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Architecture
Around The World
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Aēsop’s First Signature Store In Kanazawa By CASE-REAL

Following their brand concept of integrating retail presence with local culture and history, Aēsop partnered with Fukuoka-based architecture firm CASE-REAL led by Koichi Futatsumata, to realise the new store in Ishikawa, Kanazawa Prefecture. Held on a narrow site occupying a mere 67 metres-squared and located in a quiet, mixed residential and commercial neighbourhood, the intimate store sees its design re-connecting with the site’s original machiya (traditional wooden townhouse) history. Prior to the house’s second rebuild and primary usage as a storehouse, it was formerly a traditional townhouse residence. CASE-REAL and Aēsop aimed to restore the house’s original characteristics by removing existing walls and retaining its wooden structure, uncovering the site’s former architectural elements and atmospheric charm. The store’s exterior shikkui lime plaster walls were maintained, with an additional washi-style shoji screen rear window in the store’s back room area. CASE-REAL also incorporated straw fibres into the cement flooring throughout, aiming to connect each volume and space of half-outdoor doma (floor). Aēsop Kanazawa Case Real entry Aēsop Kanazawa Case Real sink The city of Kanazawa is also known as “Little Kyoto” due to its abundance of preserved traditional houses, with the retail site’s location found within the traditional district that inevitably included construction regulations and restrictions. The architects were required to retain the original vertical lattice façade, known as koushi, and changed the original hinged entrance door to a sliding door whilst maintaining it’s original brown colour furthermore adhering to strict colour standards in place to ensure visual harmony for the surrounding neighbourhood. One of the main challenges was the approach to create a more open atmosphere for the existing, dark interior. CASE-REAL removed a closed wall that had divided the tori-niwa (the central earthen floor corridor) to instead directly lead to the back of the store where a small, enclosed courtyard area (tsuboniwa) is found at the rear. By opening up the interior it created a new navigation of space, and with the tori-niwa’s new pathway and position found between the store’s front entrance and rear courtyard, it created a key focus and natural channel to guide customers toward the pivotal central sink area of the store. A continuous shelving system also aimed to attract customers, made from specially-coated steel. With design and construction realised over a period of nine months, the site is not only an example of a sustainable approach to contemporary store design, but integral to the retainment of the area’s cultural history and preservation that faces extinction. CASE-REAL casereal.com/en Aēsop Kanazawa Case Real storage Aēsop Kanazawa Case Real sitting room We think you might also like Aēsop Singapore by MLKK Studioabc
Architecture
Homes
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A North Melbourne Terrace Tells A Boom Style Story

