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What's On

Make Nice: A Participant-Led Creative Conference For Woman

If you’re not part of the solution you’re part of the problem, right? That may sound a little black and white for a world in which we all know there are 50 shades of grey, but it seems fitting for Ngaio Parr, founder­–creator of the Make Nice Un-Conference, exuding a somewhat of an A or B – and nothing in-between – attitude. As with most industries there is room to improve in ours. There are things we could do, initiatives we could ignite, to improve attitudes, experiences and equal opportunity. Make-Nice is one such example. When Ngaio relocated to Sydney and began teaching design and illustration at the University of Technology, she started to notice little things that seemed at odds with what they should be. For instance, teaching a predominantly female-filled auditorium male-dominated content; noticing her female friends, colleagues and contemporaries lose ownership of their ideas in order to get ahead or assimilate into a perceived boys club; and attending creative conferences she felt were speaking to a very specific audience. Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference But we’re not here to dwell on the negatives. Ngaio took note of what was missing – and who was missing out – and rectified the situation. The Make Nice: Un-conference for Creative Women was launched in 2016 and is curated around providing practical advice and informative discussions for women doing creative work in any and all its forms: illustrators, writers, photographers, designers, makers, bakers, curators, artists and songwriters, gamers, painters, producers and so on. The community created, perhaps initially as a byproduct but now one that is very much fed and encouraged, lives on via a global slack channel affording the continued ability to support, communicate and collaborate. The conference itself, held this year on Saturday 22-23 September, kicks of with drinks and an exhibition of the speakers’ and panelists’ work on the Friday night: the social events being key to create a comfortable and friendly environment. A full day on Saturday consists of four keynote addresses and two town hall discussions. But the topics, such as I’ve Started My Thing, Now What?, Confidence in Career, Pressure to be Perfect/ Imposter Syndrome and Collaboration over Competition, came about in a very unique way. “The panel discussions are formed based on what our slack group has been talking about throughout the year,” says Ngaio. “Everything that is programmed or curated in is because our community has asked for it. Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference “As you buy a ticket you write down the three issues that are important to you and the ones that are coming again and again are confidence: how to create a collaborative environment for woman – which obviously we’re trying to do with Make Nice to stop that competitive nature that’s kind of bred into us from education systems; how to manage a team effectively; how to stop gender bias when you’re seeing it happen if you’re not in that senior position; how to get into that senior position; how to price yourself fairly; how to negotiate yourself fairly. A lot of them come down to confidence. The imposter syndrome in particular is one of the things that ties that all together.” Clearly coming from a similar intention is the reality that there is no separation between speakers and attendees at the Make Nice Un-conference. They’re there for the entire day sitting in the crowd, chatting casually amongst the masses, and enjoying the social events. Likewise they’ve been chosen to speak because they’re in a position that is likely to be three steps ahead of the rest of us, not 30, sharing their experiences in a way that is relevant and applicable, rather than so far off it feels un-relatable. And there’s no portfolio showcasing, either. “All of our speakers are asked not to talk about their work but troubles they’ve had getting to that position, or advice they’ve been given but ignored,” adds Ngaio. To put in in their own words, this participant-led experience-slash-conference is proof that making nice works. See you there? Make Nice: Un-conference for Creative Women, 2017 Friday 22nd September, 6-9pm Saturday 23rd September, 8am-6pm Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conference Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-ConferenceNgaio Parr Ngaio Parr Make Nice Un-Conferenceabc
Architecture
Around The World

