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From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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This Design Studio Has Been Recognised As The Best In The Region By Our Industry’s Leaders

The Architecture and Design industries throw around the idea of human-centred design a lot. And I mean… A LOT! Too often, in fact, and far too recklessly. While human-centred design, however, as a concept, has been built around creating a better product for the end-user, the million-dollar question still remains unanswered: how will human-centred design not only change the work we produce, but how we produce it? How, that is, will it change the industry itself? The answer, surprisingly enough, lies in design-thinking. The same applied thought that leads to the creation of what ends up being experienced at full scale, or held in someone’s hand, is slowly but surely creating a shift within our industrial practices. Of course, the outcome of any project depends on the people involved. Design studios obviously deal with similar problems, but often in much different ways that align with a specific outlook (and often, an aesthetic one). Design studios could also be expected to hire people whose mentality and approach to work is similar, even if the area of expertise is different, in order to enhance a particular studio quality. In order to create a successful piece of design that is intuitive and responds well to the needs of the user, the right people need to be behind the wheel throughout all stages of the process.  Sounds like a no-brainer, right? Well, it's precisely for this reason that the INDE.Awards turns its gaze to not only the work that such studios produce, but the very human nature of the studios themselves.  
The Design Studio INDE.Award honours the practice that thinks forward, creates voraciously and changes perceptions in architecture, design or both.
 

Presenting the Winner of the 2018 Design Studio INDE.Award:

Studiomake

As this year's recipient of the Design Studio INDE.Award, Bangkok-based Studiomake, as a practice, maintains that more innate understandings of our environment stem from more intimate scales of interaction. In the firm’s studio and workshops these tactile moments develop from fluid, recurrent shifts between the act of design and the performance of construction. Being able to experience the weight of material and the friction of tools, their ideas are catalysed by empirical knowledge derived in-hand. Studiomake, as a notion, began to coalesce as David Schafer and his late partner, Im Sarasalin Schafer, sought to formalise their long collaboration into a future practice. Having met in the dry heat of Tucson at the University of Arizona, they both moved to San Diego to work for several significant architecture studios, earned their architecture licenses from the State of California, and then prior to moving to Bangkok, returned to academia to explore a more intimate scale of making. The premise is that there is no distinct boundary between the act of design and the act of construction. They form a singularity, intertwined and intrinsically linked. Making inspires Studiomake’s systems of conceptualising and their conceptual framework in turn guides their approach to making. The empirical informs the theoretical and the theoretical informs the empirical. Moving fluidly from studio to workshop allows setbacks and discoveries to overlap and happen more quickly. Failure is indeed a distinct part of the process; every new idea comes with a degree of risk and while experience serves to temper that risk they find themselves constantly on the edge of failure.  

Honorable Mention:

H&P Architects

  Hanoi-based H&P Architects was founded by Doan Thanh Ha and Tran Ngoc Phuong, who studied in the same class at Hanoi Architecture University and graduated in 2002. For their community-related projects, they consult with Dr Nguyen Tri Thanh – the Deputy Dean of Faculty for Architecture at Hanoi Architecture University. Doan focuses on social projects and navigating the challenges that come with implementing projects in difficult and disadvantaged communities in Vietnam. H&P’s social projects have been formulated with the viewpoint of creating spaces (‘necessary space’ is Doan’s term) that can meet and be adapted to the most fundamental needs (physiological, safety, belonging) of the poor and the disadvantaged. ‘Necessary space’ is made of ‘necessary materials’ (cheap, locally available, recycled materials) with construction technology that is appropriate to the specific context. Often, traditional craftsmanship is combined with modern technology and the building users participate in the construction. H&P hopes this approach will raise awareness, provide inspiration and shape future actions among users, encouraging them to take action and responsibly for creating a society with a ‘necessary’ and friendly culture, community and climate. H&P’s ‘necessary spaces’ are diverse in size, ranging from meeting an individual’s fundamental needs to a household and more broadly a population segment. Contexts of construction range from vulnerable communities in areas hit by natural disasters to poor ethnic minorities in mountainous areas, or disadvantaged communities in urban and rural areas.  

INDE.Awards 2018 Gala

  The INDE. Awards acknowledge the talent and skill across the Asia-Pacific region by assessing and appreciating the designers and architects of the industry that challenge our industries conventional boundaries.   This year’s entries were more advanced, innovative, creative, dynamic and diverse than previous years. Evaluating over 400 entries this years jury were faced with difficult decisions, however were impressed with the globes promising designers and architects that are going to carry our industry further.  

Indesign Media Congratulates This Year's Top Design Studios of Asia Pacific:

Studiomake – Winner, Design Studio INDE.Award 2018

and H&P Architects.

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It’s Made Of Material Waste But Declared The Best Design Object Of 2018

We rarely put thought into the everyday objects we use, let alone how they are designed. But because of how they are designed, we are not supposed to ponder the origin of a ballpoint pen or a coffee table.   Though design started out as a craft focusing on the conception of beautiful objects, over the years it has surpassed its effortless origins to demonstrate a focus on the needs of people in original and creative formats.   The best product or object design tells a story and respond to user needs in unexpected ways – disappearing seamlessly into our daily routines. Without compromising on form or function, as well as materiality and manufacturing techniques, these objects are designed to serve a function with the aim of becoming a hallmark of exceptional industrial design.   Mies van der Rohe famously said, “A chair is a very difficult object. A skyscraper is almost easier.” Referring to the way architecture and industrial design overlap in the way that they both now require consideration of end-users and the environment, it also emphasises that the approach to both disciplines – though aims to result in something iconic and distinctive –are not really one and the same, industrial design being a subset of architecture.   When it comes to industrial design, it is fair to say that products that stand out are those that have stood the test of time. In this regard, The Object category celebrates modern industrial design that carefully balances function, meaning, and beauty.  
The Object 2018 Award is granted to the finest industrial design across the Asia Pacific region. The category celebrates how objects function, what they signify and how they respond to the needs of people in an experimental and rebellious approach.
 

