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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Designing A Home For Work, Rest And Play

What does a sanctuary mean to you? Probably something rather different than what it means to me… and therein lies the challenge facing residential designers today. The outside world is chaotic, bustling, and given the constant developments in technology – the outside world has a way of creeping into our homes, where many of us are increasingly working from where we live. So, designing one’s home as an oasis separate from the craziness of the real world is a very necessary endeavour. But what can be done when you share your ‘sanctuary’ with different people? People with different needs and ideas about what the sanctum should look like and how it should behave? This was the dilemma faced by Austin Maynard Architects when they were commissioned by local Melbourne couple Angela and Rahul to re-define their home, Kiah House, in Melbourne’s trendy North Fitzroy. “The owners, Angela and Rahul, had a clear idea of what a home meant to them – ‘a sanctuary,” says studio founder Andrew Maynard. “In their brief, they asked for a light and airy house, with a strong and positive vibe, to entertain friends and family and also to relax and meditate.” In addition to the above, Austin Maynard were faced with delivering two differing ideas of a sanctuary within the one home. Andrew explains: “Rahul is a film maker who enjoys working from home. Rather than opt for a study nook or a converted shed in the back garden, he asked for a dedicated place to work in each day. Angela on the other hand is a passionate cook who loves spending her free time creating modern gastronomic dishes. She wanted a high functioning kitchen with double ovens, zip taps, sous vide and custom-designed storage space that could be cosy and intimate from day-to-day, yet could also open up for entertaining large gatherings.” Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly kitchen To include the couples varying needs for work, rest and play, Andrew et al. developed a clever concept influenced by Japanese gardens and the Buddhist retreats of Kyoto, a format which responded to the client’s desire for peace and mindfulness. This zen philosophy is sewn into every facet of the home from top-to-bottom. For example, the extension comprises two separate pieces of architecture, the master bedroom haven – which sits beside the original house extending to the northern boundary, and the separate home office poised above. “A bedroom can be more than just a place for some good shut-eye and a dark space at the quiet end of your home,” says Andrew. “A bedroom can be a contemplative, meditative space that at one time is wrapped up cosy and tight in layers of beautiful heavy curtains and then open to the outdoors the next. At Kiah House we were charged with the task of creating spaces, both private and shared, that spill out into the garden and yet adaptable enough to create solitude and privacy when needed.” The master bedroom for instance, has a dedicated Buddhist prayer space and opens up to the garden and ponds via sliding double-glazed glass panels blurring the lines between inside and outside. The towering lemon scented gum tree is enclosed by a small deck area, a place for the owners to sit and meditate. Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly dining kartell chairs The roof of the retreat is turf, covered in plants and edible vegetation (Disphyma Crassifolium) to provide an abundance of insulation as well as creating a buffer in the event of falling gum tree limbs. Accessed via a modest ladder, the green expanse also means the study is not overlooking a dull roof, instead Rahul looks out on a thriving roof garden. Like every other room in the home, the bathroom at Kiah House takes you to a different place. The sunken brick bath, big enough for two, has an earthy character similar to the ancient Onsen. A strong connection to a small private garden, created in the gap between the new addition and the old house, offers a relaxed feeling of bathing within the landscape. The bathroom leads up to the kitchen via a secret passage, concealed behind cabinetry. For Angela’s gastronomic temple, the large island bench acts as the altar for the kitchen at Kiah. Importantly, this is not a typical island bench, this is a sculptural, highly-crafted piece of furniture. Half timber bench top, half stainless steel, it is both homely and commercial. The back of the bench top flips up to give extra practical kitchen surface when needed. The final piece of the Kiah House puzzle – and arguably the most challenging aspect of the design – was to create a place where Rahul could work and relax – a common paradox many designers struggle with solving. Austin Maynard however saw the request as an exciting opportunity. Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly master bedroom Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly bedroom “The kitchen table or an awkward corner of the lounge is not a productive or feasible way for many Australians to get work done at home. A dedicated workspace is required. But does this mean that we need to dedicate a spare bedroom to office space? And how do we create a clear separation between work and life? How do we isolate or escape the stresses of work if it has a permanent presence in our homes?” Rather than opt for a study nook or a converted shed in the back garden, Rahul’s office provides a very different spatial experience to the rest of the house. The office sits above the deck, up in the canopy of the gum tree, with elevated views of the dense green roof of the master retreat and beyond. The office is long and narrow, lined in timber, with perforated steel shelving. Like all of the newly built spaces, Rahul’s office looks out onto the garden, yet this space is elevated and feels separated and private. “A different space for a different household function.” notes Maynard. As a final flourish, to signify the intent of the home, a custom mural was commissioned to “bring forth the innate power within nature,” says Andrew. Titled Awakened Flow by Seb Humphreys (aka Order 55), the artwork responds to the rich gardens and the peaceful nature of the home and its occupiers, to create a gentle explosion of colour that contrast beautifully to the spotted gum cladding. A stunning example of residential design intelligence and creative problem solving for a modern way of living. Austin Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com Photography by Tess Kelly Dissection Information White on White on walls from Dulux Door hardware from Designer Doorware Joinery design by Austin Maynard Architects and constructed by Grange Joinery and CBD Contracting Custom white perforated steel study desk and shelves designed by Austin Maynard Architects constructed by Star Sheet Metal Spiral Stair by Enzie Alphatec Signal Red powder coat on stairs from Dulux Messmate recycled timber from Timber Revival Kiklo Penny Round tiles in bathroom from Perini Tiles Black Sambucca three pendant chandelier from Ruth Allen Bedroom curtains from Barlow & Hunt Arq Shower Mixer in Rose Copper, Strata Shower Rose 200mm in Rose Copper and wall arm from Rogerseller Hydrotherm hydronic heating towel rails from Reece Kitchen appliances from Miele Induction Cooktop from Siemens 400 Series Oven from Gaggenau Rangehood from Qasair Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly courtyard Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly bathroom Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly brick bathtub Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly backyard Kiah House Austin Maynard Architects cc Tess Kelly exterior We think you might also like Gresham Street House by Jackson Teeceabc
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Delving Deeper Into Multi-Residential Design Of The Asia Pacific

