About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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HAP - Feature

Habitus #42 Will Stop You In Your Tracks – And It’s On Sale Now

Who are the architects, designers and creatives that – for now more than ten years of Habitus – have caught our attention, and held it? That is a question that the latest issue of Habitus, the Trailblazers issue, aims to answer. On Thursday 6 December we celebrated the release of issue #42 alongside Vitra Design Museum’s Miniatures Exhibition hosted by Living Edge. For the first time on Australian shores the Miniatures Exhibition is comprised of 100, iconic Vitra chair designs released between 1850 and 1990. At a scale of 1:6 and made by the same Vitra craftsmen that make the life-size pieces, this exhibition has travelled the world igniting the hearts of die-hard design enthusiasts. It’s a testament to the legendary Swiss company’s ability to push the boundaries of creativity and design to reach new heights. Which is exactly what we strived to achieve within the Trailblazers issue. We looked to communicate projects and people that embodied a unique approach to architecture and design as well as honest and responsive qualities. It was no small feat to collate and consolidate the outstanding, thought-provoking, and innovative work coming out of the Indo Pacific. Drinks were in order. We’d like to thank everyone who contributed to this issue, which extends from the writers, photographers, designers and our new Associate Art Director, Betty Wong, to the architects and Design Hunters who feature within, to our clients and avid supporters. We’d like to extend a special thanks to the team at Living Edge for hosting the launch party; for sharing with the Habitus entourage the Vitra Design Museum’s Miniatures Exhibition; and of course for their continued support over the years. Habitus #42, the Trailblazers issue, is on sale 13 December [gallery columns="5" type="rectangular" ids="84050,84051,84052,84053,84054,84055,84056,84057,84058,84059,84060,84061,84062,84063,84064,84065,84066,84067,84068,84069,84070,84071,84072,84073,84074,84075,84076,84077,84078,84079,84080,84081,84082,84083,84084,84085,84086,84087,84088,84089,84090,84091,84092,84093,84094,84095,84096,84097,84098,84099,84100,84101,84102,84103,84104,84105,84106,84107,84108,84109,84110,84111,84112,84113,84114,84115,84116,84117,84118,84119,84120,84121,84122,84123,84124,84125,84126,84127,84128,84129,84130,84131,84132,84133,84134,84135,84136,84137,84138,84139,84140,84141,84142,84143,84144,84145,84146,84147,84148,84149,84150,84151,84152,84153,84154,84155,84156,84157,84158,84159,84160,84161,84162,84163,84164,84165,84166,84167,84168,84169,84170,84171,84172,84173,84174,84175,84176,84177,84178,84179,84180,84181,84182,84183,84184,84185"]abc
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Furniture
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New Spanish Furniture Design From Masquespacio

If you’re not familiar with Masquespacio, make sure you visit their website pronto. The Valencia-based multi-disciplinary design studio is creating quite the buzz with a portfolio full of explosively colourful interiors, art direction, furniture and lighting designs. Their hospitality and retail fit-outs are the stuff design bloggers and Instagrammers live for, such is the appeal of their signature energetic style. Take the time to dig deeper and you’ll discover a customised approach and strict methodology informed by a conceptual rigour well aware of its influences, from the graphic boldness of the Memphis Group to all the fun of Tropicalismo. For their most recent furniture and lighting collections, the studio has partnered with Houtique, a furniture company also based in Valencia, and the ongoing collaboration will see Masquespacio’s Creative Director Ana Milena Hernández Palacios and Marketing Director Christophe Pennase direct Houtique’s visual strategy as well. [gallery columns="1" size="large" ids="83407,83408,83409"]
Wink Houtique
Core to their vision is the idea each item should be sexy, luxe and fun and so far, they’ve delivered the goods. Their wall and standing Wink lamps are beguiling in appearance, with candy-coloured fringing suspended as seductive ‘eyelashes’ beneath the gold-plated almond-shaped ‘eye’ fitting. While the new Arco chair is a high-end tribute to the 1970s, taken to the next level by a gold-plated frame and rich velvet upholstery. It’s fair to say all three pieces are unconventional statement items that buck any of the current trends for minimalism. As Christophe explains, “We just want to change the world that little bit without being too concerned about appearing commercially attractive.” Likewise unconventional is Chachacha, a ‘dancing’ version of the Pill stool that could put a smile on anyone’s face. It’s flirty fringing is completely charming, matched only by the maximalism of the Mambo armchair, which features a metal base, velvet upholstery in three different shades and fringing along the backrest’s base, making it seem more art object than chair. With Ana and Christophe looking to extend the Houtique brand by inviting other designers to create furniture collections, the prospect of how they’ll top a winking lamp and stool with rhythm is well worth anticipating. Masquespacio masquespacio.com [gallery columns="1" size="large" ids="83411,83414,83412"]
Arco Houtique
[gallery columns="1" size="large" ids="83416,83415,83417"]
Mambo Houtique
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Fixed & Fitted

