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Architecture
Around The World
Homes

Making The Most Of Urban Space In Beijing

In Beijing, urban space is at a premium. In the Haidan district a family of three was looking for a home that could accommodate their family, as well as the occasional working from opportunities afforded to a software engineer and architectural book editor. The solution came in a unique, slanted roof 116sq m home, and the keen design eye of the HAO Design team who noted that the unique ceiling was in fact an opportunity, opting to preserve the design. In doing so, the home is given a unique interior look, as well as an increased feeling of space thanks to the ceiling height. This sense of space is further increased through simple, pared back white and natural wood colors throughout, highlighting the textures of the materials and the linear design of the furniture. With large wooden open frame windows, the natural flow of sunlight pairs well with this muted interior, resulting in a space that looks cool, feels warm, and more open than its modest footprint would imply. The open plan common area meets a kitchen and adjacent children’s room, both with oversized sliding doors to offer privacy and prevent sound or odour distribution when needed, or opened up to enhance the sense of space of the home. Above the common area are a sidelong bookshelf, master bedroom and bathroom, and a workspace study - a quiet place for rest, work and reading. Through this height division, the home is split between public and private activates. The ground floor has been designed for socialization, games and entertaining, while the above level is ideal for these parents to work, relax and keep an eye on the activities below. Dense urban space is always a tricky proposition for the creation of open and functional homes, yet even the most stacked urban space cities don’t need to be a recipe for compromise. HAO Design has created a home that is functional, open-ended, and suitable for the flexible lifestyle of a new family. From the unique, cozy work and study nook created through the slanted ceiling, to the airy and open multifunctional social space below, the home is a message about the creative uses of space, no matter the limits. HAO Design haodesign.tw We think you might also like Sunny Apartment by Very Studio|Che Wang Architectsabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories
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Where Is Multi-Residential Building Design Heading?

Larger cities face an exponentially increasing number of people who want to live near their workplaces, and hence it has become more imperative than ever to create multi-residential developments that reflect this lifestyle. In Australia alone, ABS Census shows that apartment occupation has increased by 78 percent over the past 25 years, and will continue to upsurge. In the past, there has been a detachment between urban design and architecture. Master plans were developed without concerns of building program or market expectations and often resulted in distortions of the built form and amenities it offers. Collaborations between inter-discipline professionals of the design world establish a more integrated outcome, improving the lives of those who inhabit these high-rise structures. In recent years, cities that have recognised the importance of blurring the lines between architecture and urban design have seen an improvement in social and economic capital. More and more architects now push for the activation of multi-residential building frontages, as they value public spaces and design it to reflect the character of the surrounding area while being sensitive to the integration of existing space. Unlike before, the integrated approach has seen to encourage the use of public, semi-public and private spaces. Especially for residents within a multi-residential building, amenities can be improved, fostering a more positive attitude towards density in CBD locations. Honouring a Multi-Residential Building as part of the INDE.Awards this year is our way of celebrating the industry’s approach to design in consideration of the community, sustainability, human experience and market needs. At the 2018 INDE.Awards, the following projects were shortlisted for their ability to celebrate design and architecture that is approached with equal consideration of site and community.  

Spire Residences by John Wardle Architects

Located in Brisbane, Spire Residences sits at the northern gateway to the commercial district and shares the site with other important historic buildings. Its locality responds to two different dialogues, one respectful of its heritage neighbours and another directed at its taller companions of this developed city living. Using this as the inspiration to inform the overall design idea, John Wardle Architects successfully harmonises the tower with its surroundings. The multi-residential building fosters the needs of the city and community at street level while meeting expectations of occupants above. Amenities include rooftop facilities, concierge services, meeting areas, gymnasiums, and hence provide occupants with easy access to the city while responding to the dynamic nature of today’s lifestyles. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="86262,86263"] Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones John Wardle Architects johnwardlearchitects.com  

Gravity Tower by Plus Architecture

Plus Architecture was commissioned to design a multi-residential development in a fast-growing precinct in South Melbourne. Recognising the importance of utilising the site to its greatest capacity, Gravity Tower became the first project built in Melbourne’s Fisherman’s Bend precinct. Offering expansive city and bay views sheltered from the western sun, the tower’s street-level activation is evident as it acts as a transition space between the CBD and the Fisherman’s Bend. Gravity Tower boasts a considered design approach, informed by present-day context but is also equipped to cater for potential neighbouring developments in the future. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="86251,86249"] Photography by Jaime Diaz-Berrio Plus Architecture plusarchitecture.com.au  