Presenting the Winner of the 2018 INDE.Award for The Object:

The Remnants Table Series by Josh Carmody Studio

 
How can samples of marble or granite, which architects order and receive in substantial quantities, be put to good use? Conserving the original properties and beauty of the material offcuts, can something even be made?
  An architect with a design practice based in Melbourne, Josh Carmody introduced bespoke handcrafted pieces for both domestic and commercial clients, balancing modern aesthetic with traditional handcrafted quality – an experiment in sustainable luxury. With over a decade of furniture design and production experience, Carmody’s studio is always committed to balancing a resolved modern aesthetic with traditional handcrafted quality.   With the intention of inspiring architects and designers to reuse stone, tile and timber offcuts that are generally forgotten in design studio libraries, The Remnants Table Series is a hardware clamp on leg system specifically designed to allow the configuration of table tops in any size, layout and shape. Not only is this a method of utilising untapped resources but materials are brought together to create functional furniture pieces in a creative and simple way.   The Remnants clamp-on system is designed to accommodate materials up to 30mm thick while also allowing materials of varying thicknesses to be joined together, – permitting anyone to make tables out of any material they desire and have access to. An exceptional example of executing a simple idea, the design coordination, restraint and refinement of materials used not only address practicing sustainably but it was also designed for ongoing reuse, repair and recycling.  
“As an architect, I always felt a pang of guilt seeing a stone sample headed for the bin… All these opulent and sought after materials, pulled from the earth, transported around the world, cut, honed, polished, delivered, to then be judged not worthy by someone and discarded. This waste never sat well with me.” Josh Carmody of Josh Carmody Studio
   

Highly Commended:

Strand Chair by Adam Cornish for NAU, CULT

  Naturally, our bodies have evolved to walk upright and to recline in repose. Sitting elevated, folded into a piece of furniture or object, is a cultural habit. With that in mind, designing a ‘good’ chair, therefore, is basically the art of making the ‘awkward’ feel natural – practically a paradoxical proposition.   As a result of a dialogue between CULT, NAU and Adam Cornish, the Strand Chair was inspired by vintage steel furniture from the 1950’s. With that in mind, and taking cues from braided steal cables, three aluminium ‘strands’ work in harmony to create the outline of the design. Intricate but tactile, Strand is humble enough for residential purposes, yet strong and ergonomically suited to commercial applications.   The chair is designed based on the philosophy that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts; each component works seamlessly with the other to create pieces that rely solely on their ‘unison’.  
“The palette of simple, tactile materials were chosen for their ability to age well and add to the character of the chair as the years go by.” – Adam Cornish about the Strand Chair for NAU
  Dubbed as the ‘chair for the people’, the process revolved around designing for accessibility. The Strand Chair symbolises a strong yet quaint aesthetic without being overbearing.  

The 2018 Object Award is Proudly Sponsored by Zip Water

  Zip Water partnered up with the INDE.Awards to grant The Object award to the region’s most original players in modern industrial design.   Zip Water is a leading provider of water filtration devices that seamlessly marries functionality and style. Elegant and boasting user-friendly features, these products are the epitome of using industrial design to transform spaces for the better. Established in 1947, Zip Water has advocated local manufacturing as a means of ensuring quality, consistency and a customized response to all design specifications.   Throughout the Asia Pacific region, Zip Water products are architects and designers preferred solution because of their ability to address health and safety concerns in a sleek and streamlined design object. Often fitted in commercial and high-end residential kitchens around the world, these products are continuously prized and praised for their easy operation, innovative contemporary design and extended product lifespan.   Similar to the criteria of The Object category, Zip Water is a major proponent of innovation and a considered, meticulous approach to design and manufacturing.    

INDE.Awards 2018 Gala

  Established to celebrate outstanding architecture and design across the Asia Pacific region, the INDE.Awards is a program curated specifically to commemorate projects on the region’s own terms and not by the terms of other design centres around the world.   With over 400 entries, the calibre of projects, people, products and ideas push the industry to new frontiers by addressing the sectors of design with significant and increasing relevance to the globe’s most populous region.    

Zip Water + Indesign Media Congratulate the Winner of

The Object Category The Remnants Table Series by Josh Carmody Studios

and Highly Commended Strand Chair by Adam Cornish for NAU

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Announcing The Winners Of The INDE.Awards!

Getting bigger and even better, the second edition of the INDE.Awards culminated in a glittering Gala night on Friday, June 22 at JW Marriott Hotel South Beach in Singapore. And now the wait is over. This year’s incredibly diverse shortlist was a tough one to narrow down, and our esteemed jury worked hard to hand-select this year’s winners. So here is the complete list of the 2018 INDE.Awards winners, each with a few words from the jury and a brief description – click on the links to find more information on each laureate!

The Building

Brought to you by Cult

Winner

krakani-lumi, Taylor and Hinds Architects

“A revelatory experience of landscape and culture” This standing camp (krakani lumi or ‘place of rest’) in Tasmania’s North East National Park was created for the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania. The building was to be entirely self-sufficient and located with minimal impact within the Mount William National Park and beautifully fuflfills the remarkable cultural dimension requested by the brief.

Honourable Mention

Marina One, Singapore, Ingenhoven Architects with Architects 61

“A building with a future vision for the tropical city” Click here for the 2018 The Building Shortlist. .  

The Multi-Residential Building

Brought to you by Bosch

Winner

Nightingale 1, Breathe Architecture

“A genuine prototype for quality, affordable inner-suburban living” Nightingale 1 is the inaugural project of the Nightingale Model, a housing model with an overarching priority toward social, economic and environmental sustainability. Its architecture serves as a catalyst to unite a group with similar values and build a community. The first building in Australia to be connected to an embedded network that is 100-per-cent fossil fuel free.

Honourable Mention

M3565 Main Beach Apartments, Virginia Kerridge Architects

“When materials heighten architectural expression” Click here for the 2018 The Multi-Residential Building Shortlist. .  

The Living Space

Brought to you by Gaggenau

Winner

Room Without Roof, HYLA Architects

“Breathes new life into the traditional courtyard typology” This two-storey brick structure has the archetypal form of a gable-roofed house with an unusual twist – part of the form is actually an external courtyard that contains the swimming pool. This ‘room without a roof’ becomes the central focus of the house and blurs the distinction between inside and outside. This project re-examines the relationship of a house with its external surroundings.

