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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

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Fixed & Fitted

That’s Amore!

Throughout the global history of domestic design, the kitchen has remained a constant. Though other rooms have shrunk and stretched to accommodate changing needs and shifting trends, the kitchen has weathered generations of architectural styles with ease. Even today, as apartments squeeze into increasingly tiny spaces and there are more options than ever when it comes to pre-made food, the kitchen is an integral part of the home, be this a studio apartment for one in the heart of the city or a bustling family home in the suburbs. A place to cook, a place to eat, and a place to simply gather, the kitchen has an almost magnetic pull, and is often the first room in the house visited each morning and one of the last to be used at night. None understand this more than the Italians, for whom the kitchen has long been the axis around which daily life revolves.

In Italian culture, where the joy of food lies not only in its consumption but also in its preparation, the status of the kitchen is near sacrosanct. It is not merely a space to prepare meals, but a space where generations of one family can gather to learn the culinary secrets of their forebears and thus adapt upon a legacy. A bustling hive of activity, the Italian kitchen is one that strengthens relationships between family members and underscores their cultural ties, all the while cultivating a genuine love and respect for food that does not start with the first forkful and end when the plate is clean.

Instead, the Italian love of food and cooking starts with gathering the freshest ingredients and preparing these with care, thoughtfully balancing flavours until something is ‘just so’. In the kitchen, family and friends stand elbow to elbow and use their senses – sight, smell, taste, and touch – to perfect a dish. To cook in such a kitchen is to practice an art form, and to take pleasure in the simple joys of a perfectly ripe tomato, a wedge of fine cheese, or a perfectly crimped ravioli.

This quality of connoisseurship – this sense of everything being ‘just so’ – appears to inculcate so much of the Italian orientation to daily living: a world order of effortless perfection. Everything is suffused with care, and tellingly constructed with same. What’s more, it’s an attribute that extends far beyond cuisine on the Italian peninsula. Masters of automotive design, couture, winemaking, architecture, music, poetry (… the list is limitless), Italy has remained at the vanguard of taste-making for aeons. You need only look as far as the index in any encyclopedia of design – punctuated by so many Italian surnames -– to truly understand just how much the Italian mastery of craftsmanship has contributed to modern life.

Ilve stove

And yet, looking beyond Valentino or Ferrari, Alessi or Ponti, Scorsese or Moroso, it has always been Italy’s particular mastery of food that sends the mind and body into rapture. This is something that a certain breed of person knows all-too-well: the ‘Ilvenista’. People, that is, who understand the beauty inherent in that perfect synthesis of form-meeting-function. They are aficionadi of design as a way of living – as an extension of living, to be more exact. They cannot discriminate between the object of design, the visione del mondo of a country, its people and their inimitable soul.

The true giveaway to an Ilvenista, however, lies in their kitchen. Understanding the lifeigivng potential of design, Ilvenistas are so named because their life revolves around their ILVE oven, and the generations of their ancestors gathered around this oven for generations immemorial.

But you don’t have to come from an Italian family to enjoy food in the same luxurious, intoxicating way. Now, ILVE brings all the passion and joy of Italian cooking to your home with a range of high-end kitchen appliances to suit home chefs of all abilities. Experience the unique thrill of biting through delicate layers of home made pasta, or the satisfaction of a perfectly roasted side of beef. Take the time while cooking to treat your ingredients with love and respect, and amaze your family and friends with the incredible results.

Founded in 1952 in the town of Campodarsego in Venice, ILVE has cultivated an attitude of design’s invigorating potential for more than sixty-five years. For more than two generations, the brand’s founding families of Illotti and Berno have married the Italian adoration of cuisine, and their love of community, with state-of-the-art handcrafted manufacturing capabilities.

