About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Five Ways With Concrete

Tamarama House, Durback Block Jaggers

This five-level home on Sydney’s Tamarama Beach is a sculptural masterpiece and exquisite study in materiality. The architects have used concrete in all its many versions, from smooth as glass to rough like stone, to create a complex structure of impressive statue that’s surprisingly light on its feet. Not surprisingly, it was awarded the Australian Institute of Architects’ 2017 Robin Boyd Award for Residential Architecture, in part for the expert realisation of its carved concrete forms, which exhibit the highest level of craftsmanship, artisanal skill and nuanced detailing. [gallery size="large" ids="83573,83577,83576,83578,83574,83575"] Photography by Brett Boardman and Andrew Cowan durbachblockjaggers.com    

PR House, Architects Ink

Architects Ink’s PR House is a modernist-style beauty in the heart of Port Elliot, a favourite South Australian beachside town. The two-storey getaway is simple in plan and minimalist in its materiality: predominantly comprising a timber, timber-boarded concrete and glass palette. However, it’s the concrete that gives the home its most compelling design expression, with the architects using it for the interior’s feature walls and most impressively as cladding on the exterior. The end result displays the skill inherent in executing this finish well and also exemplifies the architects’ attention to detail in delivering a beach house that’s stylish yet thoroughly lacking in pretention. [gallery size="large" ids="83572,83567,83568,83571,83569,83566"] Photography by Sam Noonan architectsink.com    

Torquay Concrete House, Auhaus

The architects have treated Torquay Concrete House as a walled sanctuary, with the plan wrapping around a central courtyard. Concrete and natural hardwood are the predominant materials and they balance each other perfectly to create interiors that are raw and minimalist yet warm and inviting. The light grey of the concrete is especially pleasing against the timber’s caramel tones and the views looking inside from the courtyard present everything in the best possible light (quite literally). While the materials’ inherent qualities give the home its character, it’s the brass plug finish (rather than the usual dab of render) on the concrete slabs that best expresses the architects’ sense of high-end style and careful attention to detail. [gallery size="large" ids="83589,83588,83587,83583,83584"] Photography by Derek Swalwell auhaus.com.au    

The Nest, Shaun Lockyer Architects

A palette of sandblasted concrete, timber and stone lends this Brisbane home timeless appeal, not to mention a robust framework for inner-city living. The overall design has a strong verticality intersected with lightweight horizontal planes, as well as plenty of full-height glass doors that blur the line between inside and outside when open. In sandblasting the concrete walls, the architects have introduced a highly textural element to the design; one that plays off the lines and angles of the architecture and creates an element of visual interest through patterning that is truly unique. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="83581,83580,83579,83582"] Photography by Cathy Schusler lockyerarchitects.com.au    

Toorak Residence, Architecton

Architecton’s four-bedroom Toorak Residence is all about expansive interiors that let the outside in and vice versa. The effect is completely luxurious, although there’s a sense of calm that pervades the living areas, due in no small part to an organically coloured material palette. White marble flooring and pale joinery create a neutral backdrop for the stylish furniture and lighting, while the off-form concrete ceiling imprinted with the grain of American Oregon timber adds a decorative element without distracting from the visual seamlessness of the overall scheme. This timber-boarded concrete is also used on the exterior, creating just the right amount of impact within Toorak’s pleasantly bright and leafy suburban context. [gallery size="medium" ids="83564,83561,83562,83563,83560"] Photography by Jack Lovel architecton.com.au   We think you might also like Creating A Statement Bathroomabc
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Celebrating PGH Bricks’ New Luxury Range

