About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

Happenings

Who Won At The Inaugural INDE.Awards?

Above: Indigo Slam After three intensive years in development, the first ever INDE.Awards Gala took place on Friday June 30 at the Carriageworks theatre in Sydney. And it. was. MAJOR! The night was a tremendous success, rewarding and celebrating the industry’s most exceptional design talent from the Asia Pacific region, featuring appearances from the international and local design community. The impressive shortlist was a tough one to narrow down, but our esteemed jury were more than up to the task, and have hand-selected this year’s winners…

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Winner | The Building, brought to you by Cult

Indigo Slam, Smart Design Studio

Click here for the 2017 The Building Shortlist.

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TheDesignStudio

Winner | The Design Studio, brought to you by Denovo Recruitment

Austin Maynard Architects

Click here for the 2017 The Design Studio Shortlist.

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TheInfluencer

Winner | The Influencer, brought to you by Interface

Central Seat & Drinking Fountain, Steendijk for Embassy Living

Click here for the 2017 The Influencer Shortlist.

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TheWorkSpace

Winner | The Work Space, brought to you by Shaw Contract

Slack Melbourne Office, Breathe Architecture

Click here for the 2017 The Work Space Shortlist

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TheLivingSpace

Winner | The Living Space, brought to you by Gaggenau

Cornwall Gardens, CHANG Architects

Click here for the 2017 The Living Space Shortlist

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TheSocialSpace

Winner | The Social Space, brought to you by Living Edge

Humming Puppy, Karen Abernethy Architects

Click here for the 2017 The Social Space Shortlist

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TheObject

Winner | The Object, brought to you by Neolith

HUP HUP Chair, SKEEHAN Studio

Click here for the 2017 The Object Shortlist

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TheProdigy

Winner | The Prodigy, brought to you by Cosentino

Vince Alafaci & Caroline Choker, Acme&Co

Click here for the 2017 The Prodigy Shortlist

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TheLuminary

Winner | The Luminarybrought to you by Wilkhahn

William Smart, Smart Design Studio

Click here for the 2017 The Luminary Shortlist

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LPAus

Winner | Launch Pad Australiabrought to you by Schiavello 

PLICO, Dora Ferenczi

Click here for the 2017 Launch Pad Australia Shortlist

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LPAsia

Winner | Launch Pad Asia,brought to you by Schiavello 

Never Mind Tableware Series, Jonathan Saphiro Salim

Click here for the 2017 Launch Pad Asia Shortlist

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BestOfTheBest

Winner | Best of the Bestbrought to you by Zenith

Indigo Slam, Smart Design Studio

Click here for the entire 2017 Shortlist.

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Each of our winners are now the lucky owners of a bespoke designed, custom-made trophy from our official Trophy Partners, Dinosaur Designs.

On behalf of our official Partners and Supporters, we would like to congratulate the winners and shortlisted candidates of the INDE.Awards 2017.

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Platinum Sponsor | Zenith 

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Gold Sponsors | SunbrellaTongue n Groove

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Hotel Partner | The Old Clare

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Event Partners | Cake WinesCoLab DesignHarry The Hirer, Laurent Perrier Champagne, and Sample Brew

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Architecture
Homes

The Plan to Build House by tenfiftyfive

Two huge lemon-scented gumtrees dominate the site of this Melbourne home, creating a salient natural feature around which the house is designed. Engrossing windows in the living room invite in the northern winter sun to cast playful shadows through the outdoor foliage over the interior spaces. The entire first floor seemingly hovers, cantilevered above the lower living spaces in a mix of timber cladding that draws from the rich native landscape. The internal material palette combines concrete, steel, timber and brick, all chosen for their hardiness and ability to store energy and regulate temperature. An acute awareness of the home’s energy efficiency permeates the design. Concrete slabs which hold up the first storey use in-slab hydronic heating to regulate the temperature and provide an incredible noise barrier between the living and children’s bedrooms. Solar panels operate a heat pump which can be reversed in summer and entirely eliminate the need for air-conditioning. Salvaged and recycled materials extend throughout the house, echoing the house’s concern for sustainability. Old paving bricks have been reused to create beautifully aged new walls while Oregon rafter was also recrafted into a feature wall support for the upper storey. Recycled Blackbutt timber is incorporated in the ceiling beams, bathrooms, tv cabinets, kitchen, BBQ as well as the ceiling beams as a resourceful accent of earthy texture. Read the bathroom feature in Habitus #36, the Nourish issue, out now.