Since first bringing European style and quality to Australian shores in 1984, ILVE has translated the Italian culinary passion into one suited to the everyday Australian home. ILVE’s seamless marrying of sleek contemporary style and traditional quality and performance has brought their legion of Ilvenistas into every pocket of the world, all designerati gourmands brimming with a genuine love for food. Equally enamoured by their ILVE appliances, Ilvenistas take great pleasure in cooking food they love for people they love with the cookers they love. For them food is a process, not a product. They wouldn’t have it any other way … and nor would we.

ILVE ilve.com.au

Ilve Stove

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Homes
Around The World
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Radiator House By Hiroshi Nakamura Architects

Hiroshi Nakamura Architects have created a private home in Ichikawa, Chiba, known as Radiator House, relating to it’s protective, steel exterior wall and all-wood interior design. Utilising a diversity of contrasting materials, the two-story residence features a balance of stainless steel and natural wood in its design over a site area of 320.61sqm. Built in a dense neighbourhood, the owners requested a sense of privacy in the design. The architects developed a transparent exterior shell as a type of wall surrounding the house, configuring ventilation and air flow to the property. Made from GRC (Reinforced Concrete with Glassfibre) with a supporting stainless steel bar, the 2 centimetre-thick wall is rust-proof and even provides additional soundproofing. The custom wall was created for the property’s specific measurements, originally designed in plaster and made into a silicone rubber mould for replications. “As this would obstruct ventilation, we decided to build a wall approximately 18 m wide on the border between the south garden and adjacent property that would secure both privacy and passage for wind. This wall is similar to the core material of radiators that is used to cool engines,” says Hiroshi Nakamura.

The walls latticed configuration has an integrated radiator design, which draws in the southern wind from the nearby river and in summer it dispels a mist of water from it’s upper section intended as “uchimizu” (the sprinkling of water around a homes entrance that holds a deep, traditional Japanese context from rituals in temples and gardens).Hiroshi further explains, “This type of architectural creativity has faded with the arrival of air conditioners, and architectural structures throughout Japan are becoming nothing more than homogenous boxes. Creating a breeze for someone and feeling this on your skin. I aspire to cherish these warmhearted feelings and customs.”

Inside the residence, an all-wood interior includes a spacious elevated ceiling with large glass windows that occupy the entire North side of the home and look out onto the private garden. With additional window openings at the second floor height, the architects designed a “chimney-effect” that allows accelerated wind-flow at each height.

Hiroshi Nakamura Architects have created a residence with a close consideration of nature in their design, whilst incorporating traditional Japanese rituals in a modern approach.

Hiroshi Nakamura Architects nakam.info

Photography by Koji Fujii

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Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects interior dining

Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects hallway

Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects interior

Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects oustide view

Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects

Radiator House Hiroshi Nakamura Architects steel wall

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Happenings
Parties

Celebrating 10 Years Of Style With DesignByThem

Founded by Nick Karlovasitis and Sarah Gibson, in the 10 years since DesignByThem was launched, the duo has designed an extensive range of products and built a collection that showcases what's special about Australian design. Today, DesignByThem hosts a collection of over 70 designs from a stellar cohort of Australian Designers including Stefan Lie, Trent Jansen, Tommy Cehak, Tom Fereday, Seaton Mckeon, Jon Goulder and Daniel Tucker. To launch into the next decade, the brand has created a special little collection of 1:10 scale miniature designs, described by the duo as  “Bauhaus meets fun - you know, Bauhaus but if the weather was better”. The range of launched an exclusive party the celebrated a decade of DesignByThem and the power of great Australian design. [gallery columns="5" ids="68793,68794,68795,68796,68797,68798,68799,68800,68801,68802,68803,68804,68805,68806,68807,68808,68809,68810,68811,68812,68813,68814,68815,68816,68817,68818,68819,68820,68821,68822,68823,68824,68825,68827,68828,68829,68830,68831,68832,68833,68834,68835,68836,68837,68839,68840,68841,68842,68843,68844,68845,68846,68847,68850,68851,68852,68854,68855,68856,68857,68858,68859,68860,68861,68862,68864,68865,68866,68867,68868,68869,68870,68871,68872,68873,68874,68875,68876,68877,68878,68879,68880,68881,68882,68883,68884,68885,68886,68887,68888,68889,68890,68891,68892,68893,68894"] Photography and styling: Pete Dalyabc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

