the ceiling, connects walls, support shelves and act as hangars. “Functionally dynamic and playful much like the brand itself,” says a spokesperson for Nick Leith-Smith. A feature wall is crafted by hung tiles falling in an undulating curve pattern inspired bu the ginko leaf and a dramatic contrast comes at the helm of indigo blue walls. Marble flooring and in-laid shelves further enhance the atmosphere. The seating, taken from the mid-century Finn Juhnl 137 collection inspired by the iconic Miyajima Watergate, consists of low armchairs with hand-sewn upholstery in brightly coloured hues. So pull up a chair and kick off your heels – then replace them. Nick Leith-Smith nickleithsmith.com Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Living Manolo Blahnik Ginza Six | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Places

Three Brothers and One Dessert Bar

The design for Moss Bros, a charming dessert bar in Kareela, South Sydney, starts from the outside streetscape, before you have even entered the store. Walking past, the aroma of fresh coffee grounds and oozing warmth of baked goods yank at your nose, leading you through the door in to their intricately decorated cakes. Collectiuvus, the design consultancy behind Moss Bros, takes a holistic, ground-up approach to design, incorporating interiors, graphics, multimedia and branding. Head designer Michelle Khadye, inspired by the uniquely earthy and mossy details of the cakes, was able to construct a signature brand and space that champions the creativity of its goods while delineating itself from its peers. Moss Bros | Habitus Living The design for Moss Bros began from an understanding of how future customers would move throughout the space; the flow from inside to outside, the desire for more open and more protective seating spaces and how to pull customers in off the street. The countertop – enchanting in its own right, decorated in gold shelving and vines – is cleverly located at the forefront of the store to exhibit the delicious offering to those waking by. Closer in, the back cut-out kitchen reveals a theatrical show as the chefs prepare the brunch menu. “It’s all about designing for the human mind,” says Michelle. “They come in, they smell the coffee so they go near the coffee, [then] they look at the desserts.” Preluded from already strong architectural bones, the brief was to keep things clean, elegant and showcase the sweets rather than overwhelm them. “It is rare to find architecture where even when it stands alone it still looks beautiful,” says Michelle. “We didn’t want to clutter the shop front, we wanted the architecture to just speak for itself.” Moss Bros | Habitus Living Drawing on the romance of the dessert bars synonymous with Paris and Vienna, the interior infused Europe’s old-world refinement into a clean and raw aesthetic, referencing Australia’s geography and clientele. A refreshing step away from the flamboyant colour and frills usually associated with desserts, Moss Bros soaks in a more muted palette. Rich overlaying hunter and mint greens not only create a calming environment but also visually reference the subtle wildness of the desserts. The earth-toned marble counter top visually anchors the space, adding an organic rippling detail that softens the strict lines and adds a gloss to elevate the sophistication of the space. Khadye has also considered the wide ranging needs of the customers through the mix of seating, from the banquette, high bar tables and low seating, to truly open up the space to anyone – a mother with her pram, two friends or the elderly. The warm tones introduced in the brass lighting and fixtures exude a cosy and inviting space, somewhere to escape to – a treat all in itself. Collectivus collectivus.com.au Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Living Moss Bros | Habitus Livingabc
Interiors

A New Opportunity

Every so often our children – seemingly out of nowhere – say something so spot on, so uncannily perceptive, that it sticks with us. Without worrying about what they’re about to say, how it will be received, and whether they can back it up, they simply express themselves. After a year and a half working with Kiran and Michael on their home in Sydney’s inner eastern suburbs, Matt Day of Day Bukh Architects visited the site with his [then] six year old daughter. “She said, ‘that looks like a dolls house, it’s beautiful,’” Matt recalls. “And the clients loved that so much they named the house after it.” Everyone wants to live in a beautiful home, but there was more than ‘pretty as a picture’ in the brief presented to Matt. Doll House | Habitus Living A connection to the garden and outdoors was in fact top of this list for these working professionals, who have since enjoyed coming home during the week and spending their weekends at home enjoying the light-filled interiors, or in and around the garden. “The site sloping downwards of over two metres from front to back meant a split level house was possible,” says Matt. As a result they were able to add the first floor with a second bathroom and two additional bedrooms (at the time they were not only planning a renovation but a family, too – now they have both). The new master bedroom upstairs boasts enviable views of the Sydney skyline to the north. Doll House | Habitus Living But it wasn’t north facing for the sole purpose of an amazing view. Kiran and Michael took this opportunity to fashion a home that was as passive as possible, with a reduced amount of energy consumption. “The living room and master bedroom are orientated to the north with highlight glazing to the east, for maximum solar penetration in winter, and to enhance cross ventilation,” says Matt. “The concrete slab of the living dining room acts as the thermal mass.” There are high levels of insulation in the home, various shading devices, FSC timber and natural (sisal) flooring on the upper level. There is a solar boosted hot water system and rainwater storage that is reused for flushing toilets and irrigation. There was also a big, client-driven push towards using hand made products and locally based craftsmen as well as re-using existing materials. Photography by Katherine Lu Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Living Doll House | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
Conversations