In the print story, on page 105 of Habitus #36, we incorrectly attributed tenfiftyfive's telephone number. Our sincere apologies to the team. You can reach them on 03 9572 4454 or on 0431 731 939

tenfiftyfive tenfiftyfive.com.au

Words by Ella McDougall Photography by Christine Francis Plan To Build window Plan To Build kitchen Plan To Build kitchen Plan To Build Living Room Plan To Build storageabc
Happenings
Parties

Part #1: Pre-Event Cocktail Reception At The INDE.Awards Gala Night

To open the festivities on June 30th, the INDE.Awards hosted a special pre-event cocktail reception just for this year’s official shortlist, judges and partners. For a program that has been three intensive years in the making, the reception was beautifully captured with a heartfelt speech from Indesign Brand Director Dana Ciaccia and former Indesign & Habitus Editorial Director, Paul McGillick: “For over 17 years, Indesign Media Asia Pacific has been building a network across our events, print and digital channels to connect all of the moving parts of our industry. Through unique platforms such as Indesign and Habitus, our focus has always been championing the best in architecture and design across the Asia pacific region, which is why INDE is such a proud accomplishment for us. INDE has created a new benchmark for design awards across this diverse and dynamic corner of the world, its people, products, projects and ideas, and elevating this fact on a broader global stage. In this room we have our fabulous shortlist, who we wish the best of luck to this evening. Our judges, some of whom have traveled across the globe to be here and have contributed a wealth of knowledge, perspective and experience to the program, and our partners who are actively invested in this region’s creative and visionary potential. Thank you for believing in our vision and joining us on this journey. INDE would not have been possible without the contribution of each individual in this room. The reason you are all here tonight before the rest of our guests arrive is because we have worked along side you all over the years and recognise your leading work and contribution to greatness in architecture and design across our region and wanted to take this as an opportunity to allow you to meet each other, share your stories, experiences and ideas.” Photography by Tim da-Rin [gallery columns="5" ids="60058,60057,60056,60055,60054,60053,60052,60051,60050,60049,60048,60047,60046,60045,60044,60043,60042,60041,60040,60039,60038,60037,60036,60035,60034,60033,60032,60031,60030,60029,60028,60027,60026,60025,60024,60023,60022,60021,60020,60019,60018,60017,60016,60015,60014,60013,60012,60011,60010,60009,60008,60007,60006,60005,60004,60003,60002,60001,60000,59999,59998,59997,59996,59995,59994,59993,59991,59990,59989,59988,59987,59986,59985,59984,59983,59982,59981,59980,59978,59977,59976,59974,59973"]abc
Happenings
Parties

Part #4: Live Satellite Feed Into Asia, The Zenith Singapore INDE.Awards Viewing Party