C.F. Row by Woods Bagot

Melbourne’s Fitzroy is an inner-city suburb made up of layers of rich history, diverse residents and unique spirit, growing from a working-class community to now one of the most creative and sought-after neighbourhoods. Woods Bagot has captured the essence of Fitzroy in C.F. Row, the multi-residential development that celebrates the history of the suburb and keeps its distinctive culture alive. The original brick façade of the building (previously home to a furniture maker) encases the new development of apartments and townhouses separated by laneways, its combination of dwelling types attracting a diverse mix of occupants. With retail activation at the corner of the site reminiscent of a traditional pub or milk bar, C.F. Row is quintessentially Fitzroy not just in its design and way it services its occupants, but in the way it interacts with the wider community too. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="86252,86254"] Photography by Trevor Mein Woods Bagot woodsbagot.com  

Shorefront Penang by RT+Q Architects with S.M. OOI Architect

The challenges that faced the development of Shorefront Penang were three-fold: adhering to the strict planning guidelines that come with building in a UNESCO World Heritage City, ensuring each unit had a sea-view and assuring optimum privacy for the residents. In response, RT+Q Architects created three parallel strips of buildings, each unit ‘alternate-facing’ and serviced with private elevator lobbies to provide as much privacy as possible in a multi-residential setting. The buildings were designed in such a way to give each unit views of both the sea and city, while additional waterscapes and greenery throughout the public areas create a seamless connection from the buildings to the shore. This is a development that gives residents and visitors a sense of tranquillity so often needed in a bustling city, even when navigating the negative spaces between the buildings. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="86258,86256"] Photography by Masano Kawana and Albert Lim RT+Q Architects rtnq.com S.M. OOI Architects facebook.com/SMOOIArchitects   As designers and architects recognise that space is scarce, especially in urban cities, they need to take into consideration ways to overcome this without compromising on the quality of life. Large scale projects like multi-residential developments require a thoughtful material palette for durability, and appliances with smart design systems, which is why Bosch is an ideal partner for the Multi-Residential Building Award Category. For over a century, the iconic German designers and manufacturers of kitchen and laundry appliances have taken a future-facing approach to design. By promising that living spaces of all sizes deserve nothing short of the best home appliances, Bosch powers countless homes around the world, earning a reputation for reliability and innovation. Maja Pejovic, Bosch’s Brand Manager explains that “at Bosch, we aim to deliver an all-round support and service experiences that reaches the same level of perfection, reliability and quality as our home appliances, and this commitment will be at the core of the Bosch brand for years to come.

Bosch is the proud sponsor of the 2019 Multi-Residential Building Award at this year’s INDE.Awards. Watch this space, as the shortlist will be announced on the 30th of April.

INDE.Awards indeawards.com Bosch www.bosch-home.com.au We think you might also like this introduction to the 2019 INDE.Awards Judges abc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

Ricci Bloch On Why Now Is A Great Time To Be In Practice

Having worked in some of Sydney’s most reputable architecture studios, such as Tribe Studio and Meacham Nockles McQualter, architect Ricci Bloch cottoned on early in her career to what a successful practice looks like. Moreover, what running a successful practice looks like. In 2016, succumbing to the allure of independent practice, she established her eponymous studio Ricci Bloch Architecture + Interiors. But it was important to her that her work stood apart in an industry full of exceptional architects. The dream became a decision when a family friend approached Ricci with a commercial fit-out for an investment company in Sydney’s CBD, she took the reins and dove right into it. “I really enjoyed that taste of being responsible for all the decision making – everything from design resolution to delivering the completed vision. So, with no real plan, but a lot of optimism, I launched myself into practice, and I haven’t looked back,” she says. Coastal Neurosurgery Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living Coastal Neurosurgery Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living
Coastal Neurosurgery, North Gosford, Photography by Katherine Lu
Anybody who speaks to Ricci will instantly understand that she is drawn to projects with challenges and constraints. Regardless of whether it is a residential, retail, commercial or hospitality project, it is this positive outlook that enables her design studio to tackle design briefs with an empathetic response. With the aim for “elegance, comfort and a streamlined simplicity, we make sure that all projects integrate architecture, interiors and landscaping so that nothing feels added on”.

Having come from residential beginnings, she now works on a variety of projects and the contrasts between each sector keeps her fresh. Not to mention the realisation that creating a domestic aesthetic has become increasingly important across workplace and hospitality projects. Clarifying client expectations from the get-go is of utmost importance, so says Ricci. “A good project starts with a good brief – regardless of whether it’s a house, a commercial office, a shop, a clinic or hotel. And while each project requires a different design response, our process is the same.” This is because the success of each completed project is based ultimately on the brief. “Ultimately, the brief is both a blueprint and a benchmark for success. Getting that right is vital.”