Becoming Limitlessly Zen With Apaiser

Since ancient Greek and Roman times, the act of bathing has been celebrated as a technique to slow down time and encourage restoration from rigorous tasks of daily life. Often regarded as a meditative experience, it was only fitting for apaiser to release its Zen collection. Taking cues from the ancient art of meditation and the practice of Buddhism, apaiser’s collection is based on principals and a design narrative that allows users to reach a peace of mind and balance – physically, mentally and spiritually. Amongst this collection, the Zen Oval Bath is the epitome of sculptural balance. Between hard and soft lines and the choice of 12 natural colours, it adds elegance to any bathroom interior. The pared-down form of the Oval Bath exudes a seamless flow, one that echoes the purity of nature, as it resembles rippling water. Additionally, the Zen Oval Bath has a delicate geometric base and bevelled design detail on its curved edge. Derived from reclaimed marble that is synonymous with apaiser, the bath is as high performing as it is durable. Made out of apaiserMARBLE, the bath is a true testament to meticulous artisan and craftsmen who have perfected the trade over many years. Outperforming conventional bathroom materials, apasierMARBLE is made out of pure Australian minerals and reclaimed marble. Through the advancements of technology, it is also stain-resistant, therefore, poses as the ideal choice for hotels, resorts and residences worldwide. Truly an indulgent and luxurious bathing experience, the Zen Oval Bath enables users to re-energise and rejuvenate. apaiser apaiser.com Apaiser Zen Oval Bath tilesabc
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Parties

The Birthday Party For The Harbour 1976 Showroom

Late November marked one year of the Harbour 1976 showroom wowing and impressing design lovers across Sydney. The Harbour 1976 team turned the Waterloo showroom in a party house to celebrate this milestone in late November. The end-of-year event included the launch of Harbour’s indoor collection, as well as a gallery exhibition and an exclusive performance of hit song "Buses and Trains" by Australian band, Bachelor Girl. Since 1976, Harbour has specialised in designing, manufacturing and distributing high-end outdoor furniture. Now the family-owned company has expanded to include a luxury indoor range, with the first collections including Sydney Dining Chairs, Bondi, Ocean and Sail collections. Beloved in the design community for creating furniture that resonates with our Australian coastal lifestyle, the new indoor collections focus on simplicity and comfort, utilising only the most premium materials. As part of the celebrations, Harbour 1976 collaborated with highly-acclaimed photographer, Danielle Harte to feature a gallery of Australia’s most renowned beaches and namesakes of Harbour’s prominent collections - Bondi, Balmain, Balmoral, Avalon and Breeze XL. Harbour 1976 impressed with sprawling savoury and dessert platters partnered with fine champagne thanks to catering from Elegancy Catering, and live music, including a surprise set from Bachelor Girl. We raise a glass to harbor 1976 and their end of year launch, and the one-year anniversary of their immaculate Sydney showroom. We can’t wait to see what 2019 has in store. [gallery columns="4" ids="83922,83923,83924,83925,83926,83927,83928,83929,83930,83931,83932,83933,83934,83935,83936,83937,83938,83939,83940,83941,83942,83943,83944,83945,83946,83947,83948,83949,83950,83951,83952,83953"] Harbour 1976 harbouroutdoor.comabc
Architecture
Homes
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Seeing The Light In A Heritage Renovation