More than 365 days later, from more than 400 entries, and across 14 countries in the Asia Pacific region, all eyes were turned on Sydney for the inaugural INDE.Awards Gala Night. In what is undeniably a very proud accomplishment for the A+D community in this region, the INDE.Awards represents one of the very first concerted efforts to elevate Asia Pacific design to the global stage. Naturally, we have always known that our collective creative endeavour is just as cultural as it is personal. But it is also awe-inspiring to note that from the more than 400 total entries for the INDE.Awards, it has become clear that some of this planet’s most progressive buildings, spaces, objects, proposals and practitioners stem from our small little pocket of the world. With a spirit that can only be characterised as forward-thinking and compassionate, our A+D community has played an enormous role in bettering our region – its economies, its material ecologies, and finally its political and socio-economic development – to break barriers of inequity. Pushing us to new frontiers and actively creating a better world, we look to our region’s leading design-thinkers to celebrate their work in an ongoing narrative of excellence. As such, we were thrilled to have Zenith  – the 60-years-young commercial design powerhouse – bring you the INDE.Awards 2017 Official Viewing Party live from Singapore. The Gala and Ceremony was broadcasted from Sydney to Zenith’s satellite ceremony in their stunning showroom in Singapore. From Australia to South-East Asia, Zenith has ensured that the region is united, demonstrating their power of global mentorship for the visionary possibilities of design. The INDE.Awards would not have been possible without Zenith’s generosity. We are very grateful to have their partnership for the 2017 INDE.Awards to ensure that ours is a design culture that matters – that matters outside our borders – and will always continue to do so. We wish to thank Zenith for their ongoing commitment to celebrating and fostering the A+D community across our region. Zenith is your Official Platinum Partner for the 2017 INDE.Awards Take a look… [gallery ids="59555,59557,59559,59562,59565,59567,59570,59572,59575,59577,59580,59582,59583,59586,59589,59591,59594,59597,59600,59603,59606,59609,59612,59615,59617,59619,59622,59625,59628,59631,59634,59637,59640,59642,59645,59648,59650,59652,59653,59655,59658,59660,59662,59663,59665,59667,59669,59671,59672,59674,59676,59678,59680,59682,59683,59686,59688,59691,59694,59697,59700,59703,59706,59708,59711,59714,59716,59718,59721,59724,59727,59729,59731,59734,59737,59740,59743,59745,59748,59750,59753,59756,59759,59761,59764,59766,59768,59771,59774,59776,59778,59779,59781,59783,59785,59786,59788,59790,59792,59794,59796,59798,59800,59801,59803,59805,59807,59809,59811,59812,59814,59816,59817,59819,59821,59822,59824,59826,59827,59829,59831,59833,59835,59836,59838,59840,59842,59844,59845,59847,59849,59851,59852,59854,59856,59857,59859,59861,59862,59864,59866,59868,59869,59871,59873,59875,59876,59878,59880,59882,59884,59885,59887,59888,59890,59892,59893,59895"]  abc
Happenings
Parties

Part #3: The After Party At The INDE.Awards Gala Night

If there’s one thing Indesign knows how to do, it’s bringing the industry together to show them a good time! Following the formalities in the Carriageworks Theatre, the curtain was pulled back to reveal the official INDE.Awards After Party Lounge, kitted out with a hanging garden cocktail bar, gourmet bistro, desert waiters, a sponsors and partners media wall, an epic disco DJ, dance floor and running social media wall! With the winners on a high and the shortlist, jury, sponsors, partners and guests wanting to celebrate their colleagues, the night was an energetic success, filled with support and congratulations. Though we all got down on the dance floor and partied the night away, the evening was also an excellent opportunity to meet, connect and speak with one another – something we so rarely are able to do. Thank you to everyone who joined us, danced hard and made some memories. Until next year! Our after party was proudly presented by our partners and sponsors. We would like to especially thank the following organisations and brands for their ongoing support of this year’s INDE.Awards program:

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Platinum Sponsor | Zenith

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Gold Sponsors |SunbrellaTongue ‘n’ Groove

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Category Partners |CultDenovo RecruitmentShaw ContractGaggenauLiving EdgeNeolithInterfaceCosentinoWilkhahnSchiavello

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Hotel Partner | The Old Clare

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Trophy Partner | Dinosaur Designs

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Event Partners |Cake WinesCoLab DesignHarry The HirerLaurent Perrier ChampagneSample Brew