In Conversation With… Miriam Fanning

ST: Miriam, your studio is almost 18 years old. Can you tell me how it all began? MF: Branding and graphics interested me, and I wanted to be a graphic designer, I didn’t even think about becoming an interior designer. I didn’t get into Swinburne to study graphics but I got into RMIT instead and began studying interior design. When I started my studies graphic design was still very 2D and I’ve always thought in 3D visually, interior design really made sense to me and I knew within the first month of studying that I had made the right decision. You started Mim Design as a one-woman show. How did you go about setting up a studio that could evolve? I worked at a large architectural firm for some 13 years and I loved it, I learnt so much and I thought that would be my forever job. I had my first child in 2000 and at that stage there weren’t a lot of mums that went back into the workplace in an industry that was probably still 70 percent male. I thought, I’m probably better off doing my own thing, and so I became a consultant at the end of 2000. I had contracts within two weeks, including a resort in far-north Queensland. Despite my best intentions I ended up working in an office with a baby in a pram. I stayed a one-man band for approximately two years. Then you went to a two-person show? Yes, I shared an administration person and luckily my husband helped me out. Then Mim Design began to grow. How did you segue from a portfolio of mostly resort work to a point where now Mim Design is renowned for its single-residential work? I’m continually searching for inspiration and design challenges as the business represents this ethos. I’ve always been attracted to the fine detail of designing a home and intrigued by the micro as well as the macro of planning and the business followed my way of approaching the world through inspiration, challenge and purpose. Designing projects for people’s homes is very different to designing multi-residential or resort environments for clients who will probably never live in them. How do you go about that? To be a designer you have to be investigative and question your clients as much as you can about why you are designing what you are designing. The best design has a reason to exist and if you apply that philosophy across the board to commercial, multi residential and residential you are developing a solidified brief to which you can then respond. It’s not like, Oh I’ve got a residential job so I’m going to pick up my residential hat. You need to stay nimble enough to be able to design across different paths, different end uses and different feels. If I had created a studio that became known for one look I wouldn’t be doing it today. Knowledge, growth and inspiration are key factors in achieving longevity. How many people work in your studio? We have 26 staff members and I don’t really plan to get much bigger. It’s important for us and for our clients that each job has an identifiable team working on it, that relationships can develop and hopefully endure. If you don’t intend to expand the size of your studio how do you see the agency growing? By diversifying. In the past year and a half we’ve had so many residential clients coming to us asking which architects we would suggest them working with and this led us to the decision to create an architectural division within Mim Design. It’s not about creating a one-stop shop, it’s about developing a holistic approach to our business. I’ve just come back from a trip to Scandinavia and what was interesting to me was the way practices cross-pollinate, the way there’s an exchange between architects, designers and interior designers . It’s this 360 degree perspective that I find most interesting and rewarding and that’s certainly a way of working that I’d like to continue to explore.abc
Architecture
Interiors
Places