Australian housing has always been symbolic: from stout colonial buildings and sprawling Victorian mansions to industrial era terraces and breezy weatherboard beach bungalows. Houses are forever marked with the context in which they were designed or built, showcasing the way that people have chosen – and been able – to live. This year, the new Multi-Residential Building category of the INDE.Awards will celebrate multi-residential projects and recognise the unique set of challenges and opportunities presented by the multi-residential typology. The Multi-Residential Building category will honour projects that take into account scale, efficiency, and maximum occupancy as well as financial and time constraints to demonstrate that design need not take a back seat. The successful project in this category will grant equal consideration to community, sustainability, and experience alongside market needs, and demonstrate significant advancement of the architecture discipline by way of unique form, technology, and material selection. It will make innovative use of compact spaces and contribute to a strong overall urban or suburban character while representing milestone movement in the progress of design as a whole. In 2018, the Multi-Residential Building category is proudly presented by Bosch, iconic German designers of kitchen and laundry appliances. For nearly 130 years, Bosch has taken a future-facing approach to design, recognising that living spaces of all sizes and nature deserve nothing short of the best home appliances. One of the most recognisable global names in appliances, Bosch powers countless kitchens, laundries, and homes around the world and has earned a reputation for reliability and innovation. Bosch's passion for outstanding multi-residential design is rooted in a strong belief in the power of design innovation to solve problems and improve everyday quality of life. The company was one of the first advocates of the home refrigerator and early kitchen appliances, and in 1970s led the market in merging the washing machine and dryer into a single, efficient product. Bosch's pioneering spirit continues to thrive even today, as it works to convert its production facilities in Europe to manufacture products that do not release greenhouse gases and cause environmental harm. Like the Multi-Residential Building category of the INDE.Awards, Bosch recognises the value of touching the earth lightly and sensitively, and understands that small may very well mean mighty.

Bosch is proud to support design thinking and practice that steps out of the box when it comes to multi-residential design and crafts unique, striking spaces for living that will stand the test of time.

 abc
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The Not So Little ‘Little Willow’

