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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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What's On
Happenings
HAP - Feature

11 Reason To Enter INDE.Awards Before 8 February

In an era where globalisation has opened up a world of opportunity to all, it’s the strength of our community – and that inherent sense of unity that comes from within – that enriches our life’s work with both meaning and significance. Never was this more apparent than at the INDE.Awards in Singapore, last June, when a diverse group of creatives – hailing from across the Indo-Pacific – came together to celebrate the region’s most progressive designs, and pay homage to the exceptionally talented practitioners who are putting it on the global map. Symbolising that ‘coming together’ of a large and dynamic regional design community, the INDEs is built upon the conviction that our region produces some of the most outstanding architecture and design in the world. As Lily Goodwin of Pattern Studio (Honourable Mention, The Shopping Space, 2018), says: “It was truly inspiring to come together with the design community to celebrate some of the most thoughtful and exciting projects... The sense of camaraderie and support we felt as a young studio was unreal, it was so good to connect with other designers in such a warm and welcoming environment. The entire event really was a celebration of the work of all nominees,and the outstanding quality of design in the Asia Pacific region.”

ENTER INDE.AWARDS

Categories put the emphasis on progressive design

Integral to the INDEs is its carefully developed platform of awards categories, and a finely tuned entry process tailored to the entrant and their geographic location. Categories encompass 11 Jury-decided awards categories, and an extra two categories in which independently nominated entrants are awarded based on People’s Choice voting. Working with Indesign Media’s team of in-house Editors and Brand Directors, the INDEs team has devised each and every category to put the emphasis on progressive architecture and design, in all its forms, with a particular focus given to cultural context, location and user needs relative to that. “INDE.Awards is unique,” comments architect Palinda Kannangara who received an Honourable Mention for The Living Space (2018), and has joined the INDEs as an Ambassador in 2019. “Without judging through a generic global lens, it celebrates diversity of architectural thought and design, recognising projects for their contextual approach and values, irrespective of scales. We were honoured that a project from our small island practice received this recognition.”  

Creating a level playing field for all

Recognising the many economies that make up the Indo-Pacific’s vast geographic spread, the Awards strives to present entrants with a level playing field for recognition and celebration. As part of that initiative, scaled entry fees are available for select countries within the region. These include Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, India Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Vietnam.  

A program designed to put your voice first

Not to be overlooked is the INDEs’ multi-faceted program which encompasses an impressive group of Judging Alumni, and a round-table of Ambassadors – all members of the INDEs’ design hall of fame. In 2019 the INDE.Awards Jury represents a select group of industry experts, thought leaders and designers hailing from Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Australia, the UK, USA and Denmark. Returning Juror, Shashi Caan of SC COLLECTIVE, has been impressed by the calibre of INDE.Awards submissions she has encountered to date. “It’s exciting to see so many great projects, but also challenging to make responsible selections given the level of talent and competency. “For me, when reviewing projects, I look for fresh and timely, imaginative and responsible interpretations and iterations,” she says. “I especially love work which sensitively shapes new behaviours and demonstrates a deep understand of design vocabulary and skill, thereby giving new meaning and potentially generating new genre of typology.”  

Discover the INDEs design hall of fame

Hand picked from the INDEs design hall of fame is its 2019 Ambassadors. Hailing from every corner of the Indo-Pacific, their stories are an inspiring call-to-action for practitioners to dream big, enter now, and make their mark on the region. “As a small practice, coming from a small island on the southern tip of that region, it just goes to show that this awards program does facilitate recognition for work that is on the margins, regionally,” says Mat Hinds of Taylor and Hinds Architects – winner of Best of the Best, and The Building (2018), and Ambassador to the INDEs in 2019. “We were completely overwhelmed. It allowed us to focus the meaning of the project in a broader regional context. We saw it had potency for an entire region of the world, beyond the community of people who were our client,” he says. “That was testimony to the power of the message of architecture, that it can cut through that scale of things. It meant our small studio and practice was given more meaning, we could see that all the hard work was significant and it meant something. It increased the confidence of our practice hugely. It’s given us an immense sense of confidence in our professional capacity. “Our clients realised they had engaged architects that were serious about doing good work that speaks to a quality that belongs to an entire region; that we were cosmopolitan, outwards-looking and sought to make an impact, and that was recognised through the award. “Having that happen for us was great. People who never said anything to us about our work suddenly started speaking. It opened a gateway of meaning for our work. It gave it a platform and we hope to build on that.”  

Enter the INDE.Awards before 29 January, click here.