Not Your Stereotypical Pharmacy

Some buildings, universities for example, are expected to push boundaries and manipulate the physical space to merge the functional with the conceptual. But some buildings, a pharmacy by contrast, is assumed to linger safely in line with traditional stereotypes. But why can't design permeate all of these spaces and employ artistry to challenge and excite the everyday? That is the question that founded Molecure Pharmacy in Taichung, Taiwan. The owner of Molecure is a third-generation pharmacist, stemming from a long family lineage in the industry. And true to members of the younger generation, he wanted to break away from what he perceived to be the stale and uninspired setting that had become synonymous with his practice. The owner reached out to Waterform Design, an interior design studio in Taiwan and China, to visually express his vision for the contemporary store. Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy dispensing area Molecure is an amalgamation of both old and new connotations of health. Simultaneously playing out the ancient role of the pharmacist: the eternal concern for health, and the gains achieved with modern technologies in the one space. This sense of elements merging together is established right from the name ‘Molecure’; a portmanteau of molecule, an organic component of science, and cure, closer associated with the benefits of modern medicine. Waterfrom Design wanted to evoke a sense of returning to nature and to the historical understanding of pharmacy. This is achieved through a heavy motif of nature that extends throughout the store. Cement is applied in combination with cobblestones over the walls to the left and right side, emphasising the rough worn textures to give a sense of age and of nature. Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy laboratory table The centre laboratory table continues in the same vein, constructed gracefully out of stacked pieces of solid timber, all above and revealing a sculptural base from a more than 100-year-old trunk. And in addition, hanging greenery adorns the walls and falls from the ceiling to exude a sense of being within nature and a more eternal understanding of health. The contemporary, scientific perception of pharmacy, however, is created in the design details that adorn the space. The lightweight metal and acrylic display racks extend outwards in straight lines alike the structural formation of molecules. And further, the twisting copper staircase is an allusion to the spiral form of DNA. Waterfrom Design breaks down not only the look but also the feel that is expected of a pharmacy. Rejecting the strict separation of the white coat wearing pharmacist and the client between a counter, the space is dominated rather with a centre table where professionals and visitors can communicate at ease. Molecure exemplifies the role of design in engaging the public in spaces of any purpose, and helps to illustrate the evolution of – in this case – health and technology, and help a business respond to the knowledge and aesthetics of the modern day. Waterfrom Design waterfrom.com Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy dispensing area display rack Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy laboratory table display wall Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy spiral staircase Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy upward view Waterfrom Design Molecure Pharmacy galleryabc
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Architecture
NOT HOMES

Alternative Surfaces In Melbourne’s Most Instagrammable Space

For creative professionals, Highline is a space that has been designed to inspire and has quickly become the most instagrammable space in Fitzroy. Originally an old denim factory, the space’s industrial charm has been brought to life by a meticulous renovation. The natural-light filled studio boats sky-high ceilings, white walls, glass partitions and over 300 square meters of seamless X-Bond floors which has been filled with furnishings from Louis Ghost, Meizai, Click On and uniquely shaped carpet tiles from Vorwerk Carpets. To help create the perfect blank canvas, Alternative Surfaces hand-applied their X-Bond flooring on-top of the existing concrete slab, which spans throughout the entrance, stairway, kitchen, bathrooms, offices, styling-suite and break-out areas. The X-Bond floor has withstood fashion runway shows, private functions, weddings, workshops and photoshoots. For those who aren’t familiar with X-Bond, it is a seamless stone overlay system, which is hand applied at 3mm thick onto an existing substrate of concrete, compressed sheeting or tiles. Find out just how versatile X-Bond is by visiting Alternative Surfaces website - and, if you’re looking for a space to conceptualize and collaborate visit the Highline Photography: Hugh Davies  abc
Happenings
What's On

Did You See The Best Installation At Sydney Indesign 2017?

