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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes
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Unfussy Architecture By Kennedy Nolan

Perhaps it’s the weathered timber, brise soleil, or the deft juxtaposition of modest materials, but this new family home by Kennedy Nolan in North Fitzroy, Melbourne, possesses unassuming timelessness. “We’re always keen to pursue qualities that buck the trends of the moment, and so return again and again to qualities that aren’t necessarily of a particular time,” explains Victoria Reeves, director of architecture at the studio. “The contrast of blank masses of brickwork against the craft and detail of carpentry; depth within a façade to accentuate light and shadow; the reduction of elements so that forms remain strong and uncomplicated, are some of the ongoing preoccupations in the practice that we explored in this project.” The brief specified four bedrooms for a growing family, a tradie-sized garage, a robe for a passionate fashionista and most importantly a house that could be built by the owner (Ashley Rowan Builder) with little consultant engagement. “We knew that the drawings would be handed over for execution early on in the construction process,” says Victoria. “Importantly the structural logic of the house had to remain simple and predominantly carpentry based so we were keen to design a building with minimum fuss and detail but still a provide a heightened experience for living.” Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell kitchen Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell Huxley dining table Jardan Fortunately, the clients allowed Kennedy Nolan to establish the architectural language, form and spatial relationships of the house – ultimately becoming great custodians of the build process. This outcome is evident in all aspects of the build, particularly in the elegance and interplay of the material palette. The use of robust materials like shiplap cladding, exposed brickwork and concrete, terrazzo and cork imbue the home with texture and character. “All the materials in this house are selected because they age beautifully and allow for the layers of family life and personality to come over the top,” adds Victoria. Fundamentally, the team has explored their design philosophy of function over form and fittings, by simplifying their selections and ensuring the spatial experience is given priority. Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell Brooklyn dining chairs Jardan Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell Pieman Tom Fereday Zoe Chair Verzelloni Stylecraft In addition to its architectural merit, the house also adds character and a new voice to a Fitzroy street known for its rich and eclectic mix of styles (including some very unfortunate Victorian reproductions). “It was clear to us we needed to design a house that engaged and contributed to the street but was unashamed of its contemporary existence,” says Victoria.   “The clients had lived in another house on this street for a long time and so, like us, were interested in what this new building could contribute to this realm and the community that occupied it.” Kennedy Nolan kennedynolan.com.au Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissection Information Brooklyn dining chairs from Jardan Huxley dining table from Jardan Seb stool from Jardan Alice Wormald painting ‘turning over’ from Daine Singer Gallery Kirsty Budge painting from Daine Singer Gallery Pieman Chair by Tom Fereday for Dessein Furniture Zoe chair by Verzelloni from Stylecraft Luxembourg Chair by Fermob from Café Culture Insitu Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell ensuite Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell bathroom Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell bedroom terrace Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell indoor outdoor Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell Luxembourg Chair Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell garden We think you might also like Exotic Infill by Matt Gibson Architecture + Designabc
Happenings

Habitus House of The Year Spaces: The Kitchen Of Our Generation

A century ago, these spaces were purely utilitarian, existing solely for food preparation and nothing else. This was the case up until the 1960s, which marked the beginning of a colourful era: residences and kitchens looked bolder and brighter, emerging as the perfect canvas for expressing one’s personal style. Fast-forward to today, where kitchens have fully evolved into social, multipurpose hubs that are the backdrop to harmonious domestic life. Now a space for living and preparing meals, the contemporary kitchen facilitates more than just cooking and eating; it’s now a space where kids can do their homework, friends can gather over a meal, and families can enjoy the cooking process together.

Relocating the Cook

Kitchens are no longer isolated at the back of the house away from all social interaction and activity. Four walls no longer define it, and more importantly, everybody gets to experience the action and spectacle of cooking. As communal living areas become increasingly prevalent, kitchens have truly transformed into the heart of the home. As Frances Lynch, Marketing Manager at Sub-Zero and Wolf, explains: “Kitchens are not just a functional space for cooking. Now the kitchen is a place for socialising, it’s a place for the family… it’s a space for living in and enjoying.”

