About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Furniture

Ligne Roset Sofas With Design On The Front Cover

The name Cover was chosen to evoke both the design concept as well as the function of the new Ligne Roset sofas. Consisting of a base and a cover draped over the base and held in position by toggles at the rear of the seat, the simplistic design of the sofas makes for a comfortable and inviting lounge room piece, as well as ensuring that the cover of the sofa can be removed in a matter of seconds, allowing for cleaning or replacement. Cover 1 comes with a luxuriant quilted top, while Cover 2 offers a lighter form, with a contemporary geometric design. Both designs may be upholstered in bi-colour or even bi-materials, allowing the flexibility for the sofas to blend seamlessly into the overall interior design. Designer Marie Christine Dorner is an interior architect and scenographer, known for her use of modern technology when approaching traditional savoir-faire. The flawless intermingling of French refinement with contributions from other major cultures translates into a very unique energy that sets her apart from those around her. Her work reflects her careful consideration of the relationships between humans and their natural environment, as they navigate through an open and pluralised world. Marie Christine Dorner’s creations for Ligne Roset embody this meticulous approach to design, demonstrating her penchant for perfection. Ligne Roset is synonymous with modern luxury and invites consumers to revel in a contemporary, design-forward lifestyle. Known for their artful collaborations with both established and up-and-coming talents in contemporary design, Ligne Roset offers consumers an entire lifestyle in which to live both boldly and beautifully via its furniture collections and complementary decorative accessories, lighting, rugs, textiles and occasional items. [gallery ids="80404,80405,80406"] Creativity is a key value at Ligne Roset: if a new product demands new materials or production methods, the company will simply acquire them. Seats, pieces of furniture, lighting, textiles, rugs or bed linens: the idea precedes, and the technique follows. Ligne Roset is proudly available in Australia through the design experts at DOMO. DOMO domo.com.au abc
Design Hunters

“Design Has Become a Currency in its Own Right”: Habitus House of the Year Judge Raj Nandan Looks Back on 10 Years of Habitus

Print media is a notoriously tough industry to crack. Publishers must contend with not only rapidly changing tastes and often-fickle audiences but also with the challenge of remaining relevant in an increasingly digital climate. Few understand this better than Raj Nandan, CEO and Founder of Indesign Media Asia Pacific, the home of beloved regional magazines including Indesign, Lookbox, CUBES, and Habitus. Over the past eighteen years, Raj and his team have crafted engaging, authentic publications that celebrate the uniqueness of the Indo-Pacific and have carved out a well-deserved niche for the region on the global design stage. By the time Habitus launched in 2008, the eponymous Indesign magazine had already established itself as the leading resource for architects and other design professionals within our region. Still, Raj saw a gap in the market and reached out to collaborators for their input on how to fix it. “Habitus was the result of conversations I had with Paul [McGillick, Habitus Founding Editor] about the lack of a magazine that made design accessible to the design-savvy individual,” he explains, “It didn’t matter if you were a doctor, or a lawyer, or an accountant, or a café owner: if you were the kind of person who appreciated the story behind things – rather than just wanting to get the look – we wanted to speak to you.” Over the years Habitus has remained true to this vision and played a critical role in introducing design into the mainstream cultural landscape. At a time when other publications still framed design as exclusive and seasonal, Habitus championed thoughtful, authentic design that transcended brands and trends. “It gave [design-savvy individuals] a credible voice to listen to and follow that was about more than just getting ‘the look’,” says Raj, “Habitus has never covered trends.” To this day, the core of Habitus’ credibility is a commitment to presenting design as a way of life rather than falling into the familiar groove of a lifestyle magazine. The magazine has remained a meticulously curated showcase of thoughtful projects of all scales and budgets that challenge the idea that good design is synonymous with a high price tag. As Raj puts it: “Habitus isn’t interested in portraying wealth and richness in the traditional sense – we’re more about showcasing design that’s a personal, considered expression of what people really do at home and their way of life.” In eschewing big-ticket projects in favour of refined, idiosyncratic design, Habitus has developed a distinctive, down-to-earth voice that has proved influential within the industry. “We’ve stuck to our guns and played a huge part in redefining design as a normal, accessible currency and not an unusual or cold one: we’ve really challenged the idea that people who like design have to walk around in all black and shut themselves off from the world.” This passion for accessible design that elevates the day-to-day is evident in Habitus House of the Year, which Raj describes as “the result of having spent so much time – 10 years and thousands of projects – immersed in the region that we have the experience and authority to pick 25 truly remarkable projects and showcase how they shine new light on design as a way of life.” He’s adamant that House of the Year be recognised not as a competition but as a program, explaining that: “With House of the Year we want to not only showcase the talent and original thinking within our region, but also broaden the design conversation: we want to continually challenge what our readers think they know about residential design.” Raj hopes that the program will highlight the ever-growing strength of design within the Indo-Pacific. “There’s far greater cohesion and stronger design identity throughout our region than ever before,” he says, echoing the comments of Indesign colleague and fellow House of the Year judge Narelle Yabuka, “Some of the houses that we cover in Australia or New Zealand – if you change the background you can just as easily see them in the Philippines, or Thailand, or Singapore. Local identities are definitely maintaining their uniqueness in our region but they’re also listening to one another.” As a judge of this year’s inaugural program, he’ll be searching for a strong relationship between brief, client, and the finished product, in addition to sensitivity to climate, small spaces, and “the family unit”. “The word ‘considered’ is really important to me,” says Raj, “I need to be able to see that the house is liveable and carefully considered so that it’s not overdesigned or overcomplicated. The projects that really stand out are the ones that are simple – life’s already too complicated!”

