About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Furniture

The Swiss Storage Style Of USM Down Under

For more than 50 years USM has been manufacturing high-end custom furniture in Switzerland. Through the years it has become an internationally renowned design classic. Thanks to its modular and flexible system, various configurations of furniture can be designed: from bookcases to display cabinets, from media units to bedside tables, including credenzas or any other storage pieces. If you are a book lover or vinyl record collector, it will not only allow you to display them but also to store them in the most efficient way. USM has conceived the range to optimize the usage of your space and to accompany you through your life as it can be dismantled, transformed, redesigned and used differently. [gallery columns="5" ids="81447,81448,81449,81450,81452"] Made out of steel or glass, Haller comes in 14 elegant colors that can be used individually or mixed together. White pieces of any size form a neutral but elegant backdrop to display books and other valuable objects, and fit in perfectly with any color scheme in its surrounding. Reds, yellows and other bright colors can form the basis of attention-grabbing statement pieces. Its numerous dimensions also offer endless solutions for homes as well as offices. A new user-friendly configurator is now available online and allows you to play with various shapes, dimensions and colors. The Haller collection is available in Australia through Anibou.com USM usm.com abc
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Richards Stanisich On Reinvention, Reinvigoration, And Client Relationships

Jonathan Richards and Kirsten Stanisich are familiar names in interior design circles as leaders at SJB Interiors Sydney. But change is afoot, and the two have stepped out on their own to establish their new practice Richards Stanisich. Their 15 person team will forge ahead under the new name, along with a new brand identity by Deuce Design. The practice will remain in the Surry Hills location on Crown Street, where Kirsten shares that, “not a lot will change in the day-to-day experience.” We asked Kirsten and Jonathan some pressing questions about the process, what to expect next and how things will change.   Will you continue to work with SJB? We both worked at SJB for at least 16 years each and naturally developed many longstanding friendships with the teams across Sydney and Melbourne. Those friendships remain and we have current projects that we will continue to collaborate on. Of course, there are talented interior designers within the SJB team that will continue to drive the interiors sector of their business. How will the move change how you work with clients going forward? Ultimately the business revolves around the relationships we have with our clients. Having an independent brand reinvigorates those relationships – we have had immediate support from our clients, who generally seem as excited as us. On a day-to-day basis, not a lot changes – our team and the way we work remains the same. But the rebrand has brought with it a closer connection to our clients. Being an independent smaller practice, we really value each client and the contribution they make to our business. The new branding was no doubt an important way to present your new studio – what was Deuce Studio’s concept and how was it developed? We have worked with Deuce ever since we started working in Sydney, some 20 years ago. Bruce and Sophie are good friends and they just get us. Their concept was to develop a brand that reflected who we are as designers, but also who we are as people. The brand – our logo, website, social media, copy – has been designed to illustrate that we are first and foremost a highly experienced interior design studio. It’s not too architectural and not too decorative – it just suits who we are and what our studio does. Why the change now? There’s a phrase ‘if you’re at the top of your game, change your game’. Sometimes complacency can set in and you take your situation for granted. We felt, having enjoyed our time with SJB for many years, we could settle in for many more or we could reconsider the future. In the end, it just felt right to make a change. Richards Stanisich richardsstanisich.com.au We think you might also like A Lesson In Art Deco Overkillabc
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ARC - Feature