The new range of PGH Bricks, the Lang Mursten collection, deserved an appropriate celebration. The collection of extra-long format, water-struck clay bricks, exclusively imported from Denmark, was launched at an exclusive designer party event at Sydney’s Tesla showroom. Attended by a veritable ‘who’s who’ of Sydney’s architecture and design industry, the launch party for the unusually designed bricks was mirrored in its theme – anything but ordinary. Guests were treated to an extraordinary Tesla experience before being enticed by delicious Danish-inspired canapés and a six course degustation tasting menu with paired wines, especially curated by superstar chef Nelly Robinson of nel. Restaurant. In addition to a presentation by Tesla about electric vehicles and the future of driverless cars, Ms Rikke Scheel Gamborg, the Deputy Consul General and Trade Commissioner at Royal Danish Consulate General/Trade Council Denmark, spoke about Australia and the nation’s love of Danish design before the reveal of the Lang Mursten range. “The Lang Mursten collection of Danish long format bricks is our most luxurious brick range yet,” says Jai Sanderson, General Manager Marketing for PGH Bricks & Pavers at CSR Ltd, “Our team went beyond our shores to search globally for something that not only met the highest pinnacle of quality, but also stood out as something uniquely different. “We are absolutely thrilled to launch this new brick that is not only elongated and exceptionally elegant to design and build with, but delivers breathtaking colour and texture from the bespoke water-struck method of manufacture, creating an organically raw surface finish.” We raise a glass to the PGH Bricks team and toast to their successful launch of an exciting new development in brick ware. The Lang Mursten collection will be available in Australia exclusively through PGH Bricks from Wednesday December 5. [gallery columns="4" ids="83497,83498,83499,83500,83501,83503,83504,83505,83506,83507,83508,83509,83510,83511,83512,83513,83514,83515,83516,83517,83496,83518,83519"]abc
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Wes Anderson’s Latest Pursuit Isn’t Cinema – But It Sure Is Cinematic

In the heart of Vienna, opposite the Opera House, resides Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna: an art museum charactised by an octagonal dome and palatial surrounds. Inside, however, a new exhibition marries traditional with contemporary. Texan-born director Wes Anderson, known and celebrated for his highly stylised films and quirky plots, has collaborated with the Beirut-born set, costume and fashion designer and recent novelist Juman Malouf. Since 2012, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna has been inviting globally respected creative individuals to curate their own personal selections of objects drawn from the museum’s historical collections. Collections that exceed four million objects and span a period of five thousand years. Opened on the 6th November, Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures, marked the 2019 iteration of this initiative, Wes Anderson and Juman Malouf’s curation. Within the exhibition are Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities, Old Master paintings, selections from the Kunstkammer and the Imperial Treasury, items from the Imperial Armoury, Coin Collection, and Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, as well as pieces from the Theatermuseum, the Weltmuseum, the Imperial Carriage Museum, and Schloss Ambras Innsbruck. Kvadrat has supported the exhibition with 500 meter of Divina 3 textile in a selection of colours which upholster the walls in the different areas of the exhibition space. Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna www.khm.at/en All photography © KHM-Museumsverband 
Portrait above and in hero by Rafaela Proell. © KHM-Museumsverband 
We think you might also like The Budapest Cafe by Biasolabc
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Tapping Into Design With Sussex

The Sussex designers create taps using rigorous methods that have been pioneered and refined again and again over the course of two decades. The six phases of the design and manufacturing process are conducted with the closest care and attention. Which is acutely expressed in the fact that the team has a Melbourne workshop, allowing them to carry out all the crafting and finessing on site. As the only Australian tap maker with its own foundry, Sussex can melt and recycle precious brass shavings left over from daily machining operations. This sustainable practice has rightly earned the team praise and awards from the industry, but all that aside – the design of these taps is a thing to behold.  

Scala

The Scala range is a true Australian icon, inspired by the easy-going nature of the Australian lifestyle. With clean, elegant lines and industrial cues, Scala reflects the essence of our contemporary surroundings. [gallery ids="82911,82912,82913"]

 

Suba

The Suba collection celebrates contemporary Australia’s love affair with minimalist design. Inspired by the bold shapes of 20th century modernism, this collection brings a sense of strength and balance to any setting. Understatement can be powerful and Suba’s restrained subtlety creates a striking effect. [gallery columns="2" ids="82914,82915"]