The Very Bearable Lightness Of Being

Walking around Milan, I got the feeling that some designers wanted to just disappear. At Nendo’s poetic Invisible Outlines installation in the bright white Jil Sander showroom, for instance, Oki Sato and his team had created a series of minimal tableaux bringing together 16 of their projects – each mise-en-scene an ode to dissolution. There was the Flow collection of coffee tables for Alias, each one apparently melting into its attendant bowl. Thirty different shaped Jellyfish vases made from ultra thin transparent silicon undulated in a tank of water, amorphous. The Border tables interrogate the fragmented contours of a room. “We tend to perceive the existence and positioning of objects by subconsciously following ‘outlines’, and by distinguishing the “inside and outside” of these contours,” says Oki. “This means that objects with obscure outlines cannot always be identified as objects, and conversely if outlines are visible, that information which is not visible can be subconsciously supplemented.” Invisible objects may not be about to take off at retail, but philosophically speaking, they’ll walk out the door. As design becomes a spectator sport set to take the place of fashion, Nendo seems to be bridling at being asked to merely make more ‘stuff’. Which is of course paradoxical, since the Tokyo studio is one of the most prolific on the planet. As graduates of the Design Academy Eindhoven, Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farrasin of Formafantasma are vehemently opposed to the ‘stuffness’ of much design practice. Their show of recent lighting designs at Spazio Krizia was a manifesto of the Very Bearable Lightness of Being. Ethereal, the designers’ skill is in making maximum impact with minimal gesture. They put that down to the fact that they “think about lighting and less about designing a lamp”. The new Blush lamp for FLOS is a wall- or ceiling-mounted devise that features a dichroic filter adhered to sheet of heat resistant borosilicate glass. This light-harvesting unit is suspended along a tensile aluminium wire, the effect of light passing through it positively circadian. Their other new light for FLOS, called WireRing is composed of a custom made belt-like electric cable and a ring that contains an LED strip. Looped, it is a swooping white line in space emanating a gentle glow. Konstantin Grcic strove to create lighting that was all but invisible by day, immaterial, coming alive only when illuminated at night. The result is his series of Noctambules (FLOS). The basic unit of the series is a simple cylinder, somewhat akin to a transistor tube: alone, it’s quite stoic– stacked it becomes totemic. Cup and cone shaped ‘shades’ allow for directional up- or down-lighting while effectively shading nothing – they’re totally transparent too. “My original concept was to create a column,” says Grcic, “it was only later that the transparency of glass came into play and then I decided I wanted the system to almost disappear, to cease to exist.” Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec’s Nesting Tables for Glas Italia, made from hewn slabs of glass, disappear inside one another. Meanwhile, the brothers’ Baleno shelving for Cassina designate the meerest traces in space. Unadorned, they’re just fine lines on a wall. Grcic’s Soft Props sofa, also for Cassina, is composed of a simple metal railing attached to a solid block base – cushions are free-form, indeed optional. For COS (a sub-brand of H&M) Azusa Murakami and Alexander Groves working under the banner Studio Swine created perhaps the most ethereal of presentations of this year’s Salone. Their “blossoming sculpture”, a kind of immaculate maypole, plopped wobbly drops of what seemed to be liquid but which burst into cloud-like puffs when touched. With nothing to take away except the memory of the experience, it was the most poetic – and least consumable – proposition at the Fair. invisible_outlines03_takumi_otaHero and above: Invisible Outlines by Nendo Blush-by-Formafantasma-(Flos) Blush by Formafantasma (Flos) Nesting Tables by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Glas Italia Nesting Tables by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Glas Italia Noctambule-lighting-by-Konstantin-Grcic-for-Flos2Noctambule lighting by Konstantin Grcic for Flos Noctambule lighting by Konstantin Grcic for Flos Baleno shelving by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Cassina Baleno shelving by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Cassinaabc
Interiors

