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Meet Rachel Vosila, A Local And Emerging Product Designer

Sydney based Object and Furniture designer Rachel Vosila is one to watch. After following her One a Week project in which she designed a whopping 52 chairs in a year, we had to have a chat. Rachel challenges the norms of traditional object design, developing uber creative and aesthetic pieces that are not only functional but works of art. Here, we learn about her personal and professional history and design philosophy. AG: Can you tell us a little about yourself? RV: I am Sydney born and bred and went to school in the Inner West. I really didn’t have much direction when I finished school and to the surprise of my friends (and parents) ended up in a Fine Arts course at UNSW. This degree provided me with the ever sought after ‘eureka’ moment (though I didn’t realise it at the time). I began applying myself, learning quickly and passionately about art, design and the creative process. Looking for a little more ‘practicality’ I transferred to the Bachelor of Design course, where after a series of great tutors and subjects I found myself obsessed with objects and furniture. These interests guided my jobs over the years, working for Kartell and IKEA until I set up my own design studio and found myself back tutoring in the course I have to thank for my career! Where do you currently work, what is your space like? I actually just left my little shared studio in Marrickville, so am in between spaces at the moment. Though in saying that, tutoring at uni offers a really great environment for open discussion about all things design – I am always learning and discovering new practitioners and processes from the students. What do you think is unique about your work?  Where I think I have differentiated myself is the concept, process and methodology I often implement in my work. In the case for my One A Week Project, many people subscribed to my weekly process that developed over the year, taking interest in the ever-evolving notion of the chair. What is the One a Week Project? With the One a Week Project, I tasked myself with designing and making one chair a week across 2015 – so 52 chairs in total. Starting out, I began the project as a way to serve my compulsion to make. Though it quickly turned into an exploration in the vernacular of chair design. We naturally attach aesthetics, materials and form to specific locations, time periods and people – and initially I found it hard not to look for these references in my own work. By generating 52 different chairs in a year, I really had to push the envelope in terms of what a chair can be, and the possibilities became endless. In the end, I was trying to communicate that a chair doesn’t need to be made of timber and have four legs to still be called a chair. What are you looking to work on in the future? Moving into the future, I want to get back into conceptually driven design. On the flip side of the One A Week Project, I want to spend months researching and developing a story which I can tell through a family of furniture. Rachel Vosila rachelvosila.com Photography courtesy of Rachel Vosila [gallery columns="5" size="medium" ids="72144,72143,72142,72141,72140,72139,72137,72136,72135,72134,72133,72132,72131,72130,72129"] We think you might also like Gone Troppo by textile designer Julie White.abc
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Furniture Fit For A King

Designed in Australia for over four decades now, King Living furniture is renowned for their usage of high quality materials and world-class craftsmanship to create stylish pieces built for comfort. From the award-winning modular sofa ranges, to luxurious beds with integrated storage and customisable mattresses, beautiful dining collection and comfortable and versatile outdoor furniture, King Living designs stylish furniture that’s in a class of its own. Recently, Melbourne-based interior stylist Aimee Tarulli and her husband Frank of Thomas Archer Homes created their dream home, utilising King Living’s extensive range to furnish their house. Taking pride of place in the central family living area is the Plaza modular sofa in premium Palm Beach Whitewash fabric. Practical and family-friendly, Aimee’s choice of the contemporary classic is ideal for the space. Adjacent is the family area is the open dining area, which features the sleek marble-topped Former Keel Dining. Bi-fold doors open to the lap pool and outside entertaining area, where the graceful King Cove setting in Cabana Breeze with ceramic accessories makes a statement. For the Formal Dining Room, the couple looked to the Felix 3 Seater in Timo Gesso fabric to complete the aesthetic of the space. Marble accents and minimalist accessories keep the room polished and sophisticated. The thoughtfully considered guest bedroom features the Neo Bed in King Luxe fabric, with Venus side tables perched on either side. The romantic muted pinks are carried through the room from the artwork and linen to the plush Oliver Tub Chair in Boho Velvet. Aimee and Frank’s study is the perfect space to retreat, with the Felix Studio Bed in King Club fabric providing a cosy multi-purpose solution. As a chic, space-saving sofa, the Felix transforms into a sofa bed for guests. King Living Crescent Ottomans in various sizes are added for comfort, texture and colour. Furnishings: King Living Photography: James Geer Interior Design: Archer Interiors Home Design and Build: Thomas Archer Homes abc