Circa

There is no purer geometric form than the circle. The Circa collection draws upon this elemental shape to deliver timeless design, crafted to perfection in Sussex’s Melbourne workshop. Elegant and brilliant, Circa is an inspired contemporary creation. [gallery ids="82916,82917,82918"]

Calibre

Inspired by European artistic practices, the Calibre collection was born from an appreciation of architecture and urban design. The vision for its unique and innovative lines has been realised in a flawless union of form and function. [gallery ids="82919,82920,82921"]

Monsoon

The Monsoon shower head seeks to capture the invigorating sensuality of an open-air bathroom in the tropics. Its rich cascade will elicit a tingling wave of pleasure as it washes over you. Yet crafted from the finest steel possible, the Monsoon has a reassuring solidness. [gallery ids="82922,82923,82924"]   Sussex sussextaps.com.auabc
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A Contemporary Overlap By Studio Ardete

The notion of universal design revolves around making living spaces equally comfortable, safe and accessible for everyone regardless of height, age or physical ability. For an elderly couple that values time with their family and friends, Studio Artede brings a contemporary aesthetic to a busy sectoral road of Panchkula, India. To contrast the bustling and congested road right outside the residence, the studio utilised the courtyard and pool as principle elements of design. Individual masses define the façade, a demarcation that gives occupants a full view of trees along the road while limiting prying eyes from the street. Differing from standard architectural concepts that often stem only from the occupant's personalities, Pool Yard House is informed by the region’s extreme climate conditions, the desire to add greenery within an urban area and the need to create a space for the elderly couple to host and entertain their family and friends. Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj open living area and water feature Lending the project its name and character by fusing the courtyard and pool as a focal point to define the rest of the spaces within the home, the glass-fronted pool appears to be floating within the courtyard of a tropical retreat. Along the same approach, the transparency of interior spaces enhances visual connectivity between the rooms, the outdoor living areas and the pool. With glass walls, evident inside and out, Pool Yard House is dramatic in design as it visually expands the living space. The main staircase that connects the courtyard to all living spaces has a dark grey vertical screen feature behind it to seamlessly break the monotonous mass of the interior. Adding some lightness to the space, rectangular voids are cleverly placed – both figuratively and literally. So when natural light filters through these voids and the double-height courtyard, the home is awash with daylight, clarity and transparency. In a similar manner, the highly reflective windows add a sculptural feature to the entire home. Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj living area and view Additionally, cantilevered roofs reinforce the connection between the exterior and interior, while the colour palette – which includes wood and stone for – not only contrasts subtly with bold lighting features and colourful artwork, but is also a refreshing visual escape from the city and its roads. Studio Ardete studioardete.com Photography by Purnesh Dev Nikhani Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj hallway and lighting features Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj indoor dining area exterior courtyard Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj stair case floating pool and central courtyard Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj central pool bedroom view Pool Yard House Studio Ardete CC Purdesh Dev Nikhanj pool lounge We also think you might like this Courtyard House in Singapore by Hyla Architects. abc
Architecture
Places