A Kitchen for Each and Everyone

As living spaces continue to shrink and housing arrangements become increasingly diverse, it is imperative that appliance manufacturers offer solutions that suit a range of lifestyles and spatial situations. People like to live in different ways, and kitchens need to accommodate this by offering both style and functionality. Particularly as the integrated, open-plan living model retains its popularity, the ideal kitchen is one that transitions seamlessly into living spaces, allowing families to socialise, interact, and enjoy each other’s company. Because, at the end of the day, a happy family cooks and eats together. With this in mind, the ideal kitchen is one that delivers a family space while improving the overall experience of everyday life. For example, where space is tight and there may not be enough room for a full-height refrigerator, select appliance manufacturers offer solutions that allow integration of refrigeration units into kitchen drawers for maximum space efficiency. Components are starting to resemble furniture, emphasising that they are designed to be enjoyed, rather than used.

For the Love of Cooking

Attitudes towards cooking have also changed in line with the evolution of the kitchen. With easier access to recipes and the ongoing popularity of cooking shows, cooking is now seen less as something that has to be done and more as a pastime to be enjoyed. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that in 2016 over 1.4 million people tuned into Masterchef, reflecting that we are well and truly in the Era of the Foodie. “Today’s users want flexibility,” says Frances, “People have different needs within the kitchen in terms of what they like to cook: some people are huge entertainers, and they need dual fuel cookers that are 1500mm wide.”

Sub-Zero and Wolf

In 1945 Wisconsin, Westye Bakke started Sub-Zero and Wolf as a result of looking for a solution to store his diabetic son’s insulin. Existing freezers did not do a reliable job of preserving food, medication or other necessities, so the company embarked on a journey to rectify this while making durable products with distinct aesthetics and strong product engineering. Today, the company remains a third generation family-owned business that is committed to function and design, and prides itself on attention to detail and design flexibility. With over 48 different models in the range, each piece can be as unique as it’s owners. “We don’t just have one design style,” explains Frances, “Our product suits any design aesthetic, and that’s something we focus a lot on.” -- Good design is all about collaboration, and at Habitus Living, we care about good design. For our inaugural Habitus House of The Year program we are thrilled to partner with Sub-Zero and Wolf design collaborators who share this genuine passion for design.abc
Design Products
Furniture

New Furniture Down Under By Way Of Milan’s Metrica

The new Metrica collection builds upon the beloved original collection launched in Milan in 2017. Comprising ten new pieces, these furniture items are intended to offer a touch of the luxurious to contemporary life… a designer indulgence in any living space. When developing the new additions to the collection, Metrica sought to reference the design of some of the popular original pieces and adding a layer of depth and complexity. Unified in aesthetic though luxurious satin metallic finishes such as pewter and brass and satin black steel, the collection is ideally paired with marble, stained or lacquered ash wood. The sense sense of depth and complexity this range can ad to a space is unparalleled. The launch includes ten pieces, including these Habitusliving favourites…
  • Holland Desk, Bench and Console
  • Anita High Back Armchair Swivel Base
  • Anita High & Low Back Armchair with Rod Base
  • Thomas Armchair & Thomas Barstool
  • Max Modular Sofa + new corner cushions
The expanded Holland collection draws inspiration from the original Holland table, with the introduction of a desk, bench seat and console. SP01 and Metrica have referenced the stance of the 2017 table by using the same angles in the design of the new collection’s legs. This is then finished with a striking material palette made up of Marquina and Carrara marble. [gallery columns="5" ids="79298,79299,79300,79301,79303"]
Holland
In the new iterations of the Anita and Thomas seating take the form of new and improved adaptations of the originals. Anita is now also available in a high-back version, and with a new, simple rod base that follows the contours of the chair and is reminiscent of a decorative 50s style. [gallery columns="5" ids="79289,79291,79293,79295,79297"]
Anita
[gallery columns="5" ids="79308,79309,79310,79311,79312"]
Thomas
Finally, the Max sofa from the original collection is now available in a corner version, with new cushion options that wrap the inside of the sofa to create a sense of enveloping comfort. [gallery columns="5" ids="79315,79316,79317,79318,79319"]
Max
“We tried to progress and improve while retaining the spirit of the original collection that has an international DNA,” says Robin Rizzini, Chief Designer at Metrica, “In our specific case the biggest evolution is towards storage as it was a missing subject in the collection, it was challenging. SP01 is a novelty in the ever- challenging world of design furniture. There are new brands every year and all of them are willing to make a statement or to be remembered. The strength of SP01 is its specific positioning as a brand with an international collection but a very “local” sensibility for quality, taste and craftsmanship.” SP01 sp01design.comabc
Architecture
Homes
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Less Is More In This Tiny Apartment By Tsai Design