[gallery columns="5" ids="70385,70301,70302,70303,70304,70305,70306,70307,70311,70312,70313,70315,70316,70319,70320,70322,70324,70325,70326,70327,70328,70329,70330,70331,70332,70333,70334,70335,70336,70337,70338,70339,70340,70341,70342,70343,70344,70345,70346,70347,70348,70349,70350,70351,70352,70353,70354,70355,70356,70357,70358,70359,70360,70361,70362,70363,70364,70365,70366,70367,70368,70369,70370,70371,70372,70373,70377,70381,70382,70387,70388,70389,70390,70392,70393,70394,70395,70396,70397,70398,70399,70400,70401,70402,70403,70404,70405,70406,70407,70408,70409,70410,70411,70412,70413,70414,70415,70416"]   Photography by Tim da-Rinabc
Happenings
Parties

Part #2: The Official Ceremony At The INDE.Awards Gala Night

Hosted in the grand Carriageworks Theatre, the official INDE.Awards Ceremony was opened by Indesign Media Asia Pacific’s CEO & Founder, Raj Nandan and Indesign magazine Co-Editor, Alice Blackwood. Being the inaugural year, our commander in chief set the tone of the evening and the program in general by giving everyone some needed context: “When we started Indesign Media almost 20 years ago in a small one-bedroom flat in Woollahra, our ambition was to create titles that we could use as vehicles to examine, document and celebrate the very best of the Asia Pacific design region. Starting small but thinking globally from a four-person office in Sydney, we’ve been able to follow you on your journeys into new markets. From New Zealand to Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia, India, China – and many beyond. We have spent these 2 decades learning, growing and achieving great things in this region right alongside you; working hard to represent you and your incredible talents every step of the way. We’ve seen and lived through both the triumphs and setbacks of our industry just as you have – sharing the good with the bad. And tonight this 20-year path comes full-circle as together we – as an industry – acknowledge, reward and commend the most exceptional people, products and projects our corner of the world has produced, propelling them into recognition on the wider, global stage. When we began putting this program together, our vision was to be the new benchmark for design accolades across the Asia Pacific. Something that – in the tradition of Indesign Media – represents our industry not from afar, but from within. This mission has always been our number one commitment from 1999 onward, and we have been overwhelmed with the tremendous response we received to the next stage of this journey – the inaugural INDE.Awards. We owe the success of this program to all of you, where we received over 400 projects, people, products and idea submissions, from every touch-point across the Asia Pacific region; Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, Thailand, Jakarta, China and many more. Because of you, we are a new name and a unique presence on the awards stage, purpose-built by the industry, for the industry, to champion the best in design, architecture and people across South-East Asia. The support and participation of our industry’s most iconic players truly demonstrates the strength and prowess of architects and designers across our talented corner of the world. And much of the success of this program has been down to the knowledge and efforts of our highly regarded jury, sponsors and partners…” Here, Indesign Co-Editor Alice Blackwood commented on how, “Unlike many others, the design industry is one built on the strength of relationships and the ongoing support of an active community. We would not be standing here tonight were it not for the continued backing of our sponsors and partners: First of all, our long-time collaborator and Platinum Sponsor, Zenith. Our Gold Sponsors Sunbrella and Tongue ‘n’ Groove. Our Category Sponsors CultDenovo RecruitmentShaw ContractGaggenauLiving EdgeNeolithInterfaceCosentinoWilkhahn, and Schiavello. Our Trophy Partner, Dinosaur Designs. Our Hotel Partner, The Old Clare. And finally our Event Partners, Cake WinesCoLab DesignHarry The HirerLaurent Perrier Champagne and Sample Brew.” She went on to reflect on the truly “glocal nature of these awards,” and how the official judging panel – an enviable collective of our industry’s most exceptional design minds – were faced with a tall order in narrowing 400 submissions down to a tight top 60. Following the formalities and a tremendously insightful speech from jury member and Indesign Luminary Sue Carr, the evening’s emcees: Joe Snell and Solvig Walkling commenced the official ceremony, awarding each winner with a bespoke, hand-made trophy from Dinosaur Designs. Take a look… [gallery ids="59539,59541,59542,59543,59545,59547,59548,59550,59551,59553,59554,59556,59560,59563,59566,59568,59571,59574,59576,59579,59581,59585,59587,59590,59593,59596,59598,59601,59604,59608,59611,59614,59618,59620,59623,59627,59629,59633,59636,59639,59643,59646"]   Photography by Tim da-Rinabc
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Furniture

