About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

Happenings
What's On

IFFS: At The Forefront Of Design’s Own Big Bang Moment

Since 1981, the International Furniture Fair, Singapore (IFFS), has flourished into one of the region’s essential design events. Held in conjunction with the ASEAN Furniture Show and Nook Asia, the IFFS has moulded a reputation as the premiere marketplace for inquiring minds and acute craftsmanship. And again, the IFFS 2018 program promises no less. With an enduring focus on innovation, new technologies knit through the various exhibitions of the show to hammer down the eternally evolving nature of the contemporary design industry. The fair will return with offerings in lighting, furniture, interiors, fittings and accessories from exhibitors coming in from over 30 unique nations. New to 2018, however, is the introduction of an augmented reality zone. Here, the forefront of design technology will be revealed, allowing for visitors to enjoy unprecedented access to the exhibitor’s collections. Augmented reality will effectively expand the showroom beyond its physical parameters to hold an almost limitless range of pieces to explore. Growing not only in terms of technological innovation, in 2018 the IFFS will debut three new national pavilions for Portugal, Spain and Turkey. Each pavilion will offer an authentic exposé of the country’s unique character, as expressed in furniture, lighting, textiles and decorative accessories. The world of design is teetering at the edge of its own big bang moment. Thanks to globalisation, every pocket of design can be offered up to an expanding and far-reaching audience. And now, through technological innovation, not only the physical universe but also the cyber universe is unfurling before us. And through events alike the IFFS, we are able to access and experience spaces never before thought possible. Words by Ella McDougall Internation Furniture Fair Singapore 2018 Internation Furniture Fair Singapore 2018 Internation Furniture Fair Singapore 2018 Internation Furniture Fair Singapore 2018abc
Happenings
What's On

What To Expect From The Sydney Indesign LiveLife Talks

The Habitus LiveLife Design Hunter Series looks to better existing practices within the residential architecture and design sphere. It seeks to do so through panel discussions and interactive Q&A sessions. The discussions will be held between senior members of the editorial team, industry heavyweights, and emerging trailblazers. Current practices and design solutions are discussed – their pros and cons – as well as postulating alternatives that build on existing solutions in response to deficiencies and flaws.

What's up for Discussion?

Design Identities Of Australia: Communities In Design Across Australia, the Indigenous design community is leading the charge for reconsidering the role design plays in expressing individual and communal identity. more info

Size And The City: Our Developers Have Some Explaining To Do Small living, slow living, low density or high sprawl: where does the urban planner fit within the A+D community? And what can we learn from case studies from around the world? more info

Talking About Your Generation: Intergenerational Co-Habiting And Residential Design How can we re-think the residential environment to accommodate the multiple needs of many generations in a single domicile? more info

Reserve your seats now.

Who’s Heading Up These Design Discussions?

HollyCunneen-AliceBlackwood-2

Holly Cunneen, Deputy Editor of Habitus Holly focuses her time and professional output toward writing, researching and editing bespoke editorial content about architecture and design, particularly within our local Asia Pacific region. With a firm view that “design has a shared responsibility to the individual as much as it does to the wider community,” her personal and professional trajectory sees her chart the interests, accomplishments, hypocrisies, crises and triumphs of the A+D community.

Alice Blackwood, Co-Editor of Indesign Alice is a recognised thought-leader in the Australian A+D community. From her base in Melbourne her presence, reach and influence extends across the Asia Pacfic region. As the former Editor of DQ, and now the Co-Editor of Indesign, it was in her formative years that she found her love of design and writing: “somewhere between childhood pottery classes and high school English assignments”.

With special thanks to our speakers and session hosts:

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While you’re in the area don’t forget to stop by the following showrooms: each keen purveyors of cutting edge, contemporary design.

SAVAGE DESIGN Savage Design specialise in creating premium products that live across a range of commercial, retail and residential addresses. Uniquely Australian – in style, make and ownership – Savage Design develops the relationship of design and manufacture to build unique products. Brass-and-grey-shoot-3

ABEY Featuring over 56 years of experience in design, innovation and quality, Abey Australia is an industry leader offering a range of more than 3,000 premium and designer Kitchen, Basin Taps and Sinkware products. SBPhoto_Abey-Showroom_43

CORIAN AUSTRALIA BY CASF Corian Australia by CASF has specialised in decorative surfacing materials since 1998, including the original solid surface brand DuPont Corian. Corian-Grey-Onyx-backlit

And more: Abalos, Ajar, Axolotl, Café Culture + Insitu, CDK Stone, Dessein, Didier, Earp, LightCo, Made by PEN, MAFI by Woodos, SeehoSu, So Watt, Special Lights, Think Dzign, Winspear Group, Zip...