With the increase in apartment developments comes the move towards living with less: less space, less belongings, but smarter design. When Jack Chen of Tsai Design was posed with the challenge of transforming a 35-square-metre unit into a one-bedroom apartment with home office, he created a clever multi-purpose timber joinery box that serves all rooms and offers the luxury, comfort and detailing found in a normal house. To overcome the constraints of the existing apartment, Jack concentrated on creating multi-functional spaces, de-cluttering, and maximising natural light. “Layering and overlapping is the key to planning for small spaces. Two different functions can co-exist in the same space at different times. It then comes down to detailing of the joinery to make it an effortless transition between the two functions,” Jack explains. Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly kitchen closed Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly bespoke timber joinery Jack designed timber joinery that stretches the length of the apartment and connects all spaces seamlessly together. “The timber joinery is conceptually a puzzle box that contains many functions, and it depends on how you interact with it to activate the different uses,” says Jack. With hidden and integrated appliances, the 4-metre-long galley kitchen provides a backdrop to the living space. Recessed LED lights on open shelving create a bar display, and a wine-storage wall made with timber dowels also provides space for hanging coats and storing shoes and umbrellas. The folding dining table is integrated into a sliding door between the kitchen and living area so that it can be hidden away when not in use. The timber box extends into the bedroom where it becomes the bedhead and a small cut-out panel folds down to form a bedside table. The end wall panel is the bathroom door, while an internal window with switchable film replaces the wall between the bathroom and kitchen, improving natural light and providing a view of the feature green wall. “This green wall is in your direct line of sight as you open the door to the apartment, setting the mood as a space that is organic and relaxing, and creating the illusion of outdoor space,” Jack says. Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly apartment design Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly dining Smart, multifunctional design continues in the living room where the television and home office are concealed behind cabinet doors. The A/C unit is hidden at the top of the built-in wardrobe in the bedroom, and a clothes-drying line folds out in the bathroom. The white, black and timber palette is simple and calming, so as not to overwhelm the small space, and the silvery blue woven vinyl flooring is a contemporary reference to traditional tatami straw flooring. In architecture and design, we often refer to “less is more” in terms of the modernist ethos: simple, uncomplicated forms and no superfluous decoration. Today, it also aptly describes the move towards living well in smaller dwellings and the desire to live without excess. Tsai Design tsaidesign.com.au Photography by Tess Kelly Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly study space closed Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly study space Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly inbuilt shelves Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly corridor Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly kitchen Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly bathroom We think you might also like this Singaporean apartment by Mimimologyabc
Design Stories
Design Products
Design Hunters
Design Accessories