Each aspect of any project responds directly to the site and clients, which not only meets their needs but sets her work apart in its ability not to simply conform to a particular aesthetic or trend. Working closely with clients right from the inception of any project helps designers understand what clients need and what they require from a space. “We ask a lot of questions up front,” says Ricci. “This helps us to clarify the brief in their minds, as well as in ours.” High St Society Cafe Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living High St Society Cafe Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living
High St Society, Randwick, Photography by Tom Ferguson
Instead of throwing the word timeless around in a way that has been done multiple times before, Ricci tells us “timelessness, is about avoiding trends and creating a design and material palette that’s lasting, both in terms of durability and aesthetics - which are equally important”. For us, this means that when you revisit a project in five years, it still feels fresh and relevant.” For Ricci and her team, materials are apart of that story, from the way they are used to the way that they have been crafted. “We take a domestic approach to materiality and planning no matter the project type because the quality and feel of a space can profoundly affect people,” she continues. On top of managing, designing and producing different kinds of masterful architectural compositions, Ricci always remembers the importance of designing sustainably. “The glamorous interior is enjoying a revival, but with a sustainable bend. Recycled materials are a big part of the story, often used in innovative ways. It is an exciting time to be in practice,” she says. The Eye Piece Shop Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living The Eye Piece Shop Ricci Bloch | Habitus Living
The Eye Piece, Wahroonga, Photography by Katherine Lu
At the end of our conversation, Ricci leaves us with a bit of advice that is suitable for anyone finding his or her feet within the industry, but also a good reminder for us all. “Have confidence. Trust your ideas, instincts, abilities and processes. Take risks. Ask questions. And get some good people around you.” Ricci Bloch Architecture + Interiors riccibloch.com.au We think you might also like High St Society by Ricci Blochabc
Architecture
Places

The Beauty Of Age

The company established its West Australian presence 10 years ago – initially focussed on the contract and commercial business, operating from smaller premises in Northbridge – but with this new 950 metres-squared city location, it has broadened its offering and reach. Tall arched windows along Queen Street invite people in – design industry professionals and passers-by – and the ground floor showcases significant products from each of Living Edge’s brands. “It contains a sample of all of their products from simple homewares to furniture ranges,” says Hassell Studio’s Practice Leader of Interior Design, Jonathan Lake. “That level is most likely to generate customer and foot traffic, so there is a sense of brightness and openness in the tall volumes that contributes to that sense of invitation.” In contrast, the basement exploits its lower ceilings and lack of daylighting with careful placement of domestic-scaled tableaux, augmented with elegant mood lighting. The lower floor is accessed via two staircases, including a new one at the northern end of the building. “There is an open single flight of stairs in addition to the stairs around the lift core, to give people the ability to see and experience the ranges and products from multiple perspectives,” Jonathan says. “We wanted to make the stairs more interesting than a typical glass stair, and to provide opportunities for people to move freely around and within those two bottom levels, because we wanted the customer experience to be engaging and comfortable.” Meanwhile, the top floor is given over to workplace and office ranges; the main feature is a Bronzato metal-finish wine-wall installation, which showcases produce from local vineyards, alongside a burnished steel kitchen. Although each level boasts a distinctly different atmosphere, the same deliberately raw aesthetic permeates the entire offering. The intention was to maintain the warehouse character of the base building, which was upgraded by TRCB Architects. “We got in there after demolition had started and it was a really rough site which had a lot of issues, such as the basement not having footings, that were outside our scope,” Jonathan recalls. “The owner generously guided their architects to finish the building in a way that was aligned with the quality that Living Edge aspired to. “We didn’t want to put too many layers back in, we wanted to pare it back, expose the joists and the roof, and paint the walls without render,” he adds. “We wanted to take it back to the bones; we knew that would allow the products to sit well within the spaces.” The spare material palette includes burnished steel, bluestone and brass, and the design is complemented by original artworks and sculpture from Living Edge’s collaboration with Filter Fine Art and Sydney sculptor Morgan Shimeld. “We look for buildings that can echo some of our own company values and those values that we look for in the brands we represent,” says Aidan Mawhinney, CEO of Living Edge. “Those include quality, authenticity, sustainability and value, and they are all showcased within this great new environment.” The building will achieve certification under the international WELL scheme which promotes health and well-being, demonstrating the company’s commitment to sustainability. “We are very proud to have been able to influence the base-build in the use of materials and renovation processes to achieve WELL certification,” Mawhinney says. This restored former warehouse is a manifestation of the Living Edge motto, ‘Furniture for Life’; it demonstrates the value of longevity, and the rich patina and character that can develop with age and authenticity. Living Edge 7 Queen Street Perth, 6000. T: (08) 6466 7400 Livingedge.com.au Photography by Dion Robeson abc
Places
Architecture
ARC - Feature