  INDE.Awards indeawards.comabc
Architecture
Homes
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A Light-Filled Transformation By Tim Bennetton Architects

Nestled in one of Brisbane’s inner-city suburb, Yeronga House is a low-key Queenslander that has been completely transformed by local practice Tim Bennetton Architects. The aim: to create a home that was open, spacious and allowed the residents to feel more connected to their neighbours and the surrounding area - without compromising on the original and distinctive style of the house. “Greater affluence and more air conditioning means people tend to live inside a lot more. As a result, the feeling of living on the street and connecting with neighbours is being lost in Brisbane,” says Tim Bennetton, director of Tim Bennetton Architects. “We wanted to bring back the joy of community to this family home.” Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick backyard Several internal walls were removed from the house, creating a new breezeway that improves ventilation and eliminates the need for air conditioning. Those removed walls now allow for better use of the space, improving what was previously a poorly planned layout that resulted in dark, redundant areas. The home was also given a new entry to enable a better relationship to the street – where the home was once closed off to the neighbourhood, it is now open and welcoming. Along with renovations to the existing house, the architects added a new studio (dubbed the ‘pod’) to the rear of the house, accessed via its own walkway as well as through a series of decks leading to the back garden. In keeping with the original Queenslander, the studio is clad in timber weatherboard painted in a fresh white - with contrasting dark wooden deck and window frames – that complements the dark green finish of the main house and establishes a clear definition between the two structures. Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick stairs and exterior opening The design of the studio was inspired by the residents’ interest in sewing, with a ‘cloth’ draped over two framed and glazed gable ends that adds a subtle yet effective sense of drama to the low entry door. “One of our clients had a great interest in fabrics (sewing, making) which helped generate the idea of a light ‘fabric’ form draped over a structure that was largely open both ends,” says Tim. The doorway leads through to the openness of the studio, where the interior mirrors the exterior with white walls and dark wooden floorboards, its half-vaulted ceiling adding height and creating the illusion of more space. Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick window opening The desire for natural light and connection with the outdoors is further realised throughout the studio. Large windows line the end wall of the structure, providing uninterrupted views to the surrounding lush garden, while a unique set of multiple doors opens out onto the deck and allows for flexibility for the residents. When shut, those doors create an enclosed and private space; when open, those doors allow for more light to flood in, and seamlessly connect the studio to the outside. As for an enhanced sense of community, this project has done what it set out to achieve. “When the project wrapped up, we received a letter from the owners that simply said everything: ‘We christened the courtyard with the neighbours this evening and met at least two new people wandering by,’” says Tim. Tim Bennetton Architects timbennetton.com.au Photography by Shantanu Starick Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick bedroom 1 Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick office area Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick spacious window openings Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick natural colour palette Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick decking and exterior details Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick wrap around deck Yeronga House Tim Bennetton Architects CC Shantanu Starick exterior dining area We also think you might like this Brisbane Extension by Shaun Lockyer Architectsabc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

EHDO Architecture’s Pursuit For A Positive Impact

They may only be a team of three, but EHDO Architecture (Earth House Design Office) Architecture are the first interstate firm to implement the award-winning Nightingale Model, a non-profit and sustainable multi-residential formula from Melbourne. EHDO originated from a construction company (Earth Builders) that focused on designing rammed earth buildings. When founder Giles Hohmem passed the practice onto Dimitri Kapetas and Dave Delahunty in 2008, it became EHDO, a name that Dave says is respectful of its history and with an eye on the future. EHDO Architecture Montessori School “EHDO has a long history of buildable solutions driven by a need for comfort and sustainability within a modest means, and we still employ rammed earth amongst a range of other building materials when required for specific qualities of natural beauty, thermal mass and sense of place,” says Dave. “Giles led this direction at the beginning and we now find ourselves bringing the Nightingale model to Western Australia, a deliberative design model driven by creating multi-residential homes that are environmentally, socially and financially sustainable.” Current projects, including the site challenging Silver Street House in South Fremantle, the Beehive Montessori School and Nightingale Fremantle (construction is set for early 2019), reflect the company’s ethos of seeking innovation. EHDO Architecture Montessori School “We are particularly proud of the Beehive Montessori School in Mosman Park. The school is located in a special place next to the ocean. In many ways, this challenged the practical application of our ideas because of the schools unique and admirable approach to education: through self-directed learning and engagement with nature and the community. The experience and confidence of the office grew exponentially in this period,” says Dave. EHDO plan to find similarly suitable projects in the future, as well as refining their ideas and processes. As for the future of Perth’s evolving urban landscape? It’s undecided. Dave says individual buildings such as the City of Perth Library and Nightingale Fremantle have made more of a positive impact than other large-scale projects. EHDO Architecture ehdo.com.au Photography of the Beehive Montessori School by Bo Wong EHDO Architecture Montessori School We think you might also like Mount Lawley House by Chindarsi Architectsabc
Design Products
Furniture