The Reign of the North

Scandinavian design is a term that has grown to supersede its northern geography, now shared around the global creative dining table – we’ve had a taste and you bet we’re stealing the recipe. Scandinavian design is undoubtedly the most gorgeous antidote to the ruckus of our modern lives, disguising our clutter in the poetic interplay of simple lines and honest materials. Although Australia is at the farthest end of the map from the progenitive Nordic nations, the desire – need even – for soothing design is equally true. Local retailer FLOC is responding with a healthy prescription of Scandinavian-inspired pieces from Danish brand WOUD. The timber-focused collection visually articulates our longing for space and order, responding to the fundamental principals of Scandinavian design from an international pool of designers. WOUD’s adherence to a raw aesthetic aligns wholly to FLOC, a coastal-infused concept store offering furniture that draws on the inherent brilliance of natural materials. Nestling in with FLOC’s existing range, each piece honours its construction through clean designs that aim to ease rather than engulf our everyday activities. Extending through lounges and chairs, wardrobes, mirrored shelving and lighting, the WOUD Universe – as it is perfectly described – unveils a holistic range to relieve any and all interior spaces. The collection balances visually light and elegant designs with comfort. The Nakki series from Finnish designer Mika Tolvanen, for instance, fuses a discreet, angular metal base with curvaceous and embracing cushioning. This piece plays off of its disparate forms to offer reductive design without shaving off an iota of character. It is this careful tiptoeing between the stripped back and the amiable that carries the collection, allowing for the personality of each piece to adapt and meld into its desired context. And it is no wonder that Scandinavian design has peppered the global market, its slim silhouette casting it as the ideal solution to our nomadic lifestyles. Following an ethos of lightweight assembly and manoeuvring, each piece is as relevant to a roaming 18 year-old as it is to a settled family WOUD represented by FLOC in Australia and NZ flocstore.com.au Woud-Floc_Split_mono_annular Woud-Floc-Packs-studiet Woud-Floc_Pidestallabc
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Conversations