Since its inception in 2001, Indesign: The Event has made a point of celebrating the exhibition space as much as its exhibitors, allowing the industry’s top creatives to transform the showrooms into interactive and immersive spaces for the purpose of surprise and spectacle. For almost a decade, the event has featured The Project – a People’s Choice award dedicated to the most impressive and most inspirational installation featured across the event’s running period. Aside from a keyword in place each year to guide design decisions, the scope of each installation is limited only to the imaginations of each respective exhibitor and a partnered architect. Perhaps inevitably and much to our enjoyment, this can often lead to some wild designs. The keyword for 2017 was CLICK, celebrating the power of instant connections. And the winner – deservedly so – was Zip Water, working in collaboration with renowned architectural firm SJB. The Zip installation featured a myriad of cascading nylon threads, suspended from the ceiling above so as to enclose the exhibition space without boxing it in with any static or impenetrable elements. The purpose of the nylon in the installation was twofold – the first reason, as suggested, was to create an ephemeral threshold, reminiscent of cascading water and fluid in a similar way to the purpose of the products within. Moving in time to any gentle breeze or an accidental brush, viewers on the outside were afforded glimpses of seemingly floating tapware, as their mirrored plinths remained largely camouflaged. The second reason, however, may not have been as evident – save for only the most investigative guests. Made from recycled plastic, the nylon threads invoke the exact cause that Zip seeks to embody. Zip not only makes water look and taste good, but investing in high quality tapware also removes the need to replace, replace, replace, and reduces our unhealthy obsession with bottled water and the plastic nightmare that comes with it.

What can I say? Some things simply click.

The installation served as the backdrop to Zip’s new Vestal water units and their latest product launch, the new All-In-One Celsius ARC, which delivers all home water needs imaginable from a single tap. The All-In-One Celsius ARC combines instant filtered boiling, chilled and sparkling water with a regular mixer tap for unfiltered hot and cold-water options, de-cluttering the kitchen sink without sacrificing functionality. This much has been a design trend for some time now, as the contemporary kitchen adopts more of the functionality of the dining room – demanding a sleeker aesthetic to compensate. However, that’s not to say Zip’s latest offering is all looks and no substance, showing off advanced energy efficiency and top-tier cooling technology. Of course, we expected no less. You’ll just have to forgive us for craving our very own customised sparkling water inspired Cocktail Tasting Station that was featured on the day.

Team Indesign wishes to congratulate Zip Water and SJB on winning Sydney Indesign 2017’s best Project Award!

abc
Design Hunters
People
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René Linssen And His Future Trajectory

At the ripe age of 23, and just years out of University, René Linssen is emerging as one of the country’s forerunning pioneers of locally made and manufactured design. A feat that comes as a surprise even to him, “a year ago I wouldn’t have thought that I would be starting a business and building a brand,” admits René when we spoke to him recently following his trip to Sydney for the Workshopped launch night. Plucked straight from his studies in Industrial Design at the University of Canberra, René now works as a designer with local studio, Formswell. Projects span from government bike racks to perfume bottles and, being only a small studio, René is able to be fully involved in the entire process from research to concept to creation. “It’s really challenging because you’re always jumping into new worlds and you have got to learn from the start and become the expert in a new area. But it’s a good challenge.” Rene Linssen Furnished Forever insitu stools Researching new, uncharted territories, however, is at the heart of his approach to design. “I’m interested in lots of different things. I think a lot of designers just want to do chairs and things like that, but I want to do everything. I want to do things that people don’t do, things that people haven’t really looked at.” René spends his time scrolling through Pinterest – he has a board for every project that he works on – researching what products are on the market, what works and what doesn’t. But in the end, “I just trust my gut,” says René. “You take inspiration from different areas and try to do it in your own way.” At the beginning of 2017 René began work on a new furniture brand with business and design partner Elliot Bastianon. Furnished Forever offers pieces that are stackable, moveable and durable. Already René and Elliot have a low and high stool in production that they revealed at DENFAIR 2017, and have plans to extend the range with lighting, tables and chairs. Last year, in amongst masses of seasoned designers, René took out first prize in Belle’s Alessi Design Awards with a very sleek looking oyster knife. Rene Linssen Furnished Forever stools colourway “It was very surreal because Alessi is definitely a company that I have always dreamed of doing a product with. Every big designer, and a lot of my favourite industrial designers, have a product with them. It’s definitely a tick in the box.” For René, his experience with Alessi helped him appreciate his own skills as an emerging industrial designer, but also of the incredible power of design in transcending boarders. “I’m still pretty new to this but it really opened my eyes to what’s possible with design. You know, you can go across the world, to people who speak another language, but you can still have a connection through design,” says René. “There’s a bigger world than Australia and there’s no reason you can’t be in Canberra and design products for big companies.” René Linssen renelinssen.com Rene Linssen Furnished Forever low high stool Rene Linssen Furnished Forever stools Rene Linssen Furnished Forever stackable stoolsabc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes
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Atelier About Architecture Reject Ornamentation

