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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Artist’s Retreat

Almost 20 years on and the Arthur and Yvonne Boyd Education Centre is still as intriguing a design as it was when first built in 1999. Impeccable architectural prowess would have you thinking this was a contemporary build, but this year actually marks the centre’s 19th. Situated in Riversdale on the South Coast of New South Wales, the land originally belonged to Arthur Boyd, who bestowed it to the Bundanon Trust in 1993. In 1994 the Artists In Residence program was launched, and in 1999 this beautiful building was erected to house the program. Designed by Australia’s only Pritzker Prize laureate Glenn Murcutt in conjunction with Wendy Lewin and Reg Lark, the property is considered a masterwork. Inspiration for the design came from the surrounding landscape. “We designed the complex of buildings three times within three differing landscapes within the site,” says Reg. “We gained more understanding of the place as we designed and eventually locked in our third location – perched up high, with the main hall on the axis of the river looking towards the sea and the accommodation wing sat on the river axis inland.” This striking design’s original purpose was to provide accommodation to 32 school children, enabling them to study art with their teachers while allowing them to be privy to an inspirational natural environment — the same one that inspired Arthur Boyd for 26 years of his artistic career. Boyd Education Centre Glenn Murcutt Reg Lark Architect front of house exterior Glenn, Wendy and Reg stretched the building alongside the river, with its hall and blinkered sleeping areas facing it, bestowing each inhabitant with their own little piece vista. “The experience is somewhere between camping and a well-appointed hotel,” says Reg, “the childrens’ bedrooms cantilever out from the walls creating an outdoor sleeping experience.” The grey concrete anchors the building to the ground and blends with the bush. Change is afoot on the land here, though, with an announcement in April 2016 for a $28.5 million expansion plan, thus commercialising the area. Three new buildings including a new creative learning centre, the Boyd Art Gallery – which will house more than 3,800 items, 1,300 of those by Arthur Boyd among other notable Australian artists – and a new accommodation wing complete with 32 double bedrooms, a dining area and a new cafe and catering facility will be erected here. The commercialisation of the site will undoubtedly impact the existing buildings and site, with Reg harbouring concerns about the impact this will have on the Boyd Education Centre. “Arthur’s painting studio was the arrival point in our design,” he says. “I feel that is lost now. Our building will be behind the new buildings thus lessening its strength.” Reg, Wendy and Glenn are not involved in the new venture. Reg Lark Architect reglarkarchitect.com.au Photography Luke Butterly Dissection Information Grade A off form concrete walls & structure Recycled Tallowwood column and roof structure, linseed oil finished Galvanised corrugated iron roof sheeting by Lysaghts Hoop pine veneering over marine ply bedroom wing joinery Blackbutt tongue & groove tung oiled bedroom wing flooring 230 x 110 brick paving by Boral throughout dining hall and entry 200 x 50 oregan timber sliding door frames Brass top hung tracking and floor guides by Cowdroy Stainless steel grated door track drainage by Stormtech 9mm acoustic slotted hoop pine ceiling panels to main hall White Laminex Industries laminated 18 marine plywood kitchen joinery Integrated stainless steel bench tops and sinks Integrated fridges by Lieberr Gas cooktop and electric oven by AEG Abloy D32 stainless steel joinery handles Wall face wc’s and basins by charoma Tap ware by Vola Australia We think you might also like Binh Thanh House by Vo Trong Nghia 

Boyd Education Centre Glenn Murcutt Reg Lark Architect bedroom

Boyd Education Centre Glenn Murcutt Reg Lark Architect exterior details Boyd Education Centre Glenn Murcutt Reg Lark Architect concrete wall Boyd Education Centre Glenn Murcutt Reg Lark Architect exterior abc
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Art For Artists’ Sake