View the full shortlist of projects in issue 41 of Habitus, available for pre-ordering today and hitting newsstands this Thursday 27 September. For more about Habitus House of the Year, subscribe to our newsletter or read more here.

We would like to extend a special thanks to our Major Sponsors for their support in the inaugural year of the Habitus House of the Year initiative. Thank you to StylecraftHOME, Sub-Zero Wolf and ZIP Water.  

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ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Habitus House of the Year Spaces: The Health Space

According to ABC News, Australians spend 90 per cent of their time indoors: of this, 65 percent is spent at home. Our homes - both in terms of location and physical structure - influence almost all aspects of our lives. One of the most significant of these aspects is our health. Today, the definition of health has broadened to beyond mere physical health, and now includes awareness of psychological and social factors. This is reflected in the World Health Organisation’s definition of the term ‘health’ as a ‘state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing rather than the absence of ill health’. Health is no longer a concept that revolves around medical treatment, but instead, is determined by a range of factors related to the quality of our built environment.
“Great design can have an immense impact on human emotion and wellbeing, so its important to make it positive.” – Tom Fisher, marketing director of Zip Water
With no real universal principles or solutions to guide health-sensitive design, architects and designers adopt a more holistic, lifestyle-based approach that takes cues from health-supporting human behaviour, especially when designing homes. “Ensuring that your home is a sanctuary,” says Tom Fisher, “will nurture your wellbeing and physically enable you to focus on your emotional and mental state instead.” While designers and architects may not have complete control over all the determinants of health and wellbeing, they often incorporate both quantitative physical parameters and qualitative psychological parameters. One of the best-known parallels between health and the built environment is drawn by Ancient Roman architect, engineer, and author Vitruvius and his tripartite model of the three values of good design: firmitas, or health in a more conventional physical sense; utilitas, which is defined as commodity; and venustas, which colloquially references happiness. Notably, the triad extends beyond material factors, reiterating that design should be responsive to user needs, behaviours and requirements. The fact that there are numerous strategies related to certain settings and users suggests that it is crucial to design adaptable and versatile environments. This can be incorporated into the fabric or envelope of the home, its spatial layout, functional utilities, its activation within the neighbourhood and surrounding, and overall strategy. Design should ‘nudge’ users and homeowners into positive day-to-day behaviours in all aspects of their lives because, as Tom says, “healthy living is a lifestyle”. In the past, the relationship between the design sector and health received little attention beyond the requirements of designing a ‘healthy’ building in terms of preventing illness and the spread of germs. As design lovers become aware of the equal importance of comfort and delight in successful projects, there is a growing need to think more creatively about how health can be incorporated into all aspects of design.