Design Dissolves Barriers at Aesop

Situated among an eclectic neighbourhood of creative retailers, restaurants and galleries, Aesop’s new Gertrude Street store is something of a sensory relief. Imbued with muted tones and a pared-back approach to materials, the interior exudes a tranquil sensibility belying its proximity to a busy intersection. The new fit out presented Clare Cousins Architects a unique second opportunity to interpret the brand on site, after creating the initial design 10 years ago. “It was so great to be able to revisit the project,” says Clare Cousins. “So much has changed here in the last decade.” Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living In keeping with Aesop’s global presence, the revitalised Fitzroy store embodies the brand’s characteristic persona: contemplative, deeply considered and nuanced. Though understated, the design traverses a lot, conceptually speaking – expressing themes of nostalgia, restorative solitude and community within a relatively small footprint. Walls of slim line joinery showcase Aesop’s iconic bottles in a rhythmic fashion, with shelves and doors hand painted both inside and out. Faintly visible brushstrokes assert the value of skilled craftsmanship. Small knob handles reference the style of old terrace cabinetry – some of the oldest surviving examples of heritage housing in this era stand further up the street. Underpinning the design is the idea of threshold, and dissolving barriers. Here, the colour pink is used to abstract and elevate details of ordinary life: a rose-coloured pane of glass at the centre of the store gives a tinted view into the little courtyard garden beyond, while a small kitchenette to the rear is immersed in pastel pink. Artfully composed and decked in gorgeous salmon-hued marble, this space assumes the familiarity of a domestic kitchen, and acts as a casual sitting area for staff. Aesop aesop.com.au Clare Cousins Architects clarecousins.com.au Photography by Trevor Mein Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Living Aesop Fitzroy | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