Outdoor Furniture That Shines With A Ray Of Light

Designed for WOUD, the Ray collection sees 11 different and varied outdoor furniture objects, united through graphical details and consistent design lines. With distinctive colours and an unmistakable European design aesthetic, the Ray range has the style, and the strength, to suit any outdoor environment. With inspiration taken from town square and promenade furniture in southern France, the distinctive features of the Ray collection can be seen as its inclined legs, the rounded corners throughout, as well as the grooves in both seat and back of each item. The characteristics common across the range unify the outdoor furniture with a calm and harmonious aesthetic, making it suitable for spaces on from home balconies to cosy restaurants and public spaces. With a solid metal construction, the weight of the various outdoor furniture objects in the series ensures stability in all kinds of weather. Despite of their sturdiness, the designs do not lose their ability to be easily moved around in new places and in different set ups – which is great seeing how many different set ups you’ll want to try with this collection. For the Ray café armchair the armrest has been designed with the exact dimensions to provide maximum comfort and support, and the sleek, inclined legs follows the lines from this armrest to create a simple and harmonious expression. With the oblong grooves in the seat and backrest, Ray allows rays of the sun to shine through the outdoor furniture, creating beautiful shadows on the ground beneath. This elegant detail adds a sense of lightness and coherence to the design, recurring in all items in the series. “It is all about falling in love,” says Mia Koed, the creative director of WOUD “When searching for new items for our collection, we look for love at first sight. Whether that is a subtle detail, an impressive colour palette or an ingenious idea, we want our hearts to flutter and great designs should be able to create such feelings. “Our collection is made for you and made for use and we strive to have designs that are made for you to fall in love with.” [gallery columns="4" ids="84906,84905,84903,84902"] Available in Australia through FLOC Studio, WOUD’s Ray collection of outdoor furniture is waiting to add a spark of a European charm to any outdoor space. FLOC Studio flocstudio.com.au abc
Architecture
Places
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A Compelling Journey To Italy In Three Parts

There are some spaces that remind you of where you are, and others that transport you somewhere else entirely. Although the latter is difficult to accomplish without falling into the trap of the cliché or the flat, Bistecca, the new Sydney restaurant designed by local design firm Tom Mark Henry, achieves that rare geographical sleight of hand: it takes you to Italy via thick lashings of warm, thoughtful and surprising design. The client’s aim for the space was to make the restaurant feel like a genuine dining experience without all of the immediate and obvious fixes (read: grapevines and red chequered tablecloths) that ideas of Italy can so often translate to. Instead, the design team – led by Tom Mark Henry director, Cushla McFadden – relied on layers: of space, of materials, of history, and of a narrative. Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett serving station “In our research, we discovered that a lived-in feeling was typical of Italian restaurants, so although they wanted the environment to be stripped back it also had to be layered,” says Cushla. “We balanced these elements by using raw materiality such as brick, timber and rendered walls, layering them with old photographs and paintings reminiscent of time spent in Italy.” The layout itself is designed to be experiential. Three separate spaces were conceived to map out visitors’ experience from beginning to end, like a soft bell curve culminating in reflection on the full journey. Guests enter through an unassuming rear lane entrance into an intimate bar area, featuring a curved marble and timber bar where they can decompress over an aperitif. After they have settled into the experience, they are ushered into the restaurant, a dramatic space with domed ceilings and a central hearth. This is where the full theatricality of Bistecca plays out. Finally, after the bustle of the dining experience, they are led through to the wine room, another smaller space primed for reflection over fine Italian wine. Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett brick arched ceiling “Connecting these three spaces while still offering a unique experience in each was key to the spatial planning,” explains Cushla. “Materiality and lighting connect the three spaces, all being slightly different takes on the theme. The dining room is the liveliest – with a slightly chaotic vibe – while the bar and wine room start and end the experience; the bar builds anticipation and the wine room offers a moment for reflection with a good glass of wine in hand.” There is a sense of organised chaos to this transitory concept, which matches the abrupt service style experienced in Italy while softening it to put the visitor experience at the fore. Although different in their purposes and scales, these three spaces – central to the concept for the restaurant as a whole – are all tied back into the narrative through a material palette that is designed to enhance the atmosphere without detracting from the main event. Dark timber panelling, antique mirrors and archways offering discreet views of other rooms all add to the ambience, working quietly in the background to create a compelling and comprehensive narrative of Italian dining. Tom Mark Henry tommarkhenry.studio Photography by Damian Bennett Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett dim lit interior   Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennet lighting detail Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett vintage furniture Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett wine cellar Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett bar Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett vintage hanging cutlery Bistecca Tom Mark Henry Sydney CC Damian Bennett menu storage hanging details We think you might also like Pentolina by Biasolabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Home Designed Layer-By-Layer By Molecule Studio