Old-World Charm, New-World Experience

The centuries-old ‘food-market’ format is a time honored tradition. Moving from providore to providore, taste-testing all the best local produce – cured meats, smoked cheeses, pickled vegetables, fresh fruit and baked goods – housed within historic art-deco holes-in-the-wall has always been romanticised. Sure, this model was doable in the past, where the population was only a quarter of what it is now, but have you tried going to Melbourne's Queen Victoria Markets on a Saturday recently? It’s at least a 30-40 min wait to get anywhere near a counter, much less sample the produce and enjoy it before you’re abruptly rushed into your purchased and ushered away from the stand so other customers can be served. In our haste to maintain and engage with some of that ‘old-world’ charm, we’ve forgotten to redesign and update the experience. Melbourne-based designer Kestie Lane’s latest effort for Wilson & Market’s new flagship restaurant at the Prahran Market is the ultimate nexus between nostalgia and modernity. Wilson & Market is part of the current redevelopment of the Prahran market and is the hero venue in the rejuvenation of the 126-year-old market. The restaurant design for example, juxtaposes a contemporary, sophisticated aesthetic against the raw energy and buzz of the daytime market place and holds its own as an evening destination brasserie and bar venue. “The design brief was complex,” says Lane. “We wanted to create a venue that would cater to a breakfast and lunch clientele as a light filled busy café and then transform to an evening venue that was sexy and evocative all underpinned by the ethos of the farm to table concept.” The existing tenancy presented some challenges: “very low ceilings and exposed existing services made for a difficult ceiling design and heights but the great location and backing onto the market square was key in creating the design experience,” Lane explains. Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke interior painting Inside and out the venue exudes a sense of transparency and connection to the Prahran Market, with the playful design of the ‘tuck-shop’ window for takeaway coffee and the café that spills out into the market square. The internal experience of the restaurant and bar is more intimate and plays on the theatre of food with an open kitchen, an oyster and rotisserie bar and a marble clad 10-metre ‘white spirts’ bar. Wilson and Market is bustling yet intimate, the interior encourages customers to immerse themselves allowing for a different experience each visit. The magic of the interior is how the design slowly reveals itself with a series of vignettes. The innovation can be truly recognized and appreciated in these beautiful moments. The interior palette for instance, is curated of warm finishes of grey stained oak timber, terrazzo and timber floors, soft polished concrete walls offset by the punch of the green tiles and the extensive green marble bar, combined create an elegant feel-good space. The sophisticated palette of finishes and custom crafted joinery sets the design language which creates an intimate yet a lively energy to the venue. Kestie notes that, “Collaborations with artisans and craftspeople” are the core philosophy of her design practice and one that transforms the design to something truly unique and memorable. “This philosophy and practice contributes to contemporary interior design by creating intelligent and considered designed spaces rather than solutions inspired by fad or fashion.” Wilson & Market is light-filled, authentic and an exceptional re-interpretation of a classic model. It is an intimate interior, with an unpretentious elegance. The inspired food sits beautifully against the crafted interior that evokes a relaxed and memorable experience. But most importantly, every facet of the design thinking for this project embodies that healthy positive eating we all remember from our market visits – a farm to table concept where biodynamic ingredients are sourced from small local farms. Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke bar Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke resturants Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke kitchen chairs Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke table Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke table food Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke details plants Wilson and Market Photography by Peter Clarke signabc
Architecture
Homes

Opposites Attract

This Perth residence is cleverly divided into two. The front maintains its original architectural features, reminiscent of its Federation roots, while the back of the home boasts a contemporary extension with open plan living, clean lines and modern materials. “We were careful to keep the old elements (which the owners love) as intact as possible, in contrast to the new elements, which are distinctly and unashamedly contemporary,” explains architect Joe Chindarsi of Chindarsi Architects. Nestled in the heart of Mount Lawley, Perth, the design brief was to cater for a young growing family, who required more space and a functional outdoor area. The small block had limited outdoor space, so Joe wanted to enhance amenity for the home owners as much as possible. The contemporary extension to the existing home incorporated a new open plan living, dining and kitchen area, as well as a garage, pool and a second level for the master suite, roof terrace, study and additional storage. Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei living room “The biggest challenge for the architectural team was probably planning approval, as there were some objections received during advertising around the modern roof form of the rear extension and privacy concerns from the raised roof-terrace over the garage, but we worked through the neighbours concerns and secured approvals fairly smoothly,” Joe explains. Joe says the connection from the ground up was the most important aspect; allowing connectivity between the inside and outside on both levels. This functional access successfully maximizes space and allows flexibility for entertaining. “I love the roof terrace that has external steel stairs down to the pool, because of the way it connects the spaces and completes the ‘circle’ from the inside,” he says. “I think flow is really important within and between spaces and we saw the roof terrace as an extension of the ground level courtyard space.” The upstairs extension and the roof terrace, also give the home owners access to views of the park and Perth city. A mix of polished concrete, white cement and black aggregate, create a spacious aesthetic and are the perfect mix of minimal colour and texture. Warmth is accented throughout with Tasmanian Blackwood cabinetry. “The modern materials contrast, so the old is old, but the new is modern and not trying to match. It is clear where the old stops and the new starts, it’s the best of both worlds,” says Joe. Chindarsi Architects Chindarsi.com.au Photography by Chantel Concei Dissection Information Bianca Carrara marble benchtops (kitchen) Dining Table from Angove Street Collective Original Ceramics, Compact Series Porcelain Tiles (bathroom) Composite timber decking Aluminium frames with silver powder coat Copper Fittings (outdoor shower and external lighting) Tasmanian Blackwood cabinetry Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei door Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei kitchen Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei dining Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei ensuite Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei bathroom Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei outdoor shower Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei exterior Chindarsi Architects Mount Lawley Photography by Chantel Concei front of houseabc
Design Products
Furniture