In recent years, the Australian Council For The Arts spearheaded one of the nation’s most comprehensive investigations into the status of our arts community. The findings – presented in the official report ‘Health Check For Careers Of Australian Artists’ – does not, however, bode well for the future of our position in the global fine arts industry. After surveying data from more than 44,000 active Australian artists, the report’s findings prove that the image of the starved artist will not disappear from our cultural scene any time soon. In fact, while the report found that the average income for active artists within Australia rings in at a measly $35,900 per annum, approximately 16 per cent of surveyed artists earn a shockingly inferior amount (less than $10,000). Inauspicious though this data may seem, one would be forgiven for thinking that the trend indicates waning commercial interest for art across the nation. Market forces, however, attest otherwise. After almost a decade of flatlining annual sales, 2017 is primed for increased dealer activity on behalf of private clients. The crowning achievement – Sotheby’s Australian art sale in May – saw record highs indexed across more than 108 lots. Raising over $11.69 million without Sotheby’s buyer’s premiums (more than 120 per cent of the total lower pre-sale estimates), the sale brought in a total of $14.26 million within a single day. What’s more, Sotheby’s record sale arrived hot on the heels of $6.87 million raised by Menzies’ auction, $7.68 million at Deutscher & Hackett’s Rob Gould Collection, and $2.62 million for the Laverty Collection Estate … all within the space of three months. Since the Global Financial Crisis, it has been mightily rare for the Australian art market to garner close to $100 million – an annual tally that 2017 has already eclipsed, closing at almost $115 million year to date. Meanwhile, watershed exhibitions in Australia’s leading public galleries this year has seen total capacity of traffic surpass expectations, forcing exhibition periods to be extended by weeks in some cases. Following the preternatural success of their Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera: from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, and the 2017 Archibald Prize, Wynne and Sulman Prizes, Art Gallery of New South Wales director Michael Brand commented that “currently, the Gallery attendee numbers illustrate how engaged Sydneysiders are with the visual arts. There is clearly a thirst for enjoyment of culture in our community and a genuine support of the arts. […Travelling exhibitions] act as a drawcard for visitors to further explore our collection and participate in a wide range of public programs.” How, then, might we account for the disparity existing, on the one hand, between under-remuneration for this country’s artists and, on the other, the healthiest level of investment in the art market to date? “Bridging the gap between exclusive and inclusive,” says Ted Helliar, “can open the door to accessible, quality-assured art. Redefining the experience of buying and selling art, as well as elevating the profile the arts community that surrounds us.” Australian Council For The Arts pop launch At the helm of Wall Pop – a curated digital art gallery dedicated to showcasing the work of Australian artists – Helliar’s words touch upon the need for the Australian market to redress the disproportion existing between the contribution by our artistic community to Australian life (measured in cultural and social terms), and vital remuneration such individuals require to ensure that this industry can look forward to a bright future. In Helliar’s own words, it is Wall Pop’s unique gallery model that strikes a chord with artist and patron, alike: “we connect people with art by creating a platform for artists to showcase and sell their works while still enabling first time art buyers through to established collectors to buy quality art in an accessible, unintimidating online experience.” While Wall Pop’s featured artists exhibit by invitation only, hand selected by a team of multi-disciplinary curators, the brand’s raison d'être to discover and support emerging talent lends their collections a diversity of styles, mediums and genres expressing the contemporary Australian experience. On this ongoing commitment to nurturing the future of the industry, celebrated Australian artist and one of Wall Pop’s curators, Anwen Keeling, said “as both an artist and lecturer it is exciting to be in the position to be able to help foster talented young artists’ careers through this sensational platform. Wall Pop furnishes buyers with not only the opportunity to purchase dynamic and well-made contemporary artworks, but the chance to make shrewd investments in talented, young and motivated artists as their careers are launched.” And while few cultural mediums have defied the digital revolution quite like the fine arts world, new technology at our fingertips has prompted a grand opening up of the art market. Far from dislodging traditional museums and galleries from their exalted status, models like Wall Pop ensure that the exclusivity, elitism and inflation of the traditional fine arts market to date can be questioned. After all, the top heaviness of the traditional market is overdue intervention, allowing authentic and community-focused brands like Wall Pop to turn an inefficient, expensive offline marketplace – that is all too often a lazy monopoly – into a people-first environment that makes it easy for people to transact. Perhaps this very people-centric approach remains Wall Pop’s greatest achievement to date. Seeing patrons come back time and again to view Wall Pop’s collections, it seems that it is the human touch which captures the imagination. It was precisely this aspect that brought George Gregan, former Wallabies captain, to the digital walls of Wall Pop: "Mim Fluhrer is one of the feature artists on Wall Pop, I was drawn to her work immediately. As a Collector I’m always happy to help support emerging artists who put so much time and effort into their craft.” Wall Pop.art wallpop.art Photography Courtesy of Wall Pop Australian Council For The Arts Caution fragile contents Australian Council For The Arts and so i reckon i am not at the beginning of the beginning of something serious Australian Council For The Arts dining room floor with photograph Australian Council For The Arts the future is now brad teodoruk acrylic charcoal and oil pastel on cavas  abc
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Bassike Paddington And A Lesson In Restraint