The First Word On The Aēsop X Studio Henry Wilson Product Collaboration

In the 30 years since foundation in Melbourne, Aēsop – a now global brand – has consistently exhibited a deep understanding of the value design has in furthering their customers’ in-store experience and a genuine respect for the design process. And that’s exactly what Sydney-based industrial designer Henry Wilson emphasised at the Sydney launch of the skincare company’s first foray into product design. In collaboration with Studio Henry Wilson, Aesop will be releasing the Brass Oil Burner: its first piece of design for interiors “to infuse a space with scent and elegance”. In speaking to Dr Kate Forbes, Aēsop General Manager, Product and R&D, Habitus found that it was a decision that came about following countless requests from their customer base for oil burner recommendations ­– given the three (soon to be four) oil burner blends that they have. We also found that, as with most product design and development, it was a long process from start to finish. Four years in fact. There were a number of reasons the process here was quite so elongated. First and foremost – as noted by both Kate and Henry – was the unwavering dedication to getting the product exactly where it needed to be. Discussions began around an olive oil candle, however they eventually turned to the idea of an oil burner as a significantly more effective diffuser of scent. Material choice was a relatively quick and certainly unanimous decision: brass for its ability to conduct heat and patina. The shape, however, was again a much more drawn out process. More than 30 prototypes were sampled using a 3D printer. Because Henry and Kate were equally taken with the idea of asymmetry, it was virtually impossible to render the designs and view them from every angle. Likewise, the functionality in burning and diffusing scent was meticulously tested to ensure the integrity of the brand continued into this foray into the product design space. “The Brass Oil Burner…represents an interesting new product direction for the company as it combines our passions of design, function and scent into the one product,” said Kate. This isn’t the first time Aēsop and Studio Henry Wilson have collaborated, and we’d be surprised if it was the last. Aēsop aesop.com/au Studio Henry Wilson henrywilson.com.au abc
Design Hunters
People

“The House as a Backdrop for Living”: Habitus House of the Year Judge Howard Tanner on the Power of Good Design

For Howard Tanner, good design is not something that can simply be distilled into a single hero image. “A lot of people are committed to producing a beautiful photograph, and that’s a 2D experience,” he says, “The real experience is the experience of walking around or through a space.” The former National President of the Australian Institute of Architects and founder of Tanner Kibble Denton (TKD) Architects, Howard has long been an advocate of design that genuinely enriches the human experience. In the seventies he founded Tanner Architects and quickly earned a reputation for considered, highly resolved design across the residential, commercial, and education sectors. Over the years the firm expanded significantly in response to Australia’s burgeoning design and construction sectors; in 2012, with new Principals Alex Kibble and Robert Denton, the firm became Tanner Kibble Denton Architects. Howard now works as an independent consultant. For Howard, grappling with all aspects of a brief and project is absolutely essential. “I think, in life, that “engaging” is a very good word, whether it applies to the architect or the building,” he explains, “It’s an important quality.” His belief that architecture must engage directly with its environment and occupants is clearly evident in his opinions on contemporary residential design. “The house is a backdrop for living,” he says, noting that this does not necessarily mean receding into the background so much as applying a curatorial eye and responding thoughtfully to the client’s way of life, “In a way, it should be slightly understated so that the people look good in the house, the paintings look good in the house, the contents look good…” Howard posits that residential design should be an immersive, almost transportive experience, musing that, “One of the beautiful things in a well-designed property is that you’re unaware of the neighbours. You have your own world, as it were.” Still, he clarifies that any evaluation of good design extends far beyond simply “looking good”, explaining that careful planning and a context-specific approach are also critical. “I’m very keen [on the idea] that architecture is visually pleasing, but underlain with absolute common sense,” he says. He then poses a barrage of questions – a suite of criteria for success honed over years of practice. “Does this make sense in principle? Where does the house face?” he asks, “Does it face north? How does the light come in? How do you achieve privacy?” That Howard’s enthusiasm for beauty is tempered by pragmatic considerations is unsurprising, given his background in both residential and highly budget- and program-driven commercial design. Few understand better than him the importance – and difficulty – of striking a balance between practicality and aesthetics. As a judge of this year’s Habitus House of the Year program, this is the kind of balance that he’ll be looking for when selecting a winning project. He’ll also be on the lookout for logical, “fluid planning” that enables high quality indoor and outdoor living. “Increasingly, the hub of the house is a reasonably large space where you cook, eat, and sit,” Howard says, “For me, that opens to the outdoors in some way.” Indeed, the outdoors and landscaping is another area of Howard’s expertise: in 2016, he curated the State Library of NSW’s Planting Dreams: Grand Garden Designs exhibition, a deep-dive into some of the nation’s most intriguing landscape projects. “[In our region] there’s a climate that really encourages outdoor living and a real connection with the environment,” Howard says, “When I’m looking for landscaping, I’m looking for fantastic plants and a really wonderful, inventive approach to planting and design. For me, that is the ultimate compliment to residential design.” Undoubtedly, Howard’s keen eye and passion for both design and landscape setting will come to the fore when judging this year’s Habitus House of the Year, which will award top honours for the inaugural House of the Year in addition to commendations for Exemplary Integration of Environment and Outstanding Interior Architecture.