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Architecture
Homes

Savour Patisserie Hits The Sweet Spot

The visual appeal of sweets – oozing éclairs and matted chocolate moose – tug hard on our emotional core; digging up fond reminders of youth, when colour ran free and we could eat whatever we wanted. Savour patisserie takes a sugar-smeared spoon to unearth these feelings; amping up the fun with their new store in Westfield Chermside, Queensland. Although, ‘fun’ in this case, doesn’t count Savour in with the other many sweet stores as they emit a glare of toothache inducing colour and wackiness. Multidisciplinary design studio Collectivus appreciates that the delicious goods from Savour – the signature éclairs in particular – should be the visual hero piece within the store. The interior pays its respects to the patisseries of France and wider Europe, rejuvenating the revered old-world elegance in a refreshingly clean and minimal space. Collectivus masterly balance bold splashes of colour – an ink blue front counter and 3D yellow disc wall features for example – with white Corian bench tops and white painted walls. The resulting space is free spirited and vibrant, while keeping a restrained sense of glamour and sophistication. Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside Savour prides itself on the creativity of its cakes, recreating long-loved classics in updated and unexpected colours. Collectivus drew on the decoration of these cakes, extending this onto the ceiling in pendant-like, drop down dashes of colour that seemingly paint onto the interior scape alike the top of an éclair. Veering from the traditional canon of patisseries, towards a clean and contemporary look, allows for Savour to visually delineate the cakes and – more importantly – the feelings and emotions that they bring out of us. Collectivus collectivus.work Words by Ella McDougall Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside interior Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside interior Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermside Savour Patisserie Westfield Chermsideabc
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Design Hunters
Conversations

In Conversation With… Naomi Milgrom

Naomi, how was the experience of being Commissioner of this year's Australian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale? Incredible. I just loved working with Tracey Moffatt. It took almost eighteen months to put the show together and it was such a privilege to not only work with her but to become her friend. We've had so much positive feedback, we're still getting between 1,500 to 2,000 visitors a day. The Biennale bookshop has sold out of our publication. Had you known Tracey long? I had met her on many occasions over the years, but I didn't know her well. This process has brought us close together. She really seized the opportunity. People had said, “Oh, Tracey should have been at Venice before now”. But I think it was her moment. And it was our moment to work together. Obviously, you're an avid art collector but what did you get out of being Commissioner of the Australian Pavilion? Honestly, it was such a great honour, an enormous joy. I never imagined that as Commissioner you could work so closely with the artist. You have also propagated a close working relationship with Rem Koolhaas. Yes, the relationship with Rem but also with David Gianotten (Managing Partner-Architect of OMA) goes back quite some time. As a retailer I was very inspired by Rem's vision for the Prada store in the downtown Guggenheim building in SoHo, New York. It was such a unique take on what a retail environment could be, something no one had ever thought of before. I began working with OMA some time ago and when I launched the MPavilion program I always had in mind to invite Rem and David and the team at OMA to create the last one in the series of four. It somehow seems as if the three preceding pavilions – by Sean Godsell, then Amanda Levete, then Bijoy Jain – have been leading up to OMA's pavilion. You know, when I asked OMA if they would accept the commission to do it, they leapt at the opportunity. In the context of their massive building portfolio it is a small building, but they've taken to it with such verve. They seem to love the challenge of working on a small, experimental structure that is very much about what goes on inside and around it. I was really determined to complete the series of MPavilions with an architect who had contributed enormously to current thinking on architecture and the built environment generally. I had the pleasure of visiting OMA team and Rem at their Rotterdam offices recently, it is extraordinary. The entire ground floor is this bunker-like structure absolutely filled with architectural models. I'd never seen anything like it, the model-making facilities are incredible. Next Thursday (27.07) the Naomi Milgrom Foundation is hosting the Living Cities Forum at Melbourne's Federation Square. The lineup of international speakers – including David Gianotten, the V&A's curator of Architecture & Urbanism, a Pritzker jurist, a L.A. urbanism critic – is judicious rather than glitzy. Has the Living Cities Forum grown out of the MPavilion program, or is it an entirely different beast? The Living Cities Forum has definitely grown out of the MPavilion program. Melbourne is often referred to as the world's most liveable city, but what makes it the world's most liveable city? How is it going to handle the expansion of its population to eight million people by 2051. How are we going to maintain the grain that makes it such a liveable city? These questions were raised by Jan Gehl in conversation with Rob Adams at an MPavilion discussion last year. That conversation started me thinking that we should be able to bring together thinkers and practitioners from around the world to continue the conversation about what actually makes a city a place where the citizens can lead a healthy, productive and prosperous life. This summer’s MPavilion is the last in the series. I can't believe you're just going to stop there, surely you've something up your sleeve? Yes, I'm going to make an announcement at the Living Cities Forum next week.* So I have to wait til then? You do. Naomi Milgrom was In Conversation With... Stephen Todd