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Rejuvenating A Yarra Valley Icon

“Our brief was to overhaul the site and create a new brand-immersion across bar, dining, tasting and retail spaces, inspired by the surrounding landscape, the alchemic process of winemaking and the meeting of old and new worlds,” says Foolscap Studio founder and principal, Adele Winteridge. Here, Foolscap found that these ‘old and new’ worlds had one thing in common: the uplifting ritual of spontaneously popping the cork on a luxe bottle of sparkling wine. This familiar and endearing concept ultimately drove the essence of the design, where the iconic méthode traditionelle producer Domaine Chandon was cleverly and emotionally connected to the personal experiences of its visitors. Situated in the Yarra Valley, the site’s stunning natural environs and changing view over the seasons were a natural starting point for Foolscap’s design scheme. Views of the incredible landscape were a natural starting point for considering the visitor experience, the range of which will traverse loyalists and locals, diehard food and wine thrill-seekers, ‘gramming millennials and new discoverers alike. Domaine Chandon Photography by Tom Blachford Bar Seating Fearless use colour reflects the tonal shifts in the landscape, while a key counterpoint is in the application of metal finishes to joinery and an overhead kinetic sculpture. Alchemy – the transmutation of a base metal into gold – were considered as analogous to the production of Champagne, and Foolscap strove to reflect the wonder of transformation and the vitality of bubbles through our unique metal treatments. Central to the brief and the layout, was the retail space. “We worked closely with local fibreglass and metalwork manufacturers to realise different product display systems, installing bespoke sculptural joinery, portable plinths and framed, up-lit fibreglass screens for product storage and presentation,” says Adele. “The mobile sculpture was also the outcome of collaboration between metal-craftspeople and our designers.” Similarly, the process of transformation in winemaking informed the organisation of space. ‘Compression/Release’ is revealed in enclosed, intimate spaces – the Tasting Room for example – and airy, exuberant zones, like the Lounge & Bar. Open, woven materials are juxtaposed with the solidity of weighty, opaque substances to allude to the duality of density and lightness in sparkling wine. These ideas were also rendered in a style that pays homage to Chandon’s French heritage, while retaining a youthfulness that speaks to its relatively recent establishment within the Champagne house’s lineage. Banquettes styled in aged leather and velvet, with brass light fittings suggest a Parisian bistro aesthetic, but from there it’s all local goodness. Adele emphasises Foolscap’s mission to support local creatives. “We always aim to celebrate local material sources and object makers. Spotted gum timber flooring and joinery is smooth and warming next to the remarkable speckled patterning of Queensland ‘Dreamtime’ marble. Textiles were printed by indigenous artists and we worked very closely with Melbourne metalworkers and craftspeople to create the pièce de résistance: a large but ethereal mobile hanging over the central bar. Dynamic and buoyant, this suspended kinetic sculpture gently bobs to the beat of its own drum, projecting a sparkling patina in a playful take on the unpredictable nature of bubbles.” Domaine Chandon Photography by Tom Blachford Booth seating As an added detail, Foolscap were clever in acknowledging Chandon’s parent brand, LMVH, and the discerning tastes of their stylish, international clientele. “We created a retail experience influenced by the dramatic luxury you’d find in a Louis Vuitton store. Fine metal detailing references shoe and bag hardware, while curved metal frames, with fibreglass cast discs in a rice-paper texture, innovate materiality in display arrangements. Reducing the amount of stock on display elevates the product to a rarified level. We also developed a truly unique, custom metal finish for joinery, through a treatment to metal substrate that resulted from a long and deliberate process of combining different metalworking techniques.” Though armed with a highly original design concept and solid methods of making the brief a reality, the project wasnt without its challenges. “The budget demanded that the voluminous industrial structure with vaulted ceilings be retained, which required careful management of acoustics and considered demarcation of space,” recalls Adele. “Through the demolition process came little surprises and some challenges, all of which we took in our stride, making a point of integrating seamlessly the old character and history of the site with the new fit out. “Additionally, existing hard surfaces and quite a bit of loose furniture had to be retained for budget reasons. We’re comfortable with such limitations: they lead to waste-reduction and inspire careful choices of what to introduce and when. Local materials support industry and sustainability. Why import American or European timber over characterful Spotted Gum? Marble quarried in Queensland is extraordinary. Reduced carbon footprints, as well as friendlier lead-times, are big wins.” Foolscap Studio is a design house that always pursue design approaches that meet the brief essentials while exceeding what the client could possibly have imagined, through unique and visually captivating outcomes. As a result, the Yarra Valley’s new Domain Chandon Winery is a fluid and holistic system of hospitality and retail, encouraging emotional connections and ‘stay-awhile’ hospitality moments. Foolscap Studio foolscapstudio.com.au Domaine Chandon Winery chandon.com.au Photography Tom Blachford Domaine Chandon Photography by Tom Blachford Seating Domaine Chandon Photography by Tom Blachford Serving area Domaine Chandon Photography by Tom Blachford Shop We think you might also like Jackalope Hotel by Carr Design Groupabc