Heritage renovation projects often present a double-bind for the architect. On the one hand, the Federation homes that dominate established urban pockets along Australia’s east coast are usually equipped with robust, brick-heavy material palettes that lend themselves well to longevity and passive energy. On the other hand, any problems that have been built into the original structure become harder to fix under the rigid restrictions of heritage protection. Historically, a solution to this has been the time-worn ‘box on the back’ addition – a term synonymous with superficial ease. Not in the case of York Street Residence, though, a more joyful take on the derrière addition completed by Jackson Clements Burrows Architects (JCB) in St Kilda West, Melbourne. For lead architect and senior associate Rob Majcen, the original heritage structure represented a solid starting point for what would be an opening up of the old typology – a coming together of the old and new for the sake of greater wellbeing. The client, a retirement-age couple with three occasionally visiting adult children, wanted the best of both worlds to facilitate their quietly hospitable lifestyles: privacy and openness, connection and separation. The architects’ approach was to retain the front of the house and keep that private, then to bring a garden aspect deep into the interior through a light, breezy and open rear addition. York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell living area York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell kitchen dining “It was an east-west site and originally our idea was the keep the addition at the same level as the front of the building,” says Rob. “But we also saw the opportunity to create other enclosed spaces. For instance, the living room that is sunken but still trickles down to connect with the garden. “It was all about how that living space connected to the two courtyards. By nature, these heritage Federation buildings were very closed and dark spaces that were poorly ventilated, but we opened that up. The biggest thing was that the living space connects to the deck via two sliding doors. Then we had that internal courtyard with an east orientation so you’re getting beautiful eastern light that you’re able to control with blinds.” York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell fireplace York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell fireplace and sunken lounge Natural light and ventilation were huge focuses of the client brief, which is why Rob and his team relied on more than just one opening to bring them in. Sunlight is omnipresent in the space thanks to lattice-like, hit-and-miss brickwork that threads both eastern and western light through the house at all hours of the day, dappling the walls with bright and ever-changing patterns. This brickwork also references the angular lines and sturdy materials of the original structure, but in a thoroughly modern way: the rear addition takes a more sloping, abstracted form that seeps into the crests and valleys of an undulating ceiling inside the home. Even on the second storey of the new addition, the occupants are able to directly connect with the outdoors through some unconventional additions. “The client wanted a door from their ensuite bathroom that led out onto an internal deck,” explains Rob. “We were a bit sceptical at first for reasons of privacy – the shower opens straight out onto the deck via a glazed sliding door – but it adds that extra layer of transparency and looks over the beautiful textures that are in the garden. You can really enjoy the whole house from other parts of the house; it’s really nice.” Jackson Clements Burrows Architects jcba.com.au Photography by Derek Swalwell York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell bedroom and window detail York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell bedroom York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell bathroom York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell counter seating detail York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell courtyard entrance York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell facade details York Street Jackson Clements Burrows Architects CC Derek Swalwell blinds up pool ambience We think you might also like Cirqua Apartments by BKK Architectsabc
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Fisher & Paykel
Fixed & Fitted

The Integrated Kitchen And The Modern Home

An integrated kitchen offers serious design freedom for the modern home. Keen eyed design lovers can integrate appliances to create a seamless aesthetic in the kitchen, or hide appliances to put the focus on others. The idea of the integrated kitchen allows you to choose what to hide, and what to show or use as a feature product – and this is what has driven Fisher & Paykel’s integrated range. Fisher & Paykel’s refrigerators, rangehoods, DishDrawers and CoolDrawerscan be installed with custom panels matched to any cabinetry, to give any modern kitchen a unified aesthetic and seamless appearance. Induction and gas-on-glass cooktops lie flush within benchtop surfaces, allowing the cooking areas to be almost as discreet as the hidden appliances.

Stainless steel refrigerators definitely work in some kitchen designs, but in space conscious designs or homes with open living plans, integrated fridges and freezers can help the kitchen feel like part of a cohesive, larger space. This was done in New Zealand’s Hahei House, from Studio2 Architects, where the beautiful texture of the timber interiors flows into the kitchen, creating a harmonious and unified space.