Celebrating The Power of Design and The Importance Of Health with Zip Water

Zip water designs and manufactures stunning ranges of instant drinking water systems that deliver fresh, crystal clear boiling, chilled and sparkling water. With a focus on improving people’s health everyday, the HydroTap collection is available in a range of contemporary designs and colours that complement and enhance every setting. “Healthy hydration is essential for us, so convenient access to pure tasting water in a form you’ll instantly love is where we start. Our MicroPurity filtration technologies are tested to the highest global standards, and removes impurities like VOCs, chlorine and lead,” explains Tom. For our inaugural Habitus House Of The Year Program, we are excited to have Zip Water on board as a Major Sponsor. To discover and hear more about the supporting role of architecture from Tom Fisher, pre-order Habitus #41, House Of The Year Special Edition, here. abc
Design Hunters
People

“It Just Keeps Gaining Confidence”: Habitus House of the Year Judge Karen McCartney on the Emergence of a Regional Design Character

When it comes to architecture and design writing in Australia, few voices are as prominent as that of Karen McCartney, architecture editor of Belle magazine and design columnist for Good Weekend. Deservedly so: over the years, Karen has been integral to the development of some of the most recognisable titles in Australian design publishing. Originally from the UK, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in English literature and art history from UCL, Karen cut her teeth in the notoriously competitive London publishing scene before relocating to Australia in the late 90s. After helping launch Marie Claire Lifestyle – a spin-off of the iconic Marie Claire title – she leapt into a role as the Founding Editor and Editorial Director of Inside Out magazine, where she remained for 10 years. “At that point,” Karen muses, “I thought, ‘I don’t want to be one of those editors who’s [at a magazine] forever’, so I went into an editorial directorship at News Ltd.” From there she moved into a second directorial position at boutique e-tailer Temple & Webster before landing her current roles at Belle and Good Weekend. As if that wasn’t impressive enough, along the way she penned eight books, the latest of which – The Alchemy of Things – graced shelves earlier this month. Karen’s experience grants her unique insight into the trajectory of residential design and architecture in the region, a topic she comments on with characteristic eloquence. “People are looking at things globally, not just locally, and that gives them a greater degree of confidence in their own ideas and decision making,” she says, when asked what she believes to be the most significant areas of regional evolution, “Australian design… it just keeps gaining confidence: what we saw [in the past] as quite avant-garde ideas are now much more commonplace. Designers are more experimental with materials and the concepts surrounding them.” On reflection, she muses that this move toward innovation and the cutting edge is coupled with a renewed appreciation for the basic principles of planning and functional design. “There’s much greater emphasis on the flow of spaces and on how spaces are used,” Karen observes, “Not everything has to be so generic or look or feel a particular way.” She is sceptical of – if not outright resistant to – trends, arguing instead that good design should be less about appealing to the now so much as communicating a coherent, well-considered concept or message. In Karen’s view, the concepts embodied by regional residential design have themselves evolved: today, she notes, “There’s a new interest in the feeling of a home – not only what it does but how it makes you feel. And this feeling comes from material mixes and inventiveness and beautiful combinations.” Accordingly, she observes that a definite formal shift is apparent in regional architecture, particularly with regard to the resurgence of traditional materials such as brick and concrete. Citing the introduction of curves and movement away from the “rectilinear movement” as key drivers of this change, she describes how “We’re seeing a lot more use of concrete, concrete mixed with wood, and lightweight materials being used in interesting ways and combinations of forms.” Karen’s keenly trained eye and wealth of design knowledge will be put to good use later this year, where she will join other industry heavyweights as a judge of the inaugural Habitus House of the Year program. She plans to use the position as a way to reward innovation and celebrate projects that go beyond the norm to deliver distinctive design informed by a unique character. “It’s about finding something that has been very well thought out and executed and has some cleverness to it,” she says, “It doesn’t have to be like everything else you’ve seen: it needs to have delivered something that takes you into a new territory. It’s more a level of thinking that you want to see applied rather than specific outcomes.” This level of consideration should be carried through all aspects from planning and construction to material selection, says Karen. “I like it when the materials deliver something – a quality, a feeling – and have clearly responded to the brief in a way that takes it above and beyond. Maybe they’ve solved a problem, or delivered something in a beautiful way. It matters to me that the interior reflects the architectural intent. They really need to sing as one.”

For more information about the Habitus House of the Year program and to view the shortlisted homes, pre-order your copy of Habitus issue 41 and subscribe to our newsletter today. Read more about Habitus House of the Year here.