Honourable Mention

Artist Retreat at Pittugala, Palinda Kannagara Architects

“A magical place born of a singular vision and clever design” Click here for the 2018 The Living Space Shortlist .  

The Work Space

Brought to you by Colebrook Bosson Saunders

Winner

CSIRO Synergy Building, BVN

“The science sector brings a new vision to the workplace revolution” Synergy is a new centre for CSIRO on the Black Mountain campus in Canberra. The reinvention of the workplace is the central design tenet, merging a place of scientific research with the contemplative necessity of write-up and reflection. The project puts emphasis on ‘place’ partially through some very thorough passive strategies for its Canberra site, including a thermal chimney.

Honourable Mention

PwC Melbourne, Futurespace

“A workplace that puts the client at the centre, without compromising the staff” Click here for the 2018 The Work Space Shortlist .  

The Social Space

Brought to you by Dyson

Winner

Barangaroo House (Architecture), Collins and Turner

“An extraordinary statement and a new dimension for Sydney’s Barangaroo precinct” A three-storey building with a striking form that is approachable from all directions, Barangaroo House smartly maximises front row seats for some incredible harbourside views. A new prominent urban landmark in Sydney’s newly developed precinct with a unique timber facade system developed with parametric design software.

Honourable Mention

BE Friendly Space, H&P Architects

“Makes open space and community in an urban jungle” Click here for the 2018 The Social Space Shortlist .  

The Shopping Space

Brought to you by Aesop

Winner

Domaine Chandon, Foolscap Studio

“An exquisite reinvention of the cellar door experience” Championing local materiality and makers (like native timber, Queensland marble, fabric by indigenous artists and a kinetic hanging mobile by Melbourne-based metalwork craftspeople), Domaine Chandon celebrates the wine culture’s links to the new world. Champagne bubbles were playfully referenced with bespoke display elements and gravity-defying effects.

Honourable Mention

The Daily Edited Melbourne Flagship, Pattern Studio

“A highly photogenic retail space that encourages you to experience it in real time” Click here for the 2018 The Shopping Space Shortlist .  

The Learning Space

Brought to you by Living Edge

Winner

Macquarie University Incubator, Architectus

“A light-filled gesture that stands out among the concrete buildings of Macquarie University” A pair of pavilions in Sydney that capitalise on the prefabrication potential, flexibility and beauty of constructing with timber. The materials allowed for an innovative approach to design, while offering a very high degree of reuse should the Incubator ever be relocated.

Honourable Mention

A Journey of Self-Exploration, Bukit Panjang Public Library, Grey Canopy

“When learning becomes an exciting and unpredictable journey” Click here for the 2018 The Learning Space Shortlist .  

The Wellness Space

Brought to you by Mafi

Winner

Bendigo Hospital, Silver Thomas Hanley with Bates Smart

“A broadminded approach to wellbeing, anchored to its place” The largest hospital in Victoria, Australia, Bendigo hospital creates an important community asset for the future healthcare needs of the growing regional population, so it was important to establish a friendly and human scale to the hospital. The design introduces a street-scale rhythm of vertical framing elements.

Honourable Mention

Artemis Centre, Melbourne Girls Grammar, BVN

“A refreshed look at the role of wellness within the education model” Click here for the 2018 The Wellness Space Shortlist .  

The Design Studio

Brought to you by Careers Indesign

Winner

Studiomake

“A remarkable and ingenious model for the South-East Asian design studio” Bangkok-based Studiomake maintains that more innate understandings of our environment stem from more intimate scales of interaction. Studiomake explores the overlapping realms of architecture, interiors, furniture and object design. Their projects shift from buildings to doorknobs, and their roles vary from architect to contractor, collaborator, and or fabricator.

Honourable Mention

H&P Architects

“When design becomes good, useful and responsible” Click here for the 2018 The Design Studio Shortlist. .  

The Influencer

Brought to you by Geberit

Winner

Microlibraries, SHAU

“Brings imagination and innovation to a crucial educational challenge” Microlibraries began with the mission to make learning attractive and accessible in Indonesia through architectural design. Individually designed and always paired with other activities, each Microlibrary is tailored to fit the programmatic demands of its community and the potential of the site. It is a design laboratory to test ideas about community, materiality, construction, sustainability, typology and small-scale building.

Honourable Mention

The Nightingale Model, Breathe Architecture and Nightingale Housing

“A demonstration of the real feasibility of people-centric sustainable development” Click here for the 2018 The Influencer Shortlist. .  

The Object

Brought to you by Zipwater

Winner

The Remnants Table Series, Josh Carmody Studio

“Sustainability has a new standard of excellence” Remnants creates a new stream of use for material samples from the architect or interior designer’s library – going way beyond drink coasters. The designer has created an elegant clamp and leg system that creates functional and flexible furniture in a simple and creative way, appealing to the designer as both the user and the specifier. The appeal goes beyond that of a product that looks, feels and functions nicely.

Honourable Mention

Strand Chair, Adam Cornish for NAU

“A chair for our time, and maybe forever” Click here for the 2018 The Object Shortlist .  

The Prodigy

Brought to you by Cosentino

Winner

David Neustein and Grace Mortlock, Other Architects

“Re-writing the role of the architect” Sydeny-based Other Architects take on work at broad range of scales, always seeking ‘other’ approaches that challenge popular opinion, conventional wisdom and architcetural trends. Current projects include a small country house, an exhibition in a car park, a boutique apartment building and a vast metropolitan cemetery. Click here for the 2018 The Prodigy Shortlist .  

The Luminary

Brought to you by Wilkhahn

Winner

Mia Feasey, Siren Design Group

“Not just a role model for women, but for everyone in the design profession” Founder, CEO and the creative driving force behind the interior design consultancy Siren Design Group, Mia Feasey counts tech titans such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, Linkedin as clients. With offices in Melbourne, Sydney and Singapore, Siren has been redefining the interior architceture landscape for thirteen years and is considered as the game changer in the industry. Click here for the 2018 The Luminary Shortlist .  