What would make you visit a traditional, brick and mortar store, over the convenience of online shopping? Regardless of whether you’re shopping for fashion, food, furniture, homewares or literature, it’s a question that has had the retail industry captivated since the internet boom. How can we create an online environment to compete with the atmosphere of physical spaces? And on the reverse, how can traditional retailers compete with the ease and affordability of online shopping? But what if that’s the wrong approach? Instead of pitting the two outlets against each other, what if a brand was to celebrate the strengths of each? bassike has 10 physical touch points (stand-alone stores) and one online retail space. The locations don’t compete with each other, nor does the online shop. Instead, they celebrate their differences and different locations. Kelvin Ho, architect, interior designer and founder of Akin Creative has worked with bassike for 11 years and all 10 stores – including Venice, California, and the first iteration of their Paddington store on Glenmore Road. “Retail design is becoming increasingly more about end-to-end brand experience rather than a traditional retail experience,” says Kelvin. “Our objective was to create a fully immersive brand experience for the customer. We have sought to design a space that cultivates emotional connections with the space and, in turn, the bassike brand.” bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin shelving Akin Creative Established in 2006 by friends Deborah Sams & Mary Lou Ryan, by 2010 bassike had opened their store in Paddington. It hasn’t been touched in eight years – but eight years is a long time, and the timing felt right to realign the space to the evolution of the brand. There are many ways in which the brand has held consistency over the years: their ethical and sustainable values; a relaxed approach to dressing; shapes, styles and fabrics offered. But there are also ways in which they’ve evolved. “The brand [has] matured, it [has] become refined and more contemporary. The garment construction more in-depth – the store design needed to communicate similar values,” says Kelvin. Likewise, there are practical considerations to factor in to the store design, such as shelving for the bags, footwear and accessory lines they now offer, but didn’t eight years ago. This additional offering requires unique and bespoke real estate within the store. As for the material and furniture choices, they needed to mirror the fabrics, designs and brand language. A natural material palette consisting of oak, wool rugs, sisal mats, linen curtains & travertine felt most suitable. Vintage Hans Wegner Scissor Chairs, sourced from Grandfather’s Axe in Melbourne, mark the rear of the store. “A space in which you can relax,” notes Kelvin, “a mood bassike communicates so well with their product. We wanted the store to speak into that same relaxed, almost residential tone.” And it does. bassike bassike.com Akin Creative akinatelier.com Photography by Terrence Chin bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin Hans Wegner Scissor Chairs bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin lower ground bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin staircase bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin first floor bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin artek stool bassike paddington kelvin ho cc terance chin courtyard We think you might also like the Bec & Bridge space by George Livissiannisabc
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A Forest-Like Restaurant Interior By Ryoji Iedokoro Architects

Located in the heart of Tokyo’s Roppongi district, Ryoji Iedokoro Architects have created a new restaurant with a forest-like interior, inspired by the origins of man. The architect and client met socially, where the restaurant owner expressed his plans to open his first restaurant in central Roppongi. Due to the abundance of restaurants in the area, the client expressed an intention to create something visually striking that would set it apart from the rest.

The restaurant serves yakiniku (Japanese grilled meat), hence Ryoji Iedokoro Architects’ design concept being based on the early origins of man, and furthermore connected with the primal diet of meat. From this, the architects have reimagined the concept of communal gathering spaces as places of generating conversation and dialogue, the very basis of human connection.

Over a total of site area of 130sqm divided over two floors, the restaurant sits on a corner site in Tokyo’s dense Roppongi area.Ryoji Iedokoro explains, “The exposed corner site meant a protective building was required for both visual and acoustic privacy, and the design seeks to create an enclosed shelter for the occupants.”