  We would like to extend a special thanks to our Major Sponsors for their support in the inaugural year of the Habitus House of the Year initiative. Thank you to StylecraftHOME, Sub-Zero Wolf and ZIP Water.  abc
Interiors
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Concrete Curves And Sunshine At Nikkou Store, Byron Bay

There is a great distance between Casuarina, a quiet coastal town on the Queensland-New South Wales border, and Japan – but it doesn’t feel so great inside Nikkou Store, a boutique fashion retailer that blends the breezy openness of coastal Australia with the quiet detailing of Japanese design. When designer Vanessa Webber was approached by her old high school friend, Nikkou Store founder Tiffany Cooper, to design the space, the brief was as simple as the philosophy she wanted to instil within its walls. After travelling extensively in Japan, she decided on the name nikkou for her foray into retail. Meaning ‘sunlight’ in Japanese, this is exactly what she wanted to flow through every inch of the space, capitalising on the natural assets of the northern New South Wales coast. To Vanessa, this easily translated into an overarching casualness to the concept: big, soft curves, light and feminine colours, and an open invitation to the elements. “To reflect the brief, in the details I used a lot of soft curves,” she says. “You can see that in the arches of the fitting rooms, the details of the joinery, and even in the store room. At first we’d drawn a square storeroom but then we were like, ‘Hang on, that doesn’t work. There can’t be any corners in here!” But as with everything in life, a soft touch is brought into even starker contrast when juxtaposed against something harsh. In Nikkou Store, this necessary contra comes in the form of the exposed concrete floor, the rough textural finishes, and the overall palette of hard materials. “To reflect the locality and to have an honesty of materiality we left the exposed concrete floor, which also meant we didn’t have to use any unnecessary or wasteful materials,” explains Vanessa. "The paintwork that we did was a feminine soft pink that we applied a textured finish to – it almost has a sandy finish to it. It’s created that juxtaposition with the soft fabric that’s displayed there.” The most important finishes to the store are intangible ones – sunlight and wind, which are welcomed in through clever site planning and structural manipulations. “I was initially given the floorpans and there was only one entry into the store,” says Vanessa. “But because Nikkou Store is on a corner location, I thought, ‘Why not have people walking through both entries?’ I added another door and [Tiffany] often leaves them both open so you’re getting this beautiful breeze through the space. “We also lowered the wall to the fitting rooms because we wanted to get as much natural light as possible. Even when you’re in the fitting room, you’re still getting that natural light.” Nikkou nikkoustore.com Vanessa Webber adesignmind Photography by Andy Macpherson We think you might also like Aje, Perth, by We Are Triibeabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fisher & Paykel
Fixed & Fitted

The Inspired Approach Of The New Fisher & Paykel Column Refrigerator

The Column series has been created by Fisher & Paykel to suit any contemporary style of kitchen design coming panel-ready with a choice of stainless steel fronts, or fully customizable with the customer or designer’s supplied panels. Adding to the customization for the series is the choice of handle – square and rounded contemporary style. Not just a pretty face though, Fisher & Paykel have designed the under-the-hood technology of the Column series with performance to match their looks. Featuring unique ActiveSmart™ technology along with two variable temperature zones for extraordinary food care, the only thing better looking than the outside of the fridges, should be the food inside. Variable Temperature Zones A wonderful feature of the Fisher & Paykel Integrated Column Refrigerators are variable temperature zones. These dual, independent cooling zones are driven by two evaporators that deliver precise temperature control in separate zones. This means that each appliance contains two completely independent cooling zones so that customers can totally customise their storage needs, while temperatures are kept consistent with Fisher & Paykel’s ActiveSmart™ technology. “We’ve found that our customers love the idea of independent compartments inside their fridge,” says Shane Rehm, Fisher & Paykel’s Chief Engineer for Refrigeration. “We also know that different foods require different temperatures, so we developed a system that combines the two.” Refrigerator and freezer alike have three food modes – pantry, fridge, and chill mode on the refrigerator side; soft freeze, freezer, and deep freeze on the freezer side. These can be changed with the touch of a button to ensure food is stored at the best temperature to suit how you shop, cook and entertain. The right option Suitable to its name, the Column series is available as 46cm/18”, 61cm/24” or 76cm/30” freezers and 61cm/24” or 76cm/30” fridges, and these columns can then be mixed or matched, to suit every kitchen. What’s more, the columns can be placed together or apart. Enjoy the daily convenience of the fridge close to the workbench with the freezer in the pantry, or choose to have a column at each end of their kitchen, or the classic side-by-side design. Beautiful to use The Fisher & Paykel column refrigerators have a thoughtfully designed interior layout with brilliant LED lighting and glass-bottomed shelves making it easy to see everything inside. Crafted from quality materials, the columns have soft-close metal runners on extension shelves and doors that are tested 300,000 times for toughness. The seamlessly smooth interior lining makes the columns very easy to clean.