The story of this house begins in “Marvellous Melbourne” in the late 1800s when the big, cosmopolitan city (by world standards) was fuelled by the prosperity of the gold rush and an influx of migration. With this boom in wealth and people emerged an architectural style unique to the place and era. Aptly named the Boom Style, Victorian terraces became ornately detailed and highly picturesque with English and Italian architectural influences. This A1 heritage-listed Victorian terrace was built in the Boom Style and its exterior remained virtually unaltered. Matt Gibson Architecture + Design (MGA+D) updated the house for a family of five, bringing in natural light and ventilation, repurposing rooms and adding new living space where planning and heritage guidelines allowed. “We wanted to ensure the original fabric remained true to its time and told a story of its past,” says Matt Gibson, “and that new work was born from this story, bringing the home into the current day so that the story could be told for years to come.” North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell second level view North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell open plan dining In keeping with Victorian-era tradition, the drawing room at the front of the house observes the “best room in the house” edict with dark walls accentuating the height and detail of the ornate plaster mouldings. The hallway has been restored with exposed original brickwork and a curving timber balustrade. White lacquered cabinet doors extend from the staircase through to the new addition, mediating the transition between old and new. The two-storey rear extension accommodates the kitchen, dining and living area downstairs and children’s bedrooms upstairs. “As part of our heritage investigation, we catalogued and researched the history of this house, but also the evolution and iconography of building fabric and forms in the neighbourhood,” Matt explains. The lower volume is open and transparent, “like an undercroft that brings the landscape inside,” says Matt. The upper volume is a contemporary interpretation of the neighbour. “It reads as one simplified form with a brick-clad roof, no fascia, mouldings or gutters,” Matt says. Expressed steel and hit-and-miss brickwork provide privacy, depth and interest. North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell dining area North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell kitchen and dining Setbacks allow for gardens around the living space, and curvatures in the ceiling allow light and ventilation to filter deeper inside. Oiled local Australian timbers and burnished concrete floors define interior and exterior spaces, while varying levels differentiate functions and modify ceiling heights: lower over the kitchen and dining for a sense of intimacy, and higher over the living area as it flows to the garden. MGA+D reused bricks from the original building so that the new house emerges from the old and continues to tell its story. The brick wall provides a backdrop to the dining table, which sits beneath a carved-out void in the ceiling. This brings in daylight and connects to the hallway above, with pendant lights suspended through the void accentuating the verticality. North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell kitchen island North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell open plan Across the room, a black joinery wall and timber-lined ceiling stretch the length of the kitchen and living area, and furnishing, lighting and art is inspired by a recent Danish trip. “This house is about the finer detail and craft. A home where the narrative envelops you, where one element is not complete without the other and a story of the past is adapted for the future,” Matt says. Matt Gibson Architecture + Design mattgibson.com.au Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissection Information Toss B white pendant lights from Hub Furniture Borge Mogensen leather chairs Arne Jacobsen Mayor Velvet sofa Kerry Armstrong Bird on a Wire painting Muuto ‘Under the Bell’ felt pendant from Living Edge North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell outdoor living North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell staircase North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell indoor living North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell chair North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell hallway North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell brickwork North Melbourne Terrace Matt Gibson Architecture + Design cc Derek Swalwell outdoor We think you might also like Halo House by Breathe Architectureabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Celebrating The New Gessi 316 Tapware Collection At Abey

In Melbourne’s Abey Showroom, Gessi unveiled the all-new Gessi 316 tapware and mixer range. The uniquely woven designs are available in four bespoke brushed-steel colour selections, and are the first of their kind for steel manufacturing in kitchen and bathroom accessories. The Gessi 316 range is a beautiful expression of Gessi's style, creativity, and technology, and the party celebrating the collection’s launch was suitably attended by some of design’s best and brightest, as well as Gessi, Abey and e&s staff. The collection comprising the styles… Trame – inspired by high-end jewellery, this design features a spiral drawing pattern that is timeless and contemporary Intreccio – a sophisticated woven texture that is graceful but strong, rich and distinctive, this design is a combination of traditional and modern architecture Meccanica – a classic look reimagined with an accentuated and bold pattern creating an industrial chic feel that is rich and captivating Cesello – sophisticated industrial glamour created by a refined and discreet punctured texture Flessa – a smooth, minimal design that lets the iconic round shape and metal speak for itself [gallery columns="4" ids="80732,80733,80734,80735"] Available in four finishes – steel, warm steel, copper and black metal – the Gessi 316 collection is exclusively available via Victorian specialist kitchen, bathroom and laundry retailer e&s. With catering by Melbourne favourite Neptune Food & Wine, the evening was a brilliant success and a wonderful showcase of the finer side of kitchenware design. [gallery columns="4" ids="80736,80737,80738,80739,80740,80741,80742,80743,80744,80745,80746,80747,80748,80749,80750,80751,80752,80753,80754,80755,80756,80757,80758,80759,80760,80761,80762,80763,80764,80765,80766,80767,80768,80769,80770,80771,80772,80773,80774,80775,80776,80777,80778,80779"] e&s eands.com.auabc
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Furniture

