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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Rebuilding The Dream

Once upon a time, the phrase ‘dream home’ conjured the same hazy, idyllic images for everyone: a manicured lawn; a breezy verandah; a sun-dappled interior and hardwood floors, and enough space for a car out the front and kids out the back. Today, market forces have changed these aspects of homeward dreaming, or at least forced it to evolve to keep up with the times. For many, the ‘dream home’ has changed dramatically: hopes of a front yard have been adjusted to a balcony or patio, and carports have shrunk to the space for a single bike or scooter. With this in mind, it’s easy to feel confused about the future of Australian housing. But everything’s looking up! From 23 to 25 March 2018, The Design Co-Op is infusing the Australian design community with a fresh dose of optimism and imagination about what’s still to come for our living spaces. The one-of-a kind event will unite the Australian design industry and foster valuable ties between professionals and the design-loving public, sparking a much-needed dialogue about the role of design in today’s housing market. Design Co-Op Team The brainchild of Anne-Claire Petre of Anaca Studio and Elizabeth Bull of One Fine Print, the event program is carefully crafted to showcase Australian design brands and empower attendees to transform any place into a meaningful “home”. The Design Co-Op will bring together 14 local brands, 3 leading interior designers, and 20 industry professionals. Whittling the line-up down to just 14 designers was no easy task, considering the local talent pool. “We wanted to work with brands that were aligned with our beliefs,” explained Anne-Claire and Elizabeth, “We started with the people we had either worked with before and who we knew would take this seriously and be meticulous about organisation.” As is to be expected from an event curated by a furniture designer and a photographer, The Design Co-Op’s line-up marries style and functionality. Participating brands and designers span Australia’s diverse design landscape and include everything from lighting and furniture, to rugs, plants, and décor. From the rich textures of Cadrys and the tactile quirkiness of Cakebread to the colourful concrete of Fox & Ramona and the leafy luxury of The Plant Society, The Design Co-op truly has something for everyone. Following a launch party on Friday March 23, The Design Co-Op will host a day of panel discussions that present a fresh perspective on topical issues. “The panels are all about sharing knowledge and making connections,” said Anne-Claire and Elizabeth, “We wanted to have casual discussions around subjects that are relevant to both the public and the design industry.” To kick things off, Amelia Barnes of design blog Rented Space will host “Rental is on the rise – why we shouldn’t compromise our home environment”. Responding to an increasingly rental-driven market, the panel is sure to appeal to today’s younger generations, who are gamely exploring new ways to evoke the cosiness of home in transitional, rented, and non-traditional spaces. August Stool and Idle Bench Apparent Photography by Michael Gordon Hill Photography by Michael Gordon Hill Next, Natalie Mortimer of Australian Design Review will host “Challenges, wins, and outright fails – the real life of a design studio”. Going beyond the glamorous portrayal of design studios in social and print media, this panel will offer insights into what life is really like in three leading Australian design studios. And last – but certainly not least – Alice Blackwood of Indesign Magazine will host “How to lead by design? Opportunities to create change in the industry”. Ending the line-up on a future-facing, optimistic note, this panel will empower attendees to refresh the industry for today’s market and transform any space into a meaningful home. The Design Co-Op sidesteps the monoculture of showrooms and tradeshows, instead highlighting the benefits of ‘cross-pollinating’ different brands and aesthetics. For the weekend-long Showcase, leading Australian interior designers – Fiona Parry-Jones of Von Haus, Lauren Li of Sisalla, and Manuela Millan of Meanwhile in Melbourne – will use products from The Design Co-Op participants to craft three distinct living spaces that evoke different interpretations of ‘home’. In so doing, Showcase will not only spark imaginations but also remind brands and designers of the benefits of working together, instead of in competition, with one another. The Design Co-Op is a satellite event of Melbourne Design Week, an annual initiative of the Victorian Government that links businesses with communities. Learn more about the event at thedesignco-op.com Tana Shelf Tide Designs Photography by Mike Baker Photography by Mike Baker Anaca Studio Photography by Elizabeth Bull Photography by Elizabth Bull Design Co-Opabc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes

Celebrating Space and Landscape Integration in Singapore

See Through House, designed by Wallflower Architecture + Design, is situated in one of the most exclusive areas in Singapore. Established in 1999, Wallflower Architecture + Design has undertaken a wide spectrum of work, ranging from commercial and residential projects and have received numerous awards for excellence in design. Wallflower was commissioned to design the first house in the cluster of seven sub-divided plots in the area. With the house sitting on the highest point of the land with a panoramic view of the city, their brief was to design a house no taller than the second storey balcony of the old house. The core design for the site was inspired by both the idea of balancing space and landscape integration and the celebration of the mature conservation protected Tembusu trees found on the site. The design was largely inspired by the idea of creating a green and airy corridor, with the building comprised of two parallel volumes, separated by a Tembusu tree and a grassed courtyard that surrounds the tree. The courtyard design results in an intimate outdoor room that is up to interpretation, with the courtyard working as a garden, a terrace and the central core of the atrium-style house. See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Side entrance In order to minimise noise and maintain the desired celebration of the natural world, the site features a tall solid concrete wall around the mechanical plants. This was also used to maintain the unobstructed panoramic views of the site. By designing a second storey that overhangs the first, the direct sun is reduced, allowing for the first storey of the building to maintain its core temperature. This means the space can be kept open throughout each of the seasons without disruption from the elements. The second storey, aka the ‘skin’ is made up of several layers of material and components, each with their unique function and purpose. The timber screen forms the outermost ‘skin’, functioning as a sunscreen against the harsh tropical sun and reduces heat gain. It allows breezes to comb through, refreshing the interior spaces while providing privacy to the rooms behind. The second layer is comprised of aluminium windows, protecting the interior space from tropical monsoons and pollutants. By maintaining an air pocket between the timber screen and the aluminium window the space forms an insulation layer, which further reduces a rise in temperature due to external heat. The final layer of blinds allows for further heat control and the ability to shut out light, for both temperature control and privacy. Wallflower Architecture + Design wallflower.com.sg Dissection Information Balau timber screens Haiku fans from Big Ass Fans Eigg freestanding bathtub by Claybrooks in master bathroom Starck 3 wall hung WC by Duravit Miniskill Square light by SIMES in driveway Bosch & Miele kitchen appliances   Photography by Marc Tey See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Facade See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Open plan See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Staircase See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Bathroom view See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Bathroom See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Corridor See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Boardwalk See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Walkway See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Swimming pool See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Open corridor See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Louvers See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Garden See Through House Photography by Marc Tey Driveway view We think you might also like Forever House by Wallflower Architecture + Designabc
Design Products
Furniture

Tom Dixon Creates With IKEA

DELAKTIG (Swedish for ‘involvement’) taps into the global community of IKEA hackers who modify or combine IKEA products beyond their prescribed design and intention to create furniture tailored to their own styles and specifications. IKEA initially objected to the hacking culture but has slowly embraced it, running hack-a-thon sessions, using it as a tool to learn what people want from their products, and now collaborating with Dixon on a hackable bed/sofa. Described by Dixon as a “living platform,” the single bed/sofa can be adapted for different uses with add-ons (or hacks) that change its purpose. These include task lamps and side tables that can be clamped, slotted or bolted to the frame to create a space for sleeping, relaxing, working or entertaining. It can be transformed from a single bed into a chaise longue or three-seater sofa and has the potential to become a twin, bunk or four-poster bed. “The general idea is that, just like with your iPhone, people can build apps around this sofa which will allow them to adapt it for a longer life,” Dixon says. “The success of this will be if, in 30 or 40 years, people have changed its functionality and it’s still survived rather than just being discarded.” In this way, DELAKTIG is never a finished piece of furniture. Dixon, IKEA, designers, manufacturers and users can continuously expand the collection by creating an ever-growing range of hacks. The flexibility and versatility mean one piece of furniture can serve multiple and changing uses over a longer lifespan. Dixon originally pitched a cot and a coffin to IKEA. They settled on a bed/sofa. DELAKTIG is designed for adaptability, longevity and user customisation, and with add-on accessories that can take it from day to night, it may have the potential to serve from cot to coffin. DELAKTIG launched in Europe in February 2018 and will be available in Singapore from April. Tom Dixon X Ikea Multi-facing lounge Tom Dixon X Ikea Lounge armrest Tom Dixon X Ikea Light lounge Tom Dixon X Ikea Loungeabc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating The Innate Collection From Spence & Lyda