Hogg & Lamb Prove Architecture Can Be Simultaneously Minimalist And Humanist

B&B Residence is an alterations and additions project in the suburbs of Brisbane. The clients are working professionals with three young children, three chickens and a Boston Terrier – her name is Joy. Their brief to local architecture studio, Hogg & Lamb, was for a private and “peaceful house” following minimalist design principles and features a strong connection to the outdoors. And a limited budget was an important part of the brief. As a result, maximising the functionality of the existing Queenslander was key to the final design. In fact, the entire original house was retained, thus keeping costs to a minimum. It was simply re-imagined as the children’s realm, while the master bedroom suite and grown-up spaces were located in the new addition. BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones open dining and backyard BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones minimalistic exterior Initially, this was met with some trepidation from the clients, but they quickly came to understand and appreciate how the separated realms afforded privacy and retreat. “Committed minimalists, the aesthetic quality of the interior and exterior was seen as crucial,” says Michael Hogg, referring to his clients. Respecting this affinity to minimalism, the project team sought to remove superfluous materials, features and distractions. “The removal of typical building elements such as skirtings, architraves and cornices – with the use of a restrained palette of materials – enables the occupants to focus on the essential qualities of nature: the blue of sky, the green of lawn, and the turquoise of water, in a heightened and serene atmosphere of calm,” says Michael. BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones open plan family home BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones outdoor dining However, it was important to find an alternate, albeit understated, way to define the different spaces. Rather than relying on materials to do this, Hogg & Lamb played with the notion of “volume as room maker”. The kitchen resides within a double-height barrel-vaulted space. This signifies the importance of this area as the centre around which home life revolves. The master bedroom and ensuite similarly contain smaller barrel vaults marking their relative importance in the overall composition of the new building and its interlocking volumes. The fact that the builder was a friend of the client’s meant that there was a very “collegiate” relationship whose informality led to cost savings and easy resolution of problems as they arose. The clients are now able to experience the best of both worlds in their new home. Whether they are indoors or out there is a level of openness, natural light and ventilation akin to being outdoors. Likewise, no matter whether the family is enjoying time together or peaceful separation, the feeling of connection is a constant. Hogg & Lamb hoggandlamb.com Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones corridor BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones bathroom entrance BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones shower and vanity BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones play area BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones backyard BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones entrance BB Residence Hogg Lamb cc Christopher Frederick Jones exterior We also think you might like Halo House by Breathe Architecture abc
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4 Showstopping Kitchens From Habitus House Of The Year

Courtyard House by Guy Tarrant Architects

New Zealand
Photography by Patrick Reynolds
Courtyard House Guy Tarrant Architects Kitchen Courtyard House Guy Tarrant Architects Kitchen Courtyard House Guy Tarrant Architects Kitchen

Courtyard House

 

Gibbon Street House by Cavill Architects

Brisbane, QLD
Photography by David Chatfield 
Gibbons Street Cavill Architects kitchen Gibbons Street Cavill Architects kitchen

Gibbon Street House

 

Knikno House by Fabian Tan Architect

Malaysia
Photography by Ceavs Chua
Knikno House Fabian Tan kitchen Knikno House Fabian Tan kitchen Knikno House Fabian Tan kitchen

 Knikno House

 

St Vincents Place by B.E Architecture

Melbourne, VIC
Photography by Derek Swalwell
St Vincents Place BE Architecture kitchen St Vincents Place BE Architecture kitchen St Vincents Place BE Architecture kitchen

 St Vincents Place

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Finishes

Win a trip to Spain with the design surface solutions of Rocks On

For over 20 years, Rocks On has been supplying exclusive, luxurious porcelain stoneware to the building industry. Australian-owned and operated, Rock On has spent more than two decades priding themselves on sourcing only the highest quality, most technologically advanced products from around the globe. This commitment has earned the respect of leading architects, designers and builders throughout Australasia. Rocks On specialises in bespoke solutions for a range of complex residential and commercial projects, both interior and landscaping. They offer not only the highest quality Italian and Spanish ceramic tiles and slabs, but also precision-cutting for custom-designed floors and walls. Glass mosaics are a speciality, with intensely beautiful results achieved via the use of transparent, iridescent, mirrored and textured materials. Rocks On is also a company at the forefront of technology, with principals travelling the world to discover the latest advancements in porcelain and stone product, resulting in a range that is as innovative as it is beautiful. They also believe that the preservation of natural resources is paramount for our future, and to this end they ensure that environmental standards are met in the production of all materials. [gallery columns="4" ids="81399,81400,81401,81402"] Rocks on take a hands-on approach to working with architects, designers and builders, advising from the very earliest stages on the right materials to maintain the integrity of the project. This way of working has earned them the trust of their partners, many of whom seek the advice of Rocks On for every job. Rocks on have an inspiring studio space in Alexandria, available to view by appointment, or their knowledgeable consultants are always happy to travel to your office or worksite to showcase the full range of products in person. Not only that, you've now got a chance to win a trip to one of the world’s most exciting ceramic tile trade fairs – the 2019 Cevisama exhibition in Valencia, Spain! Simply request a quote on any number of the Rocks On product range for a chance to win. The more quotes you request, the more chances to win – so register today for free, no obligation! abc
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The Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Arts By Herzog & de Meuron