The Epidemic Of ‘Stuff’ – Part #4

Handcrafted furniture and seasonless style aside, the most obvious antidote to too much stuff is less stuff. If you visit US online homewares store Piaule, you will find just two products under the category ‘Towel’; one is a hand towel and the other a bath towel in thin Japanese cotton. ‘Tableware’ is just one cup, one bowl, one plate. It's what The Future Laboratory are calling ‘anti-choice architecture’, a radical streamline of inventory at odds with the retail culture of volume shifting. It all boils down to what the minimalists have been practising for decades. Marie Kondo’s Spark Joy inspired my own mission to cull in the home, find the joy in what I have and value the handcrafted. Instead of following a relentless shopping instinct, I want to turn my focus back to what I’ve already collected. The scraps of vintage kimono silk, the 1950s souvenir dolls. Not quite what the minimalists had in mind. Minimalism is relevant again as we contend mass-consumption, and social media has given it a human voice this time around. Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus of The Minimalists blog and docu-film now have millions of followers, as does the Tiny House movement. More of us are throwing in the proverbial towel and going for that thin, 100 per cent cotton towel from Piaule instead. I take great comfort in this collective response that is powered by people fed up with relying on government for change. But while I’m happy to steer clear of cheap homewares and ‘on-trend’ advice, my living room will never look like Joshua Fields Milburn’s. I wear sequins to school pick-ups, for God’s sake. So I’m calling myself ‘minimalish’. The half-made pom-pom garland I strung in between contractions while in early labour with my second daughter still hangs beneath a mantelpiece and makes me very happy. When I think who would fight in my corner of excessive decoration I think of artist Kate Rohde. Her works are Rococo-inspired and a mad mix of coloured paint and resin; maximalism to the max. She titled her 2013 collection Ornament Crimes in reference to the Adolf Loos Bauhaus essay Ornament as Crime, written at the advent of the Modernist era. But even Kate says she’s “very unsentimental about keeping things”. “I'd say rather than the Kondo ‘does it spark joy’ philosophy, I ask is it still useful to me?” Her own creativity is expressed through her work, while my (lesser version of) creativity manifests itself in the vignettes of bric-à-brac I group around my mantels. We can’t all let loose in a resin-splattered studio. It helps me to know that Marie Kondo, who also wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, owns 19 sets of chopstick rests and advocates decorating your home with baubles and tchotchkes. Ornament and art are functional in the home if their function is to assure daily happiness. Art curator Juliet Rosser founded Platform72 based on a belief that “life is better with art”. “People are sick of ‘stuff’,” she tells me. “Things they have accumulated that have no soul, no meaning, no story to the owner.” For her there’s an interesting intersection between the notion of luxury and arts and crafts. “What is more luxurious than something made with the hands, heart and soul of another human being? I know I would prefer to live in a home where I engage with most items.” Artist Hannah Bertram says ornament “simultaneously adds value and is functionally superfluous”. Interestingly, Hannah Bertram’s work is the ultimate in ephemeral art. She uses stencils to create intricate installations in dust. The temporary nature of her work is its point; it honours the passing of time. She links this idea to the Japanese philosophy of wabi sabi; the acceptance of growth, decay and death as an integral part of living. So what of the decaying stuff you just can’t bear to bin? I always think of my friend Myles, the fine furniture maker who stitched a plastic high-chair tray with copper wire. I need to hold on to my utopian dream of reformed industries around the repair services – more tailors, re-upholsterers, cracked-plastics specialists to call upon. Maybe someone is already collecting brittle screws intent on saving a few shelves from a premature end. Myles tells me that those who know how to repair and see value in materials and objects that others don’t – a spark plug here or a fuel filter there – would appear to be terrible hoarders. Decluttering is a symbolic gesture, but better than binning is investing time or money into repairing what we can. I fantasize about leaving my children’s broken doll’s house furniture on a street corner somewhere for a lucky child’s clever grandpa to find and fix. When a consequence of capitalism is that even some high-end brands have fallen prey to cost-cutting, one of the few surviving definitions of luxury is rarity – and the rarest commodity of this age is time. The time it took Myles Gostelow to carve minute details into each corner of my table, the time it took Hannah Bertram to create an artwork in dust that she knew could be blown away in seconds. “We predict a polarisation between the ‘wants’ and the ‘want nots,’” explains Future Lab’s Chris Anderson. “How we all grapple with the complications of 21st-century living will increasingly be divided along civic and ethical lines.” The millions of new subscribers to anti-consumption values shows a definite veer off the dangerous highway; some of us are minimising, some unplugging, downsizing and some advocating slow making. We can’t necessarily realise utopian dreams in our lifetimes but we can think twice about that cheap coffee table. Words by Joanne Gambaleabc
Interiors

The Step Down House

The Step Down House by Bijl Architecture has connected the property’s expansive outdoor space by situating the new addition at a slightly lower, stepped down floor level. The original Federation 1910s dwelling has been renovated at the front, retaining the general room layout and refurbishing existing architectural features such as decorative timber posts and verandah fretwork, timber shingles above the front window and leadlight stained glass windows. 150611-Step-Down-House-1000LR At the rear, the existing, poorly lit lean-to 1970s addition has been demolished, replaced with a new kitchen, dining and living area that opens up to a wide covered deck. The original hallway broadens to connect the old and the new, becoming the hinging point of the house, fanning out into a generous open-plan living space. 150611-Step-Down-House-0812LR Whitewashed Tasmanian Oak was chosen for the flooring, lending a Scandinavian edge to the house, while bi-fold doors open the room completely to the outdoor timber deck, grass and pool beyond. A clean, minimal approach has been taken to the design, with the wide parapet and door elements emphasising the horizontal plane, while skylights in the decking roof create three visual punctuation marks. 150611-Step-Down-House-0542LR At the side of the house, the new black bricks and existing light brown bricks are arranged in an artful mosaic-like placement, repeated in the external laundry steps that form the meeting point of the existing house and the extension. 150611-Step-Down-House-1111LR Inside, a long letterbox window has been used in place of a kitchen splashback, wrapping the corner of the room and carrying its slot-like proportions through the living and dining room windows to bring in welcomed light and reinforce a sense of simplicity. Photography by Peter Bennetts Bijl Architecture bijlarchitecture.com.au   150611-Step-Down-House-1023LR 150611-Step-Down-House-0851LR 150611-Step-Down-House-0403LR 150611-Step-Down-House-0202LR 150611-Step-Down-House-0190LR 150611-Step-Down-House-0033LRabc
Design Hunters
Conversations