Innate is a collection of Australian furniture with an inherent design language – spare, lean and elegant – embracing a sense of refinement through the use of materials with a unique Australian sensibility. This capsule collection – including an armchair, credenza, console, coffee and side tables – is the result of collaboration between Adelaide’s Jon Goulder and Sydney local Fiona Lyda. The range was launched in style at Spence and Lyda’s showroom, with local designers, design lovers, friends and enthusiasts alike turning out to see the collection first hand. On hand with the new pieces was some terrific champagne and wine by the award winning South Australian Deviation Road, and a selection of food from Dallyn & Kerr catering. Congratulations to Jon, and Spence & Lyda on this terrific new launch of furniture. [gallery columns="5" ids="72281,72282,72283,72284,72285,72286,72287,72288,72289,72290,72291,72292,72293,72294,72295,72296,72297,72298,72299,72300,72301,72302,72303,72304,72280,72305,72279,72306,72307,72308,72309,72310,72311,72312,72313,72314,72315,72316,72317,72318,72319,72320,72321,72322,72323,72324,72325,72326,72327,72328,72329,72330,72331,72332,72333,72334,72335,72336,72337,72338,72339,72340,72341,72342,72343,72344,72345,72346"]abc
Homes
Design Hunters
Conversations
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Sensible Density And Small Scale Residential Buildings

In Australia we have seen a preference for home ownership and the detached house but without ever questioning the long-term viability or impact on the city. We insulate our lives, setting back our homes from one another for fear of change or forced interaction, exacerbating our estranged spread of housing and risking our growing neighbourhoods to be enjoyed only through isolated community buildings and spaces. Even with a limited opportunity to make an impact, small scale residential buildings continues to express a concern for the future of our cities. The examples below coincide with well-informed clients and planning decisions, delivering a sensible density through thoughtful urban responses. Acting as mediators and design catalysts, they make sense of the desires for domesticity but engage with the realities of the densification of our suburban environment. Paving the way by considering urban objectives to suburban living and showing strategic design principles, they shape how we might begin to better engage with our growing cities.   Perimeter House – MAKE Architecture Perimeter House in Collingwood sits adjacent to a historical residential area and is surrounded by a string of industrial buildings. Its unique circumstance allows the design not to be confined by the setbacks that one would usually see in residential zones. MAKE Architecture saw this as a beautiful opportunity for social and urban exchange in the façade alongside the footpath. The building is activated through its direct relationship with the street, mimicking the intimate exchanges of our bustling urban environment and encouraging interaction with passers by; allowing peers and neighbours to engage from within the house to the street. MAKE considers these urban outcomes throughout many of their projects. These visible urban responses see the architecture engage with the street, while achieving similar domestic amenities to that of a quarter-acre block, making it a significant part of the city. [gallery size="medium" ids="72247,72250,72251"] Photography by Peter Bennetts   Rose House – Baracco + Wright Architects The Rose House explores three tight and activated frontages on a prominent site and reconciles two residences within its singular form. By swelling out to the boundary it has increased its civic presence as well as its internal amenity. This opened up possibilities for the house to directly engage with the street through this clever urban gesture. An under-croft along one of the public boundaries allows flexible outdoor spaces to mediate the ground floor living space with the close proximity and openness of the adjacent reserve and public bike path. Operable mesh curtains along its entire length offer a shared spatial quality with the adjoining public reserve rather than a hard wall or garage door. It demonstrates a reversal of the street pattern that engages the perimeter in a playful manner and treats the nature strip/reserve and gardens as an extension of the home. This is where we see Baracco + Wrights clever spatial planning and responsive materiality, tempering the public/private duality of the site. This house makes both a beautiful and valuable demonstration of design flexibility for inner urban density. [gallery size="medium" ids="72257,72254,72255"] Photography by Andrew Kidman   THAT House – Austin Maynard Architects Occupying a middle site neighbored by huge houses and with almost half the floor area, THAT house is defiant to the urban model of its surrounds and a comment on an Australian desire to fortify or insulate our homes and the problematic consequences of poorly designed, isolated large homes and their associated sprawl. THAT house does not seek to be the solution or a prototype but it is a significant gesture. Creating an openness not known to the street, it blurs the threshold of public/private/natural to both the residents and the public. A careful negotiation of the separate forms and spaces and large glazed openings allows the building to be adaptable and loose. An arterial central spine of the house creates a clear connection with the public realm and draws the street and the garden into the house. The large sections of glazing are fitted with upward blinds, allowing the user to temper their privacy needs while still being able to look out to the garden and street beyond. This home embodies a series of design decisions that actively pursue an urban desire for houses in Australia to function for a more successful communal realm and the residents inside. All of these projects shift the narrative of houses as being separate to the city and instead, part of it; allowing residential objects to be more influential. These houses are exemplary projects and it is vital to qualify their contribution as to how we need to engage with our growing cities through meaningful urban responses in our suburbs. [gallery size="medium" ids="72261,72258,72262,72259,72260"] Photography by Tess Kelly   MAKE Architecture makearchitecture.com.au Baracco + Wright Architects baraccowright.com Austin Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com We think you might also like How Architects Design For The Futureabc
Architecture
Places
Primary Slider