Inspirational And Influential Design By The Stella Collective

At 55 square metres, Naim is a small Middle Eastern café in Brisbane, but its cultural impact is hoped to be far bigger than its diminutive size. The owners engaged Hana Hakim, founder of The Stella Collective, to design the café, as they both share Syrian heritage. “Food and design to me are the greatest cultural bridges,” says Hana. “I wanted to create a space that gives a peek into Syrian and Islamic architecture, and to bring a very special message about Syria into the light.” The brief was to celebrate Middle Eastern design with a modern take. Hana drew inspiration from cherished memories with her family in Aleppo, Syria, remembering the ancient city’s internal courtyards, bountiful oasis, elaborate geometric tiling and hole-in-the-wall tea houses. Niam The Stella Collective CC Sean Fennessy tile and greenery detail “This concept was very personal to me. Aleppo was so beautiful and one of the places left in the world where the spirit and generosity of the people were truly arresting,” Hana explains. “Naim is designed with love for Syria. It is an interior tinged with nostalgia and hope.” All elements fit neatly within the small footprint of the café to maximise natural light and space. The serving area is just wide enough for benchtop display and food storage, and to allow space for banquette seating along the opposite wall and next to the windows. The light-coloured palette also enhances and reflects natural light. “The palette was derived through soft texture and symmetry, which are the backbone of Syrian architecture,” says Hana. Niam The Stella Collective CC Sean Fennessy cafe seating detail Custom tiles with refined geometric patterning are a modern interpretation of arabesque tiles. The traditional geometric designs combine repeated squares and circles in intricate and complex patterns, which Hana has pared back into a subtle, randomised display. Tadelakt, a plaster technique, meaning to “rub in” in Berber, brings a sense of depth and texture to the walls, as do the rattan backrests. And the green-tiled floor and plants evoke the bountiful oasis, while mirrors reflect natural light and blackened steel features contrast with the Tadelakt and tiles, adding definition. “The more the Western world gets to experience the Middle East’s food and culture, the more curious they will be about it and maybe they will start to raise questions about what is happening to people over there and how they can help.” The Stella Collective thestellacollective.co Photography by Sean Fennessy Niam The Stella Collective CC Sean Fennessy details brass and metal Niam The Stella Collective CC Sean Fennessy cafe counter tile detail We also think you might like Full Circle Café in Bali by X+Oabc
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Mardi Doherty Returns To Talk About Creating A Statement Bathroom

Leanne Amodeo: What makes a statement bathroom? Mardi Doherty: The positioning of the vanity and feature bath has a lot to do with creating drama within the bathroom. I also think tile selection and the incorporation of natural light are both paramount. The blue bathroom we renovated for Ivanhoe Residence, for example, originally had a window but because we reconfigured the vanity to be on that wall we had to get rid of it. So we needed to introduce a skylight to capture the natural light, which adds the most drama to that space. It was also the reason why we chose those particular tiles, which are a combination of gloss and matte finishes. We just knew that the light washing over their surface would create the most beautiful reflections. What is the first thing you consider when designing a client’s bathroom? Definitely the entry and what you see as soon as you enter the bathroom. We’ll sometimes even modify the entry or move the entry, depending on how things are working, for maximum impact. Natural light is also a strong consideration. Doherty Design Studio Kew Residences CC Derek Swalwell white bathroom statement mirror Doherty Design Studio Kew Residences CC Derek Swalwell mirror vanity details Doherty Design Studio Kew Residences CC Derek Swalwell double sink Doherty Design Studio Kew Residences CC Derek Swalwell sink
Kew Residence by Doherty Design Studio
Can you tell me a little bit about the concept behind the two bathrooms in Kew Residence? The clients’ son’s bathroom is fun and poppy and is based on a concept to do with sport because he loves soccer. So we looked at the soccer ball’s form and its stitching and these informed the mirror shape and tile pattern, respectively. In terms of colour palette, we used blue because it was a colour we hadn’t used in the rest of the house. In this case we created drama through a point of difference. On the other hand, the main bathroom has a quite sophisticated Art Deco feel to it; there’s a green onyx benchtop that wraps up to form the splashback, curved corners on the cabinetry and brass accents surrounding the mirror, as well as a bathtub designed by Patricia Urquiola. This space is a nod to the original 1930s home that previously occupied the site. How did you arrive at the different colour and material palettes for the other bathroom in Ivanhoe Residence? We used green in this bathroom as a way to visually connect with the clients’ incredible garden. And we also wanted to create a sophisticated, timeless design that has a shock element when you walk into the shower because the entire recess is lined with these beautiful green finger mosaic tiles. This is especially dramatic because it’s tucked behind a wall of marble and provides stark contrast to the rest of the bathroom. Doherty Design Studio Ivanhoe Residences CC Derek Swalwell bathroom Doherty Design Studio Ivanhoe Residences CC Derek Swalwell bath tub Doherty Design Studio Ivanhoe Residences CC Derek Swalwell shower and tiles Doherty Design Studio Ivanhoe Residences CC Derek Swalwell blue bathroom statement
Ivanhoe Residence by Doherty Design Studio
Are there more challenges involved in designing a statement bathroom or kitchen? I think there are more challenges involved in designing a bathroom; it’s often a lot smaller, there are lots of plumbing points and quite often there are window restrictions. Clients also mostly want privacy in the bathroom, whereas the kitchen is on show. With a kitchen, there are more opportunities to use different materials and sculptural elements, which makes it easier to achieve a dynamic outcome. What new trends will we be seeing in bathroom design? We’ll be seeing more bold colours as well as different tile combinations. In the past, there’d be one type of tile used on the floor and another on the wall, but now the trend is moving towards mixing things up by increasing the number of different tile finishes within the one space. Doherty Design Studio dohertydesignstudio.com.au Architecture photography by Derek Swalwell We think you might also like Top 4 Bathrooms from Habitus House of the Yearabc
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Announcing The Winner Of The Ultimate Design Hunter Package!