*The announcement we – and the wider A+D community – patiently, if eagerly, awaited has come and MPavilion has announced a two-year extension until 2019.

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Happenings
What's On

10 Reasons to Join Us at Sydney Indesign

  1 - The Biggest Brands ray_lounge_9243_9241_9247 Join us in getting up close and personal with more than 300 of the world’s leading design brands including some of our favourites: Abey, Active Locker, Alternative Surfaces, Axolotl, Blu Dot, Briggs Veneers, CBS, Corian, Corradi, Denis Abalos, Earp Bros, Europanel, Folioworks, INDE Studio, Interface, Interstudio, Lamicolor, LightCo, NL Curated – Dutch Design Hub, Premium Floors, Rensons, Seehosu, Signature Floors, Special Lights, Stormtech, Sunbrella, Winspear, Woodos, Zenith and many more…   2 - The Best Locations 20130817_SID_1139 With so much to see and do, we’re making it easier than ever for you to get around and soak in all the greatest that SID17 has to offer! With free hop-on-hop-off buses operating all day on Saturday, you’ll be able to travel in style between 15 exclusive showrooms and studio destinations as well as exciting pop-ups across Alexandria and Waterloo.   3 - Put Your Design Knowledge to the Test MiD_20160812_FSP_3589 Learn about the latest innovations and products taking the A+D community by storm, and put your design knowledge to the test at our WorkLife and LiveLife seminar series. With an impressive lineup of local and international guest speakers, you’ll have the chance to rub shoulders with tomorrow’s movers-and-shakers in A+D.   4 - Up Late In Design 20130815_SID_264 But don’t get too comfortable because we’re not even halfway through yet. Stick around SID17 well into Friday night for SID Up Late. Up Late celebrates a fusion of interior design, architecture, culture, art, lighting, music, food, drink & entertainment as well as the launch of Purchase/specify available during Sydney Indesign.   5 - The Most Creative FSP_seehosu_20130816_080 Those products you know and love are finding new and creative applications thanks to some of this country’s most creative names. Visit various showrooms and pop-ups at SID17 to see how the likes of Tom Fereday, Group GSA, The Bold Collective, Don Cameron, ACME & Co, Zunica Design (and many more) reinterpret classic design objects into incredible installations for The Project.   6 - The Biggest Names Screen-Shot-2017-07-19-at-2.33.48-PM Whether across the globe or just next door, some of the biggest names in A+D are flocking to Sydney for SID17. Meet some of the most influential thought-leaders from, Europe, the United States and Asia, and get up close and personal with the future of our vibrant industry.   7 - Catch Up With the Locals INDESIGN_SAT15-965 The most recognisable names in Australian A+D will be out in full force at SID17. Be sure to visit Pioneer to see the latest in Australian design, manufacture and innovation with the likes of Abalos, Axolotl, INDEStudio, TIRRAR and more.   8 - Cut Corners (the right way!) at Work ray_konferenz_9206A_torro_ral9016fs_weiss_Loc_013 Thanks to our generous exhibitors, we’ve got a HUGE collection of offers available launching at Up Late on Friday 11th for Purchase/Specify. Simply visit participating showrooms and pop ups to learn about the latest products and snap up an exclusive offer for yourself for the year ahead.   9 - Meet Your Community PBL_Corporate_000266_130706_401 Everyone who is ANYone is out and about for SID17. Whether getting down and dirty on the d-floor at the Official Wrap Party, or checking out the latest designs across our SID precincts, you’ll be able to shake hands with all the novices and veterans who make up this creative and diverse industry.   10 - Sit Back, Relax, As You Enjoy over $10,000 Worth of Prizes field-lounge-chair-3-4_nv_field-lounge-chair-edwards-navy Thanks to our amazing exhibitors, you can be in the running to receive over $10,000 worth of incredible designer products hot off the factory floor.   #SID17: The global design story. Leading-edge ideas. Game-changing designs. Front-line quality. Sydney Indesign indesigntheevent.com/sydney  abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Sacrificing Function For Form? Never Again!