Swedish Design Down Under From Cube + Circle

Sharing the same values of fine craftsmanship and respect towards the natural environment, the Cube + Circle team consistently present high-quality products that are always made with Mother Nature in mind. Every piece is created with strong attention to detail so that the design is able to come to life exactly how it was imagined. Their focus to promote the value of highly sustainable furniture is shown in the products offered. Swedese and Cuero Design create furniture that not only looks timeless but also lasts through numerous eras of design. As a popular philosophy in Sweden, the furniture is made to remain both functional and beautiful for generations to come. Much of the collection has also achieved the honourable Nordic Swan Ecolabel: a classification made to identify and promote the best environmentally friendly goods and services. Requirements for the Nordic Swan Ecolabel are strict and set to a high standard that involves the entire life cycle of a product. From beginning to end, the products from these companies are made with respect to the Earth that surrounds us. Fine craftsmanship is displayed in every detail of the products from Swedese and Cuero Design. Whether it’s leather, wood, or metal, the core of the collection rests in each material’s high quality and ability to withstand limitless use. The Spin Stool is an example of the quality of furniture supplied by Swedese and the epitome of incredible craftsmanship. As the winner of the Carpenter’s Challenge, the spin stool is known for its design that seems too complex to be produced. The furniture available through Cube + Circle can always be trusted to have been manufactured with intense artistry and precision. Their newly opened showroom features many of the Swedish made pieces, including the Button Sofa which was named the 2017 Furniture of the Year by Stockholm Furniture and Light Fair. A number of products from both Swedese and Cuero Design are available to be seen in person at the showroom, with virtually every product possessing the ability to be customised. The Cube + Circle showroom is located in Sydney at the Waterloo Design Centre and is open Monday to Friday 10 am to 5 pm, and Saturday 10 am to 3 pm.

Guest Writer: Somethea Ma

Cube + Circle cubencircle.com.au abc
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Were You There For The Launch Of Habitus House Of The Year?

Habitus House of the Year is a celebration through our various channels (digital, print, and social media) of the outstanding work in the architecture and design community that is coming out of Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. Ten years ago when Habitus was first established our mission was to communicate to the rest of the world that the Indo Pacific is not a corner of the world that follows suit: we have a distinct way of life; we live in a distinct environment; we interact with design in distinct ways; and we have distinct design preferences. Whilst we whole-heartedly appreciate the amazing work of our European and American counterparts, we have established a Regionally specific approach to design. A decade later, and our mission hasn’t wavered. So each year Habitus House of the Year will select and showcase 25 of the most outstanding, innovative and compelling examples of what it means to live through design in the Indo Pacific. To celebrate the launch of this exciting new annual initiative, Tongue N Groove hosted Habitus, our guests, and a stunning installation by The Hourglass for an evening of rich architectural discussion and appreciation. Habitus House of the Year We value your educated opinion, too! Vote for the People’s Choice Award here!   We’d like to all our wonderful sponsors who have joined us on this journey including our Major Sponsors StylecraftHOME, Sub Zero Wolf and Zip Water. [gallery columns="5" ids="80711,80710,80709,80708,80707,80706,80705,80704,80703,80701,80700,80699,80698,80696,80695,80694,80693,80692,80691,80690,80689,80688,80687,80686,80685,80684,80683,80682,80681,80680,80679,80678,80677,80676,80675,80674,80673,80672,80671,80670,80669,80668,80667,80666,80665,80664,80663,80662,80661,80660,80659,80658,80657,80656,80655,80654,80653,80652,80651,80650,80649,80648,80647,80646,80645,80644,80643,80642,80641,80640,80639,80638,80637,80636,80635,80634,80633,80632,80631,80630,80629,80628,80627,80625,80624,80623,80622,80621,80620,80619,80618,80617,80616,80615,80614,80613,80612,80611,80610,80609,80608,80607,80606,80605,80604,80602,80600,80599,80597,80596,80595,80594,80593,80592,80591,80590,80589,80588,80586,80585,80584,80582,80581,80580,80579,80578,80577,80575,80574,80573,80572"]abc
Design Hunters
Conversations