K Pop Minimalism At Ban Ban By Genesin

There are a few names synonymous with Adelaide’s current design renaissance and Genesin Studio is one of them. The practice’s hospitality work has been instrumental in re-branding the South Australian capital as a hub of design, with fit-outs such as the exquisitely detailed Viet Next Door and Scandi-inspired Nordburger contributing to the State’s renewed cultural landscape. Founder and director Ryan Genesin is not only a master at balancing materials and finishes, but he also knows how to get the most out of problematically small spaces, as the recently completed Ban Ban proves. Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide food bench Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide drinks The Korean fried chicken eatery is essentially a fast food joint on Franklin Street in the heart of Adelaide’s CBD. But Genesin’s colourful treatment of the 150-square-metre space via what he calls a “low-tech K Pop minimalism” has transformed it into an immersive customer experience memorable for its playful aesthetic. Built-in tables and storage units stand monolithic in the space, anchoring the overall scheme and creating a clear circulation path. These forms are further highlighted by a glossy pale blue D-Tile modular tiling system that evokes the futuristic fashion trend favoured by some K Pop performers. More importantly, the tiles’ pale finish and rounded edges provide the perfect backdrop for the deep green stools, hot pink crockery and yellow neon artworks, while also expressing the branding’s grid motif in an impactful way. Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide seating booth Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide seating detail As Genesin explains, “This grid is an integral part of the design and sets the tone for the branding, which is applied to the menu, signage, packaging and website, weaving Ban Ban’s physical and digital spaces together.” Indeed, Genesin worked closely with London-based graphic designer Carlo Jensen from Peculiar Familia to develop the design concept and this has resulted in a cohesive visual outcome. Their collaboration definitely allowed for a degree of curation across both physical and digital spheres as they were able to brainstorm ideas from the outset. They also worked with Japanese illustrator Masao Takahata, who produced the original artwork that’s installed in neon or as a lightbox and brightens the space, adding yet another fun element. The shopfront’s new bi-fold window and glass doors have re-activated the streetscape by opening the kitchen up to passers-by. It places the theatre of the back-of-house front and centre and ensures the food is never overshadowed. There’s a sense of measured balance in this fit-out – the accent colours are bright but not ostentatious, the branding is bold but used with restraint – that makes this hospitality offering very inviting. Genesin Studio genesin.com.au  Photography courtesy Genesin Studio Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide plate table detail Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide tile details Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide bathroom Ban Ban Genesin Studio Adelaide shop front We think you might also like Infinity Spa by Space Popularabc
Happenings
HAP - Feature

Perth’s New Living Edge Showroom Is Next-Level

More than 300 design industry professionals flocked to the launch of Living Edge's three-storey showroom, filling the Federation-era warehouse with upbeat vibes, buzzing conversation, and later on, dancing in the rear laneway. It’s an attractive offer: the 1900s warehouse – which operated as a sewing machine repair factory up until 2017 – has been transformed into an elegant backdrop for high-end furniture and design objects, arranged over its three levels. The project commenced when local architects Fred and Jody Chaney teamed up with the building’s new owner to restore it; Living Edge then agreed to occupy the entire building and engaged HASSELL to undertake the interior fit out with senior associate Jonathan Lake taking the lead. “This was by far the most collaborative effort,” CEO Aidan Mawhinney said of the extended design and fit out process. The design powerhouse that is Living Edge has matured with a focus on global furniture design brands. This focus has seen a shift towards residential furniture in particular, while growing in strength in furniture for other areas, encapsulated in their tagline: Furniture for Life. This, a play on words as Aidan explains. "We want our range to touch people in every aspect of their life – be it their home life, social life, and even in their school life and anywhere a person interacts with furniture. The flip side to this tagline is that furniture from Living Edge should also last a lifetime. We have carefully selected some of the most prominent design brands from around the globe all of whom share the same values as Living Edge in terms of quality, authenticity, and sustainability." At the launch event, guests were greeted at the main sales desk; a sculptural bronze installation by NSW-based artist Morgan Shimeld. Just behind it, an oyster bar with freshly shucked Albany oysters set the tone for the festivities. The rear carpark area was converted into a courtyard for the evening, offering a wine bar and beer truck in collaboration with Voyager Wines, Whipper Snapper Distillery and Colonial Co Brewery. Upstairs, a pair of sushi chefs dish up fresh plates of sashimi. Downstairs, the moody face brick walls and dramatic lighting of the lower level provided an ideal backdrop for a multi-layered grazing table, resplendent with local cheeses and fruit. Although the building features multiple staircases and ramps that connect various split levels, guests were never far from the music thanks to a DJ in the courtyard, who pumped out tunes into the surrounding CBD late into the evening. Living Edge coasters and shopping totes emblazoned with a memorable quote summed up the overall vibe. “Take your pleasure seriously,” said Charles Eames, and the Perth design community had no trouble putting that maxim into action on Friday night. Living Edge livingedge.com.au [gallery columns="4" ids="86115,86116,86113,86112,86104,86121,86125,86118,86124,86123,86119,86093,86090,86089,86088,86087,86086,86085,86084,86083,86082,86081,86154,86079,86168,86167,86165,86160,86158,86156,86152,86149,86148,86147,86146,86145,86144,86140,86139,86138,86137,86134,86132,86131,86130,86128,86127,86126,86169"] Photography by Jillian McHugh  We think you might also like Onsa Chair by Living Edgeabc
Architecture
Homes
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A Boxy Brick Annexe Makes The Perfect Addition To This Terrace House