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Designing For The Beauty Of Everyday Life

A famous, best-selling Korean book – Botong-ui Jonjae (Normal Being) – has informed the design approach for local firm Rieuldorang Atelier’s latest project – Manhwaricano House. The beauty that is found in ordinary life is the primary theme of Botong-ui Jonjae, and due to the book’s popularity, became a national phenomenon in Korea, where the public has long suffered from the aftereffects of compressed urban growth. “In order to discover the beauty in ordinary things,” says Rieuldorang Atelier principal and architect Kim Seongyoul, “it is necessary to view them with a poetic sensibility, especially when it comes to our nation’s residential character. So, I started designing Manhwaricano [House] with the question of how architecture can enter the world of emotion driven by the mundane and expected.” Located in Uljin-myeon, just 30 minutes away from Ulsan, the setting is a place where non-Korean immigrants have been increasingly living in rural areas. Kim explains: “Most of the immigrants here build houses on mountain and farmland.” Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwan Walkway “Placing a different type of architecture side-by-side the more traditional and typical homes makes the urban situation uncomfortable, but this ‘discomfort’ is what native Koreans are accustomed to in their residential settings. In leaning into this idea, we hoped to resonate with the mentality of the locals, while moving the architectural landscape of the area forward.” Manhwaricano House for example, is exceptionally flat where the surrounding houses are varied in periodic ‘thatched’ styles. “In order to smooth out the opposing styles, I thought it would be effective to emphasise the ordinariness of this hyper-plain, solid rectangle of a building by turning a traditional form inside out – literally – where the exterior was box-like, and the interior was gabled and arched like a standard roof. In the form of a square box, the gable roof was deliberately taken out the exterior equation and placed in the interiors to directly oppose the normality of its neighbours – playing with the ideas of what was ‘ordinary’ in the area.” In addition to the simple shape of the home, Kim focused on creating “empty space where the surrounding landscapes could flow through, to further communicate a sense of beauty in the everyday”, he says. Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwann Seating area The most important of the client’s requirements however, was the space under the eaves. “In suburban housing eaves play a very important role. A lot of things that you cannot do in an apartment are possible under the eaves, which was the case for this expat family,” says Kim. “It is a place for instance, where you can do various activities without being influenced by the weather. I was touched by the client’s affection for her family and wanted to present a special format where her family could make the space their own kind of perfect. It was hoped that the home would be a precious thing found in ordinary everyday life. Daily routines will repeat here for the family, and the landscape of the village will always be the same.” By paying close attention the region’s most ordinary design characteristics, Manhwaricano House rather intelligently takes the ordinary, and transforms it into the extraordinary. Rieuldorang Atelier rieuldorang.com Photography by Yoon Joonhwan Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwan Walkway Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwann Storage Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwann Rear area Manhwaricano House Photography by Yoon Joonhwan Village We think you might also like White House by RIGI Designabc
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How To Use The Past To Inform The Future

When the time comes to let go of the past, solace can be found knowing you’re making way for the future. And that’s certainly the light in which TV producers Julian and Sarah choose to view things. This warehouse in Sydney’s inner west suburb of Annandale – one that belies a spacious four bedrooms, open plan kitchen–dining–living area and internal courtyard in an area known for compact terraces – once belonged to Julian’s father, Frederick Cress. When the English-born, celebrated and Archibald prize-winning artist passed in 2009, Julian inherited that space. Once an artist’s studio, the space was soon transformed into a family home. But it was important to Julian that the space kept true to its history – an industrial site turned artist’s studio – whilst embracing its new life as family home designed to last generations onwards. There were some non-negotiables for the space: the four bedrooms were in anticipation the two kids the couple now parent. A carefully considered kitchen facilitates sociability amongst the family during mealtimes, as well as more formal entertaining. Getting natural light into the building was also an important factor, though not necessarily the most straight forward to achieve: “Starting from scratch we looked and the light and where the sun comes from,” says Sarah. “Getting natural light into an old building can be a design challenge. A light-well and internal courtyard was the key.” Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Kitchen Obstacles during the refurbishment were met with a positive attitude and transformed into features. Old painted brickwork was stripped back to instead highlight the raw brickwork typically associated with industrial warehouses. Likewise, an abundance of exposed steel truss roof frames were painted black and assimilated into the overall design aesthetic. “Where we found issues, we made them a feature,” says Sarah. Now, as was the case nearly a decade ago when Julian and Sarah first inherited and moved into the space, the time has come once again to continue onwards. Work commitments have drawn the duo to Melbourne at increasing frequency and duration, with their young children nearing the age of school; they’ve made the decision to move to Australia’s culture capitol on a permanent basis. “The property is unique, and adaptable, and waiting for the next occupants to enjoy it,” says Sarah, sad to say goodbye but taking it in stride. Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Living Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Breakout Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Lightwell Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Master Bed Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Bathroom Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Garage Julian Cress Annandale Warehouse Internal Courtyardabc
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How Do Architects Design For The Future?

There’s a school of thought gaining traction in design of late: nearly every problem that exists has already been solved by nature. Furthermore, that learning not just about nature, but from nature is the key to a better existence. This is the fundamental thinking behind biomimicry – a theory which advocates emulating, through art and science, nature’s best biological ideas to solve human problems. While this theory has its limitations – nature can’t do anything about your email’s overzealous spam filter – the concept has carried a lot of weight throughout history, resulting in many inventions that have drastically changed the way we live. More recently – in part due to the release of the 1997 book, Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature by scientist Janine Benyus – the concept has found its way into the mainstream. Nowhere is the conversation more lively than in design, where architecture that utilises natural design elements to solve complex building problems continues to crop up. Architects are right to embrace biomimicry; an idea adopted by the likes of Leonardo da Vinci and the Wright Brothers and responsible for inventions such as solar power, LED light bulbs and velcro. In fact, many of the landmark buildings of this century have been driven by one simple question: “how would nature approach this?” Designed by DP Architects and Michael Wilford, Singapore’s Esplanade Theater and commercial district wears an elaborate skin, inspired by the multi-layered Durian tree, to keep interiors from overheating. In Taiwan, architect Toyo Ito drew inspiration from rocks, caves and the impermanence of water in designing The National Taichung Theatre. Thanks to its natural design elements, Toyo Ito’s building emanates a calm, soft atmosphere and is, for many, an antidote to the hectic pace of the industrial city.   Residential architecture too, is making strides. Set among the Heritage Listed peaks that have inspired artists for decades, Huangshang Mountain Village is MAD Architects’s response to biomimicry, which uses form, function and heeds to topography to develop ten residential buildings. Informed by the nearby teafields, no two of the ten are the same. Rather, each of the buildings are conceived to align with the natural curves and contours of the mountain it is set within, as well as to appear sculpted by wind and water. The dialogue between lake, earth and sky is critical, and Huangshang Mountain Village’s footprint reflects this. Apartments are designed to extend from interior to exterior and create a sense of immersion in the surrounds for dwellers. “This is the basic idea,” Ma Yansong, the founder of MAD Architects, explains. “We hope that residents will not just look at the scenery, but see themselves in relation to this environment, an attention that is brought inward. In observing oneself, one perhaps begins to notice a different self than the one present in the city,” he says. In utilising natural design elements, MAD Architects have created a new kind of landscape: one where the line between environment and architecture is blurry at best. [gallery size="medium" ids="72010,72007,72009"] Undercurrent Architects takes the imitation game up a notch, recreating the form of a leaf almost exactly – albeit on a much larger scale – for a home in Sydney’s Northern Beaches. “There are