The New Open Plan

Anyone who’s ever lived in a home with open plan living areas can appreciate how expensive it is to heat or cool. And forget about privacy. The only suitable place to retreat for some quiet time in a busy household is the bed- or bathroom. This popular trend in residential design certainly has its benefits, but designers have been quick to address the cons, re-imagining open plan spaces to promote greater flexibility. The response is the ‘broken plan’ – a term recently coined by UK architect Mary Duggan during the judging of the 2015 RIBA House of the Year award. She used it to describe the tendency of entries in that year’s shortlist to include split-levels within the interior. Along with such level changes, designers are also using devices like open shelf storage and three-quarter-height walls to slightly section off the open plan, while still allowing for openness. These in-betweeners are some of today’s most highly functional interiors due to a stronger sense of spatial definition. And while designers aren’t looking to replicate Victorian era schemes, they’re not always concerned with creating the cavernous proportions of a trendy New York loft either. At SJB, Sydney-based director Jonathan Richards has identified increased interest from clients in having a kitchen that’s separate to the lounge and dining areas. “We often use design to celebrate the thresholds between rooms,” he says. “Fitting everything into the one space works sometimes, but in many instances a separation of space is the more elegant solution. You can have a visual connection while still celebrating the purpose and function of a specific room.” SJB 10 Wylde Street kitchen Richards’ designs, such as the interiors for the recently completed 10 Wylde Street apartment complex in Potts Point, reflect his clients’ needs and are a direct response to the way people are living now, which has undoubtedly changed in the last five years, let alone the last ten. With the rise in popularity of cooking shows like Masterchef, it seems everyone’s spending more time in the kitchen. Keeping this room separate controls acoustic issues and also better manages cooking smells (both good and bad) from permeating the rest of the home. However, it’s not television that drives today’s biggest lifestyle changes, rather our use of personal devices and as a result, living areas need to work harder than ever before. Co-director of Austin Maynard Architects Melbourne-based Andrew Maynard believes that clients are expecting a lot more complexity and subtlety from their homes. “See, the problem [with open plan] is that people then go, ‘Oh, but I actually do need a private space. I need somewhere to work or I need a study space’,” he says. His solution is a concept he calls “alone, together” in which an essentially open plan interior can be adapted to offer privacy. It’s applied to great effect in the practice’s recently completed THAT House, where a moveable wall is used to close off the study from the lounge room when required. As Maynard explains, “Occupants can choose the level of engagement, from being fully engaged with other family members to being locked away. It doesn’t have to be either, it can be both.” THAT House’s ground level open plan is rigorous for a full-length foyer that splits the scheme in two, with the lounge on one side and kitchen and dining area on the other. A central staircase with perforated steel steps and an open shelf storage system separates the spaces while still allowing a degree of connectedness. And the glass enclosed courtyard between kitchen and dining areas also heightens this idea of being alone together. Surprisingly, THAT House’s interior feels all the more spacious because of the dynamism created by these thresholds and insertions. It’s something to be celebrated, especially when creating family-friendly spaces that can offer equal parts comfort and efficiency. A complete open plan backlash may be way off, but refreshing traditional ideas of spaciousness, many of which have become dated, is essential for improved models of living. Words by Leanne Amodeo Photography [above] of 10 Wylde Street by SJB by Felix Forest Photography [below] of THAT House by Austin Maynard Architects by Tess Kelly Austin Maynard_Architects That House exterior Austin Maynard_Architects That House kitchen Austin Maynard_Architects That House kitchen Austin Maynard_Architects That House staircase Austin Maynard_Architects That House living room Austin Maynard_Architects That House bathroom Austin Maynard_Architects That House bathroom Austin Maynard_Architects That House study Austin Maynard_Architects That House studyabc
Architecture
Homes
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Kister Architects’ Church Conversion

On a small urban backstreet on the fringe of one of Melbourne’s most creative precincts, a disused bluestone church cuts a striking profile. Only a discreet timber entry hints at the contemporary home within. Inside, a concrete path slopes upwards to an impressive courtyard, with restrained sculptural landscaping creating an almost futuristic elegance. An invitingly lengthy pool spans the boundary of the property, while curved walls and glass meet the old church’s pillar arches in a dramatic convergence of architectural styles. “When people come over, I think there is a bit of curiosity and excitement… It is definitely an unusual house,” admits owner and architect, Ilana Kister. Read the full story in Habitus #36, the Nourish issue, out 12 June. Kister Architects kisterarchitects.com.au Words by Sandra Tan Photography by Peter Bennets Church Conversion Kister Architects pool Church Conversion Kister Architects entry Church Conversion Kister Architects living room Church Conversion Kister Architects dining room Church Conversion Kister Architects entranceabc
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Where Art and Design Meet