At the turn of the century, Austrian architect Adolf Loos promoted a philosophy of art and design that rejected ornamentation as fraud, in favour of clean and honest expression. Over a century later, Atelier About Architecture design studio draw on Loos’ philosophy to create House W. The structure is at once meditative and soothing, yet there is an overt grandeur in its presence, where beauty is derived from the surrounding natural world rather than mere ostentation House W sits in an icy region of Beijing, China. The site backs onto the mountainside, causing for the extended building to drop into the sub-zero temperatures in winter. The task was to ensure that the home was well protected from the dramatic exterior temperatures while adhering to passive heating control. This required a certain connection to the outdoors, to allow flooding sunlight in to warm the house without losing any of the heat throughout the duration of the day and into the night. In response to this concern to the exterior climate, Atelier About Architecture enlisted the help of the Architecture and Technology Research Institute of Tsinghua University. For approximately six months, research was conducted on the house. The result of this research is manifested in the 150-milimetre insulation panels that wrap around the house’s walls and a large glass box atrium was constructed as the living–dining area to offer continuous heating into the cooler months. Atelier About Architecture House W bedroom The internal palette of the house follows the colder tones of the exterior. Atelier About Architecture conceived the house as a raw and honest space, extending Loos' concern for functionality and quality above all else. White washes over the walls, ceiling and cabinetry. Yet internally, and particularly within the living space, the floor plan segments into more open and closed sections. This creates optical interest in a decidedly sparse room, carving geometries into the interior for a modern appeal. While House W steers away from unnecessary embellishment, the house is in no way without intrigue or beauty. The neutral palette introduces a spectrum of timber, from the silver flooring to the rich, heavy furniture to compliment the white and strengthen the connection between the interior and exterior. Atelier About Architecture House W lounge room Atelier About Architecture House W staircase From the outside, the house has a stoic impression; bold and muscular. Yet the solid white rendered colour camouflages the structure somewhat into its snowy surrounds and the rectangular glazed panels on the middle living space minimise the visual appearance back into the sky. Windows are placed at odd sizes and locations, responding instead to the fall of sunlight and requirements of each interior space. House W evokes a gallery in its quiet and pensive tone. Atelier About Architecture fought into new frontiers of architecture, merging environmental thinking in passive heating design to a site that is inherently extreme and unforgiving, and to spectacular results. Rather than close off from its environment, the house opens itself up to it, harnessing the warmth, light and beauty of the outside world without the use of additive ornament or technology. Atelier About Architecture aboutarch.com Photography by Chen Hao (exteriors) and Sun Hai Ting (interiors) Atelier About Architecture House W lattice room Atelier About Architecture House W interior design Atelier About Architecture House W bedroom Atelier About Architecture House W staircase Atelier About Architecture House W window Atelier About Architecture House W kitchen Atelier About Architecture House W casual dining Atelier About Architecture House W rec room Atelier About Architecture House W dining room Atelier About Architecture House W corridor Atelier About Architecture House W backyard Atelier About Architecture House W external Atelier About Architecture House W streetscape Atelier About Architecture House W streetviewabc
House Of The Year 2019