Read more about Habitus House of the Year here. For the latest updates on the program and shortlisted homes, pre-order your copy of Habitus issue 41 and subscribe to our newsletter today.

  We would like to extend a special thanks to our Major Sponsors for their support in the inaugural year of the Habitus House of the Year initiative. Thank you to StylecraftHOME, Sub-Zero Wolf and ZIP Water.  abc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

Akin Atelier: The Latest Incarnation Of Kelvin Ho’s Architecture And Interior Design Studio

Kelvin Ho is a well-known and respected designer and founder of a Sydney-based architecture and interior design studio – though his clients are far from limited to Australia. In addition to residential architecture and retail design, Kelvin is also a frequent collaborator with Justin Hemmes and the Merivale Group for the interior design and architecture of many of their hospitality spaces and has also worked on the set design for productions with The Australian Ballet. This, however, was all under the guise of Akin Creative, which he first founded in 2005. Almost a decade and a half later, and with firmly established following, Kelvin Ho has decided to relaunch his studio as Akin Atelier. Editor Holly Cunneen spoke – for the second time – the to esteemed architect on what sparked the shift, why it was important, and how it was put in place.   Established in 2005, Akin Creative was a well-known – and well respected – architecture and design studio. What was the reasoning for the rebrand and what is the team hoping to achieve? The rebrand articulated our process as a design firm and define the vision I have for Akin. The aim was for the new name to articulate, influence and guide the way we work. And we also wanted to become a spatial communications studio that explores the idea of each project being a visual and literary representation of our process. What will be the key differences between Akin Atelier and Akin Creative? The re-brand is an evolution that respects our history and takes us into the next stage of Akin. Akin Atelier provides more structure as we expand our services, while embracing the underlying values that have always defined Akin. Rebranding seems like an involved and intense process. Can you talk us through the process and your experience? The rebrand came during the discovery phase for the website. It was a luxury to look at the business from that perspective. While our core values hadn’t wavered, our process had greatly evolved. Our objective with the rebrand was to develop a visual language that represented our process. Did you have a pre-existing relationship with Paradise Studio? [Brought on board to evolve the visual profile] What made them the right people for the job, and why did you choose to outsource this given the multi-disciplinary capabilities of your studio? Paradise Studio explicitly understood Akin. We hadn’t worked together previously, so Paradise brought fresh perspective and new opinions, ultimately challenging any preconceptions or brief I had for our first website. Paradise had also never worked on branding for an architectural/interior design office, so the concepts felt left-of-centre which resonated. And having created identities for fashion, beauty and hospitality projects, Paradise understood the nature of our work and that of our clientele. You mention one of your core values to be “enriching the lives of the people who use your spaces”: be they residential, commercial, hospitality or even set design. How do you do this? We challenge those who use our spaces with unconventional elements in unexpected ways, but there is always a familiar element that creates comfort in new experiences. Habitus really resonates with Luke Flynn’s statement that Akin Atelier “shapes space through architecture”. What does this mean to you? Meaning the environment is inescapable. Realising that we work in the abstract, the most important part of the process is a clear and creative dialogue that threads each stage of a project together. We take a space and give it meaning and purpose. I believe this creates experience, which is what shapes or defines a space. Is this the final iteration of Akin Atelier or are you open to the idea that there may be future evolutions in accord with the industry and its market? There will be future incarnations of Akin. We work with clients who are constantly responding to shifts in the market. Our role as long-term creative partners is to adapt to ­– and forecast – our clients changing needs. Market changes aside, it’s important for myself and the Akin team to constantly evolve and challenge the way we operate as creatives. Akin Atelier akinatelier.com Photography by Bartolomeo Celestino Akin Atelier artefacts cc Bartolomeo Celestino Akin Atelier artefacts cc Bartolomeo Celestino Akin Atelier artefacts cc Bartolomeo Celestino We think you might also like bassike Paddington by Akin Atelierabc
Architecture
Places