In Melbourne’s suburb of Toorak, the clients – a family of five – were looking for a flexible hardworking family home. The site they’d purchased was a unique triangular-shaped 200sq m plot of land, housing a single story Victorian cottage and former milk bar, with no site-specific relationship to its unique shape. For Molecule Studio, this was essential to change. The goal for Molecule Studio was to create a functional and contemporary home that wasn’t just another modern house – it needed to be a building that had a distinctive sense of place, reflecting the unique space it inhabits. The solution was not only to design with the triangular shape in mind, but also to reference the adjacent creek turned Prahran Main Drain. The house, in this way, is conceived as an elevated sinuous element, a timber-clad boat sitting atop rocky breakwater. The corner prow of the upper floor recalls ship design, and reaches the home into the open area of the street. This bold point is anchored by the dark recessive ground floor, which acts as a form of negative space between the upper floor and the landscape. Australian geology and vegetation served as inspiration for the interior’s composition. The screeching crimson of a Red Gum before it sheds its bark, the deep green of Wattle leaves, dark pebbled rivers and natural bluestone. These elemental touchstones colour and shape the interior to create a home with distinctive Australian flavour. The interior palette is deliberately tonal, varying from room to room, combining painted surfaces, laminates and terrazzo with vibrant colour highlights in paint to children’s bedrooms and upholstery. The holistic and calming atmosphere of the interior spaces result in a home environment that recalls resort living yet acts as an undeniable residential home for year round living. When designing the interior of the home, Molecule Studio conceived the space as a container for modern family living. The compact 74sqm footprint of the ground floor is overcome with a high ceilinged family zone including kitchen, dining area, living room, mudroom, laundry and powder room. The timber lined ceiling and large full height glazing helps to dissolve the boundary between the interior and the adjacent landscape. By contrast, the upper floor, comprising a main bedroom and ensuite, plus children’s bedrooms and family bathroom, has been configured as enclosed spaces for retreat, yet elongated windows framing views of the neighbouring trees and urban rooftops prevent these retreats from feeling closed in. This layer-by-layer design from Molecule studio results in a home that is fitting for its site; at one with its surrounding, appearing to have always been in the area. In final design flourish, the home has been furnished with a collection of new furniture and lighting pieces, designed through collaborations with local designers. The created custom pieces for the home enable a holistic textural palette further referencing the colour tones and charm of the Australian landscape. Molecule Studio moleculeweb.com Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissection Information Custom table from Barbera Design Muuto Nerd chair and Rich Brilliant Willing nook light from Living Edge Nook Sofa and bed, Rufus armchair from Jardan About A Lounge armchair, Dream bedside cabinet from Cult. Eggcup side table from Mark Tuckey Line bedside light and Y Chandelier from Douglas and Bec Parachute light pendant from Domo Montecarlo terrazzo floor tiles from Signorino Pewter bedorom carpet from is Godfrey & Hirst Pumice rug from Cavalier Carpets Helsinki bathroom wall tiles from Signorino We think you might also like Triangle House by Robeson Architectsabc
What's On
Happenings
HAP - Feature