Designing Cultural Hospitality: Boosa Cafe By Kestie Lane

Cultural appropriation is a hugely important subject in modern society, and designers are certainly not immune to the sensitivities of cultural traditions and their applications in the outside world. This is of a particular barb for hospitality designers, where the cuisines of various global cultures drive and dictate the interior direction. The question then, is how can designers reference culture in spaces without being fake, condescending or downright ignorant? Melbourne-based designer Kestie Lane was recently faced with this challenge for her design of one of the city’s newest hot-spots – Boosa Cafe. Translating to ‘kiss’ in Arabic, Boosa is one of famed hospitality duo Eitam and Tammy Brami’s latest investments, focusing on rustic middle-eastern cuisine. “The original brief was ‘Modern Middle-East’,” says Kestie, “A Melbourne cafe with a touch of the middle east.” Here, Kestie developed an interior palette of modern vintage glamour, where the space’s authenticity could be found in details such as custom finishes and hand-crafted joinery. Kestie explains, “We wanted to create a genuine, elegant and timeless environment that celebrated a colourful life, where the food and interior were able to compliment each other.” Boost Cafe Photography by Peter Clarke Table To reference a modern middle-east (meets Melbourne) aesthetic, Kestie and the Brami’s decided on a rich material palette to communicate this unique blend of cultures. Elements such as pink terrazzo, brass fixtures and fittings, and warm timber panels represent the modern middle-east flavour, while other design devices such as matte black tapware and track-lighting, white-shine tiling, polished concrete flooring, black timber seating and forest green accents speak to a very ‘Melbourne hospo’ vibe. “The interior was to be a clean and elegant backdrop to the vibrant and colourful food designed and made by chef and owners Eitam & Tammy. The cafe has an energy and a fun graphic element with the use of tiling and pops of colour with the green banquette seating and dusty pink tiled bar,” says Kestie. The key was an emphasis on authenticity, where there was a, “heavy focus on custom made”. In fact, the owners more or less constructed the cafe themselves with a team of friends and family: “It was a true labour of love with no cutting corners!” As a result of her thoughtful and honest design approach, Boosa Café is not only one of Melbourne's ‘must-eat’ destinations, but a monument to how our industry can and should be approaching blended applications of culture in our hospitality environments. Kestie Lane kestielanestudio.com Boosa Cafe boosa.com.au Photography by Peter Clarke Boost Cafe Photography by Peter Magazine holder Boost Cafe Photography by Peter Clarke Bench seating Boost Cafe Photography by Peter Clarke Table setting Boost Cafe Photography by Peter High table Boost Cafe Photography by Peter Clarke Exterior We think you might also like Crafting Feel-Good Spaces with Kestie Lane Studioabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Finding Potential In Melbourne’s Suburban Laneways