Design, Beauty And Passion – Habitus Chats With Maximilian Büsser Of MB&F

In founding MB&F, you’re able to work for yourself – was this always an aspiration? Yes, definitely. That was the dream. I created my company as a life decision. The whole reason can boil down to trying to be proud of myself on the last day of my life. To look back and say, you did well; and to be happy. I was extremely lucky to fall into watchmaking a long time ago. My first job in watchmaking was virtually dead; there was no mechanical watchmaking. After seven years at Jaeger-LaCoultre I was headhunted at 31 by Harry Winston – to become the Managing Director, which was the worst day of my life. How do you mean? So it should've been the most beautiful day of my professional life. What I had no idea was that Harry Winston Timepieces was virtually bankrupt. And everything in the company was wrong; I mean like often there's two or three things wrong? Every cupboard, every drawer you'd open would blow up in your face. So I jumped on a plane the first week and went to head office in New York to meet the man who hired me. I told him “This is wrong, this is wrong, this is wrong! It's a nightmare, we can't even pay the salaries" And they looked at me and said "You know what? It's your nightmare. "Because we've got so many other things to deal with. Now, you wanted the job, you got the job, deal with it. And anyway if you don't we'll just bankrupt the company," meaning that the watch division. Right in the deep end from the first week! I just thought I'd done the biggest error of my life. I worked, 12 to 18 months nonstop… it's like the proverbial 18 hours day. I always had a pad and a pencil on my bedside table and wake up in the middle of those five hours of sleep going because I'd dream about working, "Oh we have to do that; we have to do that." It was horrible. How were you able to turn it around? What things did you audit and look at and change? That's a whole interview in itself! I think the first of all was trying to give a purpose to the company. These watches being made from the greatest greatest jeweller in the world at that time, and nobody actually wanted that division… nobody wanted those products. So first of all it was give it a purpose. I remember seeing the owner Mr. Winston saying, "look, you're the greatest jeweller in the world, you need your watches to be at the same level." But, we were not a manufacturer, we didn’t have 200 years of history, and we didn’t create our own movements ourselves. We had none of the legitimacy you would expect of a luxury watchmaker, so we needed to create products that were as incredible as the jewellery; which means working and collaborate with great people That was the first step that then led to a line called the Opus range at Harry Winston, which was about rare timepieces, equally rare mechanics, and rare diamonds. The rare diamonds was easy – I was from Harry Winston diamonds after all. The rare mechanical movement was another cup of tea. So that's when I sat down and started meeting all these independent, unknown watchmakers who were actually working as creators for other brands who never acknowledged them and I started discovering these incredible people who had all the ideas. This is where the collaboration began? This was the beginning of that, and then basically we had to do everything. We were eight people, seven employees and me, and everybody wanted to leave the company! Seven years later we’d gone from eight to 80 employees, eight to 80 million dollars. And I have never done anything like that, so I was discovering things. I was discovering that I was capable of being a CEO, doing that sort of job and having the ideas and hiring the right people. As the company was growing though, the more I understood that I hated the job. It was very weird, because when you come from where I come from, you're not allowed to hate that job. I was the poster boy of my generation. I was this young CEO who turned the company around, I had my face in newspapers and the money was rolling in. And I was feeling guilty. For not enjoying the work? When everybody wanted my job and I was feeling like I didn’t enjoy it, I just felt ungrateful basically. I was a very creative kid and I'd felt as if I’d basically sold out. I’d become a marketeer – creating products simply because that's what the market wants. You do what you need to build a business, but as a creator I realised that's one of the things I hated. Is this what led to MB&F? I realised that I could completely not accept where I was. And that's why when I created the brand, I called it MB&F, Maximilian Büsser and Friends… it’s funny, everybody told me it's the worst name! I mean, our first piece was $200k, and people were like "'and Friends?'" Seriously? What would you say is the sort of core DNA of MB&F? One of the very important facts is thinking creatively what do we do? What we try to achieve is that I've always thought watchmaking was art, and everybody talks about the art of watchmaking, but then why are 99.9% of all watches more or less the same? The whole point of art is to go and explore the territories. So my point was, for me it's a mechanical sculpture. Giving time is not the point. Not after the quartz