From street view, the wide glass facade from the ground floor is connected to the second, allowing plenty of generous light. The design provides a transparent view of the restaurant, almost as if it had been sliced in half to expose the three key elements for its concept of the origins of humans; from the caves, to earth and heaven. Architect Ryoji Iedokoro explains, “The design reminds us of these natural surroundings, being around trees on a riverside, sitting in caves to avoid rain and wind. Experiencing not only the visual image of this design, but also enjoying an emotive experience, which will create vivid and inspirational memories.

Each design material was selected for their diversity to the space. On the ground floor dining area, a long communal glass table is positioned against a mirrored wall providing the illusion of continuing space. The glass floors tiles were made from recycled glass, with the elongated glass table incorporating a smokey black ink running throughout the entire table resembling smoke from a fire. The cave-like interior presents wood-grain walls that have in fact been hand-shaped from concrete to provide the particular texture.

On the 2nd floor, find a forest-like interior with carefully segmented group dining spaces that provide privacy in an open-plan seating area. Seating separations are made by unassuming steel pipes resembling trees with branch-like hooks to hang coats and jackets from, allowing for more space. As one of the most captivating design elements, the floor was made from layered OSB wood panel with each piece hand-placed in the shape of a mountainous landscape.  “The floors are designed to show the contours of the ground so we can feel nature underneath our feet,” says Ryoji.

Plans for a rooftop garden and dining area as the third “sky” stage is anticipated for completion by next year, and part of the architect and restaurants owners ongoing collaboration. Certainly an interior concept that is not your usual restaurant experience.

Ryoji Iedokoro Architects riao.co.jp

We think you might also like Wild Rocket restaurant by Produce

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In Conversation With… Trent Jansen

ST: The In Cahoots show at the Fremantle Arts Centre aligns six indigenous collectives with six urban-based creatives. You worked with folk at the remote Fitzroy Crossing. How did that come about? TJ: It’s funny, I shared a house with friends in Alice Springs a few years back, and we’d had this idea for a long time to collaborate with a remote community. But for one reason or another it never came about. Then the FAC developed the idea of In Cahoots, this massive collaborative project and it all just fell into place nicely. What was the process? The premise was that each of the six artists including me (even though I don’t consider myself an artist) would visit the remote community twice. The first time for a week or two weeks. Then another period within six months for a further three to six weeks. I can’t quite remember what time of year I first visited, but it was certainly getting hot. I stayed for about ten days, getting the lay of the land, getting to know which people would be the most likely collaborators. I was really aware that we didn’t have a lot of time to create objects that would function, which is what distinguishes design from art. The work needs to be constructed, to be strong, durable. It’s not something that can just happen in a makeshift manner, it’s got to function. We’ve already witnessed your fascination with creature myths in your Monsters collection for Broached Commissions. One of your main In Cahoots pieces is also based on a creature. What’s that about? On that first visit I met with one of my collaborators, Rita Minga, and she introduced me to some of the local narratives. She told me the story of the Jangarra which was a tale the adults recounted to the children about a wild man that hid in the massive anthills you find out there. It was a story used to scare the children into behaving, not running too far afield, that sort of thing. A while back you described the Jangarra armchair to me as “that lumpy looking thing”. [laughs] Yeah, it’s an armchair. Loosely. Not a particularly functional armchair but still... It’s actually made from carved coolamons, shallow, hand-carved serving dishes we’ve stacked up on a structural base. We put the major elements into place at Fitzroy Crossing, then I finished it off in my studio at Thirroul on the south coast of New South Wales with a couple of the aboriginal guys. We had to do the final touches in situ at the art centre in Fremantle, it needed some more hair. Some of the old ladies at Fitzroy Crossing make string out of human hair using an amazing apparatus. Then there is the car crash furniture… Yes, we visited a car graveyard which was full of incredibly beautiful wreckage. Some of the bonnets were in really evocative shapes, it wasn’t too much of a stretch to imagine them developed into chairs or benches. One crumpled piece of metal had obviously encountered a tree or a ’roo and was pretty much sitting on an old car in the form we ended up using. We called this series Collision. They’re all one-off or very limited edition. Any plans to develop them into a commercial collection? I’d like to do more of them, but I doubt that they’ll ever be massively commercial. Yet they are beautiful, functional objects. I’m very keen to keep exploring this process and I’m really keen to keep working with several of the members of the group. I intend to continue spending time in Fitzroy Crossing, and have plans to continue working with them if they’ll have me. Trent Jansen was In Conversation With… Stephen Todd Photography courtesy of Trent Jansen and Erin Coates [caption id="attachment_69304" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective sketching Sketch exchange[/caption] Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective pocuring car bonnets [caption id="attachment_69301" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective car bonnets Trent Jansen and Duane Shaw procuring car bonnets[/caption] [caption id="attachment_69298" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective Coolomon Forms Coolomon Forms[/caption] [caption id="attachment_69299" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective fitzroy crossing Rita Minga, Julia Lawford, Penny K Lyns and Gracie Green outside Fitzroy Crosing[/caption] [caption id="attachment_69300" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Trent Jansen Mangkala Indigenous Collective Jangarra hair test Jangarra hair test[/caption]abc
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Sit Inside A Japanese Dumpling