many mimetic aspects of Leaf House and one of the design aims for the building was to reflect and respond to the beautiful site and surroundings,” Didier Ryan of Undercurrent Architects tells. “We interpreted these as essences that should pervade through the building. Leaves, trees, roots, clouds, rain, ocean currents – a small part of each is inherent in this building,” he says. The roof’s emblematic structure is complemented by undulating glass walls, which modulate light to bend and stretch the interiors and further infuse the building with the outdoors. While buildings like Leaf House blur the line between what is ‘natural’ – and what is not – through form, invisible architecture gets rid of the line altogether. Focussing completely on the existing environment, invisible architecture goes to great lengths to remain incognito. Some of these lengths – cubic mirror structures, for example – aren’t for everyone. Subscribing to this way of thinking however, can still be subtle. [gallery size="medium" ids="72012,72013,72011"] Integrating buildings further into the environs, green roofs enjoys both environmental and economic benefits. Founder of Archiblox, Bill McCorkell, explains. “Green roofs absorb the sun’s harsh rays and provide much-needed insulation. They increase the thermal performance of a home, lowering energy costs and increasing plant life to encourage biodiversity,” he says. A garden crown is particularly beneficial in Avalon House, where the owners sought to create a tangible connection to greenery to complement the property’s ocean views. Photography by Michael Wickham [gallery size="medium" columns="2" ids="72002,72003"] For homeowners similarly looking to introduce natural design elements that will emulate their surroundings, a green wall is another good place to start. Cleaning the air of pollutants and offsetting dweller’s carbon footprints, these rich living tapestries also have positive effects for mental health. Envisioned by Altereco Design, the Cole St property features large, north-facing sash windows to showcase the garden’s expansive green wall, and the effect is instantly uplifting. Photography by Nikole Ramsay [gallery size="medium" ids="71999,71997,71998,72000,72001"] Design and biological science may seem an unlikely pairing, but biomimetic architecture – and the many modern interpretations of this concept – proves this marriage to be one for the ages. In two fields where innovation and planning for the future are trumpeted above all else, it’s comforting to know that, when we really strip things back, nothing can take the place of good old-fashioned Mother Nature. We think you might also like A New Wave Of Nature-Driven Designabc
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A Private Family Sanctuary

“Our clients wanted to transform a single storey cottage into a two storey home built with materials of honesty and integrity,” explains Shaun Carter, principal at Carter Williamson Architects. His clients’ house in Sydney’s Inner West suburb of Balmain, has undergone several changes over the years, resulting in an impractical internal layout and a lack of connection with the street. “We responded by reinstating the verandah and timber fence, keeping in tune with the corrugated roof sheeting and weatherboard material palette, thereby connecting with the heritage origins of the area,” explains Shaun. “Beyond the facade, a taller, newer volume rises up to comfortably mediate the height of surrounding developments, melding in with the old front façade in the same colour tones.” Beyond the humble facade, the site experiences a significant fall, which initially presented a number of design challenges. “The clients were blessed with a site generous in width – that is, relative to the average inner west house,” explains Shaun, “however this sense of space could not be experienced in the existing house due to a lack of light and constant change in levels causing a disconnect across the house.” Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Living area In response, the team created “a unified plane” by consolidating the living zone into an open plan that utilises the full width of the site, delineated from the existing cottage street front by a full change in level, with an added bathing room and a courtyard which features the existing fireplace. Shaun also repositioned the stairs to a more central location, which allows the family to seamlessly transition between spaces they use the most. “Along with large, full-height sliding glass doors to mediate the threshold between garden and house, the living space is generously extended and opened to receive the outdoors,” adds Shaun. “The door and windows open generously to embrace the greenery so that equal amenity of light, access and views to the garden and courtyard is achieved.” The garden of Australian natives beyond the deck continues as a plateau above the lane-accessed garage whilst amphitheatre-like steps provide a safe stage for the children’s imagination. Internally, the kitchen is the heart of the house, a space where people gather. “To nurture these interactions, the kitchen window opens out on to the light-well and courtyard, which serve as an enjoyable seat for those having a conversation as food is being prepared and acts as a light scoop to the first floor draws light into the centre of the plan.” Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Atrium An important component of the client’s brief was for a sense of privacy and security. “Without compromising the need for light, the perforated screen was employed as a means of achieving both factors,” Shaun says. By using perforation, there is a level of transparency and the different sized holes create a texture on an otherwise flat plane. The heavily planted terrace above the garage, and the perforated screens along the boundary shield the house from its neighbours, without appearing austere due to their subtle transparency, textural qualities and attenuation of light. The extensive use of black in the house has filtered into the rest of the design aesthetic.“ It’s intriguingly counter-intuitive to how the use of matte black joinery in the living area increases the sense of space by dissolving into the sides of the building and drawing the eye to the greenery in the garden,” explains Shaun. “The use of black penny round tiles to clad the bathroom is a testimony of its ability to reflect and diffuse light to create a calming atmosphere. It accentuates the changing depth in the bathroom ceiling form that is moulded by the existing gabled roof.” Carter Williamson Architects www.carterwilliamson.com Photography by Brett Boardman  Dissection Information Graphite Bathroom fittings from Rogerseller Sole Trader Pendant Lights from Volker Haug Sussex Scala Kitchen Sink Mixer from Reece White Square Bathroom Tiles and External Matt Black Rectangle Tiles from BetterTiles Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Dining Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Sliding door Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Staircase Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Bathroom Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Entertainment area Screen House Photography by Brett Boardman Backyard stairs We think you might also like Sycamore House by Branch Studio Architectabc
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Snarkitecture And Caesarstone Team Up To Alter The State of Design

Snarkitecture started with water as the launch point for the Altered States project. Water is the most important “ingredient” in the kitchen – present in virtually all creation, and changing state in nature, from glacier to river to geyser, and in the kitchen, from ice to water to steam. This changing nature of water was the inspiration of Altered States. "Our starting point was the Kitchen Island, which has transformed from a functional cooking area into the hub of the modern home, a space for entertainment, social interaction and performance.” says Raanan Zilberman, Caesarstone CEO. “We asked Snarkitecture to create an installation that will inspire architects and designers to think about the future of the kitchen and use our material in new ways.” Showcased at the faded grandeur of Palazzo dell’Ufficio Elettorale di Porta Romana, open to the public for the first time during Milan Design Week 2018, the installation guides visitors through an immersive experience of a conceptual kitchen island. At the centre of the space is a large circular island, made of Caesarstone White Attica, explores the changing states of water – ice, liquid and steam. "Our aim for the Milan version of Altered States is to use ice, water and steam to create a mesmerizing collective experience around a kitchen island that has been designed around these simple elements,” say the design experts at Snarkitecture “We took Caesarstone surfaces and turned them into something voluminous and engaging, further highlighting the strength and flexibility of the material.We look forward to inviting visitors to an incredible site in Milan, to explore, and interact within an unexpected and memorable environment."  abc
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Independent Living for an Innovative Bathroom

Traditionally, products designed for those requiring in-home assistance are heavily functional, yet not appealing to the eye – the Independent Living collection is a full family of products featuring stainless steel grab rails, extended handles and integration of Methven’s Satinjet shower spray technology but combined with a modern aesthetic that doesn’t compromise on style. All this together makes bathing luxuriously easy and something to look forward to. Satinjet shower spray technology uses unique twin-jet technology to create optimum water droplet size and pressure, delivering over 300,000 droplets of water per second. The result is an immersive, full-body shower sensation that transforms the everyday shower routine into an experience like no other. Paired with this technology is the option of a massage function, which concentrates the shower spray into an invigorating spray which can help to stimulate blood flow and circulation – as well as just being a luxurious and relaxing part of the bathing experience. Coupled with designer tapware which features extended handles for ease of use, this collection of products enables you to continue living your life no matter how you’re feeling – and after a rejuvenating wash, you’ll be feeling better than ever. Methven methven.com/au abc
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Anonym Studio: Allowing Their Work To Do The Talking