Two Visionary Minds Collide At The NGV

Pushing forward the relationship between art and design, the National Gallery of Victoria’s latest exhibition – Escher X nendo | Between Two Worlds – is a world first. The premise of the show is to create a dialogue between the work of Dutch artist M. C. Escher and Japanese design studio nendo, led by Oki Sato. The show seamlessly presents the worlds of one of the 20th century’s most recognisable artists and one of the 21st century’s most inventive designers, including more than 150 of Escher’s most renowned prints and drawings from the collection of Gemeentemuseum in The Hague. Housing these arresting drawings is an immersive exhibition space designed by nendo, accompanied by original work that responds to the methodologies of the Dutch master. [caption id="attachment_84863" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]M.C Escher Art M. C. Escher Convex and concave March 1955 lithograph from the Escher Collection, Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, the Netherlands. © The M. C. Escher Company, the Netherlands. All rights reserved.[/caption]   NGV Escher x nendo CC Sean Fennessy The work of M. C. Escher is famed for intriguing viewers through visual puzzles and testing ideas of space and time in the everyday. Escher’s work depicts impossible architectural structures, endless staircases and seamless transformations of form and pattern. His fantastical constructions and repetitive infinity patterns reveal a technical and inventive genius that in recent years has become increasingly revered and celebrated. Building on Escher’s optical illusions to create an otherworldly spatial installation, nendo has taken cues from Escher’s manipulation of space and his use of shifting perspectives and playful visual devices. These have inspired the creation of an exhibition experience that transcends traditional gallery displays and manifests Escher’s world in a three-dimensional reality. [caption id="attachment_84862" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]M.C Escher Art M. C. Escher Cycle May 1938 lithograph Escher Collection, Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, the Netherlands © The M. C. Escher Company, the Netherlands. All rights reserved.[/caption]   NGV Escher x nendo CC Sean Fennessy nendo has devised a signature motif for the exhibition design − the minimalist form of a house − universally understood as an icon and symbol of space. The house appears throughout the exhibition in varied forms that reference Escher’s skilful manipulation of patterns as well as creating innovative displays for Escher’s work. In the lead up to the exhibition, Indesign magazine’s editor Alice Blackwood interviewed the Japanese wunderkind, below is an extract which can be read in full in the latest issue of Indesign Magazine (issue #75).

Alice Blackwood: You’ve designed the exhibition space for Between Two Worlds | Escher x Nendo. What insights and learnings informed your design?

Oki Sato: I was interested to learn of the obsessive nature of Escher’s working process, and the passion he had for his creations. It is quite clear that Escher did what he really loved doing, and I feel that we have this in common. I found [however] the differences to be more interesting and inspiring. For example, Escher created three-dimensional expressions in two-dimensional techniques. I am just the opposite, which creates an interesting contrast in this collaboration. A less obvious difference between us is in the creation process and the examination of new ideas. Escher took a ‘seed’ of an idea and pushed it to its limit. He tested one idea in many ways using different techniques, tools and methods. My process is to bring new seeds of ideas to every project I work on. Generating new ideas is an inseparable part of my process. While Escher evolved ideas in a very logical, mathematical way, I work more intuitively, with reality-based inspirations. So in this exhibition, I tried to [integrate] the nendo ‘seeds’ in the Escher logical thought process. Since both processes require a lot of energy, my brain is already very tired. But I truly enjoyed this process, and it has brought a fresh point of view into our office. [caption id="attachment_84861" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]M.C Escher Art M. C. Escher Hand with reflecting sphere (Self-portrait in a spherical mirror) January 1935, lithograph, Escher Collection, Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, the Netherlands. © The M. C. Escher Company, the Netherlands. All rights reserved.[/caption]  

NGV Escher x nendo CC Sean Fennessy

Alice Blackwood: The diversity of your output is so varied, is there a common thread that ties your vast portfolio together?

Oki Sato: I find a project appealing when it is difficult for me to imagine the final output, or when I cannot perceive the impact of its completion. This is when I feel excited about an opportunity. It’s the same feeling I get when I experience something [for the first time], like using an unfamiliar object or technology. A project that has a level of uncertainty, and makes you feel a bit anxious, is a project worth jumping into. Escher X nendo | Between Two Worlds is open at the National Gallery of Victoria until 7 April 2019. National Gallery of Victoria ngv.vic.gov.au Photography by Sean Fennessy NGV Escher x nendo portraitabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Elevating Living Spaces In An Australian Heritage House