With the ever-competing diversity of building typologies and programmes in dense urban environments, big cities often struggle with balancing the pressure of space optimisation and preservation of history. In Hong Kong, one of the densest cities in the world, the new Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Arts achieves the balance by adaptively reusing a collection of historic buildings while activating a historic compound with careful interventions that enable art programmes and social spaces. When Herzog & de Meuron faced the task of revitalising the former Central Police Station, the Central Magistracy and the Victoria Prison on Hong Kong island, the design team wanted to not only preserve the history of the compound but also to create an oasis of openness and public recreation in the heart of an urban jungle. The approach demanded a careful and non-intrusive strategy to create a new public space dedicated to cultural programming via revitalisation of the existing courtyards and buildings and careful addition of new spaces conducive to contemporary art exhibitions and cultural programming. Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron culture center Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron culture center precinct The resulting intervention allows two new distinct building volumes to float gently above the historic buildings as careful insertions into the existing fabric of the site. Cantilevering above the adjacent structures, the new volumes maximise the buildable floor area while retaining the existing generous courtyards and circulation spaces for gathering and activity. The new buildings are clad with a cast aluminium façade system that draws references from the scale and proportion of the existing granite blocks of the revetment wall surrounding the site. The buildings deliberately set themselves apart from the existing collection of historical buildings and create a symbiotic relationship between the old and the new. The façade, apart from drawing references from its context, is also a response to Hong Kong’s subtropical climate, addressing sun shading and rain protection. Its textural quality reduces the reflectivity and glare during the daytime. Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron entrance Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron exterior transition “We adopted this strategy of working with, instead of against, the existing material world of objects because we found it natural and inspiring, often resulting in unexpected and innovative results,” says Jacques Herzog of the strategy that defines Herzog & de Meuron’s practice and its inspiring approach to Hong Kong’s latest cultural hub. Herzog & de Meuron herzogdemeuron.com Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron exterior stairs Tai Kwun Centre Herzog & de Meuron corridor Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron atrium Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron stairs Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron exterior view Tai Kwun Centre Herzog de Meuron exterior We think you might also like this profile on Luke Yeng of Architectkiddabc
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Are The Sydney Opera House Sails For Sale?