Little Willow is over one-hundred years old. Is the heritage aesthetic something very central to your design approach? Julia Treuel Absolutely. Little Willow sits on the old Rippon Lea Estate; a renowned mansion with expansive gardens dating back to the mid-1800s. It was originally one of the gardener’s homes and we were immediately drawn to its heritage. Strangely, there were no protections in place and we were encouraged to bowl it over and rebuild. We’re lovers of the Edwardian age and were intent on maintaining its charm. There’s something extra special about homes of that era – you just can’t beat the high ceilings and bay windows. Sasha Wright-Neville We’re big believers in blending old with new and describe our style as classic meets contemporary with a luxe vibe. To nail this brief, we retained the façade and four principal rooms. The proportions are incredible and allowed us to reinstate the deep gutter cornice and ceiling roses. We extended the cornice into the modern open-plan and the effect it has is seamless.   What kinds of difficulties has working with a heritage fabric raised throughout the re-design process?  SWN After peeling back the layers of the original house, we soon realised we were in for a bigger job than anticipated. The weatherboards had had their day and the timber frame was even worse. It was rotting and crooked so we had no choice but to tear it apart and rebuild in its likeness. One wall would be pulled down then replaced before starting on the next. It was the only way to ensure the house looked the same from the front, just with a new skeleton of sorts.   On the topic of heritage, the redesign seems to negotiate different time periods with ease (ultra contemporary appliances and furniture in balance with more historic or iconic pieces). In balancing the history and the contemporary, what kinds of design decisions did you have to make? JT We always aim to keep our renovations consistent and pride ourselves on our ability to blend design elements from different eras. There’s an elegance associated with Edwardian homes so we carried that through via marble tiles, Shaker cabinetry, and champagne gold tapware. These finishes are quite classic but we modernised them in different ways. For example, we’ve used marble tiles in more contemporary shapes and our joinery has no handles and is push catch. This application allowed us to use ultra-modern appliances in the kitchen without seeming out of place. The property has been extended recently. Can you describe the changes made to the fabric of the home, and the rationale behind them? JT When we purchased Little Willow, she was a tiny three-bedroom abode that had been loved for generations and needed a little pick-me-up. Given we were flipping the property, our goal was to add as much value as possible. Our best bet was to create a four-bedroom home with enough space for a young, growing family. We knocked off the back section to add a modern open-plan then further enhanced the footprint by building a first floor extension. All up, she now boasts four bedrooms (including a stunning master suite), three bathrooms, and two living areas. The footprint has almost doubled in size yet we still managed to retain the backyard. It’s almost a form of wizardry.   One of the key drivers for this project redesign was to augment the property’s value. Designing to a growing property market in Melbourne, how would you describe the buyer profile this redesign appeals to? SWN Little Willow is the perfect property for any buyer that values period details and luxe fittings. In saying that, Elsternwick is a family-friendly suburb with excellent schools, shopping, and transport links. It’s only nine kilometres from the CBD and within walking distance to the beach. Rippon Lea Estate is at the end of the street so there’s vast landscaped gardens at your doorstep. We certainly had a young family in mind during the design phase, hence the addition of the dedicated children’s bedroom.   Approaching the kitchen space, what informed your design approach?  JT The kitchen is the star of the open-plan area and boasts a high ceilings and a north-eastern orientation. We wanted to play on these two elements so we specified ultra-tall cabinets and a white finish to elongate the proportions. For a seamless transition, we kept the butler’s pantry open and integrated a double Bosch fridge/freezer. Because the property sits in a Jewish locale, it was important to incorporate elements of Kosher living. This meant providing multiple sinks, preparation areas, and two unique ovens. SWN To keep things consistent, we carried the Shaker joinery through and finished the benchtops in marble-inspired Caesarstone. The result is a perfectly classic kitchen with a modern touch. One of our favourite features is the extra-wide island. It stretches to 1200mm and feels vast and expensive.   And with particular reference to the specification of NEFF, what appeals to you about the NEFF brand (in terms of functionality and physical/visual form)? SWN Our NEFF appliances are truly the pièce de résistance. They’re sleek, contemporary, and ooze a sophistication all their own. There’s simply nothing better than our impressive four-stack. It’s beyond striking and the absolute epitome of luxury. The Slide&Hide ovens are incredibly innovative and we’ve lost count of the number of times we’ve shown them off to visitors. It’s honestly the first thing I go for when demonstrating my love for the space. JT The black and stainless steel aesthetic means they’ll work in any kitchen and won’t date thanks to their minimalistic design. I’m still in awe of the FlexInduction Cooktop with Integrated Downdraft. It’s so clever, efficient, and easy to use, and doesn’t pose a danger to young children. Of course, it’s ridiculously simple to keep clean which is a win for everyone.   What led you to select these particular NEFF products? SWN We were introduced to the Slide&Hide ovens two years ago and fell in love pretty quickly so they were high on the list of must-haves. We specified two with VarioSteam technology, as it’s such a healthy way to prepare food. From there we added the Combination Microwave and Integrated Coffee Machine which are practical yet luxurious. Together they create the most striking, user-friendly four-stack imaginable. JT We’re big fans of induction cooktops as they’re safer and much easier to control when compared with gas. We were immediately drawn to the FlexInduction Cooktop with Integrated Downdraft as it’s such a brilliant use of technology. It’s also a major space-saver as there’s no need for a rangehood above the cooktop. Of course, a kitchen wouldn’t be complete without a dishwasher or two. We chose the NEFF Integrated Dishwashers as they’re both functional and unobtrusive.   Your latest venture is Abbey Collective. Could you describe the philosophy and what directed you to develop the business? SWN Abbey Collective is our design venture founded 12 months ago. Our initial plan was to flip properties in a professional capacity, managing everything from the conceptual phase to the actual build. We’re Melbourne-based and were hoping to grow the business in our home city but life has a funny way of turning things on their head. A few months ago, I was offered a job in Seattle and after much debate, decided to take it. It’s been an absolute whirlwind and I’m still trying to catch my breath JT Little Willow is our third reno but first dedicated flip. The process has been a massive learning curve but there’s something intoxicating about it. Once this property has sold, I’ll head over to Seattle and we’ll reassess things. There’s ample scope to build Abbey Collective in the U.S. so that’s certainly on the cards. Our philosophy is simple – create something beautiful wherever you go. There’s no reason that can’t extend to the Pacific Northwest so watch this space.  abc
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One On One With Nick Harding Of Ha Architecture