Launch Pad

Brought to you by Schiavello

Ultimate Winner

Emphaty, Yeo Yiliang

“Comes from a place of pure consideration” Empathy is a coin bank that was designed to encourage the user to empathise with those in need. Once the personal savings area is filled, additional coins will fall into the charitable area suggesting that once you have enough, you can afford to provide to others. The design was inspired by Zakat – the Islamic practice of almsgiving

Runner Up

DLC-01, Dan Layden

“Designing with purpose is a design principle for the future”

Click here for the 2018 Launch Pad Asia Shortlist Click here for the 2018 Launch Pad Australia / New Zealand Shortlist .  

Winner

Best of the Best

Brought to you by Zenith

krakani-lumi, Taylor and Hinds Architects

Episodes within the post-colonial story of the Aboriginal Tasmanians are marked by tragedy and dispossession. The site of krakani-lumi holds a significant place in the fabric of this story. It is not a widely known story, and this project was to serve as the place for its telling. The architecture of the project had to carefully bear witness to and help facilitate this ‘speaking into being’. Through the revelation of the interior, a story of concealing and revealing is told, which belongs to the privileged cultural experience. Click here for the entire 2018 Shortlist.  

Congratulations to all winners!

Thank you to all of our partners and sponsors, whose support has enabled us to celebrate the diverse architecture and design industry in our Asia Pacific region!

Join us in 2019!

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This Multi-Residential Project Is Asia Pacific’s Best In 2018: And Here’s Why!

How can we live with equal consideration for community, sustainability, experience and market needs? This is the kind of question a well design Multi-Residential Building answers through its design. Taking into consideration the multitude of needs of dozens of families is a tricky prospect for a designer, let alone grappling with the large size and impact a multi-residential building will have on an area and its community. Increasingly, multi-residential living and inner city apartment complexes are the norm for many of us, but rarer are those special few projects that answer the needs of an area, and inspire us through design. This is why we choose to honour a Multi-Residential Building as part of the INDE.Awards.  

Presenting the Winner of the 2018 Multi-residential INDE.Award:

Nightingale 1, Breathe Architecture

  Great design and great designers were certainly the names of the game when it came to the Multi-Residential award this year. Narrowing the selection down to a shortlist was difficult enough, and while the entire shortlist is a showcase of the ingenuity and talent of our region, ultimately it was Nightingale 1 by Breathe Architecture that most won over our judging panel. We give a huge round of congratulations to the Breathe Architecture team and their stunning work on this Brunswick property.   Nightingale 1 exists in what the locals call Old Brunswick – industrial and run down, yet possessing an indelible charm and strangely endearing quality. The people and the sense of community keep this suburb alive. Emerging from the success of neighbouring apartment building The Commons, Nightingale 1 is the inaugural project of the Nightingale Model – a replicable, triple-bottom-line housing model with an overarching priority toward social, economic and environmental sustainability.   Nightingale is all about people. Its architecture serves as a catalyst to unite a group with similar values and build a community. This is seen in a series of communal spaces – a productive roof garden and deck, shared laundry and clothesline, bicycle parking and rooftop shed – that serve as meaningful social and utility areas, promoting interaction and engagement amongst neighbours and ensuring company is always at hand. The design strategy was building more with less, adopting an honest material palette and placing emphasis on reduction – of embodied carbon emissions, operational carbon emissions and running costs. Nightingale 1 is made up of a series of small but meaningful architectural moments. The planning was kept simple, and materiality took precedence over form. The whole together is so much more than the sum of its parts, and an inspired example of multi-residential design done right.  

Highly Commended:

M3565, Main Beach Apartments, Virginia Kerridge Architect

  A high-quality apartment building with one apartment per floor, the M3565 Main Beach Apartments designed by Virginia Kerridge Architect offers something really special on Australia’s Gold Coast, and has earned our Highly Commended recognition.   In contrast to the generic multi-unit beachfront properties it neighbours, M3565 embodies a human scale of seven to eight levels – seven levels to the street – configured to deliver a significantly enhanced street presence through both the calibre of the architectural expression and the resolution of the edge conditions to the landscape and public interface. The resulting building is one with an identity of permanence achieved through both its human scale design, and its use of elegant materials against the robust beach edge.   The building ultimately represents a new methodology of building multi-residential projects in coastal cities like the Gold Coast. A methodology that has a human scale and is built with quality and lasting materials, and one that we’re proud to have featured in this year’s INDE.Awards.  

The Multi-residential INDE.Award is Proudly Presented by Bosch

  A large-scale project required materials and appliances to be carefully considered throughout the entire project. With so much electrical and water usage happening from the one site, reliability is key here too – which is why Bosch was the natural pick to partner with when we presented the Multi-residential Building Award.   The German engineering in the Bosch appliances ensures reliability and outstanding quality in a sleek contemporary design. For generations, Bosch home appliances have been making everyday life a bit easier for those around the home, and for those designing them. Huge ranges of different ovens, washing machines, dryers, dishwashers, vacuums, fridges, freezers and sleek built in coffee machines ensure a multi-home building will include your home just the way you like it. We’re thrilled to have partnered with Bosch in presenting the Multi-residential Building award for the 2018 INDE.Awards, and know you will be thrilled whenever you specify, install or turn on any item in the Bosch range.  

The 2018 INDE.Awards Gala

  The INDE.Awards were founded on the belief that the Asia Pacific region is a special place. Special design happens here, and we think it deserves to be celebrated. In 2018, we wanted to make the second INDE.Awards event bigger than ever, and truly honour all that’s terrific about our region. Australia and the Asia Pacific’s best came together to celebrate great design, which is what Indesign Media is all about. This year, we recognised Asia Pacific’s most exciting and forward thinking design on the global stage – and promoted our region as a true design hot spot globally. Our many contexts are unique, and so are the designs that respond to them. The INDE.Awards are the new benchmark for design accolades across our diverse and dynamic region, and we were thrilled to play host to the great design and designers once again.   As so many of us increasingly choose to live in apartments and in close quarters in cities, it’s more important than ever to give proper considering to how we design and build multi-residential buildings. The examples we were fortunate enough to pore over in this year’s INDE.Awards are an inspiring showcase of what’s possible when design, aesthetics, functionality and beauty work in harmony. We thank our sponsor Bosch and give major congratulations to all shortlisted entries, and a huge round of applause to our very deserving gold medal winners at Breathe Architecture.  