New Zealand-Born, London-Based Tim Rundle On His New Collection For Space

Inspired by functionality and sporting a pared-down aesthetic, the new SP01 collection by Tim Rundle will appeal especially to minimalists. A New Zealander based in London, Tim is an industrial designer whose varied experience is backed by having worked for renowned design brands and studios such as Tom Dixon and Conran and Partners. He also runs the prestigious Design Products Masters program at the Royal College of Art in London. We find out more about his ideas behind the new SP01 collection and its contemporary pieces. What were your inspirations for the new SP01 collection? One of the key themes in the collection was taking familiar typologies and stripping them back to the essential, making them visually light in terms of the way they occupy a space. For example, the Caristo armchair could be viewed as our take on a classic wing chair, with all the bulk removed and having a lightweight frame. The silhouettes of the Michelle mirrors draw on the arched forms common in Art Deco interiors, but pared back and injected with useful functions, such as the small side table surface. How would you describe the look of the pieces, and how do you envision them in home interiors here? We think all the pieces have a very international feel, drawing on design traditions from around the world. After all, they were designed by a New Zealander in London, for an Australian brand manufacturing in Italy. As a result, they can sit equally comfortably in a Victorian house in London and in a modern apartment in Singapore. In warmer, urban climates, I think the Mohana tables in white could have a certain cool, calming effect in an interior. Tell us about the use of colour and structured forms in the collection. The forms are all based around the idea of softening the inside – the human part, with an almost architectural approach to the outside, or frame. The pieces are all easy to read in a formal sense, with frames almost drawing their outlines in space. For the most part, the structural elements have been finished in monochromes or subtle metallic tones, allowing for truly individual solutions, together with the wide range of upholstery. What are the key materials in this collection? One of the materials we had the most fun with was the fluted glass of the Mohana tables. The way the two surfaces overlap creates a great optical effect with the marble, creating a kind of graphic composition for the home. The fine steel frames apparent in each product of the collection was crucial in allowing us to create visually light furniture pieces that were still extremely comfortable and sturdy. What was your favourite aspect of working on the collection and its designs? This was the studio’s first collection working with Italian manufacturers, which was a great experience. There is an amazing history of furniture design in Italy, and this is evident in a real passion for realising a creative vision at the absolute upmost quality. We made numerous prototypes; adjusting seat angles by a degree at a time to get the right angle for comfort, and dimensions by a couple of millimeters here and there to get the proportions perfect. SP01 collection spacefurniture.com.au Tim Rundle SP01 Caristo high Back Armchair details Tim Rundle SP01 Caristo high Back Armchair Tim Rundle SP01 Shu Ying Armchair Tim Rundle SP01 michlle wall mirror Tim Rundle SP01 Caristo high Back Armchair gray and blackabc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes
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Rhythmic Timber Louvres Line Namly View House In Singapore