revolution. So I deconstruct traditional watchmaking and reconstruct it into a kinetic piece of art which ‘oh by the way’ gives you the time. As it's art, there's always a story – and not a fake story, not like "Okay now we've created this boring product, let's do a storytelling exercise." It's a genuine expression; something I didn't realize at the beginning. When I MB&F started I had HM1, HM2, and a sketch of HM3… But it's basically all coming back to my childhood. When we launched the Aquapod, our diving watch, it was inspired by my wife getting stung by a jellyfish! On holiday we were all paranoid because there were jellyfish everywhere in the water, and so from there I just sort of imagined what would a mechanical jellyfish look like and transpose it into something you put on your wrist. So that's the first of our creations which doesn't stem from my childhood. I was an only child and very lonely. I was the weird one, the one who didn't fit in… Who dreamt of being popular and was absolutely not. So to escape that, my reality was my imaginary life. So creativity was your outlet? I was a superhero! When I was eight to ten years old, in my room in the afternoon I was Luke Skywalker; I was Han Solo; I was Captain Kirk! And today I've kept a big part of that in me. Now I’m over 50, I'm a pretty level headed person, but If there's one button which you should never press with me, it's when I feel somebody is doing something which is unfair. That superhero complex comes out. Who would you say are the people who wear your watches? Initially I didn't imagine anybody because I thought you'd be absolutely off your rockers to actually own one of mine! Then I've discovered over the years that our clients all over the world are more or less the same sort of people, which was really interesting. There is no uniformity of colour, race or religion – put them side-by-side and they absolutely don't look the same but in their minds they're the same people. They're often entrepreneurs, meaning they've got their own company. You need to be a little self-asserted to own one of my pieces, or to like what I do. You aren’t a follower; you don't want to be somebody like everybody else. They're people who're in touch with their own feelings, because the whole point of having one of our pieces is being part of a journey, of our journey at least! When I talk with our clients, 50% of the reason of buying one of my pieces is the MB&F journey. And 50% is the product itself, where they say, "Wow, this blows my mind, I know everybody's going to hate it, nobody will understand it but I want this piece." There is a big element of being sure of your taste, which means all sorts of different things; in design, in architecture, in life. You limit the number of MB&F watches you produce regardless of demand, how did this approach come about? Well there are many reasons. The first one is because I want to keep my company small. What we've managed to do is have zero middle management. That was one of the main reasons. As my company will not grow, what keeps me up at night today is mostly how do I keep these great people in my team. Not growing has enabled me in the last four years, to grow awareness of the brand organically. We have no advertising budget, it's all word of mouth and when you do 20 pieces a month for the whole world, there is no way even if we had any money for advertising people would even see it, so it's all word of mouth. And so, we end up having more and more awareness, the demand is higher every year, but we don't grow. In terms of retailers, what do you like about The Hour Glass (an exclusive MB&F distributor) and how do you feel that's a good sort of relationship? I only have 25 retailers in the world, and The Hour Glass was one of the six at the very beginning. At the start, I put all my money into the company, and lived without salary for two years, working from my little flat and I very quickly realized there's no way this is going to take off. So after three months I went around the world for three weeks, and I went to see all the retailers I knew well from my Harry Winston days, with a drawing of the first piece, and my whole concept of horological machines. I was trying to get orders, knowing I would deliver two years later. But more importantly, I was trying to find anybody who's nuts enough to partner up with me. I don’t think MB&F will ever leave The Hour Glass. What about MB&F’s Australian presence? The Hour Glass here was moving far less than in Singapore. It was two or three a year compared to 50 to 60. So at the beginning of this year we sat down with the whole team and said "Okay, let's really give it a try." And so we're now offering a much bigger assortment to see if they can actually make it take off. I know my watches are unique and not for everyone, but it’s like with people – beauty fades, intelligence doesn't. At end of the day, do you want to be with somebody who's beautiful but there's nothing behind it? Or would you rather be with someone who’s got incredible depth. I know where I would stand. MB&F mbandf.com The Hour Glass thehourglass.comabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Technology Collides With Appliances In Siemens’ iQ700 studioLine Range