“Why are you Anonym?” I’ve just asked co-founders Phongphat Ueasangkhomset and Parnduangjai Roojnawate about the intriguing choice of name for their design studio. They ponder for a few seconds, and then Parnduangjai answers: “We chose this name because we don’t want our clients or the public to focus on who we are. Like when you visit a gallery and an artist has labelled their piece ‘Untitled’ – our work should speak for itself.” The lowkey pair are able to tackle all elements of their projects, with Phongphat – a graduate of King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi who later worked on huge high-rise condominium projects in Singapore – focusing on the exteriors, and Parnduangjai – who studied facets of design in France after a bachelor’s degree in interior architecture from King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang – tasked with the interior look. Founded in April 2016, this small studio is suitably based in humble surroundings, occupying a converted terrace house down a small lane in Bangkok’s eastern Ekkamai district. The studio has already been attracting international attention for its work which, while adapted to the requirements of each client, follows a belief in creating open spaces, providing airflow, and bringing in natural light. Clean lines and geometric shapes also feature in their projects, which to date have mostly focused on residential projects, with one prominent exception. “We had huge trouble deciding on what Pantone green to use,” says Phongphat, referring to Green 26, their office design for a Thai TV production company. Occupying a space measuring just 62 square metres, the client wanted a shade that represented their name, but the challenge was to find a colour that would be distinctive yet also liveable for the staff who had to work there day after day. The resulting dark hue, accented by white light fittings that resemble hanging vines and reflected through large windows by a small courtyard garden, gives off a shaded forest feel. It’s offset by the bright white epoxy floor that runs the length of the narrow space. “It was difficult,” says Parnduangjai. “With decisions like these there’s no real right or wrong solution. It’s just about your own perception and feeling.” To that end, the pair are careful about the people they work with. “Before we take on a new client, we have to find out what their attitude is,” says Phongphat. “It’s really like starting a new relationship. After all, we’ll be spending the next three years together, and will be sharing very intimate details – we’ll know the smallest detail about everything in their home!” To that end, they meet with potential clients and discuss what their aim is, and what they envision for their new home. “They have to be willing to take a journey with us,” says Roojnawate. “It’s a long process full of discussion and arguments, though everyone will be happy in the end.” Anonym Studio anonymstudio.com Anonym Lounge room Anonym Workspace Anonym House Anonym Exterior facadeabc
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The Shape Of Design

You can’t miss this modern Mount Claremont home. It’s the only minimal and bold two-story project, on an established street the boasts homes from a variety of design eras. “The home is a very modern architectural design with its cubic exterior,” says Kylie Petrou of Axon Homes. “It’s in an area where there is a mix of exterior elevations, so its unique form does stand out, but not in a way that is offensive to the overall street scape. In fact, the client was very certain that he wanted a modern home and not a copy of what already existed.” The contemporary aesthetic of the exterior continues inside with high ceilings, concrete floors and an exposed commercial air-conditioning, evoking a raw and industrial style. The client, who wanted a new build, commissioned DMG Architects to design and produce working drawings, while the construction and design details of the residence were executed by Axon Homes. “The owner met with us to discuss the design inspiration for the residence, coincidentally he showed us an image of one of our previous projects, in which the master bedroom wall and hidden pivot door was clad in timber veneer. This was the springboard for us to start the methods for a tailored outcome,” says Kylie. The 550-metre-square block caters for the 300-metre-square two-storey home that showcases a balanced blend of modern materials, textures and geometric architecture. Internally, the residence’s open space living area features custom joinery with warm timber accents. Upstairs, the three bedrooms run off a long hallway with the master bedroom taking advantage of the second level views. Oversized windows seamlessly run from the bedroom into the master bathroom, where the bath is positioned up against the glass. “It’s a blend of strong geometric spaces that are offset with soft timber surfaces and gentle tiling textures and tones,” Kylie explains. “After handover from the architect, the client instructed us to value engineer selected materials and finishes, to bring the project in on budget without spoiling the design appeal. For example, traditional timber veneer joinery material was replaced with a pre-finished timber veneer product, which was a significant cost saving for the client.” Axon Homes axonhomes.com.au Photography by Dion Robeson Dissection Information Dining table and chairs from District Outdoor setting from Embassy Home Lounge and coffee table from Empire Homewares Beds from Bedshed Artwork from Linton & Kay Galleries Kitchen benchtops by Caesarstone Bathroom and