Design hunter inspired inside and out, the Gaggenau 400 series dishwasher is perfect solution for the contemporary kitchen. Treat your crockery to the dishwasher they deserve, because design lovers know, there's no such thing as"just a dish" These are precious, fragile objects; carefully protected for decades and often holding memories more than food. And as with truly great cooking, modern tableware proudly shows off the handcrafted techniques used to create it. Why should you give these objects less cleaning attention than they deserve? Gaggenau dishwashers sit seamlessly in the modern kitchen, featuring all the little, and not so little, touches you'd expect from the legendary brand. A gentle nudge opens the handle-free door via an advanced push-to-open system, while smooth running rails and soft-close all work together to provide a seamless user experience. The Gaggenau 400 series is designed to cushion even crystal-stemmed glasses and porcelain, deceiving you into thinking you are doing something far more special than merely loading the dishwasher. Liberal with space, yet powerful and quick to wash, the dishwashers in the 400 series also dry the dishes and glasses at great speed, using intelligent Zeolite technology. This advanced technology help the 400 series dishwashers achieve both an optimal energy rating, and an ideal drying performance. Zeolite itself is an eco-friendly mineral that actually absorbs moisture while it releases heat - with this driving the washing and drying processes, the washing and drying of a full load takes less than hour. With a plethora of wash options, flexible basket systems, a clever long stemmed glass holder and a Gastronorm pan insert, the 400 series delivers on its goal of the all-in-one. The groundbreaking backlighting concept is a unique flourish for the dishwashers in the 400 series, presenting your dishes more beautifully, and providing a functional feature when unpacking after a late night meal. This innovative lighting concept is a world-first that shines from within, revealing the carefully cleaned contents. This new design uses six LED panels, housed within the back wall of the washer, lighting up at the same time as the two top front LED lights, perfectly illuminating the entire interior from every angle. The 400 series perfectly embodies the Gaggenau design philosophy of the Traditional Avant-Garde – a juxtaposing sphere of design where timeless craftsmanship meets innovative design, and where function and form work in harmony. To learn more visit gaggenau.com/auabc
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Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Insights and Innovations From The World’s Leading Bathroom Fair

We’re living in a technological world with new, advanced possibilities being achieved every day in the world of bathroom design. This year at ISH in Frankfurt, the world’s leading bathroom fair saw technology take centre stage in the design of contemporary bathroom elegance. It’s an exciting time to care about bathroom and washroom design, whether you’re a designer or simply a design savvy consumer. A real highlight of the show this year was the presentation from Laufen, who continue to take ceramics and sanitaryware to a new level of design and functionality, thanks to the revolutionary SaphirKeramik material. “I believe that in future SaphirKeramik will redefine how ceramic sanitaryware is designed,” muses Toan Nguyen, one of the talented designers in Laufen’s cohort. “It’s just the beginning of a process – like the trailer for a complete movie we’ll see later.” Utilising this materiality with impossibly fine edges and simple architectural lines are the Val and Ino ranges, exciting new additions to the Australian market. Val, crafted in collaboration with Konstantin Grcic, is a stunningly simple range of washbasins, bowls, trays baths and furniture – each featuring the trademark straight, geometric walls that characterise the delicate form of SaphirKeramik. Ino, by the aforementioned Toan Nguyen, is articulated as a fresh interpretation of washbasin forms. Another memorable showing at ISH 2017 games from Grohe. Having spent the better part of the last century leading the world in water technology, it’s no surprise the brand was continuing to impress. Now exclusively available through Reece, the brand boasts a variety of tapware and showerheads from their traditional Grandera, Concetto, and Essence ranges, as well as contemporary sharpness in the Lineare and Allure ranges. You can see more highlights from the Grohe and Laufen brands, and explore more innovations in the bathroom space at Reece.   AP01_LAUFEN_VAL_29_TF_Press essence-new--ZZH_T23486A02_000_01_no-pop-up_small ZZH_T27664Y02_007_01abc
Design Products
Furniture