Is it possible to have appliances with high-quality, minimalist design while being packed with leading technology? That is exactly what Siemens has set out to achieve with its latest range of products – iQ700 studioLine. The range will appeal to those with a design eye, as its sleek style will integrate seamlessly into the slickest of kitchens. But more than just good looks, each of the new appliances in the range feature unique automation and intelligent cooking technologies. Proving the outstanding quality and functionality of the Siemens studioLine range is the fact that it was recently awarded an iF Design Award 2018. So what is the new technology exactly? One new feature is the varioSpeed, which makes the iQ700 studioLine ovens with integrated microwave a truly flexible time management tool. This works by activating the microwave alongside hot-air cooking, speeding up the cooking time by up to 50 per cent, all without losing any of the flavour or nutrients. Another outstanding feature is the coolStart function. With this, you can simply place frozen food or meals straight into the oven and coolStart will condense the whole process into a single cooking session. Other functions include a full mix of pre-loaded cooking type options, which allows the oven to automatically optimise the heat for the best results possible, while sensor technology controls the baking process by monitoring moisture levels in the oven. Add into the mix the latest in pyrolytic self-cleaning and the Siemens iQ700 studioLine range is an inspiring and innovative option for the kitchen. Siemens siemens.com/au abc
Architecture
Homes
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Biologic Science Is The Best Designer Living