Hahei House, the Coromandel Peninsula.

This two-level beachhouse on the Coromandel Peninsula was designed by Paul Clarke of Studio2 Architects to subtly build on the experience of being close to the sea with a series of indoor and outdoor spaces that flow into each other and can be used flexibly. Clarke allowed the textural wood interiors to flow seamlessly through the kitchen space by integrating the majority of the appliances inside soft-close cabinetry with matching American oak veneer with a solid-clash edging that adds a subtle, stylish texture. The island bench was cantilevered specifically so people can pull up a stool and sit anywhere around it. The double wall ovens and integrated fridge-freezer are at opposite ends of the space, and the five-burner cooktop in the middle, opposite the stainless-steel sink and the two DishDrawers housed in the island.

Villa Conversion, Herne Bay.

John Irving, the architect behind this dramatic conversion, describes it as “a house with two halves”. The plan retained the frontage of a traditional Victorian villa, while replacing the rear with a black metal and glass pavilion that catered better to the owners’ lifestyle. The floor and ceiling of the open-plan addition are concrete, as is the single wall housing the fireplace and a sleek, matte-black metal modular kitchen designed by local studio IMO. The appliances, including a French-door refrigerator, are all designed in the integrated kitchen style within the clean lines of this modular unit, which has simple but beautifully articulated handles that add detail to the otherwise monolithic arrangement of form.

Headland House, Waiheke Island

Designed by award-winning practice Stevens Lawson Architects, this house is constructed of three “pods”, all clad in a skin of vertical rough-sawn cedar, irregularly stepped to create an organic texture across the surface. The cladding continues seamlessly into the interior. In the integrated kitchen, the architects took particular care to integrate the appliances into this material, down to the tiniest detail — by integrating the cabinetry into the vertical cedar boards, considering how far the DishDrawer™ handle would jut out, the exact shape of routing of the custom handle pull, and how to minimise the separation between cooktop and oven. What has resulted is a kitchen that is not just aesthetically pleasing, but works at the minute tactile level as well. Fisher & Paykel fisherpaykel.com Advertisementabc
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The faces that can change your fortunes – introducing the INDE.Awards Judges

What would an awards program be, without its judges? Since 2016, the INDE.Awards has built a strong and enduring relationship with its Jury – many of whom have returned for three years in a row. As a whole, the INDE.Awards Judging Alumni represents some of the most accomplished individuals within the global design industry. From the likes of Jan Utzon of Utzon Architects in Denmark, to Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu of Neri&Hu in China, William Smart of Smart Design Studio in Australia and more; each year a select group of industry experts, thought leaders and designers are invited to form the INDE.Awards judging panel. In 2019 INDE.Awards’ esteemed Jury comprises a handpicked panel of world-renowned industry influencers. Together their curatorial eye and design expertise shines a spotlight on the Indo-Pacific region’s most inspiring individuals and extraordinary designs.