As the desire to live in Australia’s capitol cities continues to grow, so too does the property market and market for multi-residential developments. No two cities have seen this more so than Sydney and Melbourne. Melbourne-based architect Nick Harding and founder/principal of the multi-disciplinary studio Ha, isn’t blind to the poor practices resulting, but he is active – and positive – about ways in which the local architecture and design community can do better to turn current practices around. Referencing the work of Robyn Boyd, Nick sees ways in which we can readapt affordable housing strategies from the 50s to the current climate. “There’s such a huge opportunity to reinvigorate that generosity in affordable housing designs in the community”. But with a lack of initiative coming from leading developers, it comes back to a need for new legislation that forces hesitant developers to “pull up their socks” and engage with architects. That could be in the form of working directly with architects, or, architect-designed off the shelf plans – a la Robyn Boyd – that take into consideration site orientation and good design principles. “There’s a huge amount of multi-residential [work] at the moment and I think that’s a huge opportunity.” Opportunity not to be overlooked. But he is equally compelled by the practice of sustainability in architecture. “I’ve always been very passionate about sustainable architecture,” says Nick. “When I first started practicing, architecture was either sustainable or it was beautiful, it couldn’t be both.” In protest, he spent his early career learning from the likes of John Wardle, for whom he worked for six years following graduation, on how as a practise they balanced the once opposing forces. Nick now runs his own studio, since 2012, wherein he continues to research and learn about sustainable methods of design as well as demonstrates and advocates for them. Sustainability in architecture isn’t easily achieved in Australia in high-density single residential architecture, which is where the practice earnt their stripes. However that doesn’t mean Nick hasn’t found, sometimes forced, ways to make it possible. The first port of call is a general check list Ha work their way through before getting to an individualised approach: site orientation, thermal performance, natural ventilation, cross ventilation and good thermal mass. There’s also an increasing interest, globally speaking, in electrically operable houses, lead as much by clients as architects. “I was and still am on a mission to do really beautifully crafted buildings and design that can be as sustainable as possible. And I definitely do not think they should be exclusive to each other,” Nick reiterates. Working for John Wardle gave Nick invaluable insight into the civic and community roles of architecture. And it left its mark. While much of Ha’s work has been private projects, community and the public experience of the space is taken into no less consideration. “We like doing projects that are in proximity to the streetscape or a public park, where there’s opportunity for the project to have an interesting relationship with the outside world,” says Nick, citing interest in how the final project interfaces with the bordering architecture, infrastructure and community. In each commission Nick Harding completes, his commitment to honest architecture, great design, and community engagement absolutely emanates. As a nominated Prodigy in the 2018 INDE.Awards one can only hope his work has an influence on the existing and emerging architecture and design community. ha h-a.com.au Is Nick Harding your Prodigy of the year? He could be taking home the INDE.Awards Prodigy trophy for 2018. Join us at the INDE.Awards 2018 Gala as we celebrate The Prodigy of the year, presented by Cosentino. Nick Harding Ha Architecture Nick Harding Ha Architecture We think you might also like to read about Kuala Lumpan architect Eleena Jamilabc
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Lighting

Lee Broom Makes His Way To Space Furniture

Lee Broom first created his company back in 2007, and currently is one of the U.K.’s leading product designers having worked with recognisable names such as Christian Louboutin and Mulberry. Space Furniture is a company that focuses on inspiring people and projects to do with design. Together, Space and Lee Broom are bringing the region a range of new and unique lighting combining craft, heritage and modernity in order to create luxury lighting. While being unique it’s simultaneously familiar as Lee takes classic and traditional materials and reinvents them to have an innovative and modern feeling. Materials used are mostly marble, brass or gold conveying the concept of simplicity and elegance. Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.au Space Furniture Lee Broom Optical pendant Space Furniture Lee Broom Mini crescent chandelier Space Furniture Lee Broom Fulcrum light chrome Space Furniture Lee Broom Fulcrum light brass Space Furniture Lee Broom Fulcrum light black We think you might also like Lee Broom at Salone del Mobile 2017abc
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Academy Tiles And KAZA Concrete Team Up To Make Your 3D Tile Dreams Come True

Since 1978, Academy Tiles has set a high bar for its fellow Australian tile suppliers. Boasting an unrivalled range of tiles, mosaics, decorative wood, and wallpaper products, Academy Tiles has earned a reputation as one of the nations’ foremost suppliers of unique, cutting-edge surface coverings and screens. The brand has twice been named Australia’s Most Trusted Tile Brand by the prestigious annual Architecture & Design Trusted Brands survey, and is synonymous with quality, performance, and – above all – innovation. [caption id="attachment_72951" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Liquid Forms by KAZA Design Liquid Forms by KAZA Design is Angela Fergusons’s favourite from the range.[/caption]   Though the Academy Tiles product offering is diverse, it is united by a fearless approach to design that challenges the conventional limitations of form and material. From richly textured ceramics to stunning, multi-faceted 3D tiles and striking tactile screens, Academy Tiles brings together designs from some of the best local and international designers and manufacturers.  Their range includes KAZA concrete tiles from the eponymous Hungarian brand, which has been integral to the global rebranding of concrete – a formerly industrial material – as the contemporary material of choice for designers seeking to create sophisticated bespoke surfaces. [caption id="attachment_72957" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Shingle by KAZA Design Shingle by KAZA Design is Collin Bell’s (Red Design Group) favourite.[/caption]   This year, Australia’s most trusted tile brand and the Hungarian design powerhouse are doubling down on their partnership, teaming up to present the Academy KAZA Tile Design Competition. The inaugural competition offers to aspire and established designers alike the unique opportunity to see their original 3D tile design transformed from a dream into reality. [caption id="attachment_72958" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Edgy by KAZA Design Sue Fenton’s favourite from KAZA is Edgy[/caption]   Designers are invited to respond to KAZA’s virtually unlimited technological capabilities and Academy Tiles’ ethos of fearless creativity by designing their own decorative 3D concrete tile. The competition prompts designers to reconsider the age-old design dictum of ‘form before function’, and instead carefully consider the unique opportunities provided by concrete in comparison with other materials. [caption id="attachment_72959" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Philanthia by KAZA Design SJB’s Kirsten Stanisich loves Philanthia by KAZA.[/caption]   The design may comprise several different shaped tiles that form a homogenous surface when assembled, and are limited only by the designer’s imagination: KAZA’s unique manufacturing technology allows them to produce bespoke concrete tiles in any conceivable shape, with minimal limitations on size and thickness. Designers must also ensure that tiles use only a single colour, which must be selected from KAZA’s library of 25 base colours and 6 metallic shades. [caption id="attachment_72960" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Vine by KAZA Design Vine is Philip Chia’s favourite KAZA design[/caption]   Entries will be judged by a jury featuring some of the Australian architecture and design industry’s most prominent practitioners. Entrants to this year’s competition will have their work considered by: Angela Ferguson, Managing Director of Futurespace Design, Colin Bell, Creative Director of Red Design Group, Greg Natale, Director of Greg Natale Design, Kirsten Stanisich, Director of SJB and NSW President of the Design Institute of Australia, Philip Chia, Founder and Director of The Uncarved Block, and Sue Fenton, Senior Associate of Woods Bagot. [gallery ids="72967,72968,72965,72963,72966,72964"] The winning design will be manufactured by KAZA and promoted across Australia by Academy Tiles. It will join the prestigious ranks of KAZA’s official concrete selection and will be made globally available through KAZA’s extensive network of distributors. The winning designer will also receive an expenses-paid trip to Budapest to tour the KAZA Concrete production faculty, with return flights and 3 nights’ accommodation at the Four Seasons Hotel Budapest included in the prize package.   [caption id="attachment_72961" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Form by KAZA Design Form by KAZA design is Greg Natale’s favourite.[/caption] To enter, designers must submit orthographic 2D or 3D illustrations of their tile design, including annotations for dimensions and scale. This must be accompanied by a maximum 500-word description of the submission. Entries to the Academy KAZA Tile Design Competition are now open and will close on 16 July 2018, with the winning entry announced on 29 August 2018. Learn more about the competition and browse Academy Tiles’ stunning catalogue here.abc
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Templeton Architecture Stay Down To Earth