In the hands of the design team at AlvinT Studio, Gyoza Bar channels Japanese culture old and new, recognisable and subtle. With eye-catching Japanese inspired anime-esque graphics throughout, there’s little confusion as to the cuisine in the bar, and the custom-designed furniture matches this aesthetic, with a young and cheerful mood held in mind during the design process In the eating space, furniture has been chosen and designed to convey a convivial mood, representing both contemporary Indonesian style, and Japanese iconography. A notable highlight of the space is an oversized suspended lounge chair in the eating space, alongside the main dining area that takes the form of a unique seating booth complete with a giant Gyoza-shaped woven canopy! There are many symbolic references to Japanese culture throughout the space, from a coin-shaped partition in the private rooms, and custom prints wallpaper on the main wall, to the branding’s inclusion of a cartoon Tanuki, an iconic breed of Japanese racoon. Overall the space echoes an idiosyncratic character that is contemporary Japanese fused with Indonesian touches. Gyoza Bar space is a rather playful multilayered ornamentation inspired by both contemporary and traditional Japan, along with hints of Chinese and traditional Indonesian visual aesthetics. AlvinT Studio alvin-t.com We think you might also like The Night Market by Alexi Robinson and Adam Goodrum. abc
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A Brisbane Extension By Shaun Lockyer Architects

Since Shaun Lockyer established Shaun Lockyer Architects (SLa) in 2009, he’s been prodigious in his residential output. The Brisbane-based architect is recognised for a ‘regional modernist’ style that responds both efficiently and elegantly to the Queensland climate. Little wonder the practice is in high demand and its large portfolio ranges from small and modest to breathtakingly sublime. The recently completed Folkhouse sits somewhere in between; a bold yet contained extension to a character pre-war cottage at the crest of the Balmoral hillside. It was a highly personal project for Shaun and his team as the clients are the parents of a SLa staff member, which actually proved quite advantageous during the development process. “Because they’re friends it afforded us a very honest and open line of communication in order to achieve the right outcome,” he says. The brief had a strong focus on hospitality and social gathering and this informed the bulk of the design decisions. While the extension houses the main bedroom and living areas, including a generously proportioned outdoor dining room, it’s the kitchen that’s pivotal to the layout. This space is the heart of the home and the place all family members spend most their time. The open plan makes the ground floor of the two-storey extension even more welcoming and large windows and window seating add to a feeling of spaciousness by extending the inside outside. It also allows for plentiful ventilation resulting in a naturally cool interior. Shaun Lockyers’s material palette is a robust yet clean mix of brick, timber, marble and polished concrete. The brick carries on the narrative from a previous post-war extension and honey-coloured timber as the kitchen joinery, stair and upstairs balustrade, accents the lightness of the overall scheme. As Shaun reflects, “It’s a simple house with a simple idea about scale, occupation and light. And it’s about how one revitalises these beautiful homes within Brisbane’s inner city suburbs.” The adult children’s bedrooms remain in the existing cottage and the threshold between old and new is distinguished by a large void traversed by a bridge. There’s a playful visual dynamism to the ceiling volume, thanks to the extension’s steeply pitched gabled roofs. Not only does it accentuate the scale of the space, but it also assists with the distribution of light, evened out by a number of strategically placed windows and skylights. This is a home to be admired as much for its robust architectural integrity as for its warmth, intelligence and the liveability of its human-focused plan and arrangement. Shaun Lockyer Architects lockyerarchitects.com.au Photography by Scott Burrows abc
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New Nordic

Let’s talk about ‘it’: that quiet, confident ability of making perfection appear entirely effortless. Unsurprisingly, every designer the world-over spends inordinate amounts of time and energy trying to achieve that feeling of ‘it’, the self-assuredness of an object appearing as though it was always meant to be just so, revelling in its singular and unaffected timelessness.