Meet the 2019 Judges

(L-R) Stephen Burks, Stephen Burks Man Made (USA); Shashi Caan, SC Collective (USA/UK); James Calder, Calder Associates (AUS); Sue Carr, Carr (AUS), Judy Cheung, cheungvogl (HONG KONG).(L-R) Stephen Burks, Stephen Burks Man Made (USA); Shashi Caan, SC Collective (USA/UK); James Calder, Calder Associates (AUS); Sue Carr, Carr (AUS), Judy Cheung, cheungvogl (HONG KONG).
(L-R) Josh Comaroff, Lekker Architects (Singapore); Eleena Jamil, Eleena Jamil Architect (Malaysia); Leone Lorrimer, Lorrimer Consulting (AUS); Paul McGillick, McGillick Consulting (AUS); Chan Ee Mun, WOHA (Singapore).(L-R) Josh Comaroff, Lekker Architects (Singapore); Eleena Jamil, Eleena Jamil Architect (Malaysia); Leone Lorrimer, Lorrimer Consulting (AUS); Paul McGillick, McGillick Consulting (AUS); Chan Ee Mun, WOHA (Singapore).
(L-R) Raj Nandan, Indesign Media Asia Pacific (AUS/Singapore); Luke Pearson and Tom Lloyd, PearsonLloyd (UK); Jan Utzon, Utzon Architects (Denmark); Joyce Wang, Joyce Wang Studio (Hong Kong/UK); Luke Yeung, ArchitectKidd (Thailand).(L-R) Raj Nandan, Indesign Media Asia Pacific (AUS/Singapore); Luke Pearson and Tom Lloyd, PearsonLloyd (UK); Jan Utzon, Utzon Architects (Denmark); Joyce Wang, Joyce Wang Studio (Hong Kong/UK); Luke Yeung, Architectkidd (Thailand).
Returning for a second year of judging, Shashi Caan of the SC COLLECTIVE, says: “My jury experience of the INDE.Awards is that this competition attracts a wonderfully diverse and very high caliber of submissions from across Asia. As Juror, it’s exciting to see so many great projects but also challenging to make responsible selections given the level of talent and competency.” Awarding the most progressive architecture and design in the Indo-Pacific, the INDE.Awards dwells at the centre of its dynamic and thriving region, to award its most exceptional buildings, spaces, objects and people. “For me, when reviewing projects,” says Shashi, “I look for fresh and timely, imaginative and responsible interpretations and iterations. I especially love work which sensitively shapes new behaviours and demonstrates a deep understanding of design vocabulary and skill, thereby giving new meaning and potentially generating new genre of typology.” As Sri Lankan-based architect, Palinda Kannangara of Palinda Kannangara Architects, says, the INDE.Awards’ regional viewpoint has given rise to a unique judging process that sheds light on outstanding design in the most unlikely of locations. “The INDE.Awards is unique without judging through a generic global lens, it celebrates diversity of architectural thought and design, recognising projects for their contextual approach and values, irrespective of scales,” says Palinda, whose studio received an Honourable Mention in 2018 for ‘Artist Retreat at Pittugala’ in The Living Space category. “We were honored that a project from our small island practice received this recognition,” he says. Enter the INDE.Awards in 2019. View the Categories and Enter Now.abc
Architecture
Places