An initiative that was established to celebrate a decade of Habitus, Habitus House of the Year honours exceptional residential architecture and design completed across the Indo Pacific Region within the past 18 months. While our esteemed panel decided on a number of awards, we also opened the voting up to the Habitus public for the People's Choice Award, and we're thrilled to congratulate Victoria's Yixing Jiang on their win! For helping us celebrate the outstanding residential architecture of our Region, Yixing is taking home an ultimate design hunter package with $30,000 worth of prizes from our partners at Ajar, Fanuli, Lump, StylecraftHOME, Sub Zero Wolf, The Hour Glass, Tide Design, Top 3, Totem Road, and Tsar Carpets Yixing's vote was for New Zealand's 399 House by Strachan Group Architects. This warm and sunny home was designed by architect Dave Strachan for his family, and sits on a busy suburban street and turns up some ingenious privacy and sound solutions. The design was a conscious exercise to intensify in a low-density, suburban site; to build a bridge between the old New Zealand dream and today’s reality by showing how we can live closer together well. Its second story is climate-responsive design, something Strachan Group Architects is renowned for.   Ultimately, however, it was D House by ARO Studio in Vietnam that took out the People's Choice. Nonetheless a great choice deserving of a great prize, we thank all who voted in the 2018 House of the Year People's Choice Award, and again congratulate Yixing Jiang on their vote and $30,000 prize package. We'll see you next year! See the full list of winners here.abc
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The Long-Awaited Habitus House Of The Year Cocktail Event

On Thursday 16th November, with a Cocktail Event hosted at the inimitable StylecraftHOME showroom in Melbourne recently renovated by HASSELL, the inaugural Habitus House of the Year initiative drew to close. In a room full of architects, designers, contributors, collaborators and friends, editor Holly Cunneen announced the independent jury’s selection of outstanding residential projects accompanied by founding editor Paul McGillick. Taking the opportunity, then, to give attendees a little insight as to where Habitus House of the Year came from, we’d like to share those sentiments with everyone who couldn’t make it on the evening. Habitus House of the Year was the result of many discussions centred around how to celebrate the milestone that is Habitus’ 10th anniversary. Teasing out countless ideas and feeding off each others enthusiasm resulted in lots of exciting possibilities – but also the need to refine, to come back to the centre and ask ourselves: what is the habitus mission ? For now more than a decade, Habitus has been unwavering in its mission to seek out the very best in architecture and design from across the Indo-Pacific and communicate to our readership how it both serves and expresses the residents’ way of life. From there, it became obvious. What better way to celebrate the anniversary than to pull together a new, annual undertaking. This year, and each year that follows, Habitus has hand-selected 25 recently completed residential projects that we feel, exemplifies what it means to live through design in Australia, New Zealand and South-East Asia. The 25 houses we’ve selected for the 2018 initiative are our, Habitus Houses of the Year. You have all done an outstanding job. And according to Habitus, you have all won. But we thought we’d confer with some industry experts for a second opinion. And as such, we’d like to celebrate the projects that Howard Tanner, Consultant Architect; Karen McCartney, Architecture Editor / Author / Curator; Narelle Yabuka, Editor of Cubes, Indesignlive.sg, Indesignlive.hk and the Asia Co-Editor of Habitus; Neil Burley, Founder of Burley Katon Halliday and Anibou; Paul McGillick, Founding Editor of Habitus; and Raj Nandan, founder, Publisher and CEO of Indesign Media Asia Pacific have identified and separated.