They say it’s all in a name, but sometimes it takes some digging to excavate all the layers of a concept, physical or theoretical. In the case of Matilda House, a residential project by Melbourne-based architecture firm Templeton Architecture, the name refers on the surface to the Australian bushland setting among the granite hills of northeast Victoria. But if one looks beyond this to its etymological roots, Matilda – meaning ‘container for personal belongings’ – also refers to the deep personal resonance of the project. Built on the site of the client’s upbringing, Templeton Architecture’s design came to embody a container for childhood memories. “It was quite a romantic brief, in some ways,” says director Emma Templeton. “The location is on the client’s family’s farm, where he grew up, and [he] wanted to build a place where they could go visit the extended family, who still live in the main homestead.” The romantic, memory-box aspect of the project that Emma refers to was the client’s request that the new build frame and recapture the views he had over the river as a child. To do this, Templeton needed to contend with less romantic, more pragmatic realities, such as the existing infrastructure of the site (all of the services already ran to a specific location on the farm, limiting where they could build) and climactic constraints (the harsh climate – cold in winter, hot in summer, and often windy – dictated what the material palette could comprise). To combat the latter, rammed earth was chosen as a primary material that could deal with two birds of thermal regulation and young kids. “Part of the brief was the issue of durability, so rammed earth seemed really appropriate, and it also had this natural beauty,” explains Emma. “This allowed us to deal with the issue of thermal mass and to give the internal spaces a robust quality for the young boys, who run up and down the hallways with their scooters. A plasterboard wall just wouldn’t cut it.” Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Kitchen A lot of time was spent trying to reconcile the necessity of a less-than-ideal west-facing location with the brief’s strong focus on connecting with landscape. While Templeton struck a compromise by integrating a couple of spaces that could capture northern light, they also dug deep – both figuratively and literally – to find more creative solutions. For west-facing spaces, glass was specified for its high-performance glazing. This was rounded out with awnings that could mitigate harsh sunlight while expressing the view in all its majesty. “We didn’t want the enclosed space of a traditional eave because the views are quite vertical and you really wanted to see the full floor-to-ceiling views,” explains Emma. “We wanted not to cap the sky.” Adding a different perspective, a sunken courtyard was integrated along the eastern edge. Nestled into the contours of the land, this benevolent external space provides a solid connection to the landscape that is at once protected and intimate. This connection with landscape continues throughout the interior with the raw beauty of rammed earth walls, Australian hardwood flooring, and graphically contrasted details such as the limestone kitchen splashback. These are able to be fully appreciated thanks to all of the time that was spent crafting a deceptively minimalist scheme of fixtures and fittings. “We spent a lot of time trying to make the furniture look quite integrated,” says Emma. “It is in some ways a minimalist and robust house, with large dining and sitting areas but not a lot of loose furniture. The fireplace has the build-in toy boxes beside it, all concealed, and there was a lot of storage area so things can be put away. The avoidance of plasterboard walls really exposed the rammed earth, to tie it all together.” Templeton templeton.com.au Photography by Ben Hosking Dissection Information Glass from Viridian Paint from Dulux Portsea Grey stone from CDK Stone White Mahogany Timber floor Rammed Earth and Gabion walls Rug in living room by Armadillo&Co Beetle dining chairs by Gubi Bowls from Dinosaur Design Photograph in living room by Brooke Holm Sculptures by David Umemoto Compendium light by Daniel Rybakken over kitchen island Moon 80 Pendant by Davide Groppi in dining room Chic 50 by Davide Groppi in master bedroom Cooktops from Bora Build-in microwave and oven from Neff Refrigerator from Fisher & Paykel Wine Fridges from Vintec Taps from Vola Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Dining Kitchen Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Dining Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Fireplace Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Facade Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Hill view We think you might also like Gresham Street House by Jackson Teeceabc
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Takenouchi Webb Is Adding Flavour To Design Across The Asia Pacific