A Technology-Infused Retail Space By Wynk Collaborative

There has been a great debate on the fate of brick-and-mortar retail in our digital world. And the general consensus is that it is a half-full, half-empty glass situation. The shift toward online shopping does put a huge strain on traditional retail, but with that challenge also comes myriad of opportunities for retailers and designers to invent new spaces and new ways to engage customers. One of these new spaces is Habitat by Honestbee. Designed by Wynk Collaborative (who also designed the Honestbee office in 2016) and launched in October, Habitat by Honestbee is the physical embodiment of the app-based company’s grocery shopping service. Grocery shopping used to be a chore. Thanks to online supermarkets, grocery shopping apps and their various free delivery promos, this chore has been made considerably easier in our digital world. “So how do you craft a new experience to attract and retain customers? That was the gist of the brief,” says Si Jian Xin, Design Partner at Wynk. “We wanted people to not just come to shop, eat and leave but also to hang out, bring friends and meet people here. We wanted this place to be more of a community space than a consumption space,” Si elaborates. Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore ceiling detail and natural light While putting retail and F&B concepts in one venue is a tried-and-tested design recipe, according to another Design Partner at Wynk Leong Hon Kit, in Honestbee’s case the brief is further layered with the need to integrate the app into the physical space. He says. “How would the app influence the space, and vice versa?” The design research involved an excursion to the markets in Paris and London, and extrapolating the experience with the consumer preference in Singapore. The concept emerged from the outing was to make the space feels like an open-air market, where one is free to meander and discover using the app as both an all-access pass and a wallet. The architectural shell of Habitat by Honestbee was formerly a warehouse with ten-metre height encased in solid walls. Wynk evokes the feel of an open-air market by knocking down the solid walls and replacing them with generous glazed surfaces to bring the natural light in. Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore shelf dining table and shop counter After scanning the app, shoppers enter the venue’s main space through a gallery of window displays that opens up to a bright, lofty space occupied by its florist concept Hanaya. The differences in scale and lighting between the two zones, and Hanaya’s floral décor and display, work wonderfully in tandem to set a festive welcome. The space beyond is dedicated to the fresh supermarket produce and no less than 15 F&B concepts. The loftiness of the space is retained by keeping everything – baring the café mezzanine that serves as a stage for live music – at the ground level. Display shelves, usually maximised to available are kept below 1.5-metre height, leaving the view unobstructed and enabling shoppers to quickly orient themselves. “The experience is very non-linear, both in the physical sense and the experiential sense,” says Leong. The F&B concepts are placed along the periphery of the interior, leaving the central part free from services. In addition to these F&B concepts, there are plenty of informal spaces that invite people to linger.  You will not have a security guard shoo-ing you for sitting on a base of a bookcase at the bookstore, or on an empty nook that otherwise will be used to display products in the spirit room, like so often happens in conventional retail and supermarket environments. Even the banal act of waiting for a friend outside the toilet has been transformed into an experience with the way the space is done up like a beauty store, complete with moveable shelves displaying beauty product sold at the venue, of course. Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore shelves The material and colour palette is pared down to let the product shine, consisting of mostly pale wood and glazed tiles in pastel colours. “We refrained from being too specific to certain brands or identity, so the space will allow seasonal brands or display to take over or switch concepts whenever needed,” says Leong. “Like a spatial canvas for content,” adds Si. Some of the design elements created to accommodate the changing contents include the band of mesh on the upper part of the counters for signage, the curving corners of the counters that can serve as product displays, and the Bodega, a permanent pop-up space featuring perforated mesh shelves that can hosts a wide range of special exhibition and collaboration. And what’s retail in the digital age without a little tech spectacle? Installed along the beam is a conveyor belt carrying shopping bags for online shoppers. The checkout experience offers two world firsts: a cashless auto checkout process where you push through your cart for packing, and a robotic collection point where you collect the shopping bags from robotic shelves. The word ‘Instagrammable’ also comes to mind. Asked if it is a requirement for retail this days, Si demurs, “It is inevitable, but ultimately people will want to take photos in a nice space. So we will always strive to create a nice space.” Wynk Collaborative wynkcollaborative.com Habitat by Honestbee habitat.honestbee.sg Photography by Jovian Lim and courtesy of Wynk Collaborative. Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore flexible seating arrangements Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore formal dining Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore dining tables and shop stalls Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore flexible space Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore check out system Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore bathroom waiting area Honestbee Habitat Wynk Collaborative Singapore entrance We also think you might like Retreat Yoga by KCA.abc
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Sala Ayutthaya In Thailand Works Magic With Material And Mood