And over the past decade or so, the design history of Scandinavia has captured the world’s attention for precisely this reason. Touted as the enduing aesthetic, or the perfect synthesis of form meeting function, the Scandinavian design tradition is undoubtedly one of honesty and sublimity. It comes as no shock, then, that the Finns have a word for ‘it’ – muutos: ‘new perspective’. Taking its cues from this singular and perfectly honed word, Scandinavian design house MUUTO has taken it upon itself to reimagine the parameters and perspectives of the region’s design thinking. Founded by Kristian Byrge and Peter Bonnen, MUUTO maintains the stance that timelessness in design need not shirk the concept of change and innovation.

After all, within this past decade when Scandinavian design took over the world – proliferating an entirely new conception of living well through design – it  became apparent that through appealing to the late majority we quickly found ourselves faced with the constant reinterpretation of existing designs and a pervading sense of ennui. We began to worry: is this the end of cultural history? And while I’m normally not one to back the naysayers, it’s not a dumb question which lies at the core of MUUTO’s orientation to contemporary design. Having tired of the overabundance that ended up cheapening the Scandinavian design tradition, MUUTO engaged an impressive lineup of architects, designers and fine artists from the Nordic countries to disrupt and reimagine the accepted concepts of Scandinavian design history. The brand has now ushered in, in their own words, “a great new era of Scandinavian design” that covers accessories, lighting and furniture now vaunted as the benchmark for quality and functionality.

Seeking to expand the heritage of Nordic design, MUUTO continues to innovate with unflagging aplomb. Forward-looking materials, techniques, creative thinking and specialist craftsmanship all combine with its ongoing commitment to a no-nonsense, fresh perspective on the history and future of Scandinavian design and aesthetics. And never, it would seem, has this come at a more timely point for the design lovers amongst us. After all, Christen Grosen, Design Director at MUUTO, wisely reminds me that “today, the boundary between private and professional lives is slowly dissolving – workplaces, restaurants and other public spaces are becoming less formal and we do not enjoy everything too sterile and rigid.” Recalling for us that, while the conditions of our daily lives continue to change, perhaps then the design traditions that facilitate these changes should evolve, too?

“I am very aware of how much power aesthetics has in a room,” says Christen. “For example, the difference between a table being square versus round – it changes the dynamics of a meeting. You change your daily life by moving around and it shows what a huge influence your décor has. It creates renewed energy and, derived from that, a sense of happiness.”

Celebrating this keen understanding of the future of Scandiavian design, Living Edge – MUUTO’s suppliers in Australia – hosted a private event at the Sydney Opera House’s Utzon Room to welcome the brand’s CEO, Anders Cleeman, and Sales Director, Christian Ernemann, to Australia where it seems that Scandinavian design has left an indelible mark on our national psyche. Showcasing an impressive host of designs by an equally impressive list of names, pieces from MUUTO’s latest collections beautifully offset Sydney’s harbour views. And in Living Edge’s own words, “The brand strives to expand on the strong Scandinavian design tradition but always approaches it with a new and original perspective.” After all, whoever said that beauty couldn’t be an everyday affair?