Scene One: Tanjong Beach Club is the quintessential beach lover’s retreat, with a 70s California vibe put forth from cobalt banquette upholstery, baby blue rotund lighting fixtures, timber screens inspired by palm trees filtering light in, and a motif of portholes found in the breezeblock walls and circular apertures in the ceiling that traces the time of day. [gallery size="medium" ids="72873,72872,72874"]   Scene Two: Loof is a roof top bar with playful scalloped walls – a modern interpretation of roof shingles – and nostalgic elements such as cane chairs, intertwined with unexpected accents such as fuchsia bench seating, all encased by walls of greenery. [gallery size="medium" ids="72877,72876"]   Scene Three: The Working Capitol is a co-working space housed in five shop houses, whose interiors have been refreshed in a fresh palette of azure, lemon and teal. Butcher’s tiles and plywood meld with luxurious marble surfaces to create a light-hearted and invigorating space that eschews stuffy work environments. [gallery size="medium" ids="72880,72882,72879,72878,72883,72881"]   Welcome to the world of Takenouchi Webb, where pattern, colour and texture combine to create lively and sophisticated sets for living, work and play to take place. Founded by husband-and-wife couple Marc Webb and Naoko Takenouchi in 2006, the firm has dressed many hospitality venues that have come to define Singapore’s maturing Food & Beverage (F&B) scene such as The White Rabbit, The Black Swan, Whitegrass, Empress, and also Bali’s Katamama hotel, in addition to those mentioned above. Their latest project is private members’ club Straits Clan, housed in the former New Majestic Hotel, where accents of rattan and terrazzo take a page from Singapore’s past. “We like to think our designs are not so much driven by trends or fashion and are happy to say that in the fast turnover of Singapore’s F&B, most of our projects have endured and are still in operation. We have been fortunate in working on a lot of heritage buildings in Singapore and we always look to these for inspiration. We certainly have always been drawn towards more vintage designs and the timeless qualities that they have,” shares Marc. The firm naturally gravitate toward hospitality projects due to their previous work experiences (Marc in Kerry Hill Architects and Naoko in SCDA Architects) but it was also because of chemistry: their first client The Lo & Behold Group who tasked them to design their first restaurant liked what they saw and continued seeking their services for subsequent projects. “It is something we both really enjoy. There is both the very practical side of the design and the drama of creating another world for guests. The greatest pleasure we have is seeing a completed project full, and people enjoying the space we have created,” says Marc on designing restaurants. Even after 12 years, the duo never tire of working on such projects: “The more restaurants we complete, the more our knowledge is increased, but every projects is also like starting from new, with its own unique challenges and problems. In our profession, there is never any repetition.” Takenouchi Webb takenouchiwebb.com Photography courtesy of Takenouchi Webb   Empress [gallery size="medium" ids="72885,72888,72887,72886,72889"]   Katamama Hotel [gallery size="medium" ids="72891,72893,72892,72894,72890,72895"]   Whitegrass [gallery size="medium" ids="72898,72899,72900,72901,72902"]   Straits Clan [gallery size="medium" ids="72903,72905,72904"] We think you might also like Anonym Studioabc
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The Kasturi On Chendor Beach, Malaysia, Is Not Just A Resort