“The project is about making simple moves to improve the functionality for the family that lives there, whilst maintaining and celebrating the original character,” explains Breathe Architecture project architect Madeline Sewall, when asked about the studio’s renovation of a heritage listed terrace house in Port Melbourne. “A dilapidated 1980’s extension was demolished and replaced to bring in more natural light, better building performance, more amenity, landscaped courtyards, and warm honest internal materials.” Given its heritage status, the front façade of the house has been left in situ, while a new freestanding brick studio (housing a guest room, painting studio, workshop and laundry), addresses a quiet street to the rear of the property. It’s the extension that provides all the clues as to the strategic thinking and visual language employed by the architects. Informed by the street’s interface of roller doors and outbuildings, the addition is a utilitarian structure, rendered in stack bond brickwork, which gives the house an undeniably contemporary aesthetic. “We wanted to create a robust, informal structure that would tie in with this context while having an architectural language that would relate to the extension of the main house,” says Madeline. The team selected recycled red bricks for its sustainable, utilitarian nature to underscore this intent, with the studio parapet tying in with the parapet of the existing neighbouring structure. Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross shelving detail The team’s manipulation of space is evident in their strategic approach to the brief. Whilst the clients initially approached Breathe with the aim of a large family home, this desire was muted after the clients spent a year renting a small, urban apartment in Copenhagen. “They returned to Melbourne with a renewed perspective on how much space they actually need, and what their priorities are,” says Madeline. “We respected this decision tremendously, and we started schematic design over, with brief and budget cut in half. We prioritised updating the kitchen, living and dining and left the front portion of the terrace house and upstairs as is, with the original Victorian character intact.” The configuration and dynamics of the internal (and external) flow support the clients’ hospitable nature and love for casual entertaining. The kitchen features an oversized, functional island with a higher servery ledge, where family and guests gather while cooking or preparation is underway. Given their love of gardening, the clients landscaped the two courtyards themselves, one of which is shared by the main house and studio, providing a valuable external amenity to both. Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross kitchen area Materially, the manipulation of brick used both internally and externally, blurs the boundaries between inside and out. Inside, the effect is more intentional. Whilst some of the existing brick walls have been painted white, to reflect light, all the new brickwork has been left unpainted. The double brick walls also reduce the need for applied finishes. Australian Blackbutt timber veneer joinery and recycled Tasmanian Oak flooring bring additional warmth into the palette. Overall, this is a terrace house that underpins Breathe’s philosophy of ‘build less, give more’. “We also consider it our professional responsibility to help clients understand that they often need less than they may originally think – smaller footprints, less applied finishes, more robust materials and more efficient construction. These are the conversations we are constantly having with our clients through the design process.” Breathe Architecture breathe.com.au Photography by Tom Ross Dissection Information PH5 pendant light from Louis Poulsen VL45 Radiohus pendant light from Louis Poulsen Flare wall light in Black Glass from Ross Gardam Dioscuri 25 wall lights by Artemide Pitella 6820 door levers in Satin Chrome from Pitella Bathroom and sanitaryware from Reece Appliances from Fisher & Paykel Silverdare seat upholstery from Camira and Blazer Tiles from Academy Tiles and Defazio TopCer Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross kitchen Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross kitchen bench Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross bedroom window Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross bathroom Brick and Gable Terrace House Breathe Architecture CC Tom Ross bedroom doorway We think you might also like Shadow House by Nic Owen Architects. abc
Architecture
Around The World
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Homes
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H&P Architects Creates Life Within The Void

AgriNesture is a two-storey house on the edge of Mao Khe Coal Mine, 120 kilometres from Hanoi. The owner is the eldest son in the family: 40 years of age and a bachelor who has recently left his occupation as a miner. With an appreciation for the simple life, he spends the majority of his time at home in the company of his pets, chickens and bonsai plants. The previous, one-storey, fibrocement-roof house was dilapidated, so his brothers pitched in to have a new house designed and built for him. H&P Architects was chosen because they had designed architecture in Mao Khe that was appreciated by the family: BES pavilion, for example.