HOUSE OF THE YEAR

Boneo House

John Wardle Architects

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR CONNECTION (Joint Winners)

Gibbon Street

Cavill Architects

&

Artists’ Retreat

Palinda Kannangara Architects

INTERIORS

St Vincents Place

B.E Architecture

ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE

Rabbit Residence

Boondesign, Attaporn Kobkongsanti (Landscape Design)

PEOPLE’S CHOICE

D House

ARO Studio

  On behalf of Raj Nandan, founder, CEO & Publisher of Indesign Media Asia Pacific, Habitus would like to thank everyone who worked on the initiative. We’d like to thank our judges Howard Tanner, Karen McCartney, Narelle Yabuka, Neil Burley, Paul McGillick, and Raj Nandan. We’d like to thank our collaborators for the Ultimate Design Hunter Package for their hand in making it a huge success: Ajar, Fanuli, Lump, StylecraftHOME, Sub Zero Wolf, The Hour Glass, Tide Design, Top 3, Totem Road, and Tsar Carpets. We’d like to thank our Major Sponsors StylecraftHOME, Sub Zero Wolf, and Zip for joining us on this journey. We’d like to thank Axolotl our Trophy Sponsor. And we’d like to especially thank Chelsea, Anthony, Tony and the team at StylecraftHOME who not only put together the beautiful cocktail event, but they were also kind enough to host us in Sydney for the Habitus House of the Year Judging Day. Photography by Elleni Toumpas See the full list of winners here. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="83212,83213,83214,83215,83216,83218,83219,83220,83221,83222,83223,83224,83225,83226,83227,83228,83229,83230,83231,83232,83233,83234,83235,83236,83237,83238,83239,83240,83241,83242,83243,83244,83245,83246,83247,83248,83249,83250,83251,83252,83253,83254,83255,83256,83257,83258,83259,83260,83261,83262,83263,83264,83265,83266,83267,83268,83269,8327"] abc
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A Modern Design Solution For A Sloped Site