The mosaic is an ancient art form with roots going back to third millennium BC Mesopotamia. A unique combination of art, fine craftsmanship and industrial design, mosaics are timeless examples of the beauty that arises from crossing over the worlds of art and design. Artistic mosaics find a place of their own in the Mosaico+ universe, offering the highest level of personalisation and prestige. Mosaico+ explores all the expressive potential of the mosaic form, with the aid of an all-Italian production system that combines innovative techniques with an traditional culture and craftsmanship. Ophelia_particolare-1 Juxtaposing chips, assembling fragments, selecting materials, expertly adapting shapes to specific spaces: these are the actions that make each Mosaico+ project unique and unrepeatable. An artistic mosaic can only be done by hand, but Mosaico+ has succeeded in integrating traditional craftsmanship with modern technology; adapting IT tools and advanced procedures typically used in industrial design to elaborate or develop requests made by clients during the planning phase. A recent launch from Mosaico+, the Dialoghi collection, comes from a design search focused on the experience of the material. Experience as a tool for exploring the worlds of design, and material as a means of enhancing the essential elements of the mosaics. The texture layout and original chip designs of the Dialoghi range lets architects and designers create their own mosaics, expressing the legacy of the form while channeling contemporary luxury. Mosaico+ makes all its design and manufacturing experiences available to customers to best assist them in the development of their projects, with a before and after-sales service comprising design and technical advice for the choice of the most suitable materials and sizes as well as technical assistance and supervision during installation. Sculpture_pannello Sculpture_particolare-1 Ophelia_particolare-2 Dialoghi_Agile-op_1 Dialoghi_Agile-op_17abc
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Victorian Style Homes: The 10 Best Victorian Houses in Australia