Umbrella House

The architects speak of this as a renovated house. The drawings show that actually only some columns and beams have been retained, while the old floor has been taken out. So, while it is not strictly-speaking a conversion, it can reasonably be seen as one from the point of view of the clients – a young couple with a ‘simple lifestyle’ – and the designer. Umbrella House is located deep in the high density housing quarter of Ho Chi Minh City and there’s not too much of interest in close proximity, hence the architects chose to focus on the interiors. Accordingly, every part of the site is used, but not every nook and cranny is utilised, ensuring that the small house is compact but not compressed. The construction components (walls, beams, columns, stairs and so forth) are also used as interior elements. Each of them appears in only one or two places, so it does not repeat itself while maximising its uniqueness. The whole house is a series of cleverly designed spaces and seemingly, nothing is redundant. Spatial organisation becomes a game of visual juxposition in the architects’ hands. We can see their intention to make familiar elements unfamiliar in the face of common sense: the ceiling is made of glass like a curtain wall and the ground is paved with air-bricks like a screen wall. The intention is to create perceptual confusion: the old structure is finished like a new one, while the new elements are made as old (brick walls, concrete ceilings and stairs are not plastered or painted); the bedroom, which should be private and discreet, is open; the kitchen, which should be light-filled and ventilated, is shielded. The intention is to create dramatic situations: backgrounding the sophisticated forms (of furnishings and fittings) and orienting views from spacious areas to cramped ones, creating shadows to draw attention to the light sources, and the use of white paint to emphasise the prominence of dark holes. Glass and bricks are used – because they make sense. Not only does transparency help to expand views and draw in light, but being allowed to see something behind glass also creates the effect of photo-collage because of the reflected images. Bricks on the internal wall seem separated from each other and create the sense that this wall is broken by being ‘bent’ or overloaded by the stairs. The convex surface has a tendency to push everything away from it, but two walls bending in, in opposite directions, create a conflict and squeeze the stairs between them. The idea of ​​an umbrella is also part of the visual game. The architects want to create a pleasant space in the shadow of a wide roof, which is more airy and cooler than outside. Thus the columns from one side of the bedroom upstairs are removed to expand the panoramic view and let the wind blow in. The structural transition from the roof fringe to the central column (characteristic of an umbrella) is intentionally shown off through the glass ceiling above the bed. This umbrella is of the rectangular type used in coffee shops or swimming pools, hence evoking the relaxed feeling of being in a bungalow at the beach, not in a fast-paced, bustling city. Umbrella House, with its moderated simple design, welcomes everyone to live in it, with all their belongings.abc
House Of The Year 2019

Apollo Bay House

If you live in inner suburban Melbourne and need a regular spring clean, Bruny Island (less than an hour by car and ferry from Hobart in Tasmania) couldn’t be more perfect. The island is a 15-minute ferry trip from the main island of Tasmania and was named after the French explorer, Antoine Bruni d’Entrecasteaux who, in 1793, surveyed the Derwent River and the channel (also named after him) separating Bruny Island from the mainland. Bruny Island is alternately dramatic and enchanting and nowhere is this more the case than Apollo Bay, just a short drive from the ferry terminal. The house has water frontage and enjoys sensational views across the bay and beyond to Hobart and Mount Wellington. The client wanted something completely different from his family’s customary lifestyle and something closely connected with its coastal environment. He had worked with architects before and was relaxed about leaving it to Dock4 Architects to develop the driving ideas. There was an existing three-bedroom Cedar shack on the site and architect, Richard Loney, says that the concept for the new house was driven from the start by the dilemma of “whether it was worth keeping the existing fabric” of what was realistically a nondescript structure. In the end, a lot went, but the architects retained the flooring, the stud walls and footings. The new 125-metre-squared house consists of the old shack expanded with spaces alongside, in front of and on top – all wrapped in an angled lightweight steel frame that hints at a tent structure, thus signalling that this is a house that is not imposed on its site, but an integral part of it. All the new spaces – the living/kitchen/dining area, two external decks sharing the same contour, and the bedrooms above – have a strong connection to the outside and the house itself is filled with light. The light comes from extensive glazing but is also filtered through the polycarbonate screen that seems to almost casually lie against the side of the house on the entry side – the entry being a corridor that runs down the side of the original shack to the living area. From the corridor, stairs lead up to a mezzanine-like level containing three bedrooms. Down the entry corridor, a suspended fireplace draws the visitor towards the living spaces. Here, ample visual connections; the external decks on either side of the living space; a long bench seat extending from inside to outside, together with the extended kitchen, all reinforce the sense of inside and outside being one. Almost as a relief from this, there is a lounge tucked away behind the kitchen, a private nook raised up a little from the living space. The achievement of this house is that it combines the uniqueness of its rural context with the relaxed comfort and amenity of a completely modern home. The material palette helps to generate this happy union – light in tone and modern in character inside, while outside the darker tones resonate with the surrounding bush and marinescape.abc
House Of The Year 2019