Downside Up House in Albert Park, Melbourne, is a heritage-listed Victorian villa with a contemporary extension that turns the typical ‘rear extension’ on its head. Designed by WALA, the house has living rooms upstairs, bedrooms downstairs, and a batten-screen façade that references the pitched roofs of the Victorian typology. The original building was a double-fronted heritage-listed Victorian house in serious need of repair. The modest-sized, triangular-shaped site presented a challenge on its own accord, not to mention a series of rear lean-tos that had been added in ad-hoc fashion. “Our goal was to retain and restore the existing front of house whilst improving the flow and functionality of the old and new wings of the dwelling,” says Weian Lim, director of WALA. As such, their design response was governed by the strict heritage rulings of the area, and the desire to maximise natural light and the small footprint of the house. Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt exterior elevation night Instead of the typical rear extension that sees living space added to the back of the house, WALA elevated living spaces upstairs with a second-floor addition, retaining the bedrooms at ground level, where they have privacy and security from a new boundary wall on the laneway. The contemporary addition is clearly distinguished from the heritage building, while drawing inspiration from the forms of the old lean-tos and nearby houses. “The façade celebrates the classic pitched roofs of old Victorians in the neighbourhood by referencing these triangular shapes,” Weian explains. “This aluminium batten screen not only presents a clear external graphic to the laneway, but also protects privacy by shielding views into the neighbours’ gardens.” The all-white palette reinforces the visual impact along the laneway, and has a crisp, clean aesthetic. Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt natural light in living area A clear polycarbonate wall on the internal face of the batten façade allows northern light into the upstairs living rooms, like a “wall of light,” Weian describes. “The combination of the polycarbonate wall and aluminium batten screen creates lovely dappled light from mid-morning to early-afternoon, negating the need for artificial lighting.” The living spaces are bathed in soft light during the day, and glow like a lantern when illuminated at night. External and internal finishes introduce texture and complement the old and new. Aluminium-framed windows and glazed sliding doors are a modern contrast to the existing double-sash, timber-framed windows, and the precision and uniformity of the aluminium batten screen upstairs juxtapose the hand-laid weatherboard cladding downstairs. A cement composite sheet panel on the new boundary fence is arranged in a stretcher-bond pattern to add to the geometries along the laneway. Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt living room couch detail WALA carved out a pocket garden along the side of the house for the benefit of the laneway. “We wanted a feature that promotes engagement with the street and its pedestrians,” Weian says. Angling the boundary fence towards the house provided enabled a small garden to be planted for the owners and passers-by to enjoy. WALA wa-la.net Photography by Tatjana Plitt Dissection Information Aluminium battens from Centurion Powder Coating Floorboards and decking by Spotten Gum Internal and external wall paint in Vivid White by Dulux Glazed sliders and windows from Upton Windows Polycarbonate Wall from Danpalon Calcatta Nuvo kitchen bench from Caesar Stone Kitchen appliances supplied by Miele Bathroom tiles from Western Distributors Coroma Coolabah tapware range from Reece Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt flexible living space Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt round dining table and book shelf Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt round dining table and kitchen Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt study area hallway and screen Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt master bedroom Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt rear garden deck Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt bathroom Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt exterior elevation day Downside Up House WALA cc Tatjana Plitt exterior elevation We think you might also like The Potential Of Laneway Architecture And Backyard Buildingsabc
Architecture
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Homes
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Five Of The Best Australian Prefab Homes

The benefits of prefabrication have become increasingly recognised within Australia’s residential sector and, as an industry, it’s burgeoning. At a micro level, prefab homes (or modular homes) are an affordable building option for clients mindful of budget. However, at the macro level, many believe it has a role to play in alleviating societal housing crises. Certainly, the pros can be rattled off like a shopping list: reduces waste and is environmentally sustainable, promotes safety because construction takes place in a controlled factory setting, saves time during construction, cost-effective because of the reduction in on-site work and promotes the use of lightweight materials that aid in passive design, to name a few. The following five projects by some of the very best in the business disrupt outdated stereotypes of what prefab homes looks like.

Clydesdale House, Archiblox

Archiblox Clydesdale House Modular Homes CC Tatjana Plitt Archiblox’s Clydesdale House comprises two separate quarters – the main house and a guest pod, both of which were prefabricated and constructed off-site. This was the most cost-effective building option for the clients due to the remoteness of the rugged 8.5-hectare site and once the lightweight timber modules were transported by truck to the property, all on-site work only took three weeks. It’s the quintessential Aussie getaway and appeals as much for its robust exterior as for its relaxed yet elegant interior. Clydesdale House is also an excellent study in passive design and kit homes Australia to achieve a high degree of comfort, from the correctly oriented quarters that enable cross ventilation to the positioning of the guest pod so it doubles as a shading device for the main house. [gallery size="large" ids="84610,84612,84609"] Photography by Tatjana Plitt Archiblox archiblox.com.au    

San Remo House, Ecoliv

Ecoliv San Remo House Prefab Homes CC Warren Reed Located in the small town of San Remo, this holiday home sits on the mainland end of the bridge to Phillip Island in the Gippsland region of Victoria. The clients wanted a striking home that captures expansive views of the ocean and landscape while engaging with its surrounds and utilising sustainable materials and construction methods to ensure long-term minimal environmental impact. Ecoliv has delivered on the brief with a home comprising two modules that connect to provide a streamlined layout proving to be an efficient use of internal space with perfectly framed ocean views. While the pool is cleverly incorporated within the building envelope, appropriate glazing, orientation and insulation guarantee natural temperature controls at all times. [gallery size="large" ids="84615,84614,84616"] Photography by Warren Reed Evoliv ecoliv.com.au    