From the outset Overton Terraces proves to be a standout suite of apartments – 11 to be exact – that has got people talking. Not only for the immediately obvious architecturally considered exterior façade, but also the expansive views of the Indian Ocean and Rottnest Island captured by the luxury apartments. But it wasn’t all glory, all the way through. “Having a slope of eight metres across the site presented both challenges and opportunities,” says Steeg Banham, director of Banham Architects entrusted with the project. “It also abuts the historic garden terrace of Cottesloe Civic Centre, which required due consideration in creating a building that is sympathetic to its surroundings.” Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson exterior shot driveway and entrance Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson exterior portrait shot of driveway Height restrictions of no more than two stories above street level, as well as protected views from the Civic Centre, resulted in the terracing of the sleek apartments down the site. This low profile design allows Overton Terraces to sit back into the site, keeping a low-profile in the suburb. “Terracing the residences over one another enabled us to comply with the stringent height restrictions and created the large terraces with views of the ocean. The large floating pergolas provide protection and are a striking juxtaposition to the white boxes and curved random stone walls,” explains Steeg The project had a unique brief, as the landowner approached Australian Development Capital to jointly develop the property. Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson open plan living Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson living space lounge and chair “The owners wanted two apartments for themselves: the penthouse and the studio unit,” says Steeg. “The developer sought to create an exclusive project befitting of its site and location, and they left it to our creativity to develop a solution that best suited this site.” The solution is a timeless, minimalistic and modern design where no two apartments are the same. Apartments range from a one-bedroom apartment to the penthouse. The coastal location inspired the minimal material palette, with Portuguese Limestone tiles designed to mimic the beach sand and split-stone walls influenced by the coastal limestone cliffs. Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson open plan indoor outdoor Extensive floor to ceiling glazing was used to maximise the views and blur the division between inside and out, while one-way vision/solar film was used on the street-facing bedroom windows for additional privacy. Expansive cantilevered pergolas provide solar protection to the expansive terraces and glazing without hindering the view. “There are the fundamental principles of good design; ensuring that spaces have adequate light and ventilation and good passive solar properties. However, architecture can further enhance its inhabitant’s well-being with the creation of spaces that feel open, spacious and inviting,” says Steeg. Banham Architects banham.com.au Australian Development Capital auscapital.com.au Adrian Zorzi Homes adrianzorzi.com.au Photography by Dion Robeson Dissection Information Glass doors and windows from Avanti Glass Aluminium glazing from Avanti Glass Portuguese mocha cream stone flooring by Limestone Oven, cooktop and dishwasher from Siemens Wall tiles by Bianco Matt Electrical downlights by Erco Furniture from Mobilia Newport random ashlar stone cladding by Eco-Outdoor Solarshade louvres by Sunlite Calacutta Nuvo kitchen benchtops by Caesarstone Toorak and ravenswood timber cabinetry from NavUrban Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson kitchen island Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson kitchen cabinetry Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson dining area art Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson dining space Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson main bedroom views Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson vanity bathroom Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson outdoor living area terrace Overton Terraces Banham Architects cc Dion Robeson locaiton exterior We also think you might like Beach House On Stilts by Luigi Rosselli Architects.abc
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The Charm Of New Zealand Design

What is unique about New Zealand design that separates it from the rest of the region? When it comes to our design history, we’re a fairly young country, and there’s no distinctive ‘New Zealand style’ yet that’s unique from the rest of the world. However, one hallmark of New Zealand design is what I’d call a modest modernity. That is, there is a humility to our design - a simplicity - which belies our significant level of sophistication. We’re not a showy people – New Zealanders are known for their laid-back, unpretentious attitudes, and these values I believe can also be felt in our design. We tend toward clean, uncomplicated forms, and put function and quality first, and but not to the detriment of contemporary style. [caption id="attachment_82930" align="aligncenter" width="838"]Parison Pendant by Cheshire Architects for Resident Parison Pendant by Cheshire Architects for Resident[/caption]   What are some changes you have seen in New Zealand design? Our country has always punched above its design weight, but over the past decade I’ve seen a significant evolution in refinement and confidence of voice. Our leading designers are producing spaces and products that would be right at home in Manhattan, Milan or Melbourne. We are participating more on the global stage and being incredibly well received at international events. And (not so much a change as a proud preservation): despite every economic reason to take manufacturing offshore, our designers have, for the most part, kept production very much local. We know our makers, and we design with full respect for craftsmanship. [caption id="attachment_82933" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Part of the ICFF events for 2018 included this pop-up showroom in TriBeCa from New Zealand furniture designers Resident Part of the ICFF events for 2018 included this pop-up showroom in TriBeCa from New Zealand furniture designers Resident[/caption]   What are some trends you are seeing emerge? We’re a nation who’ve long loved the bleached blonde Scandinavian aesthetic, so it’s been refreshing to see an new embracing of darker timbers – dark oak, walnut, mahogany. Rattan and woven materials, particularly in furniture, have made a big return, and reeded glass is also on its way back. Terrazzo, narrow vertical shiplap, and beige as a new neutral have all been big in interiors this year.   What are your favourite new designs of the past year? [gallery columns="4" ids="82934,82935,82936,82937"] [caption id="attachment_82939" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Gidon Bing ceramic lighting and sculptural tableware – particularly the Bone Crackle Finish Gidon Bing ceramic lighting and sculptural tableware – particularly the Bone Crackle Finish[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_82941" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Nodi Tasselled Wool Rugs – for lending a warm materiality to any space Nodi Tasselled Wool Rugs – for lending a warm materiality to any space[/caption]   Alana Broadhead is the curator and editor of The New, an online journal dedicated to the very best of New Zealand design.abc
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Winners Revealed: Habitus House of The Year 2018