Melbourne’s suburban rear laneways have long been underutilised, but homeowners are increasingly building studios and renovating garages at the back of their properties to create flexible and functional spaces. Studio House in Northcote is one such adaptable space for the different needs of a family with three teenage children. Designed by Zen Architects, it mediates the utilitarian nature and robust character of the laneway, while offering a building that connects with and opens to the garden in front. Studio House is a low-impact building with adaptable spaces that can accommodate many functions, despite its constrained footprint. Downstairs is a kitchenette and open area used for entertaining, socialising, dining, games room or relaxing, and joinery along the wall provides convenient storage. Upstairs, connected by an external stair, is more private with one bedroom, a bedroom/study and a bathroom. “The external stairs allows a more compact footprint while giving the family two floors that can be used independently of one another,” says Luke Rhodes of Zen Architects. Backing on to the rear laneway, the studio has a tough and durable character with recycled red brick on the lower level and Corten cladding on the upper storey. From the front, as viewed from the main residence on the property, the lower level has sliding and stacking glass doors, allowing interior and exterior spaces to flow into one another. “It appears like a fortress or tank from the laneway yet is open and light from the private courtyard and garden,” Luke explains. Studio House Zen Bridge St Living area While upstairs appears more solid, the perforated Corten steel enclosing the deck offers a sense of transparency and lightness. It has been configured to capture views and sunlight without overlooking the neighbour’s property. As Luke describes, “the materials do all the talking,” and inside, materials are as tough, durable and low-maintenance as the exterior palette. This includes plywood joinery, timber window frames and Victorian Ash beams, and vibrant green carpet on the first floor to evoke the adjoining garden and complement the otherwise neutral and natural palette. Clerestory windows maintain privacy along the laneway. “It is a well-designed small building that has transformed the way our clients live while using minimal materials, land and energy,” says Luke. “What’s not to like?” Zen Architects zenarchitects.com Photography by Jack Lovel Dissection Information Recycled pressed red brick Corten metal clad rainscreen Blackbutt external timber from Urban Salvage “Monument” external paint from Dulux Custom timber windows in Australian hardwood from McKay Joinery Mizu plumbing fixtures and fittings from Reece Lighting from Light Project Armourpanel blackbutt internal plywood from Big River Green twist pile carpet from Supertuft Hoop ply cabinets and solid Rock Maple shelves “Vivid white” internal paint from Dulux “Traffic” matte Floor finish from Bona Studio House Zen Bridge St Study Studio House Zen Bridge St Hallway Studio House Zen Bridge St Front facade Studio House Zen Bridge St Front Entrance We think you might also like Modscape, designing prefabricated sustainable homes in Melbourne.abc
What's On
Happenings
HAP - Feature

What Makes A Design Prodigy In 2018?

Who can resist the allure of a prodigy? From their preternatural talent to their unflagging work ethic and uncanny ability to predict what’s next on the curve, there’s something undeniably inspiring about someone who is exceptional at their craft. The prodigies are the ones who learnt to run and walk all at once, who are beyond adept at translating even the most wistful of dreams into a reality bigger and brighter than one anyone else can even imagine. Driven by a goal to “innovate with responsibility”, family-owned Spanish surfaces specialist Cosentino Group is a fitting sponsor for the Prodigy category of this year’s INDE. Awards. For decades, the company has shaped the face of innovative surfaces throughout the global A+D industry, demonstrating a bold, resilient creative spirit that distinguishes it from its competitors. Combining strong R+D capabilities with a future-oriented design methodology, Cosentino Group is a truly formidable design force with the ability to predict the upcoming wants and needs of the global market. Flexible in the face of change and always relishing a challenge, Cosentino Group innovates to solve the problems of today and anticipates and addresses the problems of tomorrow. The company avails of the latest technological advances and design thinking to craft unique, high performance surface solutions for crafting spaces that stand out. Thanks to a commitment to continuous improvement and innovation, Cosentino Group is constantly growing and evolving. A true prodigy, the group knows that in spite of being at the top of their game there is still much room to grow, and at their core maintains values of international expansion, innovative R+D, respect for the environment and sustainability, and corporate commitment to the wider society and the local communities in which they operate. This year, the Prodigy category of the INDE. Awards breaks down the boundaries between design disciplines to celebrate professionals at the forefront of their respective practices. The Award honours innovation, bravery, and forward thinking in architecture, interior design, and industrial design, and rewards practitioners who have fearlessly blazed their own trails and cleared the path for others to follow. Such practitioners are evident in all pockets of the Asia Pacific A+D industry, where the prevailing spirit is one of constant progress and self-improvement, commitment to finely honing one’s skills, and considering the big picture. From a shortlist of nominees compiled by INDE. Awards‘ experts and Indesign Media editors, A+D community members are invited to vote on the designer that they believe best embodies the spirit of the prodigy. Selected by their peers, the 2018 INDE.Awards Prodigy will be a true reflection of the vanguard of the industry and reminder of its unyielding potential for growth and evolution. Cosentino Group believes that design excellence should be recognised and rewarded in order to fuel future generations of creative wunderkinds. The company is excited to support the recognition of remarkable emerging design talent in the Asia Pacific Region and looks forward to seeing prodigies selected by the design community from amongst their peers. abc
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Design Products
Lighting