Most resorts promise a dubious scenario: the combination of a home-away-from-home and a safely exotic experience. In practice, they usually provide neither. But The Kasturi, on Chendor Beach on Malaysia’s east coast, is a remarkable exception to this rule. Architecturally, its 24 villas are a re-imagining of the traditional Malay house. But not as an exercise in pastiche. Rather, it arises from a deep commitment to sustainability and conservation. Hence the vernacular domestic typology is given new life, serving the needs of contemporary holiday-makers while also respecting the environment and celebrating local culture. “This was an opportunity for me to do something different because the concept is, in many ways, an extension of our indigenous culture – but making it contemporary so that it can live in this world,” says architect and developer, Hijjas Kasturi. So, like the traditional kampung house, the villas are on stilts so as not to disturb the natural ground plane. In fact, the carriageways around the resort are also elevated. This avoids disturbing the forest and wildlife, generates breezes and separates people from mosquitoes. The bedrooms in the villas are higher than the living rooms, so guests can see the sea from their beds, lying underneath traditional high-pitched ceilings which catch the sea breeze. Outside there is an origami-inspired flat-tiled roof forming an A-frame and reaching down to ground level so that you don’t see the wall, only the roof. There is a lot more to the resort’s conservation/sustainability credentials and its ‘tropical modern’ approach – not to mention the turtle hatchery. Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Turtles Hijjas Kasturi is Malaysia’s most outstanding commercial architect. Now in his 80s, he has retired, leaving the practice to be run by his daughter, Serina. He was ahead of his time, designing commercial buildings which were of their place without resorting to vernacular revival pastiche – modernist buildings which embodied the spirit of local culture, which engaged with their context (especially at ground level) and which explored sustainability (for example, the extraordinary Telekom Tower with its dynamic twisting form and garden terraces, lifted up from the ground plane to create cool, sheltered public space). Angela Hijjas was involved for many years with WWF and the Malaysian Nature Society. On their delightful property, Rimbun Dahan, on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur, Angela has developed a medicinal forest that is used for educational tours. She and Hijjas have ‘rescued’ three historic Malay houses, brought them to Rimbun Dahan and restored and modernised them for use by artists in their artist-in-residence programme. (See Habitus #2 for a full description of the project) “He has always been very interested in doing things that have a sense of place, some connection with traditional forms and ideas,” says Angela of Hijjas. He could do this only to a limited extent with commercial buildings, so post-retirement it was their first conservation hospitality project in Penang that provided the blank cheque. This involved restoring and adapting a cluster of shophouses and terrace houses on the edge of what was soon to become the UNESCO World Heritage precinct in George Town. Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Swimming pool The heritage façades were retained with an extra storey added to the shophouses. Hotel Penaga is a celebration of Straits-born Chinese culture and uses traditionally inspired fittings and furnishings (some made in Adelaide and Melbourne) along with genuine antiques picked up as a job lot in Jogjakarta, local encaustic tiles, and carved timber doors and screens made by Chinese craftsmen. Hijjas linked the buildings by converting the grubby rear lanes into a lush garden landscape, a delightful oasis showcasing a wide range of plant species chosen by Angela. Their team approach was applied to The Kasturi, this time including Australian landscape designer, Greg Dall of Pentago, a long-term resident in Malaysia. The resort has an 800-metre beach frontage, informally extending north and south with sweeping views out across the South China Sea. On approach there is forest, then a lake, then the beach and the sea. So, the immediate issue was where to place the main building. Here the priority was protecting the forest and Angela made the decision to place the building over the lake. “The aim,” she says, “was not to touch the ground.” Hence, as well as the elevated carriageways, villas are built around the trees, plants were removed from construction sites, preserved and later re-planted since they are already adapted to the environment. Each villa has its own septic tank (thus avoiding trenching for a central sewage system) and they convinced Council to allow natural drainage into the sand rather than peripheral drainage. Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Cabins Otherwise, they have used local materials and contractors (Indonesian masons made the distinctive rubble walls which delineate public and private space using local stone, inspired by the clocktower in nearby Kuantan), recycled timber was milled on site, rainwater is used for toilets and gardens, lighting is all LED, the air-con is solar-assisted, ceilings are handmade bamboo, sawdust from the mill is used as mulch and Angela is helping a local farmer establish an off-site herb garden. However, the most astonishing – and most popular – part of the conservation programme is the on-site turtle hatchery. The green sea turtle is under threat with its eggs eagerly collected for sale in the markets. So, working with a partner, Pak Su, the Kasturis have bought more than 40,000 eggs over the last four seasons. “That means that forty turtles will survive over the next thirty years. I provide the money, Hijjas provides the site and Pak Su the expertise,” says Angela. The eggs are kept safely buried in beach hatcheries and when they are ready to hatch large numbers of people turn up – locals, Kasturi guests and visitors from other resorts along the coast – to watch the inspiring spectacle as the hatchlings dig their way out of the sand eager to make for the sea. People are encouraged to ‘adopt’ a hatchling, shown how to handle it safely and then participate in a joyously moving ritual of releasing the hatchlings who then make a charge for the water. Most resorts offer anodyne sensuality. The Kasturi does this, but also provides an architecturally and culturally enriching experience along with the chance to experience first-hand how we can sustain our habitat, the natural world. The Kasturi the-kasturi.com Photography by Ian Teh Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Outdoor area Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Outdoor shower Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Rooftop Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Walkway Kasturi Photography by Ian Teh Entrance We think you might also like this wellness space by Kostas Chatzigiannis Architectureabc
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Homes

Produce Squeezes Big Design Into Small Spaces

Houses based around courtyard design have long been popular in Singaporean shophouses as a reaction to the city-state’s dense urban fabric. These courtyards offer a sense of the outdoors, within the confines of the private enclosure so densely packed in a modern city. Itis this design idea, taken from shophouse popularity, that’s inspired the layout for this house. Designed by Produce, takes the form of a tall, narrow, 3-storey townhouse style home punctured by an internal courtyard formed in the middle of the building. Placing the courtyard internally, compared to the traditional rear or front of the house, is an inspired choice by the Produce team – not only allowing natural lighting to flood into the space, but the stack effect enabled a natural cooling to take place. This central void, ironically, serves as the anchor for the design of the family home – the staircase enraptures it, eyes are drawn to it, and main circulation spaces have been planned around it. Produce Singapore family home stairs For client Chris and Tine, the house needed to have space to accommodate themselves, their own young children, and two elderly grandparents. To accommodate this large family a generous attic was the solution for the constricted size of the plot, yet it was the common areas of the house that served as the focal point in the design. Family-focused, the common spaces such as the dining hall and living areas were given particular weight, serving as places for gathering and conversations as the family meet together at dinner daily. Part of the charm of an internal courtyard like this is the way the outdoors are brought inside, but with the Singapore heat, this presents its own set of challenges. The solution was a skylight finished in low emissivity film to reflect the harshness of the sun’s rays, as well as paired with ventilation openings to keep the heat out in the summer. This, along with the planter boxes around the void, give the space the impression of an outdoor veranda with none of the problems. Produce Singapore family home stairs and courtyard In a theatrical flourish, at night the space is lit up with up-thrown lights, causing the plants to cast dramatic shadows onto the brick and teak surfaces because even the smaller spaces deserve a big show. Produce produce.com.sg Photography by Daniel Chia Produce Singapore family home living space bean bag courtyard Produce Singapore family home entrance gate We also think you might like Symbiotic House by C.H.I Design Studioabc
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Mornington Glory