Indesign Media and Bosch Congratulate Breath Architecture and Virginia Kerridge Architect on the Best Multi-residential Design in Asia Pacific

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Design Cues From The Nature And Timber That Surrounds

On the east coast of Tasmania, ever so slightly hidden amongst the coastal bushlands of the Freycinet National Park, resides the new RACT Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions. In case the location isn’t unique enough for those able to take advantage of the rare, completely immersive accommodation experience, the architecture – interior and exterior – is a feat in itself. The curved structure of the building on the exterior is clad in charred hardwood, which sits nicely in amongst the dense forest – at times it is hard to believe you’re just metres from the ocean. Internally, however, a dark, bold choice in timber is complemented by the warmer, lighter hues of Tasmanian Oak. Freycinet Lodge Tasmanian Timber cc Diana Snape deck Freycinet Lodge Tasmanian Timber cc Diana Snape exterior “Using timber helped achieve the curved wall because we kept the boards at a width that could quite easily work around the curves of the design,” says Michael Lane, Director of Hobart-based builders Cordwell Lane who worked on the construction of the project. He notes the use of Tasmanian Timber answered questions of function as much as aesthetic. But the lighter colour far from means a lighter impact. In fact the timber boards were intentionally used in varying lengths and thicknesses in order to create a patterned effect. To further the ideal of complete immersion – outside in the landscape and inside in the architecture – Tasmanian Oak plywood was also used on the floors and ceilings. Solid Blackwood and Blackwood veneer was used for joinery including benchtops and vanities. Freycinet Lodge Tasmanian Timber cc Diana Snape Tasmanian Oak Freycinet Lodge Tasmanian Timber cc Diana Snape bedroom “Timber brings softness to a project,” adds Michael. “It softens the room and gives the room a nice textural feel. It’s also really good for layering wall fabrics and breaking a room up. It creates a bit more interest than a bland plasterboard wall. “Blackwood has a lot of variances in its appearance, so that provides a really beautiful feature. The colours in it are great, making it a really nice warm timber.” Tasmanian timbers are known locally for their ease of use, suitability for internal applications, desirable colour variances in tone and appearance, longevity and availability. Projects like RACT Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions are helping to spread the word nationally and internationally. Tasmanian Timber tasmaniantimber.com.au Architecture by Liminal Studio Photography by Dianna Snape Freycinet Lodge Tasmanian Timber cc Diana Snape Tasmanian Oakabc
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The Potential Of Laneway Architecture And Backyard Buildings

The garage, the granny flat and the backyard shed have evolved with these often-neglected buildings being reinterpreted to provide for more flexible living needs as office, studio, teenage hideaway, guest room and tenancy. In constrained inner-suburban sites, homeowners and architects are not only realising the potential of the diminutive building cum laneway architecture; how it can contribute to both a property and rear/second street frontage. Designed as an auxiliary to the main residence, these adaptable and multi-functional buildings are bookending backyards and creating contained outdoor spaces, while offering a more visually appealing public presence on busy streets and utilitarian laneways.    

The Backyard Studio by Figureground Architecture

In North Fitzroy, Melbourne, The Backyard Studio by Figureground Architecture replaces a garden shed and provides a multipurpose space accommodating a garage, music studio, guest room/study, storage room and ensuite. “As expanding urban growth places more value on inner suburban sites, so too does our desire to realise the full potential of a block. The Backyard Studio achieves this by reframing the backyard as an active social space and essential element of the family home,” says Principal Architect Matt Rawlins. “It also encourages a model of density sensitive to evolving family structures and multigenerational living.” The studio is designed as a “kit of parts” arranged within a compact two-storey form, and with folding doors on the garden side and roller door on the street side it allows for engagement between public and private spaces. Wrapped in white timber slats on the property side, it presents a visually appealing backdrop when viewed from the house, while having a more robust brick public presence on the rear laneway. [gallery size="large" ids="76485,76486,76488,76487,76489"] Photography by Derek Swalwell    

Redfern Studio by McGregor Westlake Architecture

McGregor Westlake Architecture developed Redfern Studio driven by both personal and public interest, proposing an alternative model to the council for the typical laneway studio. “The laneway studio is a small project in itself, however when seen as a type, multiplied across hundreds of city lanes, it becomes a large urban project,” says Director Peter McGregor. “As the need for density and intensity of use grow, the 25-square-metre footprint is an increasingly important model for the fine-grained pedestrian city.” McGregor Westlake added a second storey to the existing garage located in a rear laneway in Redfern, Sydney. “The laneway studio doubles the height of existing frontages and adds another layer of use to the service lane, imbuing it with the qualities of an active, connected and urbane street,” Peter explains. The contrast and combination of the garage with mansard roof and dormers presents a robust but engaging presence, offering a private, domestic space on an otherwise public, utilitarian street. Inside, a living/dining/kitchen area overlooks the lane and sliding timber panel doors conceal the bedroom nook and bathroom. Lined with hoop ply, the interior offers a warm and simple palette, like a refuge from the tough brick streetscape outside. [gallery size="large" columns="2" ids="76491,76494,76493,76492,76495,76496"] Photography by Brett Boardman    

Waterloo Laneway Studio by David Mitchell Architects

Waterloo Laneway Studio comprises a garage or workspace on the ground floor with a bedroom, bathroom and kitchenette upstairs, connecting to the house via deck. David Mitchell Architects designed the building to forge a connection between the main residence and lane. David designed the form of the building to complement the fences, garages and small houses that front the rear laneway, The selection of materials is also sympathetic to the surrounding buildings with brick, corrugated iron and steel-framed copper-clad doors that will patina with time. “The doors were designed with the intent of contributing to the laneway aesthetic and providing interest for those living in close proximity,” David explains. “If only we could replace all the roller shutters in our back lanes with solutions like this, our laneways could become so much more than the service corridors many of them currently are.” [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="76497,76498,76499,76500,76501"] Photography by Michael Nicholson    