Contrary to first impressions, there’s little difference between too much and too little. “Too anything and it’s rubbish,” you might remember comedian Ricky Gervais saying in an episode of his short-lived, well-loved sitcom, Extras. Architecture that offers too much space, and not enough interior furnishings, falls just as short as architecture that doesn’t take into account how the room will be used and the space available, presenting a cramped and claustrophobic interior. Namly View House, in Bukit Timah, Singapore, sits front and centre in the middle of the spectrum – to a stunning degree. The project team at Wallflower Architecture + Design have created a residential building that speaks equally to generous spaces and absorbent furniture and furnishings. Expansive rooms are balanced out by sleek corridors while warm timber runs the length of the floors, then continues out the to exterior by way of sun screens that offer a rhythmic concealing and revealing according to the varying demands of privacy, light and view. The steep topography of the site, large trees, and low roofline afford enviable, and at times panoramic, views of the surrounding raintrees. This is further explored in an open deck that allows for a seamless and subtle transition from the interior to the exterior on the raised ground floor. Namly View House by Wallflower Architecture + Design is designed as a series of spaces that embrace the surrounding raintrees, using time-tested, passive-cooling design strategies. Wallflower Architecture + Design wallflower.com.sg Photography by Marc Tey Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey staircase side Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey timber louvers exterior Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey timber louvers Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey stair case above Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey pool white timber louvers Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey balcony Wallflower Architecture Design Namly View House Photography by Marc Tey back of house exterior    abc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating 25 Years Of Australian Design With Tait

Tait had much to celebrate at its recent 25th anniversary soiree, held in the group's brand-new space in Sydney's Waterloo. Having spent a quarter of a century collaborating with a roster of renowned Australian design talent, manufacturing each piece to perfection in a custom Melbourne factory, Tait has been an imperative player in the growth of Australia's design industry. Reflecting on twenty-five years of designing and making, founder Gordon Tait presented a new icon - the Tait makers mark. The application of the makers mark would identify and reveal the authenticity, quality and craftsmanship of each piece. Joined by a guest list of Australian designers, design industry figures, media, company partners and collaborators, attending guests experienced the new light-filled double volume space as well as the recently launched, highly acclaimed Trace collection. The evening was met by guest speaker Adam Goodrum, who told of his long-standing history working with Tait. Cheers to Tait on this great milestone and here's to the next 25 years of great Australian design. Photography by Fiona Susanto [gallery columns="5" ids="68912,68913,68915,68916,68917,68918,68919,68920,68921,68922,68923,68924,68925,68926,68927,68928,68929,68930,68931"]abc
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Parties

What Does The Kitchen Of The Future Look Like?

There are only two guarantees in life: death and taxes. That’s what they say, right? You can’t predict the future definitively but there are certainly measures you can take to prepare yourself. Enter Cosentino. Following the release and publication of The Global Kitchen Study, which they helped produce, they hosted a brunch in their Sydney showroom to unveil insights into global trends within the kitchen, emerging technology, usage habits, responsive design, and ultimately to predict the future of the kitchen and its role in the home. Vanessa Feo, Global Head of Communications for Cosentino; Chef Felix Halter; and Jacqueline Symond, Director at the speciality colour consulting agency, The Colour Agency, each speaker shared a brief presentation before diving into an impassioned panel discussion. Interestingly, a lot of the trends emerging globally – technology in the kitchen, open plan layouts, luxury appliances becoming common place, expansive design and plenty of clean storage – have already presented themselves in Australia. [gallery columns="4" ids="68898,68899,68900,68901,68902,68903,68904"]abc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Out Of Africa

There are some places on this planet that, quite simply, just break your heart. Places of maroon dust and lavender sunsets. Places that seduce with a sense of vague familial echo. Canvas tents and shuttered balconies. Bazaars spilling to the fringes of iridescent copper canals. Soft, camphor breezes and dragonflies and quicklime. Places where the prayers of the blind muezzin respond to the same of the evening’s cicadas.  The discreet rhapsody of savannahs. The charm of temple gardens blanketed in moss.