“Where the bloody hell are ya?” You know you’re in Sydney, grift city, when a bloviating, alt-righteous radio shock jock can ride roughshod over a senior public servant doing her job to protect the nation’s most prized building – and a UNESCO World Heritage site to boot. “Who the hell do you think you are, Louise?” 2GB’s resident bombast Alan Jones demanded of Louise Herron, CEO of the Sydney Opera House, after she’d refused to allow projections of horse names and branding onto the ‘sails’ of the building to promote a multi-million dollar horse race. If it had’ve stopped there it would have been just another right-wing Jonesing of what he perceives as the “latté-sipping” cultural elite. But the ensuing saga escalated to Shakespearean heights with first the NSW premier Gladys Berejiklian forcing Herron to submit to the projections, then prime minister Scott Morrison – the man behind the ill-fated “Where the bloody hell are ya?” Australian Tourism campaign of 2006 – declaring it “just common sense” that a building which has become the very symbol of the nation should be used to advertise the interests of a wealthy few. Morrison’s assessment that “people are getting so precious about it” showed just how removed he is from a public that didn’t elect him in the first place. In defiance of the Sydney Opera House Charter, Section 4.14 which states that “the Sydney Opera House exterior… should not be regarded as a giant billboard”, Morrison blithely declared it a “no-brainer” that the state’s “biggest billboard” should be used to promote a $13 million horse race in the middle of New South Wale’s Responsible Gambling Awareness Week. Whoever said irony was dead never lived in Sydney. But where the comedy of errors becomes dangerously unfunny is when Jones tries to leverage populist sentiment by suggesting that Herron is somehow co-opting for elitist purposes the building she spends her waking hours trying to protect as a public asset. “She might have been representing some people but not the wider public,” he insisted, as if somehow the interests of a corporate horserace with a buy-in of $600,000 in which two of the horses were sired by a stallion owned by Jones somehow represented the interests of some wider public, some citizenry. The suggestion is that to oppose Jones and his cronies is somehow un-Australian. Living in the pricey eyesore apartment block known as The Toaster right across from the Opera House, Jones apparently thinks its forecourt is his backyard, a place he and his mates are free to clutter as they see fit. Now who’s elitist? The one good thing to come out of this debacle is that Jones’ pernicious attempt at twisted populism struck such a deep nerve in the “precious” people, the citizenry who prize the sanctity of public domain, that the outcry was loud, immediate, and felt around the world. More than a quarter-million people signed a petition protesting the blighting of the Opera House by the gambling lobby, and over a thousand assembled to shine their own lights onto the sails in an attempt to obliterate the ads. A series of Instagram tiles by local graphic designer Marcus Piper, their witty quips – OUR SAILS ARE NOT FOR SALE, THE HOUSE ALWAYS WINS etc – rendered in a punchy font borrowed from boxing posters went viral. And government architect Rory Toomy’s (@rorythearchitect) satyrical sketchpad rendering of a logo-laden opera house captured the trepidatious mood of us, the incalcitrant, unrepentant and downright angry latté-sippers of this place. The New York Times titled one story covering the scandal, “Is All Australia for Sale?” to which we respond, “No, it’s not”. The battle for public domain is a fight for the democracy itself – and this will not be the last time we have to fight. Resist. Sketch Rory Toomy Graphics by Marcus Piper [gallery size="large" ids="81392,81391,81390"]abc
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Studiofour Redesigns For Better Living

Built in the late-1800s, this Victorian-era house had closed-off, compartmentalised rooms and consequently a lack of light, ventilation and outdoor connection. A rear extension provided additional living space, but there was room still for improvement. When the clients engaged Studiofour to add a second storey, architects Annabelle Berryman and Sarah Henry saw the opportunity to replan the ground floor to create better living spaces. “Our aim was to retain as much of the building fabric as possible, and work with the existing structure to increase the amount of natural light, fresh air and ventilation entering into the house,” Annabelle explains. “The design not only delivered the best value for the client but enabled the Victorian terrace to be refreshed and provide a healthy home ‘fit for purpose’ for a growing young family.” Alfred Street Residence is home to a professional couple and their two young girls. The upper floor now accommodates two children’s bedrooms and a bathroom, while downstairs, the master bedroom is in the front of the house, the living area is in an existing addition, and a new extension has the kitchen and dining. New joinery and changes in floor and ceiling levels define each space. Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath open dining and kitchen Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath open living and dining Heritage characteristics are retained in the front of the house, which opens up to a light and spacious living area. It faces with a fireplace with timber-batten joinery, behind which large sliding glass doors open the room to a new central courtyard. This landscaped area provides a green backdrop to the living area and bathroom in the front of the house. One wall of the living area provides shelving for the client’s collection of books and has a large portal that provides access and frames the new kitchen and dining area. The clients wanted their books in one location and Studiofour designed the shelving to fit all their books, measuring the collection in linear metres. The new extension has a lower ceiling height than the living area, creating a more intimate space. The long island serves as a dining table at one end – with a raised floor level – and kitchen bench at the other end – stepping down to a lower floor. The rear wall is clean and simple with shelving above and cupboards beneath the benchtop. Sliding glass doors open to a previously unused rear courtyard with a new outdoor dining area. Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath courtyard dining Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath living room coffee table Studiofour used a restrained material palette with whitewashed walls and pale timber joinery to provide a neutral backdrop for the client’s collection of books and objects. “It often seems easier to start a design and build from scratch, however in the case of an existing architectural base that contains heritage and original character, this often does not bring the client the most value,” Annabelle says. “This job shows that with careful due diligence and focus we were able to carefully balance the amount of new build required within our client’s budget restraints.” Studiofour studiofour.net.au Photography by Shannon McGrath Dissection Information Sky 4.0 seater (custom) sofa from Jardan Sky Ottoman from Jardan Clio Chair by Max Alto from Space Furniture Mega Drum coffee table from Mark Tuckey Muuto Around coffee table from Great Dane Furniture Lean Floor Light by Jenny Back from Great Dane Furniture CH20 Elbow Chair from CULT Elan Bar Stool from Interstudio Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath corridor Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath master bedroom Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath master bed Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath kids bedroom Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath kids bedroomStudiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath bathtub Studiofour Alteration Addition CC Shannon McGrath vanity We think you might also like Type St Apartment by Tsai Designabc
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Indigenous Collaborations: Yutu Badayala