Little Brick Studio by MAKE Architecture

Little Brick Studio by MAKE Architecture is squeezed into a tight corner space of a property in Abbotsford, Melbourne. Designed to adapt to the family’s changing needs, Little Brick Studio has a garage on the ground level and a roof deck and studio space on the first level with the potential to be a home office, teenage retreat, guest bedroom or a tenancy to rent out. MAKE Architecture built up instead of out, reducing the size of the existing garage to allow for more outdoor space. “We kept the footprint of the building as small as possible to ensure the impact on the house and backyard is minimal,” says Director Melissa Bright. The corner site offered the opportunity to do a more public building that engaged with the street, and like a sculpture designed in the round, the building can be viewed from all sides. The brick is a response to the commercial buildings across the road and textured finish is inspired by the nearby factories. As the garage entrance is recessed beneath the corner, the two-storey brick volume appears to cantilever over the footpath, bookending the street, with the front door emphasising its public presence. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="76503,76502,76505,76504"] Photography by Peter Bennetts    

The Kite by Architecture Architecture

Designed by Architecture Architecture, The Kite is an extension to a late-Victorian home in Albert Park, Melbourne, with the existing garage developed into a flexible space that engages with the backyard, residence and streetscape. The auxiliary building serves as an office and garage space, and opening up on both sides, it allows for a view from the main house, across the garden through to the laneway behind. The house is located on an irregular battle-axe block and the addition of the open-plan kitchen, dining and living area to the main house stretches diagonally across the L-shaped junction, which inspired the triangular form. Architecture Architecture continued this concept in the studio with a triangular timber-slatted canopy and pitched roof that extends from the garden. It creates a more intimate garden space beneath it and blurs the boundary between indoors and out. The triangular forms continue on the ceiling inside, and a slice through the top corner of the structure allows for a triangular skylight to illuminate the upstairs level.   [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="76509,76508,76506,76507,76510"] Photography by Peter Bennetts   We think you might also like Sensible Density And Small Scale Residencesabc
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Pana Barbounis And His Passion For Chocolate-Based Entrepreneurship

Melbourne-based entrepreneur Pana Barbounis revolutionised the raw vegan chocolate business when he established Pana Chocolate in 2012. Six years later and the product is available across Australia and in 25 other countries, with the U.K. one of its biggest markets. The brand prides itself on its artisanal processes, a strong commitment to organic, plant-based eating and the high quality of its decadently rich chocolate. Leanne Amodeo talks to Pana about his passion for food, the innovation in what he does and the importance of design in delivering a holistic brand experience.   When did you start working with chocolate? I started playing around with chocolate in 2011 and began Pana Chocolate as a part-time business when I was involved in commercial kitchens and had some space. A friend brought me some chocolate and I looked into it and thought I can do this. I’d just watched the movie Chocolat so I’d been inspired by that! It all evolved from there. Has food always been your passion? We never just ate dinner at home, we always had a feast and that’s where my love of food began. It kept on evolving and it wasn’t until later in my hospitality career that I started to appreciate food on another level – slow cooked food, organic food and all the intense flavours of food. I’ve had a long career in hospitality that actually came from my appreciation of food and everything it has to offer. I think if I was starting my career today I would probably become a chef. That’s how much I love food. But I’ve always had two passions – timber and food and when I finished high school I looked at working with one or the other. I ended up accepting a position in hospitality, did some vocational studies and the journey continued from there. I became self-employed when I was 21 and have been self-employed ever since. What do you consider innovative about what you do? The innovation is in how we retain all the goodness in the product and we do this by not exposing ingredients to high temperatures during cooking. We’re not cooking all the goodness out of the chocolate and that’s where the innovation lies. We produce raw chocolate and technology has allowed that to happen through processes and measures that can be put in place from harvest through to the making and delivery. How much science is involved in creating the chocolate? There’s a lot of science behind producing the chocolate and a lot of passion too. But at the end of the day there’s not a lot of numbers; it’s still a handmade product. We weren’t looking to make a product that has a two or three year shelf life, so the science is simple. What I know today I didn’t know in the beginning and some of that knowledge comes from just grabbing ingredients and understanding each one and where they come from, but without having full awareness of how it got to that stage. Now we’re piecing it all together. I was fortunate to be able to start the company with a minimum amount of information and keep building on that, which has helped move it forward. Do you use any old chocolate making processes? I’ve been self-employed for so long that I’ve learnt what to do and more importantly, learnt what not to do and I was able to employ all those learnings to the brand and look at how we wanted to operate. Today, innovation is in the technology behind the processes and the standards of cleanliness involved in these processes. We still ferment our beans in banana leaves in wood crates so we still use a lot of old processes and we don’t want to lose that element of our business. Our pods are still hand harvested and cut at the tree so the outer shell is composted immediately. How important is design to what you do? It’s very important. Every touch point needs to be an experience because when I started Pana Chocolate, it wasn’t just about creating another product for the mass consumer. It was a brand experience. Using recycled packaging is important to me but it’s also about the feel of the box when you hold it. Even the fact we use edible gums to seal the box and when you pull the chocolate out, you can tell it’s been physically wrapped by someone and hasn’t gone through a machine. And then having a message imprinted on the actual chocolate – either ‘Love the Earth’ or ‘Love your insides’ – are words that mean everything to me and just complete the whole experience. Where do you see the business in ten years’ time? We want to be a household name and we want Pana Chocolate products to be in everyone’s pantry; to be an organic company that has a wide reach. Pana Chocolate panachocolate.com Photography courtesy Pana Chocolate We think you might also like the Confetti Collection by DesignByThemabc
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New Volumes Collection 01 Sees Local Design Hit New Heights