laundry benchtops by Bernini Stone & Tile Tiles by Myaree Cermaics Cabinet Maker by Histonium Furniture Joinery Maker by New Age Venees NavUrban Custom track lighting, kitchen pendant and LED down lightings by Corsa Lighting Tapware by Phoenix Sanitary ware by Seima and Caroma Appliances from Bosch Fireplace by Fireplace Corner Concrete Floor Finishing Trade by Shine-It Systems Door hardware by Zanda Windows and sliding doors by JGS Windows Paint by Dulux Metal work by Bespoke Metal Industries Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Living room Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Armchairs Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Open plan Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Bedroom Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Bathroom Axon Homes Photography by Dion Robeson Exterior facade We think you might also like Triangle House by Robeson Architectsabc
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SJB’s Kirsten Stanisich On Design In Barrangaroo, Sydney

Evocative of place – specifically, Sydney Harbour and its surrounding bushland – 12-Micron draws on the colours, tones and textures of a Spotted Gum, exploring a uniquely Sydney interior from stone floors to floating clouds and bark like leathers. Beautifully realised, the subtle and elegantly luxurious space features careful planning to allow everyone, including staff, spectacular harbour views. Wanting to know more about the process of achieving such a warm, welcome atmosphere in a highly planned – and only very recently opened – area of Sydney’s CBD, we spoke to Kirsten Stanisich of Richards Stanisich on design in Barrangaroo. SW: What was the initial brief? KS: The client’s brief was to create an “Australian Restaurant”. As part of the Barangaroo foreshore, it was essential that a Sydney aesthetic be developed to harmonise, but not compete, with the harbour views. Did the concept change/evolve throughout the process? We had a pretty tight design programme for the project, so there was only time for some minor developments to the brief, but we did develop the design throughout the process. Since completion the restaurant has found a large market for events, and currently we are designing minor alterations to accommodate this and I’ve found this a very challenging process to go back to the project so soon after completion. What was your design approach to the project? What was the strategic thinking behind design in Barrangaroo? We had a very short time frame of five days between receiving our clients’ brief and presenting the first concept. We started by looking at the site context on the edge of the Sydney CBD and Sydney Harbour. There is a strong connection between the built urban environment of the city and the natural topography of the harbour. We looked at a concept of a gridded overlay, often used by artists, interior designers and architects to represent urbanisation and contrasted this against the tones, colours and textures of a Spotted Gum Eucalyptus, an indigenous tree that grows along quite a lot of the east coast of Australia, including Sydney Harbour. We divided the plan with a series of screened joinery elements which, all construction from solid and veneered spotted gum in natural, soft limed and plum stained finishes and drew on the connection to the outdoors with the use of a rough cobble floor in soft green and blue. The table layout was developed to activate either side of the dining space with views of the harbour and the open kitchen. What was challenging about 12-Micron, and how did you resolve those challenges? The restaurant has been designed around a complexity of programmatic challenges, from restrictions limiting any construction within one metre of the façade, complex services requirements, operational flows, developing spaces for small and large seating groups. The biggest challenge was addressing the scale of the space and developing a ceiling concept which addressed the low ceilings heights between 2.4 and 2.8 metres high. We designed a series of vaulted ceilings inserted between fabric style pergola spaces, which were developed to evoke the experience of a eucalypt canopy and to give some movement to the space. The result was a sculptural approach to the ceiling where the contrast in shapes and depth are effective because of the lowered heights. Is there anything else interesting about this project that people might not know? Part of the client brief was to design a luxurious restaurant and we wanted to translate this into our Australian sense of luxury. I think this is about a place with an extra special sense of occasion but without a sense of exclusivity. I hope we achieved that. Richards Stanisich richardsstanisich.com.au 12 Micron 12 Micron12micron.com.au Photography by Felix Forest 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Corner booths 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Table setting 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Lounge area 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Both seating 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Dining room 2 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Dining room 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Bathroom 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Hallway 12 Microns Photography by Felix Forest Desk We think you might also like Cantala Apartments by SJBabc