Integrated Column refrigerators and freezers are available now at the Fisher & Paykel Experience Centre, 90-96 Bourke Road, Alexandria NSW fisherpaykel.com

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Architecture
Homes
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Whiting Architects And The Beauty Of Small Footprint Living

A recent renovation of a cottage in Melbourne’s Albert Park proves Whiting Architects’ mastery in small footprint living and making small spaces appear larger. It’s a skill not to be underestimated, especially on a site so tight the only place to move is up. Accommodating the lounge, dining, kitchen and laundry within 32 square metres highlights the necessity of an efficient spatial plan. While the addition of a rooftop terrace increases floor space, giving the clients – a young couple and their dog – the extra living room they so desire. A central courtyard is maximised to let in plenty of natural light, as are a series of skylights, highlight windows and floor-to-ceiling glazing. The effect is bright and modern, yet its skilfully tempered by a colour palette of black, grey and white so the single-storey interior doesn’t seem too stark. Dark flooring and kitchen joinery visually grounds the scheme and the black window frames add a dramatic detail. The lounge area’s window box seat is particularly striking, as it literally punctuates a wide expanse of glass to occupy the threshold between inside and outside. Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath small footprint living Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath Fisher & Paykel “Small spaces are something we’ve always worked with and we’re confident in finding a response that makes the most of every inch of space available,” says Whiting Architects’ Design Co-ordinator Josie Somerville, “In this project, we looked at where we could borrow extra space and the window box seat is an example of this, providing additional seating in the lounge area without extending the building’s footprint.” The white joinery beneath the stairs leading to the rooftop terrace contrasts with the window’s black seat and is also the interior’s most effective storage solution. It’s a hard-working feature, not only housing the laundry, including a washing machine and linen cupboard, but the fridge too. Concealing appliances and keeping surfaces flush and unadorned creates more room to move around in. The clients had this in mind when furnishing their home as well, avoiding clutter and adopting minimalist styling. Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath kitchen Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath small footprint living Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath bathroom If the window box seat borrows space, then so does the rooftop terrace, taking it to the next level of small footprint living both literally and metaphorically. For the clients, this is the perfect place to entertain family and friends and in having an outdoor living area they’re also afforded unobstructed views of the city. It provides the opportunity for a long skylight in the downstairs living areas too, which adds a sense of volume. The architects have ultimately delivered a compact design that doesn’t feel compromised by the constraints of its site, making this home feel as highly functional as it is comfortable. Whiting Architects whitingarchitects.com Photography by Shannon McGrath Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath Flag Halyard Chair Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath small footprint living Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath rooftop terrace Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath new addition Albert Park House Whiting Architects cc Shannon McGrath small footprint living We think you might also like Moor Street Residence by Whiting Architectsabc
Design Hunters
Conversations