What do Thomas Coward, Ross Gardam, Dale Hardiman, Marsha Golemac, Nick Rennie, Sarah King, Tom Skeehan and Emma Elizabeth have in common? Perhaps a better question would be what doThomas Coward, Ross Gardam, Dale Hardiman, Marsha Golemac, Nick Rennie, Sarah King, Tom Skeehan and Emma Elizabeth most recently have in common ? Premiering in Melbourne this June at DENFAIR, New Volumes is a new collection for the home and office from Artedomus designed and made is collaboration with the aforementioned slew of highly regarded, exceptionally talented and innovative-minded local industrial designers and makers. Collection 01 is the first of an annual series briefed to explore and push the boundaries of what it’s like for a designer to work with a single material. The inaugural collection explores Elba, a rich and complex stone 250 million years old, that is cut by stone and hand-finished into the object we see before us. “Our story begins here and stems from our travels and connections across the globe, through which we identified an untapped volume of story and space,” says Artedomus Managing Director Phil Brenton. “New Volumes was the idea born out of this void and has become a way for us to express ourselves through people, design, materiality and of course, their stories.” The seven other designers, notes Creative Director Thomas Coward, were chosen in part for their genuine understanding of, and appreciation for, the gravity of Elba as material of choice. But also for their design portfolio that exhibit a unique approach to form, process and material. “For thousands of years [marble and stone] have been a symbol of luxury and our dominance of the natural world. We use it in sculpture to immortalise figures, leaders and heroes, and in architecture to build monuments, shrines and pillars of grandeur. At home we walk on it, we prepare food on it and we bathe in it. Through great power from both man and machine, we excavate it and it enriches our personal and public realms,” says Thomas. Sincere, serene and strong are the key descriptors used to communicate the pieces, and fittingly so. New Volumes newvolumes.com Photography by Sean Fennessy Styling by Natalie Turnbull New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Wyrie Nick Rennie Wyrie by Nick Rennie New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Napoleon Hurlysi Thomas Coward Hurlysi by Thomas Coward New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Napoleon Lydn Thomas Coward Lydn by Thomas Coward New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Napoleon Hemera Ross Gardam Hemera by Ross Gardam New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Undara Nick Rennie Undara by Nick Rennie New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Napoleon Josephine Sarah King Napoleon & Josephine by Sarah King New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Semper Vase Dale Hardiman Semper Vase by Dale Hardiman New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Spomenik Marsha Golemac Spomenik by Marsha Golemac  New Volumes Collection 01 Artedomus cc Sean Fennesy Napoleon Artemis Emma Elizabeth Artemis by Emma Elizabeth Cover image Bacchus by Tom Skeehan We think you might also like the AnZa coffee machine by Montaagabc
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The 2018 National Design Award For Product Design Goes To Blu Dot

At a time where product design is at its most accessible, and interior design and architecture has made its way to a widespread, global appreciation, it’s ironic to notice good design, genuine design, and innovative design is increasingly difficult to come across. Cheap materials, impractical design, and ever-controversial replica furniture flood the market blind-siding even the most well meaning consumer. Perhaps this is why, now more than ever, it’s important to recognize industry players furthering the cause. Established in 1997, Blu Dot was the brainchild of two architects (Maurice Blanks and John Christakos) and a sculptor (Charlie Lazor), after Maurice and John, fresh out of college and looking to fill their homes with furniture that reflected their passion for art, architecture and design, didn’t like the pieces they could afford and couldn’t afford those that they did. So they sought to bring modern American design to an affordable market. And every day in the two decades since, that’s exactly what they’ve done. So it stands to reason they be recognised not only for their contribution to the industry and those who consume it, but for the designs they produce as they stand on their own. Blu Dot has proudly received the 2018 National Design Award for Product Design as awarded by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. “Many people in the U.S. did not have a reference for good design. These guys helped to define what modern design was to popular culture.” So says Rob Forbes, Founder of Design Within Reach and member of the 2018, interdisciplinary jury. The awards series as a whole were conceived as a way to honour lasting achievement in American design and awarded to those in recognition of excellence and innovation achieved. In Cooper Hewitt’s own words, the awards “celebrates design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world, and seeks to increase national awareness of the impact of design through education initiatives.” If industry recognition doesn’t get your accountant over the line on some Blu Dot pieces for your own residence, perhaps some more traditional tactics will: from now until 30th June, all Blu Dot designs are 20 per cent off – no exclusions. So whether it’s the addition of a set of the iconic Real Good Chairs around your dining table, a Field Lounge Chair in the corner of your bedroom, or a selection of pieces from the Dang Collection that’s been missing, the time is certainly now and the price is most definitely right. Blu Dot bludot.com.au 2018 National Design Award 2018 National Design Award 2018 National Design Award 2018 National Design Awardabc
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Fixed & Fitted

Barazza – 50 years young at EuroCucina

For Barazza, EuroCucina 2018 served a journey through modernity to the future – showcasing a series of cutting-edge innovations for the kitchen. Significant product evolutions ranging from ovens to hobs and to food storage systems were presented in an area created to exhibit, illustrate and experiment with shapes and functionality. “The ergonomic for us means essential space and essential design,” says Barazza’s marketing and communications head Francesca Lovisotto, “Technology in the kitchen is really important, and for Barazza the idea is to put technology and design together – creating products that re ergonomic, easy to work with, and that are friendly with you” In the brand’s 50th year, it’s clear the Barazza team are showing no signs of slowing down or easing up on the innovation front. EuroCucina was a venue for the team to show off the new Lab Evolution Hob, available with or without integrated cooker hood. Offering modularity and flexibility, the hob is characterised by sleek, flush surfaces. The distinctive personality of Lab has evolved even further, being given greater depth, Flat Eco-design burners and cast iron Soft-Touch pan supports. [gallery columns="4" ids="81460,81461,81462,81463"] With the integrated cooker hood, the Flat Eco-design burners generate a vertical flame, ensuring greater efficiency, less heat loss and uniform cooking with Soft-Touch cast iron pan supports that are pleasant to touch, more resistant and dishwasher safe. Both options are available with a Lab Cover, which allows the hob area to be transformed into a covered, safe work area that’s as functional as it is sleekly stylish. On the induction front, Barazza have also introduced the Space induction job. Efficient and elegant, Space has been designed to widens your cooking horizons, thanks to its range of functions. Space with Touch controls and a multi-slider is now available in a new model with a central cooker hood. Steam does not rise and is extracted directly – which means a simple and safe cooking process. Lastly, there is Fusion. Barazza’s innovative system Fusion takes the traditional concept of kitchen appliances to a new level. The system allows for an entirely personalised built in appliance solution for any kitchen. Able to be installed quickly on any type of top, the Fusion system technology allows for the total integration of cooking and washing systems directly into the worktop. Aside from being a designer’s dream for practical reasons, the resulting space is a single stainless steel element in line with a client’s needs – stylish, practical and customizable in full. In Australia, the Barazza range is proudly distributed through their partner Abey. Abey abey.com.auabc
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ARC - Feature