In Conversation With… Emilie Delalande

You were born and raised in the countryside outside of Paris, and today you’re a Sydney-based interior designer. How does your background inform your practice? I grew up on an old farm with a lot of history. Stone walls, solid timber windows and doors, terracotta tiles on the floor with a big dip in front of the entry door – so many people had walked on them over the centuries. Brass door handles that left this metallic smell on your hands for hours. As a little girl, I spent hours walking around the farm, building cabins and making things in my dad's workshop. Where did you study design, and how did you come to be in Australia? While I was studying interior architecture and set design in Paris, I did an internship with Jacques Grange. One of his clients was Australian and I put out the word that I was interested in coming here to do a two-month internship. That lead me to SJB and the two months have turned into eight years. I completed an advanced diploma in interior design and a bachelor of interior design at TAFE Enmore before joining Akin Creative. That’s where my passion for hospitality really started, working closely with Kelvin Ho and Justin Hemmes on Merivale venues including Papi Chulo, Coogee Pavilion, The Paddington and the Newport Arms. Tell me about Etic, the core ideas at the heart of the studio? Etic was created to explore design in many different ways. While hospitality is the studio's main focus, retail, residential, event and even industrial design are areas that interest me. To me, getting to know and understanding my clients is the most thrilling part of the project. "Etic" comes from the anthropology term describing a way of analysing a society from the outside so the human factor is at the centre of everything. What are you working on at the moment? I have designed a bbq in collaboration with Robert Plumb which will be shown at Denfair in June. It is exciting as it is the first project of this kind for me. I am just starting on the new Lee Mathews store in Brighton due to open in July. It is great to be able to work with the same client again. Another project I am thrilled about is a collaboration with Solotel on their new Barangaroo venue. It is the first hospitality project of this scale for Etic. Also florist stores for Hermetica in Darlinghurst and Poho in Potts Point. What are some of the major difficulties of being a young design studio and how do you resolve them? Having to juggle between the realities of running a studio (administrative, financial, etc.) and managing to remain creative despite that. I have found great support in some of my peers and to a greater extent in friends who have started their own business. You seem to be most drawn to the hospitality sector, why is that? I’m French, I love to eat! I come from a family of "bons vivants". Meals have always been an important part of my life. It was always a happy and social moment, when there wasn't the traditional French heated argument over lunch. Getting together with friends for a meal – minus the arguments – is still one of the most satisfying moments for me. So it feels really natural to design restaurants and bars. What is your five-year plan for Etic? More collaborations! With great clients but also with other designers and creatives. The studio is open to any challenge. More hospitality projects and retail are on top of the list. Emilie Delalande was In Conversation with... Stephen Todd Portrait by Wesley Nelabc
Architecture
Around The World

Mrs Sippy moves to Bali

When the outside world is already so glorious it seems almost rude to cut through it with harsh, unnatural form. Mrs Sippy Bali, a new Balinese restaurant and bar, by contrast frames the exterior world, brings it into focus, and transforms it into stand-alone artefacts of beauty. A favourite night spot in Sydney’s Double Bay, co-owners Andrew Stanway and Ben May have expanded the name to Seminyak, a beach at the southern end of Bali, in what is due to be the next luxury venue for Bali’s celebrated frivolity. Reaching out to Akin Creative for the design, both Andrew and Ben sought to emulate and build on the existing colour, energy and ebullience of the location. “It’s not about us, it’s about Bali, said Andrew. “It’s about what is here already, and what has made Bali such an amazing place. We are not trying to reinvent the wheel, we just want the wheel to keep on turning.” Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living The wobbled bone-like curvature on the main saltwater pool and attached diving pool create a salient centrepiece. The cemented separation of each gradients to rise and fall as though sand in a shallow ocean pull, crafted by currents. Daybeds cradle the soft contours of the pool, abandoning the strict side-by-side formation to suggest the seeping movement of a natural lagoon. Mediterranean-style architecture seemingly protrudes from the calm of the water with curving whitewashed stairs cutting out geometric silhouettes in the natural landscape. Following a minimal colour palette that borrows from local stone, timber and brick creates a soft and clean canvas. The pool is transformed into a bed of pure white sand while the surrounding low sitting stools proudly site their veining timber, exuding a naturalness that melds the space into its surrounding locale. This focus on tonal, calming materials delineates the greenery beyond and, no doubt, attempts to soften the space when adorning a mass of patterned bikini-clad bodies. Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living The pearlescent whites are offset from the strong inclusion of timber in the furniture, heavy exposed beams and stick roof shading enclosing the pool-side bar. Reminiscent to the three little pigs, this overhead feature of rough-cut local timber branches emits an excess of light and air without visually disturbing the raw edges followed throughout the space. Accents of vibrant foliage and exotic fruits decorate the space, where the rough texture and angular shape is reconsidered as a piece of art that needs no further embellishment. The underpinning ethos for Mrs Sippy Bali is keeping things simple and paired-back, as though it not a man-made structure at all. And this is because, as Andrew described, “it’s just about fun, that’s our core value. It’s about everyone having a great time with music, food, drinks and one of the best pools in Bali.” The space is a backdrop that aims to enhance and guide the experience, not overwhelm. Mrs Sippy Bali mrssippybali.com Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Living Mrs Sippy Bali | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