Indigenous Collaborations: In Cahoots

In Cahoots was an 18-month long project that brings together six established artists with Aboriginal Art Centres in remote communities across Australia. One of these collaborations took Trent Jansen to Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia, where he worked with makers to bring a local creature myth to life. Trent has an ongoing interest in creature myths so it was an appropriate place to start learning about the local culture. On his first trip to Fitzroy Crossing, “I met three old ladies one afternoon — Penny K Lyons, Rita Minga and Elsie Dickens,” says Trent. “[I] started asking them about local Creature Myth. Rita was just awesome. She’s so cheeky and funny, got a cackle that’s hilarious. She started telling me stories — she knew everything about all these local creatures that most people didn’t know.” This led to a simple exchange where drawings of some of the creatures were sent back and forth between Trent and Rita, in a kind of visual dialogue. When that process had been creatively exhausted, they went back to one of the early drawings that interpreted one of the sketches as a piece of furniture. “Rather than trying to sketch all of this into existence,” explains Trent, “we started making components. [I thought that if we] physically arrange the components 3-dimensionally, that might be more fitting with the way people do things out there.” Based on the Jangarra creature, a hairy figure who hides behind an anthill, they started making segments of an anthill out of coolomons. “We made about 25 of these components with a bunch of artists. Cutting down trees into sections, forming them with axes and finishing them with angle grinders,” Trent explains. [caption id="attachment_79559" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Jangarra Armchair, image courtesy of the Fremantle Arts Centre[/caption] He worked closely with Johnny Nargoodah, a Nykina man who has lived in the Fitzroy valley all his life. From working on cattle station for many years, Johnny had a range of practical skills, which had been honed over 15 years at the arts centre where he is now a studio technician, stretching canvases and helping artists with whatever they need, plus making boomerangs and knives, leather art, carving and painting. Led by Trent and Johnny, the construction of coolamons happened over many hours and days with senior women carving out the coolamon shapes with small axes and files. These women, senior cultural leaders and artists, then also created hairstring from real hair, taking many hours of working handheld spindles on their laps and carefully selecting and binding the hair. The woven hair was then attached to the coolamons, bringing the hairy man, the Jangarra, to life. Significantly, this process enlivened old traditions and allowed senior women to share their unique traditional skills with younger generations, and towards contemporary design outcomes. After making the components, “Johnny, Wes Maselli and I took all of them down to the river bed and drove long sticks into the sand and used those as bases [upon which] to rest the coolamons. We positioned them and sculpted the form 3-dimensionally in real time,” Trent recounts. They then took it apart and shipped it to Trent’s studio in Thirroul, where Johnny and his son Illiam travelled to recreate the structure in a way that is solid. “It’s not identical,” admits Trent, “but it’s as close as you can get.” [caption id="attachment_79556" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Collision Bench, image courtesy of the Fremantle Arts Centre[/caption] As in all collaborations, the balance of leading and contributing was complex, but there was a meaningful exchange of skills and ideas from both sides. “It was really good working with Trent in Sydney,” says Johnny. “I learned from him – techniques and about using old scrap wood.” For him, it was an opportunity to develop his own practice as an artist, rather than supporting others’ practice. Johnny and his son Illiam also returned with enhanced confidence and knowledge from their experience in this collaborative art making process. Trent, too, learnt something important, not only in the making of this piece but also in another project they worked on. “We went for a drive and got this old wrecked car bonnet and brought it back,” says Johnny. “Trent said, ‘What are we going to make out of it?’ I said, ‘Well it looks like a lounge chair.’ So we cut it up, it got sent away to Sydney, then Trent got some chair legs to put on it.” Trent thought the piece was finished, but Johnny started talking about the functionality of it – the fact that no-one would sit in a hot metal chair in the Kimberley. As a skilled leatherworker, he immediately thought of putting leather on the top of the chair. Despite initial reluctance from Trent, they went ahead and “Actually, it’s bloody beautiful,” says Trent. “It makes the thing. That’s a beautiful outcome, a benefit for me. I’ve learnt that I’m totally wrong a lot of the time and to listen to people. Johnny has this totally different sensibility and has shown me that this combination of textures and materials – that I probably would never have tried – is so lovely.” In Cahoots represents six completely different experiences of cross-cultural engagement, which adds another layer to the already-complex intention of creative collaboration. From sitting and making to telling stories to just asking what a community may want to achieve, they all actively bring together indigenous and non-indigenous, urban and remote, and established and emerging artists, to produce works that symbolise an underlying theme of creating meaningful connection.  Trent Jansen Studio and Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency [caption id="attachment_79560" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Johnny Nargoodah, image courtesy of Trent Jansen[/caption] [caption id="attachment_79557" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Illiam Nargoodah, image courtesy of Trent Jansen[/caption]abc
Architecture
Around The World
Places
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Ancient Romance At Karesansui Hotel