A Minimalist Masterpiece Perfectly In Tune With Its Mountain-Top Perch

High up in the mountainous state of Uttarakhand, north India, you will find the region of Kumaon. It’s a skip and a jump from both the border of Nepal and the region of Tibet, and at 300km from the Himalayan mountain range, it has some views worth writing home about. The newest offering from Zowa Architects; a luxury minimalist hotel with 10 rooms, a yoga space and a spa, nestles beautifully into this mountain-top location. “The property itself is named after the region: The Kumaon,” explains lead architect Pradeep Kodikara, “employing local workers during construction and now during operations, serving local cuisine, and encouraging guests to explore the unique local flora, fauna and culture through this contemporary yet rooted property which serves as a gateway to the Kumaon region of India.” chalet Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma bamboo cladding The hotel celebrates the narrative of its surrounding environment beautifully. Throughout the construction it worked with handymen, artisans and stonemasons all from adjoining villages and communities. At the peak of construction there were more than 80 local workers on site helping bring this mountainside retreat to fruition. In addition, the hotel utilises – almost exclusively – locally-sourced materials such as stone, timber and bamboo; of which India has hundreds of varieties. These materials root this hotel firmly into its existence here, cementing its place in the hillside and helping to give it a grounded warmth to an otherwise pared-back, contemporary build. Of course, this was no accident and according to Pradeep and fellow architect Jineshi Samaraweera the hotel continues to grow into its location day by day. “The effort was not to try and subsume nature with the built form,” explains Pradeep, “but to allow nature to re-emerge through the property once construction was complete. “The natural contours of the land were restored, and local grasses and flora have been planted to ensure that the site seamlessly merges with the adjoining forest.” Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma suite Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma bedroom In its completion, the hotel continues to speak its local vernacular. Rainwater is harvested from the chalet roofs and collected in a large holding tank at the bottom of the site, local herbs and vegetables are grown to be used in the hotel’s kitchen to prepare local dishes for guests and the hotel continues to employ local workers in managing the operations of the hotel. Its pared-back minimalist design dances somewhere between luxury and minimalism, highlighting that less is more in this beautiful contemporary creation. Zowa Architects zowaarchitects.lk Photography by Akshay Sharma Dissection Information Toilet fittings: Jaquar, sourced from Alankar Bath Fittings, Rudrapur Taps: Jaquar, sourced from Alankar Bath Fittings, Rudrapur Fabric/upholstery: locally sourced from River View Factory, Almora Floor tiles/wall tiles: “Kadappah” stone, sourced from Janki Marbles, Haldwani Furniture: Wood (teak) purchased from Heera Singh, carpentry: Triloki Sharma team and Aslam team Copper ware: Javed, Moradabad / Mr. Tamta, Almora Lights: Pardeep Lighting, Khan Market, New Delhi Blinds: Stiched by Satish and team Stoneware: Saxena Handicrafts, Agra Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma dining Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma bathroom Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma internal garden Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma lounge Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma lobby Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma suite Kumaon Zowa Architects India cc Akshay Sharma evening We think you might also like this Forest-like Restaurant by Ryoji Iedokoro Architectsabc
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Dance For Life 2018 Went Off!

Brought to the design scene from TCW, Instyle and ThinkingWorks, Dance for Life is a dance event and competition that brought over 700 enthusiastic members of Sydney’s architectural and design industry together, all in the name of Mental Health. Having a dance and raising money for Reach Out, which provides support and practical assistance for teenagers struggling with depression, anxiety and suicide, the Dance for Life 2018 event was the biggest and boldest iteration of the event so far! This year, designers and employees from Greenbox Architecture, The Bold Collective, Hassell, Geyer, Curio, Billard Leece Partnership, Crone Architects and Stack, Smart Design Studio, COX, and Rothelowman put their wallets, and feet, where their mouths were and come together to raise over $70,000 for Reach Out - all while partying and revelling in the dance spotlight. The team are still taking donations now - so if you want to chip in something for a great cause, please do! Ultimately though, it was Hassell who took out the gold medal with an inspired and exciting performance. TCW, Instyle and and ThinkingWorks would like to congratulate all who participated, and thank the official Dance For Life Platinum Sponsors – Armstrong Flooring and iGuzzini, Gold Sponsor – JDV projects, and Silver Sponsors – FDC and Tongue ‘n’ Groove. Dance for Life 2018 dfl-danceforlife.com [gallery columns="4" ids="76205,76206,76207,76208,76209,76210,76211,76212,76213,76214,76215,76216,76217,76218,76219,76220,76221,76222,76223,76224,76225,76226,76227,76228,76229,76230,76231,76232,76233,76234,76235,76236,76237,76238,76239,76240,76241,76242,76243,76244,76245,76246,76247,76248,76249,76250,76251,76252,76253,76254,76255,76256,76257,76258,76259,76261,76262,76263,76264,76265,76266,76267,76268,76269,76270,76271,76272,76273,76274,76275,76276,76277,76278,76279,76280,76281,76282,76283,76284,76285,76286,76287,76288,76289,76290,76291,76292,76293,76294,76295,76296,76297,76298,76299,76300,76301,76302,76303,76304,76305,76306,76307,76308,76309,76310,76311,76312,76313,76314,76315,76316,76317,76318,76319,76320,76321,76322,76323,76324,76325,76326,76327,76328,76329"]abc