A New Kind of Court House

Nestled into the fold of a ridge in coastal Aireys Inlet, Victoria, the Court House is designed as an homage to the dry-coloured scrub that it encircles. True to the tale of retirement, the house comes to symbolise the moving back to nature, stepping away from excessive ornament, to encourage instead contemplation and commune. After much deliberation between the architect, Peter Winkler Architects, and home owners, the conceptual understanding of the entrance came to realise a home that is built for a couple while creating also the perennial hub for visits from faraway family. The courtyard centres the house; it is where you arrive, are greeted, and provided the link between the two pavilions of the house. Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living The house is segmented into two wings: a public wing in which family and friends are encouraged (through an open plan design) to congregate together; and the private wing containing the bedrooms, bathrooms and study spaces. These two wings intertwine via the central courtyard, protecting it in turn from the harsh whip of the oceanic winds. This courtyard can be closed off at either or both ends for protection from the rain and wind and to help stabilise thermal heating within the house, opening up through carefully positioned windows and doors to allow cooling airflow and ventilation. In winter, a wood boiler within the courtyard is activated to simultaneously warm both wings of the house via a hydronic panel system. Visually, the house is a showcase of different textures and colours. Recycled Australian blackbutt is used throughout the internal and external faces of the house, accented with Australian white mahogany cladding. Hoop pine plywood walls were also applied creating a visual reference and cohesion to the stand out hoop pine desk and contrast the blackbutt used throughout. Court House | Habitus Living While the homeowners were inspired by their love of timber, they opted to veer away from more ordinary building materials such as plaster to create a truly crafted and original structure. Cement sheet is applied for its raw, deconstructed appeal, while polished concrete flooring promoted a sheen that amplified reflected light and lowered the house’s eco foot print through its thermal mass properties. The conceptual significance of the entrance – to invite and embrace – informs the design of the house. The emphasis is on the salient central courtyard, drawing you into the house. Sections can be closed off to offer clean, minimal spaces or alternatively unfold to create nooks and retreats. And while the house is designed to accommodate two people it is also able to stretch out and welcome in the pilgrimage of both friends and family. Peter Winkler Architects peterwinklerarchitect.com.au Photography by Jack Lovel Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living Court House | Habitus Living  abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Think Cold is Just Cold? Guess Again!

There’s more to food preservation than simply keeping food cold. With Sub-Zero’s range of built-in refrigeration products, guarding freshness is a breeze. The designer refrigeration products address the three pillars of food preservation: temperature control, proper humidity, and purified air. Sub-Zero’s built-in refrigeration models incorporate this leading technology with the unmistakeable elements that make for great design – handsome lines, distinctive grille, sleek hinges – everything the modern design lover is after. The 1067mm Sub-Zero French door refrigerator/freezer is the latest addition to the renowned Sub-Zero line of built-in refrigeration. The two refrigerator doors allow for more open-door access, a benefit for small kitchens, or where space is an issue while still providing a generous 420L refrigerator capacity. In addition, the spacious 220L freezer drawer provides ample storage space for frozen foods. Sub-Zero refrigeration couples outstanding design with a unique food preservation system engineered, built and tested to perform like no other. Dual refrigeration provides the ideal humid yet chilly conditions for fresh foods, along with dry, frigid air for frozen foods. A NASA-inspired air purification system scrubs the air of ethylene gas, bacteria, mould and viruses. Bright LED lighting illuminates the interior, and a discreet internal water dispenser provides up to 1 L of chilled, filtered water at a time without disturbing the seamless design of your kitchen. An advanced water filtration system significantly reduces contaminants while preserving water's fresh, clean taste. The fridges are available in stainless steel, with your choice of pro or tubular handle styles to coordinate with Wolf cooking equipment. subzero-wolf.com.au ICBBI-36UFD_ICBWS-30S_1100x730@72abc
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Furniture
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Looking Back on Milan: A Top 10 From Cult