The brief set for H&P Architects was very basic: convenience for living and worshipping; ventilation and heat isolation because the house is orientated east-west; and cost-effectiveness. In response, H&P has taken this set of fairly standard requirements to do something simple yet testing of the unusual.

H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living

The two-storey house is quite literally a cube – 7mx7mx7m – with voids inside that can be rearranged later as needs arise. The outside looks simple but unusual: a non-plastered brick wall with neither details nor balcony. The structure and covering are fixed from the beginning but allow further development inward. A double-layered brick wall with buffer space enables the atmosphere to be cooled down in the summer but kept warm in the winter. Pre-installed windows in all directions, at different locations and in various sizes help maximize ventilation. H&P has paid close attention to the “new” daily life of the resident: trees are arranged in the voids (with skylights above), and the roof is designed as a vegetable garden because a garden on the ground could be destroyed by the chickens.

Microclimate effects of the house are more or less confirmed over the eight months in use, including cold winter, humid spring, and hot summer. Furniture from the original house remains in the new house. More importantly, the resident has quickly adapted to the house and found excitement to live with it, to begin a “new life”.

H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living In conversation, he excitedly said that every day he was moving up and down stairs numerous times in different ways, using different stairs – “such movement is nothing compared to working in the mine”. Because slag, coal, mud and soil were all too familiar materials, it is the roughness that brings the house closer to a home. Furthermore, the ventilation and lighting features of the house are not just pleasant design cues, but also play a large part in ensuring the resident’s comfort, a welcome contrast against a career spent in underground, enclosed mines. AgriNesture – whether accidentally or deliberately – has helped the resident to be both physically and mentally healthy.

H&P Architects want to experiment with using AgriNesture House as a standardised module with simplified structure – yet diversified forms and flexible spaces depending on a future client’s needs. AgriNesture is the idea of redeveloping rural communities based on the mix of housing and farming. In fact, the studio had originally planned to create a group of three modules (for three brothers), but only one was constructed this time around because the two other brothers did not yet need new residences.

H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living

For better practical application of the house, H&P Architects has some improvements to make; such as minimizing the skylight to maximize the roof garden area, making the double-skin brick walls “breathable”, sun-screening and rain-proofing for windows.

All in all, the house has shown a truth: If the architecture is designed with the heart – it will be received by the heart.

Photography by Nguyen TienThanh

H&P Architects hpa.vn

H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living H&P Architects AgriNesture | Habitus Living We think you might also like Stepping Park House by Vo Trong Nghia Architectsabc
Design Products
Furniture

Designer Brand NAU Now At David Jones

The Australian design brand NAU has joined the home collection of David Jones, alongside other designer brands new to the David Jones Home portfolio such as HAY, Gubi and Vitra. NAU is the brainchild of the founder and director of Cult, Richard Munao, and was born out of the desire to champion the creativity and unique style of Australian designers. NAU offers a collection of furniture and lighting by a collective of Australia’s leading designers, including Adam Goodrum, Tom Fereday, Kate Stokes, Adam Cornish and more, and now favourites from the NAU collection will be available on level three of the home department of David Jones’ Bourke Street store in Melbourne, as well as online through the David Jones website. Unveiled at an exclusive AW19 home brands launch event in late February, the NAU collection at David Jones Bourke Street will range from sofas and armchairs to dining tables and lighting. “As a brand that is dedicated to Australian creativity, authentic design and creating quality, timeless products, a partnership between NAU and David Jones seemed a natural fit,” says founder Richard Munao, “We’re delighted that Australian design now has a platform within the country’s most iconic retailer, and that David Jones customers have access to exceptional pieces by Australia’s most talented and spirited designers.” NAU’s collections have been charming the design community since launching in 2017 with designs suitable for both residential and commercial spaces. Elegant lounge furniture, modular shelving, unique lighting and more offer designers endless possibilities, and now thanks to David Jones, it’s more reachable than ever. NAU naudesign.com.au
The Nau section at David Jones, Melbourne. Photo by Jessie Obialor.

The Nau section at David Jones, Melbourne. Photo by Jessie Obialor.

The Nau section at David Jones, Melbourne. Photo by Jessie Obialor.