What is the collaborative project? Sasha Titchkosky: The foundations of Yuta Badayala (‘in a new light) is a range of lighting products we’ve developed with the artists. This has extended into beautiful sculptural wall art (for Noma’s pop-up restaurant in Sydney, for example) and meeting pods. How did the project come about? ST: We came across Yolngu weaving in about 2006 and embarked on a nearly 3-year journey of understanding this craft form, what went into it and the cultural significance it represents. Finally, after much questioning, I eventually asked Elcho what they thought and the uber-talented Mavis Ganambarr tried it. She is an incredible woman, as well as artist and senior cultural figure, whose talents are extraordinary. Once Mavis was keen to work on the project and didn’t see a problem with it, the magic began! [The project launched officially in 2009]. We have visited Elcho many times since and use these opportunities to develop new ideas. What has been gained or learned as part of the process so far? ST: We’ve been lucky enough to learn something of Yolngu culture and to develop deep and lasting friendships that traverse very different cultures and backgrounds. Indigenous Collaborations Koskela Elcho Island Arts sourcing What have been the challenges? ST: The hardest part has been the revolving door at the Art Centre. The women have been incredible at keeping the project going despite constant change in Art Centre Managers. I feel as though we could have had a greater impact and developed more ideas if this role was more stable — we need this role to help drive the administrative side of the project and to help keep the quality evolving. How does the collaboration work in terms of the creative process? JM: I have always done weaving. We go out bush and get pandanas, dig up colours (plant roots) and make things with them. I mix the colours with rainwater and ash to dye the pandanas. I have always done it with my family, and now I do it with my daughter and grand-daughters. I am passing my weaving on. I have three grandchildren — A, B, C. Abigail, Bronwyn and now Cliff. They sit next to me when I weave; A, B, C, all in a row. They watch me and I teach them. I tell them about how to make the colours and do the weaving. Their ngandi (mum), Sharon, is my daughter, and she weaves with me too. I used to only weave baskets and bags and mats things done from the old days and from the Mission days. But now we do new things. I weave in the old way to create new things like lampshades and soft sculpture — things like fish, dugong, puddy git (pussy cat) and piggy piggy. ST: It’s a genuine collaboration. Koskela develops the form and the artists have complete artistic license to weave whatever they’d like on the frames. Every time we get a shipment it’s like Christmas as we unwrap the shades that have travelled from a remote island off the east coast of Arnhem Land and discover what they’ve created. Indigenous Collaborations Koskela Elcho Island Arts art weaving Why did you decide to start the project? ST: When Russel and I started Koskela in 2000, we had always set out to create a business that did more than just make money. These projects with Indigenous artists are at the core of Koskela and are what drives us. 1% of our revenue now goes into the further development of these projects, as we’d like to be able to create more income-earning opportunities for these artists around Australia. When we embarked on this project we very much wanted it to be structured in a way that meant it would be able to continue for as long as the artists were willing to work on it. It’s all self-funded, which means it’s not reliant on government grants or donations to continue. It was important to me that this wasn’t a short-term project. Indigenous Collaborations Koskela Elcho Island Arts weaving Why is it important or beneficial to engage in collaborative projects like these? JM: Making new things shows people our old ways. They can see our culture in a new light. Since I have been doing the new djama (work) people have started to say that I am manymuk (good) artist. My djama has been in exhibitions — I have been able to travel and my djama is in major galleries, like in the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra. My grandchildren will go there one day to see the things I created with them at my side. The Yuta Badayala project is dhapirrk (fantastic) djama. We do special djama with Koskela. We do it with Sasha and Russel and Andres and Mika. They have new ideas and share them with us, and we share our ideas and culture with them. The Koskelas are manymuk family. My family is working with their family, creating new things, sharing culture, showing a new way. It also helps us earn extra rupiah (money) to raise up our kids. I feel like I will work with them until die. My family and their family working together.” ST: It’s important to be able to use your skills to create positive change. It’s also a real honor to be able to learn and work with these artists and to have the privilege of learning something about the oldest surviving culture in the world. The Yutu Badayala pieces are available for sale through Koskela, who buy all the work produced in the collaboration, eliminating the risk for the artists and the art centre, and then on-sell them to discerning consumers. Koskela and Elcho Island Arts Photography courtesy of Koskela and Elcho Island Arts Indigenous Collaborations Koskela Elcho Island Arts collection Indigenous Collaborations Koskela Elcho Island Arts landscapeabc
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The Difference is (and always has been) Gaggenau