1.-Lightyears---Suspence-Pendant-in-Copper From Lightyears comes the Suspence Pendant in Copper: Designed by GamFratesi, the Suspence lamp series is all about translating movement into physical shapes. In copper, the pulling shape of the lamp is given a eye catching and warm aesthetic.   2.-Magis---Officina-now-upholstered The Officina collection, from Magis sees the creative language of forged iron pushed to new heights. Following on from the tables, chair, stools and accessories of the range, a voluminous upholstered lounge chair, ottoman and sofa were introduced in Milan.   3.-Bilgola-by-Adam-Goodrum-for-NAU-at-Local-Milan-Installation Preview of Bilgola by Adam Goodrum for NAU: NAU is a new contemporary Australian design brand by Cult, offering furniture, lighting and accessories by a collective of Australia’s most curious, talented and spirited designers. Before the international and local launches of NAU at ICFF and DENFAIR, the new Bilgola collection by Adam Goodrum for NAU was previewed at the Local Milan exhibition. Inspired by the Australian modernist architecture prevalent on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Bilgola is a lightweight collection of furniture that includes a lounge chair, coffee table, dining table & chair, dining bench and daybed.   4.-Montana---Limited-Edition-Panton-Wirein-Gold1 Montana’s limited edition Panton Wire: Paying tribute to Danish designer Verner Panton, the Panton Wire range is expanded with a limited edition gold finish. Raw yet elegant, light yet industrial; the Panton Wire units can be used individually or in combination.   5.-Zanotta---New-Hotelroyal-Bed,-Taschino-Night-Table-and-Judy-Armchair The new Hotelroyal bed from Zanotta, designed by Terri Pecora, comes with graphite or white painted steel frame and feet, and upholstered headboard and footboard. Also pictured is the new Taschino Night Stand and Judy Armchair.   6.-Anglepoise---New-Ceramic-Finish-for-1227-Collection Anglepoise’s new ceramic finish option for the 1227 Collection: The new 4-piece Ceramic Collection exudes simplicity and elegance. The glossy smoothness of the pure bone china shade is complemented by smart, chrome-plated fittings. When the light source is switched on, the white gloss-finished shades turn translucent   7.-Louis-Poulsen---New-YUH-Collection-by-GamFratesi3 The YUH Collection from GamFratesi: For the first time in eight years, Louis Poulsen returned to Salone del Mobile with the launch of the YUH collection. A flexible lamp - which comes in floor, wall and table styles - the most essential feature of the light is that it is personal, being able to rotate, rise and lower.   8.-Fritz-Hansen---New-Lune-Sofa-by-Jaime-Hayon1 Fritz Hansen’s New Lune Sofa, designed by Jaime Hayon, is a new modular sofa that does away with traditional modular conventions. Lune is based on curvy design philosophies, making it quite distinct from other modular sofas. The bold design looks and feels like a conventional sofa but offers the versatility of a modular construction.   9.-Carl-Hansen-and-Son---New-Rocking-Nest-Chair-by-Anker-Bak Carl Hansen and Son launched the new Rocking Nest Chair, by Anker Bak. For this year’s Milan Furniture Fair, Carl Hansen & Søn created an apartment that explored the way we translate the house we live in into our home and the new Rocking Nest Chair by Anker Bak was a highlight of the space.   12.-Magis---New-Sequoia-sools-by-Anderssen&Voll Sequoia by Anderssen & Voll for Magis is a footstool of colourful and contemporary design, made of steel coated polyester in a variety of colours It has a comfortable footrest, round base with tubular steel and the seat saddle-shaped. All these and more are available from Cult. Cult cultdesign.com.auabc