The Nau section at David Jones, Melbourne. Photo by Jessie Obialor.

abc
Design Products
Habitus Loves

Habitus Loves… Textures

Rombini by Mutina Tiles from Di Lorenzo

Rombini, launched by Mutina, can be combined to create various pattern and shape configurations, the results being nothing less than amazing. Di Lorenzo   

Dreamweaver Light from Pop & Scott

Inspired by the Fog & Morup woven lampshades of the 50s and 60s, Dreamweaver’s are individually hand-woven using the finest quality yarn. The intricate strands create a warm glow of light and add beauty to any interior setting. Pop & Scott  

New Volumes 01 by Artedomus

An inaugural collection for the home and office by Artedomus, New Volumes ™ explores and pushes the boundaries of a single natural material. Collection 01 explores Elba: a rich, complex stone 250 million years in the making, cut by machine and finished by hand into an object whose story is yet to be written. Artedomus New Volumes 1

Totem Stool by Totem Road

Raw simplicity designed by nature each Totem Stool is authentically unique. It has been hand-finished and is more than versatile, giving users the options to use it as a stool, side table or sculptural accent. Totem Road  

Clay Bottle from Fanuli

Each piece made by Italian ceramicist, Paola Paronetto, has a unique texture from adding paper pulp and fibre to the ceramic mixture, giving each piece a delicate and tactile quality that makes it a beautiful decorative piece for any space. Fanuli  

Mela Chair by Artisan

Distinctive in character and classic in style, this mid-century inspired occasional or dining chair is suitable for both residential and contract use. The idea behind the Mela chair was to create a piece that has a distinctive character, combining the typology of the classic chair with an upholstered shell and the poetic beauty of a wooden chair Artisan    

Poesia from Austral Bricks

The clear glass brick is a first for the Australian market. The collection’s solid glass construction allows architects and designers to create dynamic light-filled interiors, dazzling gallery spaces and transparent volumes the flow and interconnect. Austral Bricks Brickworks Glass Bricks orange  

Grain Traider by Lara Scolari for Designer Rugs

This rug from Lara Scolari Gallery features her signature organic forms and fluid shapes, inspired by memory, meditation, music and the culture and essence of Australia – each eye-catching rug conveys the same beautiful translucent colour palette of her paintings that reflect the natural landscape. Designer Rugs   We think you might also like this profile on Lara Scolariabc
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Celebrating The Bauhaus’ Centenary

Walter Gropius founded the Bauhaus school in Weimar, Germany, in 1919 with a utopian vision: to conceive and design a new modern future. And while it has become synonymous with progressive, modernist design, Gropius established the school with a craft-based manifesto. He believed the fusion of art and craft would help stimulate social regeneration for Germany’s working classes. Like the Arts and Crafts Movement in the nineteenth century, Gropius’ design reform responded to the effects of industrialisation. The Bauhaus emerged after a period of political, social and economic turmoil in Europe, in the aftermath of World War I, the German Revolution, Russian Revolution and months of civil war. Gropius and his avant-garde contemporaries wanted to positively impact society and translated their ideas and ideologies into the unity of all arts. Gropius’ vision unified architecture, sculpture and painting in a single creative expression. [caption id="attachment_85849" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Bauhaus Centenary Marcel Breuer, Tubular-Steel Table Set B 9 B9-9c, design 1927, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Gunter Lepkowski[/caption]   The school offered a craft-based curriculum that would train artisans and designers capable of creating useful, beautiful objects for this modern way of living. A preliminary course included the study of materials, colour theory and formal relationships in preparation for specialised workshops in metalworking, woodworking, cabinetmaking, pottery, typography, wall painting and weaving (for the ladies – who were discouraged from participating in other areas). [caption id="attachment_85846" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Bauhaus Centenary | Habitus Living Paul Klee, Postcard no. 4 for the Bauhaus exhibition in Weimar in summer 1923 (“The Sublime Side"), 1923, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin[/caption]   Craft served as a primary source of inspiration during these early years, as embodied by Marcel Breuer and Gunta Stölzl’s African Chair (1921). Made with painted wood and colourful textile weave, the highly decorated chair is the earliest surviving piece of Bauhaus furniture. The goals of the Bauhaus shifted in 1923, moving away from the craft model to emphasise mass production. Reflected by its new slogan “Art and Technology – a new unity,” the Bauhaus embraced the power and potential of the machine and industrial technology. An abstract and universal design language emerged, freed from history, tradition and national identity. Designers remade the everyday according to the laws of function and efficiency. They distilled forms to their simplest elements and rejected ornament and decoration. Marianne Brandt’s Teapot (1924) is a quintessential expression of the Bauhaus aesthetic with its geometry of forms, honest construction and handcrafted production that looks machine made. (Brandt was the only woman working in the metal workshop.) [caption id="attachment_85847" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Bauhaus Centenary | Habitus Living Marianne Brandt, Tea infuser (MT 49), 1924, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Photo: Gunter Lepkowski © VG Bild-Kunst Bonn 2019[/caption]   The cabinetmaking workshop, led by Marcel Breuer from 1924 to 1928, produced some of the most well-known and archetypal Bauhaus pieces, deconstructing conventional furniture forms to their essence, such as Breuer’s B3 Club Chair. The metal workshop developed prototypes for mass production, and the commercial success of the fabrics produced in the weaving workshop provided much-needed funds to keep the Bauhaus in operation. (Thank you, ladies!) [caption id="attachment_85848" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Bauhaus Centenary | Habitus Living Woman wearing a theatrical mask by Oskar Schlemmer and seated on Marcel Breuer’s tubular-steel chair, c.1926. Photo: Erich Consemüller, dress material: Elisabeth Beyer-Volger, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin © Dr Stephan Consemüller[/caption]   In 1925, the Bauhaus moved from Weimar to Dessau where Gropius designed a new building that would become an exemplar for modernist architecture with its steel-frame construction and glass curtain wall. Hannes Meyer succeeded Gropius as director in 1928. He stressed the importance of architecture and design for the public good but was replaced by Mies van der Rohe in 1930, pressured by the right-wing municipal government. The school moved to Berlin in 1930, and eventually shut its doors in 1933 due to the unstable financial condition of the school and the pressure of the Nazi regime. As Europe descended into war, many of the key Bauhaus figures emigrated to the United States, spreading their modernist approach to design underscored by a utopian vision. Both an idea and institution, the Bauhaus propagated its ideology through products of design that have influenced generations of architects and designers around the world for 100 years and counting. Indeed, as Mies van der Rohe stated: “Only an idea has the power to spread so widely,” Bauhaus Association 2019 is offering a program of events to celebrate the centenary. Under the motto “Reinventing the World,” the program explores the historical legacy of the Bauhaus as well as its significance for the present and future. The exhibition Original Bauhaus is on display from September 2019 until January 2020 at Berlinische Galerie, and the Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung building, which opened in 1979, is being extended with the addition of a new museum. [caption id="attachment_85850" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Bauhaus Centenary | Habitus Living Das Bauhaus-Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, 2015, architects: Walter Gropius, Alex Cvijanovic and Hans Bandel © Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, photo: Werner Huthmacher[/caption]   Bauhaus bauhause-dessau.de  We think you might also like A Reference Point For When East Met Westabc
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HABITUS HOUSE OF THE YEAR: PEOPLE’S CHOICE HITS CHANNEL 7