Elliat Rich Wins AFDA 2017

‘Place’ from Elliat Rich is a dainty oddity. Finely resolved timber pieces in soft stained colours fit together as a handcrafted jigsaw puzzle. Each segment scrutinised by hand to hook-in and intertwine into the greater body of the piece. Held up to the judging panel, Place won Elliat first prize in the Australian Furniture Design Awards (AFDA) 2017. The awards are hosted by Adelaide not-for-profit design studio JamFactory and Australian-founded luxury furniture retailer Stylecraft. And together, they divulge the glorious minds of Australia’s far-reaching design community. Based in Alice Spring, Elliat drew on her experience driving across the enduring Central Australian landscape in the creation of Place. The judging panel, consisting of JamFactory Creative Director, Jon Goulder; Stylecraft Brand Director, Tony Russell; Curator of Decorative Arts with the Art Gallery of South Australia, Rebecca Evans; Habitus Guest Feature Editor and Design Editor for the Australian Financial Review, Stephen Todd; and Practice Director for Carr Design Group, Susan Standring, were impressed by the conceptual foundation that supported Elliat’s work. Elliat-Rich_Photo-Andre-Castellucci Described as a “sculptural vanity”, Place is an old-fashioned object d’art that evokes the grace and joy of the female ritual. The piece consists of a concealed drawer, formed out of stacked and coloured dowel, which creates a graphic confetti-style collage from the front view. Place also features a curvaceous, and removable, storage unit and velvet-covered pivoting mirror, all perched atop light timber legs. “AFDA is an award with a huge amount of integrity and one that stands alone in the Australian design industry,” says Elliat. “I am really excited that this is just the beginning of such an amazing opportunity that will continue to roll out over the next few years and beyond.” Elliat received a cash reward of $20,000 as well as the opportunity to undertake a residency in JamFactory’s furniture studio. Here Elliat will be able to develop new work to go into production for Stylecraft throughout Australia and Singapore. Further, Place will be on show as a part of the Art Gallery of South Australia’s permanent collection. Words by Ella McDougall ERich_Place_2017-side.etc_Photo-Noel-Mclaughlin ERich_Place_2017-mirror-Photo-Noel-Mclaughlin ERich_Place_2017-drawer-Photo-Noel-Mclaughlin2 Elliat-Rich-Brain-Parkes_Photo-Andre-Castellucciabc
Architecture
Homes

An Elegant Rethink Of Communal Living

Share housing might be deeply entrenched in memories of a living standard some of us would sooner forget. But the essence of living together in a space designed to encourage the sharing of time, spaces and facilities is altogether a positive and nourishing means of living. That explains why some prefer to live en masse in retirement villages and how apartment blocks often evolve into microcosms of community. We like to be alone, but we also like to be together. And when populations abandon the village to flock towards an often inhuman-scale city, holding on to some element of that neighbourhood structure – even one so small as contained within the same property – that can only be good for us. This is the understanding that informed the design of and renovation to an existing Edwardian terrace from Foomann Architects. An emphasis of the communal was inherent to the site from the very beginning. The architects are long-standing friends with the soon-to-be occupants, who rallied together artists and furniture-maker friends to collectively advise on the design of the site and work on custom pieces used within. Unknown-1 The team from Foomann helped to search for and find the perfect site. The site itself held a humble two-bedroom home in good condition, which would be saved and tenanted out to friends. Meanwhile, the farther carport space would be transformed into a second standalone structure, separated from the main house by an intersecting garden, and offer expanding flexibility to the original plot of land. The secondary structure laces together different Australian architectural typographies to form a beautifully balanced relic of both old and new. The brief was to create an economic structure using affordable, good quality materials. Corrugated iron cladding across the front and back of the structure nod to the nation’s rugged past. The cross-directional placement of sheets exaggerate the optical dimensions of the building all the while creating a modern, tapestry-like façade. Balancing the symbolic weight of this material, the warehouse presence of the site – structural bones on display – helps to create an ultimately contemporary building. From the back laneway perspective, the secondary structure is quite closed off – harsh even – with a distinctly industrial feel. However when approached from the main house across the garden, the new structure is eased, resembling closer to a welcoming cottage. Lygon-16 Floor to ceiling sliding glass doors illuminate light back over the garden and visually extend the interior space to the outside. The inclusion of different toned timbers help to merge the built space into the surrounding native plantings, imitating the nearby trees while nicely offsetting the strict lines of the iron roofing. Likewise, the interior is a soothing mix of mid-century inspired contemporary pieces. Lush rose velvet and sunburst orange linen sofas in elegant timber frames delineate the space. Minimal art and wall decorations help to extend the height of the rooms and ensure a sense of openness. This does not mean though that the space is without interest, with flourishing deep green potted plants casting lively shapes against the white walls. The intention is to fully capture the potential of the site, to enable for friends to visit and to stay – to live together. Outside of the bedroom spaces, the houses, garden and living spaces are designed to be used and shared between all occupants. A clever response to increasingly unaffordable cities, or an elegant means to live a life fulfilled not only by spaces but by the people within, the rejuvenation of this site marks the evolution of modern living – one which no doubt will be increasingly common in future years. Foomann Architects foomann.com.au