Ivanhoe Extension, Modscape

Modscape Ivanhoe Extension Prefab Homes CC John Madden Modscape’s clients decided on a two-storey modular extension to accommodate their growing family and the result is a striking addition that adds character to their weatherboard home. The upper level’s curved form and battened timber screen is the design’s most compelling expression, also functioning as a sun shading and privacy device. While the new internal living areas are made all the more inviting and relaxed because of the full-height glass doors that open up to an outdoor dining area and backyard. During off-site construction, (which is possible with prebuilt homes and additions) the clients remained in their home disruption-free, moving out four weeks prior to installation of the modular homes component, which only took one day, followed by another three weeks to complete all on-site work. [gallery size="large" ids="84622,84623,84624"] Photography by John Madden Modscape modscape.com.au    

Belmore Home, Mode Homes

Mode Homes Belmore House Kit Homes Australia CC David Curzon Belmore Home is exemplary for its strikingly simple, minimalist concept and form. The one-bedroom, one-bathroom pavilion sits on a hardwood deck and is clad in timber board and battens. It’s a modest sized dwelling, often the case in prefab cabins, but the open plan of the living areas, along with the generous ceiling height makes it highly efficient and extremely comfortable. Full-height double glazed doors open out to the north-facing deck and so the interior also receives plenty of natural light. But it’s the warm plywood-lined walls that make this project so memorable, providing a perfectly neutral background for the client’s stylishly Scandinavian, modernist-inspired aesthetic. [gallery size="large" ids="84620,84619,84618"] Photography by David Curzon Mode Homes modehomes.com.au    

St Andrews Beach House, Prebuilt

Prebuilt St.Andrews Beach House Pleysier Perkins Kit Homes Australia CC Michael Kai Prebuilt’s prefab homes are designed by their partner architects Pleysier Perkins and built in the factory in a matter of weeks then installed on-site in a few days. Their recently completed St Andrews Beach House on the Mornington Peninsula is embedded within its rugged sand dune location, providing the clients with a perfect sanctuary. The project’s robust materiality protects it from the harsh southerly winds blowing across Bass Strait, while generous glazing means they can still enjoy views of the surrounding coastal landscape. Prebuilt has a green approach that informs all areas of construction in modular homes and prefab homes, from utilising plantation and recycled timber and water-saving plumbing fittings to offering clients grey-water recycling systems and solar hot water. [gallery size="large" ids="84625,84627,84628"] Photography by Michael Kai Pleysier Perkins plesierperkins.com.au Prebuilt prebuilt.com.auabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Cool Your Summer With Aeratron AE3+

There is a lot of things Australia is known for; its beaches, its wine, its design and definitely its heat. To help combat the summer and ensure that you and your family have a breezy and beautiful summer, the AE+ designed by Danny Gasser for Aeratron, available at Workshopped, is an award-winning design and efficient three-blade fan. Using up to 75% less energy than traditional ceiling fans, it is rated as the most efficient cooling ceiling fan since 2018 by Energy Star, so families can now focus on having an enjoyable summer with the AE3+’s quiet and smooth airflow. Aeratron AE3+ Ceiling Fan woodgrain Available in six different colours including dark wood grain and white canopy, the AE3+ will fit into any modern and contemporary interior setting. Apart from being on trend and redefining the ceiling fan as a class of its own, it is also equipped with a patented ‘wobble’ free technology with Silent Operation. The modern RF remote control is also easy to use. Considering that the AE3+ is a modern upgrade of the AE3, it now comes with accessories that also feature a 10W Dimmable LED Warm White light, Wifi controlled modules and a Building Automation Control unit. With the warmer month well and truly upon us, there's no point in denying your home a cool space to relax. Aeratron's AE3+ is a designer-friendly choice to cool down your home, take in the sun, and relax through the summer in style and comfort. Workshopped workshopped.com.au Photography courtesy of Workshopped Aeratron AE3+ Ceiling Fan light woodgrain living dining areaabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Intimate And Intricate Architecture By LLDS