“From a Gaggenau perspective, we are constantly inspired by considered design, professional cooking and craftsmanship,” says Robert Warner, General Manager of Gaggenau Australia. He continues: “We have strived to deliver a space that will inspire our customers.” A better word could not have been chosen. Inspire. At the heart of Gaggenau – the brand, the icon, the legacy – is this drive to inspire. So much of its 335 years speaks to this concept of design that is transcendental in its capacity to inspire, to elevate the everyday through craftsmanship, precision and quality, and ultimately celebrate the human spirit of creativity. So as the backdrop against which the brand recently launched its first showroom in Australia, the luxury brand sought to bring this thoughtful design legacy from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere – proving again that with Gaggenau, excellence transcends design and becomes a way of living. Upon opening the doors to this sleek, enthralling space, the showroom brings to the fore all the possibilities of what can be achieved when embracing the cultural connoisseur’s lifestyle: equal delight in the eating and preparing of food with Gaggenau’s state-of-the- art appliances. Collaborating with Carr Design Group, the space creates dialogue between design, architecture and culinary encounters like never before. The compelling relationship to our local design heritage, Gaggenau’s vast history and the industrial innovation at the heart of its products, are all showcased here with pride. With Carr, Gaggenau’s new Australian home is an architectural performance – a narrative of ideas and design history – that revels in the brand’s unique story, its Germanic origins, and the wealth of culinary joy that Gaggenau has brought to countless homes and restaurants across the globe. Like the act of cooking itself, the showroom provides a sensory immersion; intimacy is paramount. Access is gained through a moody and dramatic entry with hints of black and exposed brick redolent of Gaggenau’s Black Forest origins. Counterbalanced by the dimly lit interiors, this motif is continued throughout, with the articulated form of black mirrored towers representing the verticality of the forest trees. Gaggenau’s renowned cooking appliances are partially hidden from view, creating a curious succession as consumers make their way further and further into the space. Curated appliances are inserted within each tower, lit above like a “gemstone in a jewellery box” – on the edge of extravagance and inquisitiveness. The Gaggenau Melbourne showroom represents an important milestone in the brand’s long history – one that started on the edge of the Black Forest when the very first nail was struck from the forge. “All it took was one idea,” says Gaggenau Australia’s Senior Brand Manager, Aleks Efeian. “That spark – the desire to take something raw and make it into something that was beautiful – is the same spark that brings us here.” Gaggenau gaggenau.com.auabc
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How To Maximise Vertical Spaces In Loft Apartments Around The Region

#1 Chic penthouse with thoughtful touches

High ceilings have been taken to new heights of chicness by the Poetus design team. The six-metre-high ceiling in the shared living and dining area maintains a spacious visage, thanks to the minimalistic design treatment of the walls, which is covered in special effects paint. The designers also flanked one of the walls with solid wood strips arranged in a staggered pattern for greater visual interest. To maximise the high ceiling in the adult son’s bedroom, the designers conceptualised a loft bed and study. They say: “Once he saw our proposed loft design, he was sold.” Sleek recessed lighting keeps the study area at the bottom well-lit while the clear glass panels serve as a counterbalance to the heavy woodgrain accents. Poetus 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living chic penthouse living space 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living chich penthouse master bedroom stairs 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living chich penthouse masterbedroom  