Toward the latter end of the Nineteenth Century, it was precisely this headiness of romance that whipped intrepid westerners into a frenzy of overland travel. Where, hitherto, Grand Tours of Classical Europe and the Mediterranean had been voguish amongst the cosmopolitan elite, the combined efforts of Late Romantic poets, adventure novelists and colonial gentry began to set in motion a craze for safari journeying throughout distant continents. In part, the drawcard was always twinned: balancing the exoticism of far-flung destinations with the anthropological curiosity of communities relatively untouched by the swift encroachment of western influence.

Today we are all too familiar with the effects such tourism triggered: big game hunting, ecological and social devastation, the obliteration of authentic cultural traditions and the commercialising of communities displaced by what ethnographers term ‘genetic drift’. And yet, the sublimity of these arresting environments, the magnificence of the people who live there and the customs they follow continue to play upon our dreams of voyage and discovery.

Mcgrath Out Of Africa wild animal

Twenty-five years ago, Julie McIntosh found herself contemplating this precarious equilibrium. In a bid to balance the ardour for exotic locations and wildlife with the proven-to-be potentially disastrous effects of the modern tourist, she sought to reimagine the accepted methodology of travelling. Such marks the beginning of The Classic Safari Company. In the words of McIntosh – the company’s Founder and Director – “now celebrating our twenty-fifth year, we’re Australia’s leading safari specialists. Since our first days in 1992, we’ve been exploring the world and sharing our passion for extraordinary wilderness regions across Africa, the Indian Subcontinent, Latin America and far beyond.”

“Passion”, of course, is the perfect term. Carving out a rare place in the tourism landscape, The Classic Safari Company’s unique “passion” for taking first-hand experiences and translating those into truly exceptional – and always bespoke – journeys has given their team an unmatched degree of access to entire pockets of untouched wilderness, and rich, energetic communities (not to mention some of the most breathtaking encounters with wildlife).

“I always prefer the term of ‘active travel’,” McIntosh tells me. “Today, tourism is incredibly trend-driven. In the past several years we’ve seen the growth of sub-categories within tourism such as food tourism or eco-tourism. And while these offer very creative and certainly unique ways to explore other regions, we prefer instead to place more importance on engaging with the local communities and their culture. This type of ‘active travel’ immerses us in the depth and variety of different ways of life.”

Whether in Botswana or Bhutan, Sri Lanka or Morocco – and seemingly everywhere in between – McIntosh’s belief in the thriving potential of ‘active travel’ has garnered The Classic Safari Company an important position in helping to achieve much-needed conservation efforts.

Photography by of The Classic Safari Company, Dan Grinwis, Casey Allen, Jeff Lemond (Unsplash)

Mcgrath Out Of Africa exterior

Mcgrath Out Of Africa aniaml

Mcgrath Out Of Africa hanging chair

Mcgrath Out Of Africa wild animal

Mcgrath Out Of Africa car exterior

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Architecture
Interiors
Places

Have You Ever Been To A Cinema With Windows?

Nothing is impossible. That may well have been the motto during the design and construction of Palace Cinemas at One Central Park, the famously sustainable, mixed-use building in Sydney designed by Jean Nouvel. Opened in 2013, the building went on to secure the Best Tall Building in the World Award in 2014, awarded by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). Design Office and Design and Beyond have collaborated on the recently opened cinemas within the building. A building that was never designed to have a cinema in it. While that certainly provided some hurdles to overcome, namely space constraints, it also added to the uniqueness of the project. “It allowed us to have such large expanses of glass, to have cinemas with windows in them,” says Damien Mulvihill, Joint Creative Director of Design Office. On the bar design, “Palace really wanted a space that was hospitable and really comfortable,” adds Project Designer Tim Reid. And the resulting space evokes the glamour of Hollywood, a destination for Sydney-Siders whether or not you’ve come to see a movie. See you there? Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park entrance Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park slow chair ronan erwan bouroullec Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park view Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park lighting Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Park Design Office Palace Cinemas One Central Parkabc