There is a certain romance and mysticism to ancient towns and their solitary structures – particularly when these structures are as beautiful and labyrinthine as they are in the appropriately named Dukezong Ancient Town in Shangri-La, Yunnan, China. When creative director of Chinese firm Yiduan Shanghai Interior Design, Xu Xujun, met a man with a dream to turn the small, Tibetan-style buildings of this abandoned town into a hotel, the chance meeting proved to be a prosperous one – an opportunity to reimagine their faded glory as an undulating, geographically blessed retreat to be enjoyed anew. The resulting hostel is called KARESANSUI, a name that was inspired by a poem from the Tang dynasty, Looking for the Reclusive Chan Taoist of South Stream by Liu Changqing. “Enjoy the green pines after the rain, walk by the path of the mountain and find the source of the water, I understand Zen from the reflection of the flowers in the stream, and I stare at them silently.” Similarly, the design of the interwoven landscape of buildings is embedded with a manifested philosophy of Oriental zen. According to Xujun, the aim was to lead guests to spiritual pleasure and psychological satisfaction: “Being enlightened by the quiet stream, enjoying tranquility from appreciating a swaying wildflower,” she says. “What is deep inside the heart is a kind of peace and joy of self-examination. Such a kind of peaceful mood integrated harmoniously with the quiet environment.” The spatial layout of the hostel – which is comprised of six small buildings and an old Tibetan house – is the most crucial element of the brief’s execution. The scale of KARESANSUI is not big, but there is a grandiosity to it by virtue of Xujun’s determination to make full use of the view, a spectacular mountainscape with a broad, rolling horizon. Each of the 15 guest rooms has access to a window that looks out onto the painterly scenery of sky, cloud, mountain and forest. The buildings themselves have been designed to blend into this landscape, mimicking its vast interconnectedness with bridging, open-air corridors and taking cues from its materiality in a natural, Tibetan-inspired material palette. Even the handrails along the footpaths that float between these wooden structures have been planted with grass, so that guests can feel as if they are running their hands along the earth while walking from their guest room to the restaurant, lobby or tea room. KARESANSUI Hotel karesansui-hotel.com KARESANSUI Hotel facade KARESANSUI Hotel facade KARESANSUI Hotel lobby KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel guest room KARESANSUI Hotel facade We think you might also like Tsingpu Yangzhou Retreat by Neri & Huabc
Lighting
Habitus Loves
Furniture
Fixed & Fitted
Finishes
Design Products
Accessories

Have You Seen The Habitus Collection Online?

At Habitus HQ we're always thinking about how to support the region's design hunters. For a decade now, we have celebrated the best in design and architecture throughout the Asia Pacific. And in 2018, we're launching out next big initiative – The Habitus Collection Online. The Habitus Collection Online brings together a range of brands and their products from across the region into one easily searchable online database. As a Design Hunter – whether you're a designer, an architect, a stylist, a decorator or just simply a design enthusiast through-and-through – The Habitus Collection Online allows you to be on top of the latest products available for the home. We find the right products, furnishings or fixtures making waves across the world so that your design needs can be satisfied faster and simpler than ever before. Designing is no easy job, with the number of products out there to choose from, trends that are always evolving, we know that you need to be two steps ahead. Trawling from one place to the next online is time-consuming, which is why we’ve launched The Habitus Collection Online to get the hardest part of specifying done for you. This is a place where we’re constantly gathering the latest and greatest design products, housed in one destination.

The Habitus Collection synthesizes the latest products, fittings, furnishings and finishes from across Asia Pacific.

We want to keep you informed and give you a platform that helps to streamline your job. The Habitus Collection Online is an easy to use dedicated space to help you select products and finishes for your schedules. Easily navigate and drill down into each category – fixtures, finishes, furniture and brands – making the searchability a cinch.

What is The Habitus Collection Online and why do you need it? 

All the necessary details from dimensions, materials, lead-time and manufacturers are listed, along with a contact form to touch base directly with the supplier if needed. It’s stripped back but technical, giving you just what you need. After all, isn’t the heart of designing paring down to just the essential?

Find out more over at The Habitus Collection Online now.