#2 Dual-key apartment for rest and entertaining

Wee Studio has given this show flat unit for Sunnyvale Residences a modern and fashionable vibe. Upon entering the unit, a spacious lounge greets guests. Set in a linear layout, the entrance foyer flows into the living and dining area, which then leads out to the balcony. The designers implemented a clear zoning of individual areas within this open shared space with the use of customised built-in furniture and plush furnishings. A feature of dual-key apartments is their accommodation a segregated suite, which gives more privacy for family members or guests. This particular suite features its own private balcony and a mezzanine loft, which the designers have turned into a cosy sleeping area. For the lounge below, the designers selected a sofa bed and loose furniture that can be easily moved around, to maximise space in a flexible way. Wee Studio weestudio.com.sg 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living dual key apartment living 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living duay key apartment levels  

#3 Going Scandinavian

Given the impressive 6-metre ceiling height of this 3-bedroom condo, the owners (a couple with two kids) had two main requests: they wanted a loft space, and enough storage to accommodate their family’s needs. Free Space Intent took charge, giving them an airy Scandinavian design, and a generous study loft complete with loads of storage cabinets. The designers also maximised the area underneath the stairs by inserting storage and display shelves, which are not just practical but also add visual interest to the whitewashed wall. Free Space Intent fsi.com.sg 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living scandinavian stairs 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living scandinavian living  

#4 A 650sqft bachelor pad

Designed by Satobent Interior Design for a bachelor in his early 30s, this sophisticated loft-style abode enjoys a masculine and contemporary Italian-inspired design, with a touch of the industrial aesthetic. Concrete panels backdrop one stretch of the 5-metre-high wall, emphasising the apartment’s generous height. To maximise the floor area, the designers have created a study on the mezzanine level, and it comes with loads of desk space. Storage has also been maximised by way of built-in storage underneath the staircase. Satobent Interior Design 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living bachelor pad chair 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living bachelor pad living 4 Great Loft Ideas Lookbox Living bachelor pad study We think you might also like Alfred Street by Whiting Architectsabc
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Stephen Crafti On Habitus House Of The Year

Melbourne is extremely fortunate to be endowed with some of Australia’s finest architecture. I was fortunate to cover three outstanding homes for the Habitus, House of the Year, a special issue. The houses were: Architect Robert Simeoni’s North Carlton house, a renovation to a period home; a substantial extension to a weekender at Boneo, on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula by John Wardle Architects; and thirdly, a palatial home by B.E Architects in Albert Park. Not surprisingly, all three homes received awards in different categories from the Australian Institute of Architects (Victorian Chapter) in 2018. The three projects vary significantly, both in location, scale and obviously responding to the individual clients’ brief. However, from seeing these homes, all share a common theme. Each one offers a new way of experiencing a house and creating unexpected moments at every turn. Simeoni’s thoughtful reworking of a narrow turn-of-the-century home into a family abode goes well beyond simply adding a family room at the back. He cleverly demonstrates how a couple with two children can live on a tight inner-city corner rather than the detached quarter-acre block. His choice of materials and colour palette, the latter being dark and moody, also goes against the grain of using light colours to increase a sense of space. Wardle’s substantial renovation (virtually a new house) also breaks new ground in providing the owners with a series of dramatic vistas rather than one singular view, as is often the case. The home’s finger-like portals in the landscape create different aspects of the countryside. And although the spaces are generous, there’s also a sense of intimacy in the manner in which Wardle has crafted each room. B.E Architecture’s Albert Park house is essentially a new house nestled behind a Victorian façade. It’s only when the threshold is passed that one realises this is an extraordinary contemporary home. Unlike the traditional Victorian pile with a wide corridor sliced through the centre, here each room takes several turns and surprises. There would be few, if any, Victorian homes that include a lap pool, gymnasium and sauna in the basement. This one also includes fine contemporary art throughout. There are numerous design awards in the design calendar each year, with various magazines staging their own awards. Given the calibre of architecture out there, it seems appropriate to bestow such accolades. It’s also an important reminder that great architecture doesn’t just happen, but is a collaboration between the architect and an enlightened client. abc