Have you ever heard of the ‘Halo Effect’? A biological term, the Halo Effect describes the fertile ecosystems that surround the icebergs in the Southern Antarctic Ocean. What has this got to do with design you might ask? For Melbourne-based design studio Breathe Architecture and their clients – everything. The Halo Effect was the driving concept for the design of this new residence in Melbourne’s Glen Iris, where the primary brief was to better serve the wellbeing of a large family: mum, dad and four school-aged kids. “The Halo Effect is a natural phenomenon whereby melting icebergs act as physical refuge for aquatic organisms while simultaneously releasing nutrients into their surroundings and generating a ‘halo’ of energetic life. In an analogous way, Halo House acts as a provider for its inhabitants, granting a young family with a sanctum in which to grow and thrive,” says Jeremy McLeod of Breathe Architecture. What tends to happen with some of these crazy and lofty inspirations is that they get the design process going; starting the proverbial fire. However, Halo House has remained very loyal, both aesthetically and conceptually, to the iceberg analogy. Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape exterior “The clients are a young and energetic family of six. The four kids range in age from 4-13 and are all active in sports, acting and after school activities,” notes Jeremy. “The family prioritises a healthy lifestyle and quality family time. With four busy kids, storage, organisation and functionality was a priority for this family. They needed a house that was easy to keep clean, and could handle the waves of after-school and weekend activity.” Some of the design responses are based on pure utility, such as the big kitchen with two fridges and two ovens, as well as a first floor laundry with two washing machines (all powered by solar) to help the family run smoothly and efficiently. This home is one that provides nourishment and support from the outside in. The exterior for example, is constructed from recycled, locally-manufactured bricks. The façade is dramatic but also mysterious, faceless, presenting white-painted brick and pine battens and with no visible openings, giving off that super cool, floating iceberg vibe. The theme continues inside, and though prescribing to an icy-ecosystem, the interior is anything but. The aim is to make the interior as warm and cosy as possible. Here, Breathe has cleverly played with white surfaces and pale timber joinery to give the space a light and airy feel while still adhering to the nordic style of the architecture. Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape kitchen In terms of ‘feeding nutrients’ to the family à la the Halo, the house is littered with design systems that enhance the lives of the residents. On the ground floor for example, is an entry hall with an individual locker for each family member, an open-plan living/dining space that looks out to the northern garden through timber-battened shutters, and an almost-commercial-sized kitchen. On the southern side of the house, tucked in behind the double garage, is a fully fitted-out gym for the family’s personal training business. The gym can be accessed from a separate entry down the side of the dwelling and shares a powder room with the residence. “A large stairway climbs up through the central void, with a woven-wire-mesh balustrade providing visual and acoustic connection between the levels. Operable clerestory windows bring in natural light, creating the impression of a halo above the stairs. When opened, they create a chimney effect for expelling warm air at night,” says Jeremy. Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape study space The first floor is given over to sleeping quarters, which, considering the number of people to be accommodated, required a clear design rationale for maximum efficiency. With so many places for the kids to play and do homework – the open-plan ground floor, the large backyard and side courtyard, even the gym – their bedrooms didn’t need to be huge. Arranged around the airy, white-and-blonde-timber stairway and with discreet garden outlooks, they feel anything but cramped. The main bedroom is larger, of course, and enjoys a view down the street thanks to that concealed front window, while the main bathroom also provides views over rooftops and street trees, through a panoramic window. One final flight of stairs leads up to a loft storeroom that can double as guest quarters for extended family. And therein lies the crux of this project: between the shared downstairs living space, the central public avenue of the stairway and the bedrooms clustered together on the first floor, this is very much a house designed to bring family together, where kids and parents are near each other for companionship and support, and where their private ecosystem is fed and nurtured. Not a bad template for well-designed living. Breathe Architecture breathe.com.au Photography by Dianna Snape Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape wire mesh staircase Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape lounge Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape bedroom Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape bathroom Halo House Breathe Architecture cc Dianna Snape deck We think you might also like Frame House by Red Bean Architectsabc
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Australian Architecture At Its Finest In The Maleny House

This sight of contemporary architectural masterpiece of the Maleny House is one that impresses those discerning few with eyes for sincere architectural expertise. Its quality, craftsmanship and the attention to detail paid by Bark Architects. For the award-winning Bark Design Architects, the brief was simple. Their expatriate Australian clients yearned for wide-open spaces, an abundance of natural light and environmental sustainability. The result is iconic. Frank Lloyd Wright’s once famous quote reads, “No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It should be 'of' the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together each the happier for the other”. Delivering on this approach to design, Maleny House celebrates its site on the Sunshine Coast, with minimal impact on its local environment and taking advantage of the breathtaking views of the Glass House Mountains National Park, Brisbane and the ocean beyond. Finished in walls of toughened glass, the indoor spaces of the house are as impressive as the outside – absorbing the outdoor surrounding landscape and inviting the site of nature into view. The meticulously landscaped garden surrounds continue the worship of the designed form enriching the natural surrounding landscape with a flourish of Japanese tradition. The house’s interior space has been designed to service privacy, functionality, and the need to collaborate and entertaining. The main level for example offers a seamless connection between indoor and outdoor – offering not only an invitation to nature, but a seamless entertain space, framed by an expansive living room and fireplace below spacious 5 meter ceilings. The 1st level master bedroom again sees panoramic views alongside walk-in wardrobe and large ensuite it. A glass walkway to separate the master leads to the family room and two further bedrooms The Maleny House is everything right about our special place in the global architecture community. This is a design that responds to its locale and channels it into beauty and function. Currently on the market and seeking a lucky new owner, the Maleny House currently being marketed by Villa Prestige Properties.abc