Teneriffe House

The story of this beautiful old Queenslander in Brisbane’s Teneriffe reflects the story of the suburb itself. The elegant, sprawling house was built in 1909 by a retired Scottish sea captain and his wife who enjoyed commanding views of the Brisbane River from their elevated perch. They commissioned local architect, A.B. Wilson (whose descendants still run Wilson Architects, the city’s oldest practice), to construct a house that soon became a focal point for local social and charitable activities. When the current owners bought it, it had long been a halfway house for disadvantaged men. Its original plan was obscured by its 26 bedrooms and 13 bathrooms, and the serious attrition of its materials. Concurrent with the area’s trajectory to one of the city’s most desired real estate havens, the uncovering, re-establishing and re-thinking of the “beautiful old girl” (as architect, Stuart Vokes of Vokes and Peters refers to it) was the remit for a fine collaboration between architect and client. “Our clients were visionary about the proposition of the site,” recalls Stuart. “The idea of a house in the garden, and of the civic gesture of sharing the garden with the street rather than marking off territory in a gesture of greed, was appealing.” The first step in the re-jig was to turn the house 90 degrees and push it back further on the block, easing up generous garden space on the streetside north and offering the length of the house to that aspect. The connection to the garden is paramount, and aligns with the home’s early history, when all manner of morning and afternoon teas took place in the garden and were served from the home’s undercroft. Reclaiming the undercroft for the main family living spaces is the key intervention in the plan. As most people who have lived in a Queenslander know, the best place to be is ‘down under’. Writer, David Malouf, eulogised the mysterious charms of these musty spaces, where laundering took place in coppers and ringers, and garden tools and life’s detritus gather dust. Dogs know it is where to rest and pant out a hot summer’s day. And, as Stuart notes, “the social life of the house is always underneath”. The kitchen takes up the pivotal ground corner position, facing the pool to the east and the expansive northern garden, replete with a playful amphitheatre for children’s shows. A paved brick arcade extends the kitchen floor space outside. Original timber stumps are replaced by a substructure of concrete beams, and the wide concrete arcade becomes the new support. Black striated screen walls and stable doors recall darkened battens, supporting the more refined white timber and shingle structure above. A flanged edge to the base of the timber gives a nod to the original Arts and Crafts influence, while editing the connection made during the concrete pour. The whole structure is crowned by a zinc roof worked in the historic Parliament profile. Far from according with the slavishly ‘historic’, the northern elevation terminates in a sharp wedge that projects like a ship’s bowsprit and seems to point to the sky and the river. This tower device establishes a lofty internal presence and brings in light to the kitchen and the levels above. An internal stair concentrates and makes openly legible the circulation between floors. “The stair becomes a room in its own right,” says Stuart, “and sets up the drama of family life.” Upstairs a series of bedrooms and elegant living rooms enjoy verandah access, with the length of the southern verandah edge devoted to a series of washroom spaces under the sloping roof. An attic level is self-contained. In a feat of future-proofing, the house’s ground level could operate independently, but for now the home breathes new life for its inhabitants and the surrounding suburb.abc
House Of The Year 2019