Sala Ayutthaya contains many secrets and surprises. It promises a journey – or rather, many journeys of contrast – that merges history with modernity, the rough with the refined, the abstract with the literal, the expansive with intimacy. A boutique hotel developed by Sala Hospitality, the 26-room estate is situated in the ancient city of Ayutthaya – Thailand’s old capital – along the Chao Phraya River. It is surrounded by much greatness. Across the hotel’s restaurant and riverfront suites is the Phutthai Sawan Temple built in 1353 AD by the Ayutthaya Kingdom’s first monarch, and surrounding the property are many archaeological and historical sites. By default, the hotel should be both restful and respectful, and Bangkok-based design studio Onion has created such an environment, framed by an unexpected yet beguiling duet of minimalist white and curved brick walls. This oxymoronic marriage is efficacious in creating a layered narrative through the property. Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya exterior dining area The discreet main entrance, heralded by a majestic Sala Tree and marked by a singular square opening within a brick façade, belies the wonders within. It leads past the reception into a gallery that promotes Thai artists, and then: a dramatic view of a corridor bordered by two sinuous brick walls of multi-curved geometries rising up two stories, cupping the sky animatedly and sending light and shadow theatrics down the rustic walls and concrete cement floors. “The curved walls are inspired by [traditional] Thai patterns. Since the hotel is in Ayutthaya, we wanted to add the feeling of ‘Thai-ness’, but translated in our way,” says Onion’s co-founder Arisara Chaktranon. The same type of brick used to build the neighbouring ancient structures is still produced by factories in the area, hence it is an ideal material to link past and present; a quotidian material usually associated with stability, here it projects poetry and fluidity. The circulation of the hotel encourages slow ambulation and curated openings in the high walls a heightened sense of discovery. Through gaps in the russet, rough contours are glimpses of contrasting shiny white surfaces – smooth, sleek marble cladding the swimming pool and terraced steps inspired by temple architecture, and the ivory walls of guestrooms punctuated by square apertures. Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya river view seating As the hotel is housed opposite a spiritual and cultural site, it would be inappropriate for guests to be seen in swimming outfits. Hence, the pool is contained within the hotel walls. What this alternate arrangement results in is a facility that, while public, has an intimate feel. Also projecting a sense of intimacy are the simple gabled volumes the guestrooms are housed in. This shape is highlighted within by slender timber posts and beams that inject warmth and visual interest into the minimalist foil punctuated with graphical details in the form a tiger leaping in a forward motion (representing strength in Thai belief) engraved upon the wooden bedheads and the sectional profile of a Thai ornament called luk-mahuad designed into bathroom counters and bed posts. Returning guests continue to be surprised as each room provides unique experiences. For instance, three have direct access to the swimming pool, while one has an alcove with a daybed perfect for children to slumber or play in; on the second storey, a suspended ‘bridge’ room has overhead views of the pool on one side and the garden courtyard on the other. Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya garden courtyard from second level Time is a recurring motif at Sala Ayutthaya – not just in the application of an age-old material such as brick, but also in how the hotel elements are designed to react with nature’s rhythms: at the terrace, steps leading down one-storey-height to the river’s level, inspired by the Chand Baori Step Well in Rajasthan, India, is designed in response to the annual flooding situation. Also, creating a picturesque scene riverside is a row of tropical Krading-Nangfa (‘Angel’s Bell) trees whose bell-shaped flowers will blossom as the trees mature. With many components to consider, resort architecture is often far from simple. But Sala Ayutthaya is proof that much expression and tactility can come from a reduced palette. Onion onion.co.th Photography by Wison Tungthunya Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya garden courtyard traditional flooring Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya bedroom ensuite Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya pool view bedroom villa Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya pool courtyard Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya pool details Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya pool courtyard Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya ambience Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya pool courtyard Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya brick courtyard wall Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya brick courtyard wall Sala Ayutthaya Onion Thailand CC Wison Tungthunya main entrance We think you might also like The Walled by Neri & Huabc
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A ‘Small’ Vitra Exhibition Arrives Down Under

To try and capture, understand, or even comprehend how human comfort has evolved over the span of two centuries, it’s only natural that we look to the design of a chair. Regarded as a blueprint of human evolution – and experimental ‘curiosity’ for designers, architects and artists, the chair has advanced from being an everyday utilitarian object to something of an icon. Though styles develop and forms have changed, the chair has always served a simple and essential purpose; to be a comfortable seating apparatus. Proving to have been an insight into the revolutionary explorations of material, technology and form, Vitra’s 100 Miniatures Exhibition present Australians a true-to-scale replica of original chairs from 1800’s to the 1990’s. Touching upon the Industrial Revolution, Art Nouveau, Modernism, Post-war Design and Postmodernism styles, the exhibition displays exactly a 1:6 scale of 100 original chairs. Perfected by imitating exact colours, construction form, materials, and even the details like matching wood grains and reproduction of screws, Vitra’s 100 Miniatures Exhibition consists of designs by illustrious names such as Adolf Loof, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, Charles Eams, Alvar Aalto, and Frank Gehry – just to name a few. [gallery size="medium" ids="83455,83469,83461,83464,83466,83462"] Accompanied by 40 wall-mounted photographs and drawings, it is a true timeline of chair design. Rich with cultural and historical context, these drawings bring the development of groundbreaking designs to light. From sketches and drafts to production and prototyping, the entire exhibition has earned a reputation for being a high-quality collectors’ item. For over a century, Vitra has captured the attention of design enthusiasts around the world with a strong commitment to contemporary, considered and careful design. Making its debut in Australia for the first time, the iconic miniatures are individually displayed and have been hand-made by Vitra’s craftsmen. Vitra vitra.com Living Edge livingedge.com.au Photography courtesy of Living Edge. [gallery size="medium" ids="83455,83465,83468,83467,83457,83460"] Living Edge Vitra 100 Miniatures Exhibitionabc
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The Transformation Of Warehouse And Woolshed By Carter Williamson