MUUTO livingedge.com.au

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Atelier Here, At One With Nature

Not all of us can be afforded the luxury of living across the street from parklands and wide-open, green spaces. Regardless of economics, logistics just doesn’t allow it. Fewer still have the added luxury of a neighbouring natural environment mirrored in the interior design of their home. But for the couple residing in Ang Mo Kio Residence and their two young adult children, that’s exactly what their relationship with their home entails. Designed by atelier here, the three storey single residence in Singapore is anchored by a predominantly white colour palette in order to visually bring in the lush greenery from outside. In search of a similar effect, the living room boasts a unique atrium that extends up from the ground floor. Here, a purpose designed white veil of gridded sunscreen fragments the park foliage into constant – yet varying – glimpses of green. Likewise, the first floor is heroed by a U-shaped balcony that atelier here have cantilevered out and over the street to further unite the lush foliage opposite and the interior design of the house. Raintree canopies frame the study to a peaceful, and work-inducing effect. The rear of the home features an open back terrace in appreciation of the hilly forest behind the house. The interior design that opens to the natural environment both in front and behind Ang Mo Kio Residence effectively create an internalized private ‘climb’ from the park to the hill. This passage forms the main spine around which the rest of the domestic spaces are arranged. atelier here have employed the use of skylights, sunscreens and expansive windows not only to invite the natural environment in, but also to capitalize on as much natural light as possible, at all times of day. atelier here have responded to a client brief in a way that respects their routine and functional needs, all the while using architectural cues to enhance a life lived through design. atelier here at-here.co/ We think you might also like Radiator House by Hiroshi Nakamura Architects Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence dining Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence Ang Mo Kio Residence  abc
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Up Close And Personal With Henry Tadros Of ercol

Does the name ercol ring a bell? What about Temperature Design? It should. Just last week we were discussing the relationship between ercol, the almost century-old furniture company based out of Britain, and their Australian distributors Temperature Design. It was one of the founders of Temperature, Vicki Corbett, who – through chance – first became aware of the English furniture design and manufacturer. Investigating the origins of the Originals Room Divider that had made its way into her possession in Japan which led her to uncover ercol. And so in 2010, just five years from establishment, Temperature Design brought ercol’s iconic designs, alongside their more recent collections, to Australian shores. In the years since their relationship has grown and developed. Temperature recently invited Henry Tadros, great grandson of the ercol’s founder, Lucian Ercolani, to speak to their Australian audience. A Q&A was hosted in Sydney by Habitus Deputy Editor Holly Cunneen at .M Contemporary gallery space in Woollahra. Henry, Holly and the wider A+D audience sat down – on ercol pieces of course – to find out a little more about the origins of the much loved British furniture company. Henry discussed the design origins of ercol, their international expansion, the importance of collaboration for the future of the brand, its UK-based manufacturing factory, and their relationship with Temperature Design. Temperature Design temperaturedesign.com.au We think you might also like to hear about Temperature Design And Their Cross Continental Connections [gallery columns="5" ids="69186,69187,69188,69189,69190,69191,69192,69193,69194,69195,69196,69197,69198,69199,69200,69201,69202,69203,69204,69205,69206,69207,69208,69209"]abc
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Quality Behind the Wall, Great Design at the Front

Compared to the traditional close-coupled toilets of old, Geberit concealed cisterns tick all boxes for the design lover – giving a reliable, quality solution with an aesthetically fresher look by hiding the cistern behind the wall. The result is a toilet that not only looks great, but also provides more useable space in the bathroom. Geberit concealed cisterns are the classics of modern bathroom installations and have been installed a million times over around the world for more than 50 years. With some flush buttons able to be placed up to three metres away from the cistern, a hidden pneumatic cistern offers great flexibility. Buttons can be placed beside the pan or on the sidewall – anything is possible with a hidden cistern and a remote pneumatic flush. While the design of a concealed cistern some distance from the pan itself might sound high tech, and it is surely the result of some inspired engineering work, maintenance and repair is no monumental task. There is no need to rip tiles from the wall or smash holes in the plasterboard to get to the cistern, with Geberit internals able to be accessed through a discrete service opening – simply removing the mechanical flush plate provides enough room for repair or maintenance work. The concept of the touchless bathroom has prevailed for many years in public spaces in other parts of the world. As technology, design and seamless integration have improved and been brought together, the popularity of such bathroom accessories has increased. Geberit has created a touchless bathroom experience with an electronic flush plate. The innovative Sigma80 is a glass plate that operates with the wave of a hand, or set to automatically flush as you walk away. Between these two products, it's clear why Geberit is becoming the go-to choice for design enthusiasts wanting their bathroom to serve as a space for relaxation and rejuvenation. abc