Enjoy ‘Une Petite Pause’ At Little Albion Guest House In Sydney

The hotel industry is in the midst of a shakeup. From Baby Boomers to Millennials, more people than ever before are travelling – whether for work or pleasure, or both. But these new types of travellers no longer settle for a stock standard hotel experience. Modern travellers want to be in the heart of a city, discovering culture, food and art just like a local would. As such, hoteliers are taking note, especially as seminal disruptors like Airbnb are moving in. But across the board hoteliers are looking at ways to enhance the experience for travellers. Enter 8Hotels. Having already undertaken several boutique hotels, founder and CEO Paul Fischmann thought there was still a gap in the market for a more homely and intimate hotel experience. Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong street Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong courtyard “Little Albion Guest House was created with the needs of today’s luxury travellers in the front of our minds, which is the authenticity of a local experience, alongside world-class boutique hotel service and ease of booking. To do this we had to redefine the whole hotel category by imagining a modern guest house, developed with the same attention to detail that a homeowner has in creating their dream home, resulting in this truly one of a kind property,” shares Paul. To turn it into a reality, Paul brought together a unique mix of creatives, including Terence Yong (Terence Yong Architecture) and Chris Haughton (SHED) on the architecture, with Connie Alessi (Archemy) and Cressida Kennedy (Space Control) for the interiors, rounded out with art curated by Nicholas Samartis. An infill building site,  Little Albion Guest House “has been designed from the outside in, and from the inside out”, says lead design architect Terence. The site itself has a north-south orientation and is wedged between two streets, Albion and Little Albion, the latter being a once poorly lit laneway at the back. Despite the optimal orientation, the dense surrounding buildings cut it off from desirable natural light. Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong meeting area Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong lounge It was important to retain the site’s unique heritage features, but just as important that the whole site could function as needed in its new intent. Explaining the approach to the project’s architecture, Terence explains, “it’s just one building attached to existing heritage buildings, but because it is in pieces, it’s more domestic-feeling, rather than something big and monolithic.” The newly inserted building is unafraid to be bold – strong angles point out from the more classic looking church next door – but there are subtle references to tie them all together. For example, the forms, “When you see [the new building] together with the church gable wall, they look like they fuse into one building because of the angles,” explains Terence. In addition, white glazed bricks on the new building reference the existing heritage structures while keeping it fresh. Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong elevator Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong parquetry timber A challenge that arose was the consideration of the neighbouring apartments. “Everything that we designed was so carefully considered with regards to neighbouring amenities,” says Terence. Moving inside the 35-room Guest House, classic design references and modern amenities bloom to life. Interior designers Connie Alessi and Cressida Kennedy worked with the concept of “old meets new”. This sees design influences from art deco, to mid-century and retro all coalesce as one, with particular attention paid to the 1920s and ‘70s. Original detailing has been maintained wherever possible, including a grand central staircase. Lining the walls of the staircase, guests can take in portraits of significant people and ‘local heroes’ from the Surry Hills area, which is described as a kind of “living museum”. These seven original portraits were commissioned especially for the Little Albion Guest House, each painted by Ann Cape. Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong suite Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong suite Each room is unique, padded out with furniture, plush soft furnishings and textiles. Nearly everything has been custom-made, as the design team worked closely with local artisans and fabricators to create the perfect design fusion of heritage meets modern. Quite simply, as Terence states, “this is not your everyday hotel. It’s a hotel with lots of character.” All of that character comes together to form a one-of-kind guest experience. Intimate in scale, clever in its execution and appealing to the new generation of modern travellers hungry for authenticity. Interior Design Connie Alessi of Archemy and Cressida Kennedy of Space Control Architecture Terence Yong of Terence Yong Architecture and Chris Haughton of SHED Architects Art Exclusively curated by photographer Nicholas Samartis Photography by Terence Yong Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong bathroom Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong bathtub Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong bedroom Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong rooftop Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong rooftop terrace Little Albion Guest House cc Terence Yong laneway We think you might also like Felix Hotel by Fox Johnston Architects and Space Controlabc
Architecture
Homes
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Nitton Architects Reconfigure Apartment Design in Singapore