Visioneer Builders visioneer.com.au

Words by Ella McDougall Styling by Esme Parker Photography by Willem-Dirk du Toit Lygon-18 Lygon-03 Lygon-04 Lygon-02abc
Design Products
Design Accessories

Pop In To The HAY Pop-Up in Melbourne

Open from July 15, the HAY Accessories Market is opening following similar installations at the 2014 Milan Design Week, MOMA in New York, Glyptotek in Copenhagen, and design fairs and hotspot all over the world. The concept installation take inspiration from traditional supermarkets – with aisles of shelves stocked with selected HAY merchandise. The HAY Accessories Market has been curated and handpicked by Mette Hay, giving Australian design hunters the chance to see and take home a wide selection of accessories from the HAY collection – from lighting and textiles to stationary and glassware. Founded in Denmark in 2002, the brand was established the desire to create modern design that fuses innovative technology with quality materials, driven by the notion that contemporary design should spring from a good idea. Now known worldwide, the brand has realised this vision with collaborations now including Sebastian Wrong, the Bouroullecs, Scholten & Baijings and Stefan Diez. Visit the HAY Accessories Market at Level 3 of the Cult Melbourne Showroom at 680 Elizabeth Street Open 15 July-15 September 2017, Weekdays 8.30am-5.30pm and Saturdays 10.00am-4.00pm. HAY_WH-Milan14-57 Rhom-Trivet Cult_Hay+Store_0A8A8827 Casette Cacti-tres-02 Bits-&-Bobs-Colour 5d25c851077b8de9a5c518f333752006 Cult_Hay-Store_0A8A8664abc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Sacrificing Function For Form? Never Again!

Design hunter inspired inside and out, the Gaggenau 400 series dishwasher is perfect solution for the contemporary kitchen. Treat your crockery to the dishwasher they deserve, because design lovers know, there's no such thing as"just a dish" These are precious, fragile objects; carefully protected for decades and often holding memories more than food. And as with truly great cooking, modern tableware proudly shows off the handcrafted techniques used to create it. Why should you give these objects less cleaning attention than they deserve? Gaggenau dishwashers sit seamlessly in the modern kitchen, featuring all the little, and not so little, touches you'd expect from the legendary brand. A gentle nudge opens the handle-free door via an advanced push-to-open system, while smooth running rails and soft-close all work together to provide a seamless user experience. The Gaggenau 400 series is designed to cushion even crystal-stemmed glasses and porcelain, deceiving you into thinking you are doing something far more special than merely loading the dishwasher. Liberal with space, yet powerful and quick to wash, the dishwashers in the 400 series also dry the dishes and glasses at great speed, using intelligent Zeolite technology. This advanced technology help the 400 series dishwashers achieve both an optimal energy rating, and an ideal drying performance. Zeolite itself is an eco-friendly mineral that actually absorbs moisture while it releases heat - with this driving the washing and drying processes, the washing and drying of a full load takes less than hour. With a plethora of wash options, flexible basket systems, a clever long stemmed glass holder and a Gastronorm pan insert, the 400 series delivers on its goal of the all-in-one. The groundbreaking backlighting concept is a unique flourish for the dishwashers in the 400 series, presenting your dishes more beautifully, and providing a functional feature when unpacking after a late night meal. This innovative lighting concept is a world-first that shines from within, revealing the carefully cleaned contents. This new design uses six LED panels, housed within the back wall of the washer, lighting up at the same time as the two top front LED lights, perfectly illuminating the entire interior from every angle. The 400 series perfectly embodies the Gaggenau design philosophy of the Traditional Avant-Garde – a juxtaposing sphere of design where timeless craftsmanship meets innovative design, and where function and form work in harmony. To learn more visit gaggenau.com/auabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Brave New World