From Page to Stage It’s official. The jury’s back! Now this celebration of the best in residential design has taken the leap from its print and digital origins into television. A three-part mini-series will go to air on Sunday 3rd March on Channel 7 in March 2019. Showing the best of the 2018 selection from which four awards were handed out, the 2018 People’s Choice Award now embraces a new television audience. Vote for your favourite house and you’ll re-enter the draw to win a second chance Ultimate Design Hunter Prize Package valued at $50,000. Behind the Scenes Seeing the potential for a whole new audience beyond print and digital, Media Asia Pacific’s CEO, Raj Nandan, linked up with MWC Media’s Director, Mike Chapman, with a vision to take outstanding residential design to a whole new audience – turning a two-dimensional product into a three-dimensional journey through the best residential architecture. The Habitus House of the Year 2018 celebrated ten years of Habitus magazine bringing together the best and most innovative residential design from all over the Indo-Pacific. But the House of the Year project was the first time the magazine had brought together such an impressive and substantial; selection for readers to compare and draw inspiration from. House of the Year editors, Holly Cunneen and Paul McGillick, chaired a distinguished jury comprising Neil Burley, Howard Tanner, Karen McCartney and Singapore-based Cubes editor, Narelle Yabuka. The On-air Team Hosting the television show are architect, Peter Colquhoun, landscape designer and well-known television presenter, Jamie Durie, along with well-know television personality, Erika Heynatz. The original 25 selections will be re-visited by the team while a peer review panel from Industry Leaders CDK Stone, Fielders, Gaggenau, Living Edge, Zip Water and Habitus who will discuss and debate on air the merits of every project. The whole team is excited to reach a new audience and get them involved in the review process. “The amazing homes which I’ve visited,” says Peter Colquhoun, “have presented sensitive solutions to challenging sites while responding powerfully to some of the world’s most jaw dropping locations,”. “We are offering a new series aimed at not only entertaining and inspiring mums and dads, but delivering intelligent, informative insights into the world of architecture and design – that fellow industry professionals can also embrace. This is incredibly important and I believe a potential point of difference that will help establish Habitus House of the Year: The People’s Choice as the signature TV series of Architectural Homes.” Indesign Media would like to acknowledge the support of the architects and Industry Leaders who have shared their time and resources to help make Habitus House of the Year: The People’s Choice a reality. As a group, Indesign Media has big ideas for how Habitus will take architecture design and the associated products to a greater Design Hunter audience across the Region. Keep an eye on this space.   “Like a great house design the show is a remarkably, simple, strong concept, where the heroes are the homes.” – Peter Colquhoun. [gallery size="medium" columns="2" ids="85896,85895,85893,85894"]  abc