C House

Things are a-changing in Kuala Lumpur. With new guidelines allowing the increase in storey height, density and size, homes in affluent and mature residential enclaves like Damansara Heights have seen quite a transformation in recent years. As many standard double-storey houses built in the 1980s did not cater to current needs, they were mostly sold, demolished and rebuilt. For the owner of C-House, purchasing and combining two average residential plots (now totaling 1200-square-metres) was necessary to accommodate a growing, multi-generational family. Accordingly, Design Collective Architects (DCA) was tasked to realise that dream home. “The building site was still in a state of flux with neighbouring homes putting up ‘for sale’ signs. Some having just been transacted and new houses are being planned,” explains Chan Mun Inn, architect and co founder of the firm. Hence, to fulfill all the spatial requirements while providing future-proofing flexibility, a “shifting boxes” design was suggested. Essentially, the design calls for two rectilinear boxes placed on top of one another with the top one shifted out of alignment. This creates two extra outdoor spaces: a covered verandah along the ground floor with connections to the formal living and dining room; and a terrace on the upper level to accommodate the swimming pool. The two-storey, overhanging structure is supported by cantilevered slabs and beams with all of the bedrooms placed here. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? But that’s only half of the challenge because feng shui also comes into play. For example, the placement of the family rooms had to take into consideration the five elements such as fire (the stove) and water (sinks in the kitchen), while the main entrance door had to be at a specific angle, resulting in the overall siting of the house being slightly skewed. However, to the architects’ credit, these requirements were communicated during the early stage of design and have been subtly woven into the fabric of the house without sticking out like a sore thumb. C-House also took on a sustainable approach by adopting principles of natural ventilation. This is achieved by restricting the building depth to ensure the effective cross ventilation of fresh air through the house. “The outdoor verandah, gardens, pool deck and rooms located on opposite sides are fitted with sliding doors and windows to allow for air to move through the building,” says Mun Inn. “The internal voids and staircases have also been designed as heat stacks to extract warm air upwards to be exhausted through openings above.” To manage natural daylight and avoid excessive heat gain, vertical sun shading elements were introduced along the north-west facing front of the house. So, even under a hot afternoon sun, this area hardly needs airconditioning. Furthermore, locally sourced trees and shrubs have been placed throughout the landscaping of the gardens. Each plant plays its part in providing shading and screening while softening the hard architectural exterior. C-House took three years to complete, but it was definitely worth the wait for the family, especially with the inclusion of the pièce de résistance: a two-storey high roof garden. It is created by having the façade wall recessed into the ‘frame’ of the building, while attached to the son’s bedroom and visible from the master bathroom. As it overhangs the neighbouring houses and conceals the rooflines, it frames the view of Kuala Lumpur city. Due to its south-western facing façade, the view out can also catch the setting sun and the amber skies during the evenings – that’s certainly a ‘top tier’ of living that any child (or adult) can hope for.abc
Architecture
Interiors
Places
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Is Hightail By Techne The Pub Of The Future?

Combine a hip food court with a luxe cocktail bar, and you might get something like Hightail – a new hotspot set to breathe life to a notoriously overlooked part of Melbourne. Australian Bar Holdings approached Technē Architecture and Interior Design with a brief to create a high-impact venue within a generous tenancy at the base of Collins Square in Docklands. With the client having recently merged with 100 Burgers, known for their Welcome to Thornbury Food Truck Park, the 950-seat space cleverly integrates individual kiosks for Belle’s Hot Chicken, Super Taco, and the ever-popular Mr. Burger. Catering to roughly 20,000 workers in the buildings above, Hightail was formed with the vision of providing the perfect backdrop for after-work drinks descending en masse. Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers seating “It’s a big venue and it’s designed for big volumes,” says Nick Travers of Technē Architecture and Interior Design. Situated within a corporate environment, Technē had a lot of heavy lifting to do with the design. “We didn’t have the benefit of a quaint corner site in the inner city,” explains Nick. “So we really had to think about elements that would make it feel pub-like.” Essential to creating that atmosphere is the positioning of the two main bars close to the two entrances – immediate visibility is key. In the absence of a beer garden, the design features a space at the entry with a glass roof, which brings an outdoor feel. Other aspects referencing the classic pub ambience include the highly decorative floor treatment, as well as foot rails and bull-nose shaped bar tops. In crafting a playful, convivial venue, Technē latched on to the idea of an oasis-type space. Reference imagery came from Graeme Base’s books, particularly The Waterhole, as a neat colloquialism for a public bar. “So through that story of a jungle filled with animals and colour, we hit upon this vibrancy and lushness. We took that idea and abstracted it to turn it into the fit-out we have,” says Nick. Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers dining room Responding to the needs of the modern foodie, Hightail is the latest in a wave of venues embracing the casualisation of the dining experience. Fast food doesn’t mean junk food, and in an era of endless choice, the amalgamation of fancy food courts with a place to pop a few cheeky bottles may just be the way of the future for hospitality. “If you’re out somewhere with your mates, often people order share plates, but everyone wants something different,” says Nick. “With Hightail, everyone gets what they want – and I think that’s the real strength of the offering. It’s quite a unique combination of uses.” Technē techne.com.au Photography by Charlie Kinross Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers bar Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers bar seating Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers tables Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers booth seating Hightail Bar Docklands Techne Nick Travers signageabc
Interiors