Made By Pen – Around The World And Back Again

The Sway light is the result of a collaboration between designer Nick Rennie, and the Made By Pen team Susan Chung and Michael Mabuti, specifically thought of as a indoors and out lamp from inception. The resulting lamp offers a soft and beautiful glow, and can be moved around with ease. “This idea of movement stuck in my mind from the very beginning” says designer, Nick Rennie, “however it was not the main focus”. Initially, they team wanted to design a lamp that was incredibly simple in its appearance. Something that would have a presence if purely used as a static image. “From here the inner child took over.  The initial sketch was similar to how a six year old might draw a “dumbbell”…two `balls on either end of a long stick,” says Nick It was from this initial concept design that Sway was truly born. The movement became its strength - a floor lamp that would not topple over, engineered to be weighted so ideally perfectly so it would return to its neutral position when knocked. “We were incredibly pleased with the fact that whilst the design was based around a static shape, the moment it was knocked it transformed in to a different object.” Nick continues, “The subtle sway almost mesmerising.” Through rigorous testing and the right combinations of materials the Made By Pen team were able to produce the perfect balance. Sway is made in Australia using carbon fibre, silicone, plastic and metal. The light mechanism is a soft touch, simple tap on and off and through colour variations of white light. The rechargeable battery has a 10 hour battery life and plugs into a charging port allowing it to be used completely wireless and brought to any space where needed. “Due to the lamps minimal appearance, we decided that having a visibly switch could really detract from the design.  So we went with a motion sensor to activate switching the lamp on and off.” The success of this product is evident from the first moment it’s interacted with, even by a child - from the initial surprise when it’s first touched and lit up, to the almost instinctive desire to give a little push to watch it sway. Made By Pen madebypen.com Nick Rennie nickrennie.com abc
Furniture
Design Products
Accessories