“The curved entry wall is the show piece,” says Chris Stribley, co-director of Cera Stribley Architects on a beach house design recently completed by the studio. “The battens accentuate the curve as it leads you up into the central living space and to views over Sorrento.” The 300-square-metre house, situated on an elevated piece of land, strikes a commanding presence in a landscape of native trees and exotic vegetation. “The curved forms follow the natural topography of the land as there is a bowl in the centre, which the building straddles,” continues Chris. “As the land falls away, the form continues out and captures the views from the living space whilst creating the cantilevered entry and carport.” Designed to accommodate multiple families, the interior plan revolves around the kitchen. “The kitchen acts as a central node, from which all the other spaces branch off and offer surveillance of the pool to the south and play area to the north, whilst still being fully functioning,” Chris explains. This central space was a result of the team’s response to retaining the existing pool, whilst creating a new outdoor area for the kids on the opposite side of the site. “We wanted to create a link through the house – two large openings opposite each other, so when the weather is good and the kids are playing in either space, you can easily interact with them. These two openings also assist with cross ventilation through the main space,” Chris continues. Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Living areas In recognition of the need for spaces that would allow occupants to retreat for some quietude, the team added an extra “apartment” ­– a cool subterranean sanctuary – as well as an additional living room (and future office) to the rear of the upper floor where the children are able to play without disturbing others. Each bedroom also boasts large recessed window seats, performing double duty as luggage racks for transient visitors and as intimate reading nooks. The master suite is located on its own level, affording the owners complete privacy. Despite the refined and robust material palette –­­ timber, polished concrete, concrete blockwork – the house exudes a sense of luxury. “I think the sense of luxury comes from the experience rather than the finishes,” explains co-director Dom Ceratonio. “The large expanses of glass means that all the spaces engage with the views and the outdoor areas. The interiors are deliberately unadorned to avoid competing with the views.” Furthermore, the palette is uniform across the internal and external surfaces, blurring the distinction between the two, creating not only cohesion in the overall beach house design, but reinforcing the sense of spaciousness. “The idea of a beach house is to get away from it all and be carefree, so the last thing you want is to be living in a porcelain vase, hence the choice of materials and the overall design,” concludes Dom. Cera Stribley Architects cs-a.com.au Photography by Emily Bartlett Dissection Information Exposed Block – National Masonry Grey Block Silvertop Ash external cladding Pangaea polished concrete veneer floors on first floor Bentzon Carpet from Halcyon Lake Custom ensuite basin stands from Grazia and Co Cheminee Philippe 600 fireplace Tapware from Sussex Taps Gervasoni Brass 95 dining pendant Bar stools from Grazia and Co Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Dining Kitchen Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Hallway Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Lounge room Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Corridor Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Swimming pool Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Facade Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Back garden Sorrento House Cera Stribley Architects Photography by Emily Bartlett Driveway We think you might also like Brighton House by Rob Mills Architecture & Interiorsabc
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The Beauty Of A Brick Wall

Hyla Architects’ house at Lily Avenue in Singapore is fronted by a composition of concrete air blocks that reads as a veil and a play on frontage and depth, in and out, porosity and obscurity. The walls’ provisions form part of a larger design solution that addresses the project brief and the challenges of the site. Sandwiched between two others, the inter-terrace house presented several design constraints typical of its typology. Hyla’s principal, Han Loke Kwang, suggests that the lack of views is one such challenge. “What do you look into?” Han offers. “Usually, you’d put the living room in front, and in this case, what you see is your car. You don’t really have much views.” Views, together with requirements for openings for light, ventilation, and the enjoyment of external spaces, therefore became a central design aim of this project. The design for the house follows the Urban Redevelopment Authorities’ revision of envelope control guidelines for landed housing in 2015, where the building massing is now to be guided by a volumetric limit. The revision has allowed for greater flexibility for design when it comes to aspects such as floor-to-floor heights and the above-ground protrusion of the basement level. As a result, Hyla was able to introduce four levels of living spaces in the two-and-a-half storey build. The first level (technically, the basement) accommodates the garage, the service room, service areas such as laundry and the household shelter. This enabled the placement of the main living areas on the second level so they are effectively elevated from the ground. It also presented the opportunity to include a courtyard that adjoins the main living spaces. The children’s bedrooms are placed on the mezzanine and the master bedroom on an attic level. Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Tree Han shares: “By dividing the spaces vertically, everybody in the family gets their own level and it really maximises the house plot. It’s an inter-terrace hosue but you’ve got a nice big courtyard.” The courtyard is placed at the front end of the house, so the living areas sit comfortably in the deeper recesses, behind a five-metre-tall sliding glass door. Here, the family enjoys the double-volume space, especially with the staircases (with beautiful concrete stair treads that have been cast in situ) pushed to the sides. Ceilings are removed where possible, with a resultant airiness that more than recompenses for the loss in the house’s floor-to-floor height. In the main living spaces, the view is orientated towards the courtyard and outward. The aforementioned wall of concrete air blocks is precast with ledges so it doubles as a climbing wall for the family’s cats. Providing light, air, views, but also for privacy, the air blocks have a randomised pattern and are also composed irregularly, making it hard for outsiders to decipher the activities of the house. HYLA Architects hyla.com.sg Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Concrete staircase Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Dining Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Living areas Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Shower Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Bathroom Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Entrance Lily Avenue HYLA Architects Front facade  abc