The Croydon House by Arent&Pyke

This house in Croydon, in inner west Sydney, is a melange of warm, sunny tones and textures, care of the design powerhouse behind the interior renovation Arent&Pyke. Materials are elegantly overlapped and built up onto one another, whilst simultaneously offset with a good injection of clean whites, to create a space that is rich, balanced and positively positive. Inhabited by an active young family with two children and another on the way, the house needed to offer an equilibrium of open and intimate retreat spaces. The original house held onto its 1900s charm, yet the out-dated layout design resulted in a labyrinth of disconnected and antisocial spaces. The couple’s brief was for a house that could allow for dialogue between rooms, even in the chaos of the AM/PM rush hours. Arent&Pyke recentred the floor plan, emphasising the connection between the communal living and dining areas with the kids bathroom and laundry. Timber is run up from the floor to delineate the doorway connecting both spaces, giving a clever graphic silhouette that artistically contours through the visual space. Arent&Pyke Croydon House indoor outdoor The couple sought out Arent&Pyke for their quirky and characterful styling, and similarly, the house exudes a flare of fun but sophisticated features. The main living space is grounded in interlapping honey timber, which bases the textural tapestry of the room. A yellow striped textile pergola casts a subtle golden glow into the interior, and colour is augmented through the heavy-fibre woollen daybed and vibrant cushions. The kitchen’s colour is balanced through the marble splashback and island bench. The more subtle rippling detail offers additional interest to play against the exuberant colours, yet the more muted tones prevent from the space tipping into the excessive. The island bench is a salient, sculptural feature, where marble and timber spill over the counter top to artistically play on the object’s form and function. This playful aspect is also emphasised in the oversized button drawer pulls. The neutral stone material of these balancing their exaggerated appearance. Arent&Pyke Croydon House kitchen appliances This rich – and expertly curated – use of texture and colour is continued throughout every room. Each bathroom has its own unique feel and feature. Geometric floor tiles differ between them, and offer gorgeous interest against the more quiet white wall tiles. Marble returns, wrapped around the bathroom vanity unit in an incredible display of organic patterning that juxtaposes nicely against the geometric flooring. The supplementary elements in the bathrooms, such as the lighting and mirrors are softer, yet adopt curvaceous and elongated forms to indirectly aid the overall joyful spirit of each room. The house illustrates Arent&Pyke’s skills in using colour, texture and usual form in conjunction to build up the character of a space. The energy of the house reflects the active lives and personalities of the young and growing family who reside within. Arent&Pyke arentpyke.com Photography by Tom Ferguson Dissection Information Agape Ottocento bathtub from Artedomus Hex Target Dove & Milk tiles from Onsite (bathroom) Flos Glo-Ball S (bathroom) &tradition Copenhagen pendants in black (kitchen) Thonet stools in classic black (kitchen) Svenskt Tenn fabric (cushions in kitchen) Electrolux fridge Arent&Pyke Croydon House freestanding bathtub Arent&Pyke Croydon House bedroom Arent&Pyke Croydon House reading chair Arent&Pyke Croydon House bathroom marble vanity Arent&Pyke Croydon House bathroom Arent&Pyke Croydon House sofaabc