Pulling The Rug Out

Since even before the Classical Period, the humble rug has remained a perennial subject of poetry and mythmaking. Capturing the imagination of designers across the millennia, rug design continues to evolve alongside the shifting landscapes of many sectors – from the smaller scale residential approach, right through to mammoth statement pieces currently enjoying a renaissance in commercial and hospitality environments. Equaling the prestige and quality of fibres one expects to see on haute couture runways, contemporary rug design has embraced the most luxuriant materials while also remaining abreast of landmark technological developments in textile design and manufacture. And, within this space, Australia is beginning to leave an indelible mark on design history. Thanks to one of Australia’s most-active brands, Stylecraft, many of our A+D community’s biggest names have turned their hands to the art of rug design. Kickstarting 2018 with Stylecraft‘s inaugural range of rugs by Australian design heavyweights – including Ross Gardam, Alexander Lotersztain, Keith Melbourne, Tom Skeehan and Helen Kontouris – the brand welcomes this new product typology to an already comprehensive design portfolio. Designed chiefly in Australia, and handcrafted in India through TAPPETI Rugs, this handmade collection uses natural fibres including New Zealand’s coveted wool. Across all processes – from dying of yarn, tufting, binding and finishing – each piece carries an individual flair that can only be achieved through a constant commitment to the expertise of rug artisans. As exciting and varied as the Australian landscape itself, the new range of rugs explores composition, texture, shape, and colour. Alexander Lotersztain and Helen Kontouris celebrate topography from above with their respective rugs, ‘Salt Plains’ and ‘Terraces’. Lotersztain drew inspiration from the transition from “the iconic red centre with endless sand dunes and stunning salt lake colours to open skies that meet the aqua waters”, tinting his rugs in vibrant, saturated hues. “Salt Plain represents the iconic red centre with endless sand dunes and stunning salt lake colours, to open skies that meet the aqua waters. The rich colours of this harsh and beautiful land inspired the geometrical forms and natural hues.” – Alexander Lotersztain. Stylecraft Rugs Photography by Haydn Cattach Alexander Lotersztain Meanwhile, Kontouris emphasizes organic patterns and the dazzling organic and geometric sophistications we find within Asia’s stepped rice terraces. So in keeping with Kontouris’ evolving biophilic aesthetic, ‘Terraces’ balances the delicate interplay of softened geometry and hardened organic forms we encounter in nature. What is especially remarkable is the manner in which Kontouris plays with vantage and scale – here the rug winkingly hints at the topography of stepped rice fields from a bird’s eye perspective, re-performing this interplay in the topography of the rug’s various segments. “There is nothing more beautiful, inspiring and grounding than nature in all its forms. Many of my creative ideas take reference from nature’s striking intelligence and simplicity, the structure of a delicate leaf or the elegance of an entwined vine dancing along a terrace. My passion is to bring this natural beauty and all its benefits within the spaces where we create, live and play.” – Helen Kontouris (interviewed in Ignant). Stylecraft Rugs Photography by Haydn Cattach Helen Kontouris Taking a subtle, linear approach are Ross Gardam and Keith Melbourne, whose rugs deftly abstract line and tone. Gardam’s ‘Noon’ is the collection’s only circular rug, and reflects through gradual tonal changes the passage of light during a 24-hour period. ‘Noon’ coordinates with Gardam’s recent furniture collection of the same name, which is also available in Australia through Stylecraft. “I think there is a cohesive design language that has developed pretty naturally throughout my practice. Working across a variety of materials and process is challenging however a desire to continue to refine or take objects to a certain place has shaped new and surprising connections between the products even if this link is not always an aesthetic one.” – Ross Gardam (interviewed in IndesignLive). Stylecraft Rugs Photography by Haydn Cattach Ross Gardam In a similar vein, Melbourne’s ‘Wash’ also focuses on the play of light in the built environment. An elegant gradient of seven tonal colours evokes Melbourne’s idiosyncratically sleek and precise design aesthetic, embodying the nuanced minimalism of contemporary residential design. In particular, ‘Wash’ emerges as an exercise in restraint and balance – here consciously moderate controlled, there effectively accentuated and over-emphasised – the piece re-enacts the dynamism of light by which it’s inspired. “Wash draws inspiration from the play of light within sculptural architecture. Sharp gradients of tonal colour reflect the precision and clean aesthetic seen throughout my collection of furniture.” – Keith Melbourne. Stylecraft Rugs Photography by Haydn Cattach Keith Melbourne Tom Skeehan’s ‘Hoshi’ rug also picks up on this thread of minimalist dreaming, drawing inspiration from a restrained, sophisticated Japanese design legacy. A unique arched shape and bold geometric emphasis combine to create an inimitable feature piece that is as timeless as it is striking. As the latest addition to Skeehan’s Hoshi Collection, the Hoshi Rug joins a portfolio of armchairs, kounges, side tables, bench seats, ottomans and a coat stand, all emphasising the subtle articulations of negative space between the range’s various compositional elements. “I have personally experienced Japan’s deep attraction to materials and process, combined with a rich understanding of how an object is made and the purpose / life cycle of the work […]. Aesthetically, I admire the restraint and often minimal approach to many aspects of Japanese culture, placing a strong emphasis on the overall process and individual daily ritual.” – Tom Skeehan (interviewed in The Design Writer). Stylecraft Rugs Photography by Haydn Cattach Tom Skeehan Stylecraft Rugs stylecraft.com.au Photography by Haydn Cattach. The release of the rugs is a reminder of Stylecraft‘s commitment to nurturing Australian talent and bringing it to as diverse an audience as possible. Since its establishment in Melbourne over sixty years ago, Stylecraft has consistently shone the limelight on upcoming Australian designers, celebrating their unique style and innovative thinking. Stylecraft is an advocate of encouraging the multiplicity of voices and viewpoints that so colours Australia’s approach to design, and to this end is recognising the importance of supporting our local communities. In conjunction with the launch of the new rug collection, Stylecraft is proud to announce their partnership with Australian organisation, Tjanpi Desert Weavers (TDW). Based in Alice Springs, TDW enable over 400 female artists in remote central Australian deserts to earn their own income from fibre art. Committed to enabling indigenous artists to continue to be able to use their skills to create contemporary Australian design pieces, Stylecraft is donating ten per cent of each rug sale to TDW, ultimately supporting the facilitation of material supply, weaving workshops and exhibitions. [gallery columns="4" ids="72169,72172,72171,72170"] Stylecraft are proud to offer one lucky winner the chance to take home one of the rugs from the brand’s inaugural collection! To be in the running for your chance to win, simply complete this survey, here.abc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes

Optimising Spatial Impact In A Singaporean Apartment

“The unit itself was very old and in its original condition,” says Project Consultant Alex Poh. To make way for the updated design features, D.D.I had to tear almost everything down. The kitchen layout was completely altered to create an open-concept plan, and was then merged with the dining area. For the finishing touches, it has been decked in a palette of navy blue and white, which brings on a fresh and clean-lined appeal. To fit a modern Victorian theme, D.D.I designed a feature wall with a unique fireplace concept for the living area. “The fireplace serves as the TV console,” the designers say. “For the details, we used Craftstone to create a backdrop for the console area, rather than traditional wallpaper or cabinets.” This multi-texture material palette of plywood, laminates, aluminium and glass was built to complement the heart of the home: the open-concept kitchen. To optimise space in the master bedroom, the designers installed a divider to separate the sleeping area from the wardrobe space. Say the designers: “With this feature, the homeowners have a changing area right outside the bathroom and more privacy for their bedroom.” D.D.I dreamzspace.com.sg HDB Maisonette Living HDB Maisonette Bedroom HDB Maisonette Bathroomabc
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Team Zenith Is Back On Board For This Year’s INDE.Awards

There’s never been a better time to be a designer in the Asia Pacific. A strong regional economy, cutting edge technological capabilities, and unrivalled raw design talent have all converged at the right point in time to make now the most exciting period in our region’s design history. None of this is coincidental: over the past few years, the industry has worked to develop strong support structures and international mentorship programs to ensure sustainable growth and that the next generation of talent is provided with the guidance and assistance that they need to reach their full potential. The INDE.Awards do just this, providing the Asia Pacific with its foremost platform for recognising and nurturing regional talent and developing strong cross-country ties. This year, Zenith will return as an INDE.Awards  Platinum partner and once more contribute to enriching the region’s already diverse and dynamic design culture. An established leading light of Asia Pacific design, Zenith embodies all the characteristics that make the region’s design landscape so unique and exciting. Like the regional industry, Zenith blends a strong spirit of innovation and idiosyncratic design aesthetic with a thoughtful design process that is driven by a twin focus on style and functionality. Akin to the broader region, Zenith takes an unrelentingly forward-facing, trailblazing approach to design and is committed to developing new and unexpected responses to age-old design questions. For over 60 years, Zenith has led our region in striking, eye-catching commercial design that doesn’t compromise on performance. From the tech boom to the open plan office, Zenith has responded thoughtfully and practically to every major contemporary design landmark. Their carefully considered approach has won admirers around the world. Zenith recently celebrated the launch of their new showroom in Shanghai, and continues to diversify its activity across the many commercial sub-sectors throughout the region. Whether they’re in Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, or SingaporeZenith approaches all design with a high degree of sensitivity to local culture and design traditions. Their hubs across the region allow them to fully understand local design contexts and challenges and design accordingly. Zenith consistently distinguishes itself from its peers by reflecting a firm grasp of not only the brief but also the context from which this emerges, responding to this thoroughly and sensitively. In today’s hyperconnected design industry, regional ties between designers, suppliers, and manufacturers are more important than ever. For designers, well-developed connections with manufacturers and suppliers feed the iterative design process and streamline manufacturing, allowing for the highest possible quality of finished product. Zenith understands this, and has developed strong manufacturing capabilities to support their design efforts within the region. The INDE.Awards would not be possible without the generous support of Zenith interiors and our other sponsors. We are grateful for their ongoing commitment to celebrating the uniqueness of design in the Asia Pacific region and look forward to working together moving forward to strengthen existing regional connections and forge new ones.abc