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Architecture
Habitus Favourites - Slider
Homes
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A Boxy, Granite Structure Has A Surprisingly Light Appearance

It’s not often that architects get a client that wants to be challenged. That’s rarely the case for anyone who takes a client. But that was exactly the case for B.E Architecture when working on Armadale Residence in Melbourne. Director Andrew Piva remembers the “vibrant” couple as accepting of the teams’ ideas and embracing recommendations for the architecture, landscaping, furniture, and even artworks. The architectural brief was essentially one of downsizing: the clients no longer needed the generous space their previous family home provided and were looking to create a home –equally luxurious – yet without so much superfluous space between the two of them. Two of the key – yet contrasting ­– elements within the brief were to be set back and protected from the street while simultaneously providing plenty of natural light. B.E Architecture was able to achieve this through site orientation and a considered selection of materials appropriate to the heating and cooling of the residence. Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell terrace Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell pool balcony “All living areas and bedrooms have access to north-facing light,” says Andrew. “The ground floor has a series of retractable glazed sliding doors so that the living area extends onto the external terrace. The first floor bedroom windows have a series of automated hinged timber battened screens to control the sun in the hotter summer months, as well as being able to close down the building in the night time, like you would with a traditional shutter.” The exterior of the residence is formed from granite and despite its robust and solid appearance, the material in fact allows light to refract over the stone. “Once we began to explore the material, we found many interesting ways to cut and finish it so that there is a series of experience in the one material,” says Andrew. “For the main form, we cut through volumes so that vertical surfaces are textured and horizontal ones are honed.” Inside, the granite theme is continued in the form of custom-designed lights, benches, balconies, bathtubs and basins. All at the hands of B.E Architecture. Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell dining Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell indoor outdoor Low maintenance exterior gardens surround the property furthering the feeling being secluded in nature in the face of an inner city locality. “The rooms are purpose-built to meet the couple’s needs including shared study with two desks and an extra-large master ensuite including a private outdoor shower in a secluded Japanese garden. This is an unexpected level of privacy for an inner city home,” says Andrew. Since moving in the clients enjoy waking up each morning to dappled light making its way through the trees into their upper level bedroom. Seeing the gardens in the front courtyard mature and fill out is something that both the clients and Andrew can enjoy. B.E Architecture bearchitecture.com Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissection Information Perspex Ring Light custom-designed by B.E Architecture Prince Chairs from Minotti Maggiolina Chair from Zanotta Bell Table from Classicon Taccia Floor Lamp from Flos Heather B. Swann, ink drawing Mark Hilton, ‘dontworry’, relief sculpture Perspex display box coffee table, custom-designed by B.E Architecture Solid granite bath, custom-designed by B.E Architecture, made by EcoOutdoor Solid granite basin, custom-designed by B.E Architecture, made by EcoOutdoor Tapware in bathroom from Brodware Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell media room Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell kitchen Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell living dining kitchen Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell stone vanity Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell entrance Armadale Residence B.E Architecture cc Derek Swalwell texture We think you might also like South Coogee House by Madeleine Blanchfield Architectsabc
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The final touch – the crown gem – of the bathroom

The acclaimed Geberit flush plate family of round buttons has a new, stylish addition. The new Sigma21 is designed to be the gem that finishes the aesthetic of any designer bathroom. Available in a range of colours, the collection has been designed to a world-quality standard that is long lasting as well as a trendy statement for your bathroom. Among Geberit’s comprehensive range of flush buttons, there is something for everyone’s taste. With a variety of materials, designs, surfaces and colours to choose from, the Geberit design experts have ensured that every bathroom can have that final touch that completes the look. The launch of the Geberit Sigma21 flush button sees the rollout of the highest-quality flush plate with round buttons to date. The design is based on that of the Sigma20. The Black, White and Sand colour options are notably impressive thanks to a precise cut that reflects the light in sophisticated fashion. The Slate colour button is manufactured from a single piece of fine-textured slate, representing this natural material used in the Geberit range of flush plates for the very first time and last but not the least Matt Black button provides a striking conversation piece for a bathroom. [gallery columns="5" ids="79194,79193,79192,79190,79910"] Like its close relative – the plastic Geberit Sigma20 flush button – the Sigma21 have elegantly curved flush buttons. Thanks to the chrome-coloured rings, the flush buttons stylishly contrast with the reflective cover. Available now in Matt Black, White, Sand, and Slate colours, the Sigma21 flush buttons are ready to be the final touch in the designer bathroom of your dreams. Geberit geberit.com.au abc