Cover Image: Max Dupain Australia 1911–92 On the beach. Man, woman, boy 1938 gelatin silver photograph If Modernism came late to Australia, it also didn’t come easy. While the European Modernists – Gropius, van der Rohe, Le Corbusier and Co – emerged from World War One determined to devise a brand new world, Australia would only really wake up after WWII. By then, it was more about a Brave New World, the title of George Orwell’s 1932 satirical novel and, provocatively – given that the Orwell tome was by then banned in Australia – the title of a 1938 photograph by Max Dupain. It’s a Fritz Lang kind of thing, all soft female flesh and hard, shiny machine. Dupain’s photography figures extensively in Brave New World, the National Gallery of Victoria’s reckoning of the 1930s in this country. As well as photography, there are posters and paintings and furniture and frocks – and a very fine lineup of Bakelite radio sets, lent by a private collector. But while the artifacts are fascinating enough, it’s the photography that really intrigues me. It’s in the photography that the friction between the Classical and the Modern is played out upon naked bodies in works by Laurence Le Guay and Olive Cotton as well as Dupain. “People like Dupain believed that Modernism had dissociated Australians from their Classical inheritance, and he felt that he could go about reconnecting us through association with the beach,” says co-curator and Dupain authority, Isobel Crombie. “I would argue that Dupain is really a Classical Modernist in that his work isn’t always about a celebration of Modernity. He definitely saw a dark side to it as well.” While Dupain’s images celebrated the new, Modernist body in all its eugenic perfection (as if the Nazis hadn’t taught us a lesson) the underlying angst is made evident in pieces like Doom of Youth (1937) with its crucified muscle boy on a Catherine/steering wheel. (Daddy Dupain, a genuine eugenicist, disdainful of the flesh, once wrote, “We see painted dolls of women everywhere, with falsely-coloured lips and cheeks and stream-lined eyebrows; but beneath this sloppy exterior is the anemic soddenness of disease and ill-health – whitened sepulchres!” Cheery, really. (Quote from the very excellent Brave New World catalogue.) “It was in the 1930s that the battle between the Conservatives and the Modernists came to a head,” co-curator Elena Taylor points out. There was conflict not just about our naked bodies, but our dressed selves too – as a rich selection of women’s fashion in this show attests. Conflict, too, about our world of interiors, as seen in a section on ‘Modern Melbourne Interiors’. And conflict, too, about the legitimacy of our indigenous population. “In the 1930s you see the rise of an aboriginal movement with aboriginal people calling for citizen rights, as well as increased interest in aboriginal Australia by artists and writers. And you have the rise of the first aboriginal artist of renown, Albert Namatjira who had his first solo show in 1938.” By breaking our Modernist history off from the European and North American canon, Crombie and Taylor enable a unique reading of a singular history. This show is a dazzler, and long overdue. Brave New World opens today at the National Gallery of Victoria, through October 15th. Words by Stephen Todd Photography courtesy of the National Gallery of Victoria Max_Dupain_Ballet-(Emmy-Towsey-and-Evelyn-Ippen,-Bodenwieser-Dancers-performing-Waterlilies)_1937Max Dupain Australia 1911–92 Ballet (Emmy Towsey and Evelyn Ippen, Bodenwieser Dancers performing Waterlilies) 1937, printed (c. 1939) gelatin silver photograph Max_Dupain_Rush-hour-in-King’s-Cross-1938 Max Dupain Australia 1911–92 Rush hour in King’s Cross 1938, printed c. 1986 gelatin silver photograph Max_Dupain_Discus_Thrower_1937 Max Dupain Australia 1911–92 Discus thrower 1937, printed (c. 1939) gelatin silver photograph Jack_Cato_Helene-Kirsova-and-Igor-Youskevitch-in-Les-Presages,-Monte-Carlo-Russian-Ballet-(1936–37) Jack Cato Australia 1889–1971, England 1909–14, South Africa 1914–20 Helene Kirsova and Igor Youskevitch in Les Presages, Monte Carlo Russian Ballet (1936–37) gelatin silver photograph Frank_Hinder_Jackhammer-1936 Frank Hinder Australia 1906–92, United States 1927–34 Jackhammer 1936 airbrush on black paper  abc