Can an HDB flat offer the experience of landed housing? Wanting to test the spatial potential of the standard Singaporean flat, architecture-trained couple Liting Lee and Khoon Toong Chow of Nitton Architects were determined to create a ‘mini house’ out of their new 5-room BTO flat in Sengkang. Their project consisted of a bold reconfiguration of the standard flat layout. There was the decision to remove every non-structural internal wall. The redrawn plans gave rise to living spaces that were more open and fluid and included an indoor garden and a guest room that could be flexibly enclosed or opened to combine with the larger living area as desired. “The open-plan layout created is emotionally uplifting, a welcome retreat from the crowdedness of urban living. Space starts to breathe and become alive, changing through the day and adjusting to different routine needs. This fluidity is especially stimulating for children, who are thrilled by the interactivity and scale of available play area,” say the duo. The guest room’s placement and design are lynchpins of the success of the home. With walls of the original bedrooms taken down, part of the bedroom floor area is now given to an indoor garden, which enjoys plenty of sunlight from the windows. The garden also forms a pleasant passage to the master bedroom. Strategic placement of sliding partitions and a full-height glass wall (with privacy curtains) allow the master bedroom and guest room to be independent spatial units that continue to form part of the larger living space. Sliding partitions incorporating operable shutters enable the guest room to be either naturally ventilated via the indoor garden or air-conditioned. Singapore Flat Nitton Architects CH07 Shell Chair Hans J Wegner The flexible enclosure of the guest room is achieved with full functionality through the integration of two concealed single beds; a pull-out bed is tucked beneath the raised oakwood deck of the indoor garden, while the other is a wall bed that is stored upright and folds down easily during bedtime. A curved curtain track recessed into the false ceiling caters for a privacy curtain to be drawn next to the common bath entrance, demarcating a passageway independent of the guest room. The design is an efficient and delightful departure from the standard flat unit, offering the enjoyment of space and light, but also a sense of liberation. It is imaginably an apartment many Singaporean homes would come to emulate. Nitton Architects www.nitton.co abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Dine alfresco with Artusi Built-In Barbecues

Picture weekend barbecue sessions in the sun, friends and family relaxing and enjoying drinking and dining alfresco style. As the colder months finally leave us, Artusi has designed the perfect barbecue to take centre stage this summer. The Built-In Barbecue is ideal for the home cook looking to add style and finesse to their outdoor living area. As barbecue lovers know, cooking the perfect cut of meat and having the right equipment goes hand in hand. With this at the forefront of Artusi’s mind, the Italian appliance brand has designed a slimline gloss black barbecue that is completely built in with easy to use functions that will turn any home cook into a cooking elitist. Manufactured in Italy, the barbecue features four stainless steel burners, a cast-iron plate, two ribbed griddle plates and side knob controls. Made from stainless steel and then baked enamel, the built-in benchtop barbecue can slot easily into existing outdoor areas or newly furnished spaces. The built-in feature maximises space and makes the alfresco area appear as a second kitchen space. The barbecue also has two different hoods on offer, a dome hood or a flat BBQ lid making it the ideal choice for either a conventional or contemporary outdoor space. As integrated indoor and outdoor living is becoming a common presence in Australian design, a built in barbecue like Artusi’s will be the quintessential element to unite the space and create a second entertaining hub in the home. Artusi artusi.com.au abc
Architecture
Homes
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What’s Important When Designing Mixed-Use, Multi Residential Developments?