The Victorian era refers to the period of Queen Victoria’s reign from 1837 to 1901 and the houses that were built within this period are known as Victorian style homes. The characteristics of this now-iconic style of colonial architecture began with simple, unfussy façades and grew to be much more decorative and ornate in the later years of the period. A Victorian house can be single or double-fronted; freestanding, terraced, or semi-detached. This period follows on from the Georgian era (denoting the reigns of King George I-IV from 1714-1830), and precedes the short-lived Edwardian era that spanned from 1901 to 1914. However, it is Victorian architecture that has arguably made the biggest impact on the Australian architectural landscape.
Fitzroy Terrace by Taylor Knights heralds a highly considered contemporary design, that quite literally turns the conventional perception of the Victorian terrace on its head. Fitzroy Terrace by Taylor Knights
During the 18th century it was quite common for British architects (among other professionals) to immigrate to the colonies. Australia was one such example and with them architects naturally brought the architectural styles popular at the time in Britain such as the terrace house and the townhouse. Given this period also saw the gold rush in Australia and a population spurt; there was money to build houses and no question of demand. Some of the most famous examples of Victorian architecture in Australia include the former General Post Office at Martin Place in Sydney, the Royal Exhibition Centre in Melbourne and St Peters Cathedral in Adelaide. In terms of residential architecture, Victorian style homes are most prevalent in Sydney and Melbourne, though the iconic buildings can be found extensively across Australia.
The Royal Exhibition Centre, Melbourne
During the course of more than half a century that was the Victorian era, the hallmarks of the Victorian house naturally evolved alongside fashion and financial means. To begin with, a Victorian style house was simple and largely unadorned. It wasn’t until the middle of the period (approximately 1860-1875) that the better-known characteristics we would typically associate with this style of architecture began to appear. On the exterior these hallmarks include a front yard enclosed by a picket or cast iron fence, cast iron lacework or timber brackets adorning the eaves, patterned brickwork and double hung windows. In some cases, the front windows would feature stained glass panels. The roof was typically terracotta tiles or corrugated iron. Inside, one could expect to find polished floorboards, decorative skirting joints and ceiling cornices, architraves around doors and windows and detailed ceiling roses.
North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell staircase North Melbourne Terrace by Matt Gibson
The latter years building Victorian style homes were characterised by the Italianate style that was increasingly ornamental and decorative. Patterned tile work began to appear at the front of the houses while inside windows, doors and hallways were designed with arches. Victorian houses do not typically denote a mansion, however at their most luxurious peak these style of houses can be very spacious and freestanding. The value of Victorian style homes can be seen for various, yet contrasting, factors. Some architects and architecture enthusiasts will appreciate the aesthetics of the period, others will appreciate the superior design, material selection and building methods that see this style of architecture still standing ­– in some cases almost two centuries later. For some, however, the value of a Victorian style house is that they are commonly found in popular, CBD fringe suburbs in Sydney and Melbourne and across Australia. Like any example of colonial architecture, the better the building has been maintained or artfully restored, the higher the financial value is likely to be.
Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath | Habitus Living Pavilion House by Robson Rak
Due to its historical significance architectural intervention to this style of architecture is subject to council guidelines that at times can be quite prescriptive. However, for the most part careful and artful restorations to the exterior façade make way for more lenient parameters inside and throughout. Usually architectural renovations will be in the form of a extension or addition as opposed to storey additions. Given our predisposition to outstanding architecture across Australia, in our time we have come across more than a few stellar examples of what a modern Victorian house looks like at the hands of talented architects and their willing clients. Below are 10 favourite examples of a modern Victorian house.   Glebe Red by Benn + Penna Glebe Red involves major alterations and additions to a large Victorian house, including new living spaces, bedrooms, courtyards and studio. The brief was to accommodate a large intergeneration family, whilst carefully managing their increased need for privacy, integration and flexibility. [gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="103065,103064,103063"]   Fitzroy Terrace by Taylor Knights Behind a very traditional façade, the residence’s interior spaces have been inverted; flipping the original arrangement by lifting the living spaces to the upper floors in a deliberate play of thresholds and journeys through spaces. [gallery size="large" type="rectangular" ids="98361,98360,98352"]   Skylight House by Chenchow Little With the façade of the Victorian Terrace left intact, the pretty wrought-iron lace verandah hides a timeless and minimalist dwelling finished with raw concrete, glass, white walls and spotted gum hardwood. [gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="103070,103068,103066,103067,103069"]   Orama House by Smart Design Studio Contrasts in styles, materials and building methods between the Victorian house and ultra modern extension here may seem obvious, but the similarities are not so apparent. Look closely and you soon see that elements of this home separated by a centurye have been designed and built with the same intricacy, attention to detail and immaculate craftsmanship. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="52040,52049,52043"]   Pavilion House by Robson Rak Reflecting the client’s love for mid-century architecture, Robson Rak has designed Pavilion House with a particular composition that balances the integrity of its existing 1888 Victorian residence with a modern new glass pavilion. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="87125,87135,87138"]   Rae House by Austin Maynard Architects Austin Maynard Architects was commissioned to transform two houses into one family home, for a couple with young children. One of the original homes was a modest Victorian cottage requiring a considerable amount of work. The other dwelling was much larger but in dire need of house plans reconfiguration for contemporary living. [gallery size="large" columns="2" ids="97875,97885"]   Paddington Terrace by Porebski Architects A renovation done in parts, seven years ago Porebski Architects converted the upstairs of this terrace house into three bedrooms with a new bathroom and attic and restored the façade. The second renovation concentrated on transforming the dark, narrow rooms at the rear of the house into a light, open and contemporary space. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="99592,99593,99594"]   Surry Hills House Michael Cumming Architect Surry Hills Terrace House by Michael Cumming Architect was an exercise in minimal intervention and clean aesthetics. The brief was simple, to renovate an aged, damp and dark Victorian Terrace, and turn into a spacious light-filled home. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="91179,91175"]   Winton House Molecule Studio A large, Victorian-era house is given a light-filled, contemporary rear addition clad in a white brick, detailed with Flemish bond as a nod to the 19th century and bridging the periods of architecture. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="101686,101683,101691"]   Highbury Grove by Ritz & Ghougassian The interior renovation of this Victorian style house was inspired by the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki and features the heavy use of concrete and brickwork. While the exterior remains in keeping with the streetscape, the interiors are born again and blend modern minimalism with Japanese sensibilities.  abc