The genesis of 102 Mill House is well worth noting because it underscores a remarkable sensitivity to protecting Balmain’s industrial fabric by both the clients and the project architects – Carter Williamson. “Originally, our client came to us with a Development Application that approved the demolition of all structures on the site (an existing warehouse and woolshed), and the construction of a new residential apartment building,” explains Carter Williamson director and principal architect Shaun Carter. “However, as a long-term landowner and resident of the area, our client wanted to do something special.” The project team’s suggestion was to re-use remnants of the warehouses and create four individual dwellings (102 The Mill and Truss House are two of these transformations.) “The ambition was to preserve the industrial and varied history of Balmain while creating an inspiring and generous home,” adds Shaun. “It’s vital for our suburbs to grow and change, however, The Mill serves as an opportunity to balance the use of existing industrial materials with a sensitive selection of new elements that continue to tell the story of the area, while adapting to new uses.” Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman entrance staircase Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman shelving and ceiling details Carter Williamson has taken a robust approach to convert the warehouse into a home by retaining key elements and inserting bold and appropriate materials into its reinvigorated iteration. A recycled, three-storey brick wall is complemented by a new steel-beamed staircase. Rich black tiles that line the warehouse façade create a new sophisticated identity for the home. The use of natural materials is underscored internally wherein the master bedrooms ensuites are clad with light grey fan tiles, perfectly complimented by patinaed steel fixtures. The kitchen’s black benchtop and joinery are juxtaposed comfortably against the original, untouched wooden ceiling. By leveraging the existing warehouse structure, beautiful volumes have also been achieved, including a 12-metre high void that brings light down four levels of stairs. Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman lounge and natural light Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman staircase void Landscaping at 102 The Mill has also been prioritised, in the form of a large courtyard, which flows from the kitchen via floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. It is lined with natural stones and recycled ironbark fencing panels, which have been recycled from the fire damaged factory and capped in black steel. A small pond lined in recycled brickwork, skirted by the familiar aged steel, is set under the master bedroom balcony. From a planning perspective, the home is divided into three areas. “From east to west; vertical circulation, a service wall and place for living, is freed from the plan to look outwards,” explains Shaun. “This design strategy allows the most used spaces to experience maximum amenities of light, air and openness through the north, west and south façade.” He notes the living area as a case in point: “A matte black joinery suite forms the service wall spine releasing the western façade to be a ribbon of sliding windows.” In addition, a 6-metre kitchen island bench dominates the centre of the space, acting as a sculptural meeting point for family and friends to congregate. Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman open living and dining and kitchen Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman kitchen bench The primary sustainability aspect of the home is evidently the adaptive reuse of a warehouse that was previously approved for demolition. In detail, this includes the re-use of structural steel, including heritage BHP hot rolled sections, timber flooring, the ground floor slab and brick walls. “Through the adaptive re-use of 102 The Mill, the embodied energy inherent in these materials continues to be locked up,” adds Shaun. “102 The Mill enjoys north-facing living spaces while corrugated shutters provide protection from the western sun.” Carter Williamson’s approach to this project demonstrates exceptional skill and sensitivity, resulting in a scenario where an existing building has resulted in the impetus for designing a generous, robust, and character-filled home. Carter Williamson carterwilliamson.com Photography by Brett Boardman Dissection Information Fittings and fixtures from Roger Seller Kitchen appliances from Miele Modernist industrial pendant light from Repurposed Steel structure feature from Repurposed Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman balcony Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman bathroom Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman carpark building shades Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman streetfront Mill House Carter Williams CC Brett Boardman street view We think you might also like Screen House by Carter Williamson.abc