Twenty-two compact, one- and two-bedroom apartments sit atop street level retail opportunities in the dense, inner city suburb of Surry Hills, Sydney. Designed by Woods Bagot and lead by the architecture studio’s global design leader, Domenic Alvaro, Short Lane is a considered example of the positive effects biophilic design and community inclusion can have on multi-residential developments. “We were interested in the development connecting with its context in new ways by looking at the way urban nature can be experienced and woven into the city, with an emphasis on biophilia,” says Domenic. “Biophilic design is beginning to boom because contact with nature is increasingly supported by research findings on its wellbeing benefits.” The exterior façade of the building warrants a double take: at a quick glance and you might simply notice the bushy Cilandra and Periwinkle plants emerging from the balconies. These balconies, however, are cantilevered and provide added visual interest by way of their diverse sizes and Tetris-like placement. Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein dining Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein living The concrete that characterizes the exterior is continued inside via exposed concrete ceilings. To balance out the coolness of concrete are oak floors and full-height glass doors (sliding, so as not to waste precious space) that lead to the outdoors. Despite a distinct architectural – and modern – aesthetic, Short Lane sits well amongst its neighbouring buildings: the Wesley Mission building; a 1847 Methodist Church; and an old terrace which has been converted to a modest food precinct as part of the site. Graffiti artwork that adorned the terrace has been restored by the original artist in a bid to create atmosphere and mirror the areas successful laneway activation. Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein indoor outdoor Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein terrace In a direct response to the concern that urban developments often lack a sense of community or even create division between old and new residents, Short Lane is a space that fosters community interaction though botanical spaces, walkways and venues open to the public. Short Lane has in fact been short listed in the World Architecture Festival under the category of Small Scale Housing ­ Completed Buildings, as well as taking out the award for Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing in the Australian Institute of Architects, New South Whales Chapter Awards. Woods Bagot woodsbagot.com Photography by Trevor Mein Dissection Information Design team: Domenic Alvaro, Simon Lee, Amy Lee tructural Engineer: D’Ambrosio Consulting Electrical/Mechanical/Hydrulic Engineer: Arrow Consulting Landscape: 360 Degree Landscape Architect Acoustic Engineer: Acoustic Logic Builder: Komplete Construction Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein building Short Lane Woods Bagot cc Trevor Mein exterior We think you might also like Minimal House by Hecker Guthrieabc
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Japanese Style Finds A Home with three new StylecraftHOME Items

Channelling timeless Japanese design aesthetics through contemporary style, these three new items from Japan’s Ritzwell have been launched in Australia from StylecraftHOME and are the perfect additions to your designer living room, work area or office. All designed by Shinsaku Miyamoto, these are modern pieces for considered living. The Beatrix Lounge Chair features a unique design aesthetic with the precision of Japanese manufacturing. Equally at ease in both domestic and commercial spaces, the Beatrix features a unique interpretation of the traditional wing back chair and an unrivalled level of comfort. The chair’s outer shell sees panels of leather juxtaposing the front of the lounge’s soft, upholstered fabric and leathers. The chair and matching ottoman are available now from StylecraftHOME. [gallery columns="4" ids="79052,79053,79054,79061"] The Light Field collection epitomises the highest level of Japanese design in the lounge space. The form of the Light Field lounge features a playful interplay between the rear upholstered panels and the softness of the front cushions. Light Field is available in single armchair, four lounge sizes and the modular forms to allow a wide collection of configurations. Complementary to the Light Field lounge collection, is also a chaise lounge and ottoman to complete the collection, which is available now. [gallery columns="2" ids="79058,79059"] Coming soon from StylecraftHOME is the Jabara Sideboard. Launched by Ritzwell at the Milan Fair in 2018, the Jabara is a collection of storage units offering a practical and stylish modern interpretation of Japanese tradition. Defined by the sliding door, the continuous fine lines particular to Japan exude a nostalgic warmth. Testament to the beauty of the new piece, Jabara has been awarded the Red Dot Design Award 2018. [gallery columns="4" ids="79056,79055,79057,79060"] While the Jabara Sideboard is coming soon, the desire to add some contemporary Japanese style to your home needn’t wait! The Beatrix and Light Field collections are in StylecraftHOME Sydney and Melbourne showrooms now! StylecraftHOME stylecraft.com.auabc