In Doncaster, Victoria, David Leggett and Paul Loh of architecture practice LLDS have created a pair of houses with a distinctive brick and zinc exterior, designed to suit a family of four as well as welcome and accommodate visitors. LLDS created two separate yet complementary homes (the main home for the family; the second at the rear to be leased out to friends) composed of zinc-clad rooms sitting atop a continuous brick plinth. The zinc-covered volumes stand at different heights, creating an interesting silhouette for the houses, distinguishing each room and space from one another. Inside, the neutral colours of the brick and zinc are matched with warm Victorian ash bespoke joinery, achieved through computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining to ensure high precision. Throughout, the intricate joinery not only acts as a means for organisation, but also as a way to partition between the otherwise open plan living spaces. Upon entry into the main house, a feature wall of panelled timber (that also conceals a door leading to the garage) seamlessly wraps around to form the kitchen joinery, which acts as the hub of the home. Natural daylight floods in through the windows and a timber-lined roof light, with further light and ventilation coming through a series of courtyards that line the edges of the home. The staircase balances light and heavy elements – while the base is solid timber (with the addition of shelving underneath providing more storage space), the balustrade is formed of clear glass and has a delicate timber handrail that appears as if it’s floating. Upstairs, laminate plywood panels separate the two teenage boys’ bedrooms and are used to create full-height wardrobes that feature a secret ‘tree house’ to be used for sleepovers. In the rear house, the use of timber continues, creating a complementary space to the main house with subtle differences that ensure this house has its own personality. Take the staircase, for example, which forms the centrepiece of the house and leads up to the three bedrooms. Constructed from Victorian ash, the handrail and balustrade are integrated as one and follow the curves of the stairs, with unique cut-out details creating a strong design feature. Together, the houses allow the residents privacy, while also creating a warm and welcoming space for visitors. LLDS llds.com.au Photography by Dan Hocking Dissection Information Gypsum plasterboard with Matt Dulux paint finish Bamboo plywood panelling and DecoPly Joinery by Power to Make Victorian Ash joinery finish with natural Osmo Wax by Power to Make Aluminium windows by Dowell Ceramic large format floor tiles by Archers Texture loop wool carpet by Gaia Bespoke natural Tasmanian Oak with beeswax finish by About Space Hail large pendant copper by About Space Countertop and island worktop in Everest from Corian Glacier White integral sink supplied by Corian Rangehood by Robam Fridge by Westinghouse Electrical oven from Bosch Mosaic bathroom glass tiles from Archers abc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

Femme Atelier Reimagines Door And Window Frames

Femme Atelier, founded in Thailand in 2018, is a multidisciplinary design studio with the aim of redefining, repurposing and transforming everyday objects. Kamonwan Mungnatee (Mew) and Lalita Kitchachanchaikul, the design duo behind Femme Atelier, are both students from King Mongkut University of Technology in Ladkrabang (KMITL) in Thailand. Intrigued by the potential of design, both Mew and Lalita believe in the potential of emotive design principles. Framemust, developed as part of a university course, is one of their first collections and consists of two tables and two chairs. Simplified as a range that reimagined the doorframe as a range of ombré furniture, the tables and chairs within Framemust are manufactured using extruded aluminium profiles and acrylic panels. Mimicking glass that is often apparent with doors and windows, the acrylic panels are finished with a UV gradient – a process where ultra-violet lights are used to dry and cure the ink as it is printed. The product boasts clean lines, a dreamy pastel palette and iridescent panes to ensure the range is applicable and ideal for any café, working or even home environment. The panels carry the same communicative values as the doorframe, acting as an entrance into another space. [gallery columns="2" size="full" ids="84789,84791"] Habitus caught up with the dynamic duo to ask them a little bit more about their design process and the idea behind Framemust. How did your knowledge of graphic design, branding, fashion and design help you come up with Framemust? In order to craft and ensure that the work we produce is relevant and communicated thoroughly, we had to share our ideas that were generated from our personal interests and skill. By combining our strengths, we were able to deliver the best solution for our initial concept and design to the best of our ability. We both believe that design is a combination of professions, so with photography, graphics and even fashion, Framemust became successful and gained popularity. Why repurpose windows and doors? Framemust actually began as a furniture series during a third-year project from the Department of Industrial Design and Faculty of Architecture at King Mongkut Institute of Technology in Thailand. At the time, the brief in-class revolved around a creative process and ideally product furniture from elements that have never been used before. We chose doors and windows because that was something people came in contact with daily; it was in everybody’s lives. All architecture requires both doors and windows. Where does Femme Atelier sit amongst the design landscape within South East Asia – specifically Thailand? We have never thought of becoming the same or even similar to any other firms. But in saying that, we do keep our standards high, which is the driving force of eventually becoming recognised internationally. We really believe that Femme Atelier, specifically, Framemust, has the ability to change the way we look at everyday objects. What’s next for you? What can we expect out of Femme Atelier? As design students, we are both interested in design and ready to learn through experimentation. We feel like our role, within the industry, is based on developing simple and good standards of design. Since there are no boundaries within design, and no right or wrong, we feel as though there may be more emerging designs with touches of Thai craft and local materials. It’s something that we both want to experiment more in. Femme Atelier behance.femmeatelier Photography courtesy of Femme Atelier We think you might also like Houtqiue by Masquespaci  abc