An initiative that was established to celebrate a decade of Habitus, Habitus House of the Year honours exceptional residential architecture and design completed across the Indo Pacific Region within the past 18 months. Chair of the Jury, Paul McGillick, Founding Editor of Habitus, and Holly Cunneen, Habitus Editor presided over an esteemed, hand-selected panel of architecture connoisseurs: Howard Tanner AM, Consultant Architect; Karen McCartney, Architecture Editor / Author / Curator; Narelle Yabuka, Editor Cubes, Indesignlive.sg, Indesignlive.hk and Asia Co-Editor of Habitus; Neil Burley, Founder of Burley Katon Halliday and Anibou; and Raj Nandan, founder, Publisher and CEO of Indesign Media Asia Pacific. Paul best sums up the judging strategy by saying that the judges were “looking for character. Something special about the house and how it relates to where it is geographically. What is it doing that is really interesting? What is it doing that is really unique?” Culminating with a cocktail event hosted by StylecraftHOME, Melbourne, on Friday the 16th of November, the program saw six outstanding homes – from a shortlist of just 25 – receive special commendation from the judges.  

HOUSE OF THE YEAR WINNER

Boneo House by John Wardle Architects

Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia

Truly synonymous with the Habitus spirit, Boneo House “conveys such a strong character,” explain the judges. An addition to an existing 1980s house, the project presents a completely new, refreshingly and artfully connected home. Clad in copper and partly cantilevered, the structure of Boneo House (above) expertly reflects its surrounding landscape and topography.  

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR CONNECTION (JOINT WINNERS)

Gibbons Street by Cavill Architects

Queensland, Australia

Artists’ Retreat by Palinda Kannangara Architects

Colombo, Sri Lanka

Gibbons Street by Cavill Architects
The esteemed panel of judges found it challenging to separate these two homes, which were equally “resolved and realised”. Profoundly connected with their physical and cultural contexts and taking full advantage of their climates, both residences have outdoor areas that inject life into the home. Further blurring the boundaries between interior and exterior, Gibbons Street House and Artists’ Retreat boast masterful techniques that achieve the ‘poetic of space’.
Artists’ Retreat by Palinda Kannangara Architects

INTERIORS WINNER

St Vincents Place by B.E Architecture

Victoria, Australia

St Vincents Place by B.E Architecture
The interiors of St Vincents Place are subtly contemporary with references to the 19th century era, without being “pastiche,” explained the judges. A result of peerless attention to detail and forming a “world-within-a-world,” the rich material palette is accentuated by ample natural light from a light well and courtyard.  

ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE WINNER

Rabbit Residence by Boondesign and Attaporn Kobkongsanti

Bangkok, Thailand

Rabbit Residence by Boondesign and Attaporn Kobkongsanti

A true balancing act between programmatic demands and outer context, Rabbit Residence is an ensemble of spaces that forms a unified whole. The palette of the house functions as a canvas for the lush tropical garden, a peaceful contrast between the brilliant white scheme and greenery. The fluid floor plan extends to the outside, encouraging residents to not only partake in outdoor activities, but also to experience a “constant state of flux,” says architecture writer Tonkao Panin.

 

PEOPLE’S CHOICE WINNER

D House by ARO Studio

Hoàng Mai, Vietnam

D House by ARO Studio
Designed and built as a result of the rapid urbanisation and lack of greenery in Vietnam, D House is a true representation of design’s role: to bring better quality of life to the urban population. Housing three generations of one family, the interior responds to different ways of living and different needs, but blends all these together in a natural manner. Habitus readers who their votes for the People’s Choice went into the running to win the Ultimate Design Hunter Package, valued at $30,000. -- We would like to extend a special thanks to our Major Sponsors, Design Hunter partners and Media Partners for their support in the inaugural Habitus House of the Year initiative.abc