About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Learning The Ropes Of Designing Rugs

Across Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Auckland, the Evolve Workshops had a tremendously impressive turnout.  Taking inspiration from huge names such as Easton Pearson, Emma Elizabeth, Akira Isogawa, and bernabeifreeman, Lia Pielli – Designer Rugs’ own senior designer mediated the workshop as people sat there in awe of the process that goes behind making and designing rugs. Designer Rugs Evolve Awards Workshop Sydney | Habitus Living With a slideshow of images featuring rugs from The Great Gatsby movie set and previous Evolve Award finalists – to mention a few – attendees definitely left the workshops inspired; inspired to design rugs with a maximum of six colours, hand-tufted in 100% New Zealand Wool, detailed with Bamboo Silk, and produced in either cut pile or loop pile with the option of carving to design details. Marking the fourth edition of the Evolve Awards – with this year’s awards extending for the first time to Asia - Designer Rugs have established themselves as a supporter of the ever-growing designer landscape both in Australia and overseas. Designer Rugs Evolve Awards Workshop Sydney | Habitus Living Applications are open until 30 April, with winning prizes of up to $30,000 inclusive of a trip to Milan, forming part of the Designer Rugs Evolve Collection 2019, and a personal rug design to own! Evolve Awards evolve.designerrugs.com.au Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.au Photography by Sean Foster [gallery size="medium" ids="87405,87403,87400,87399,87397,87396,87395,87394,87393,87392,87386,87402,87390,87391,87387,87404,87388,87389"] We think you might also like Custom Rug Collaboration: Poco Designs and Designer Rugsabc
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The Many Faces of Tiny House Design

As a species, we are slowly coming to terms with the damage that excessive clutter can do, both to the environment and to our own mental health. Before the figurehead of the de-cluttering movement, Marie Kondo, came along, architects around the world were testing out better ways to live with a tiny house design. From Adelaide Hills to the dense metropolis of Tokyo, Habitus takes a look at five regional examples of small footprint homes that are big on joy.'  

CABN, Australia

Tiny House Design CABN Set in 180 acres of natural scrubland in the Adelaide Hills, CABN is a holiday cabin that offers guests an off-grid getaway with a minimal footprint. Sitting somewhere between caravanning, glamping and an Airbnb, the tiny house – called Jude – is set on wheels to capitalise on the nomadic potential of this nimble dwelling. Although the design itself draws from the compact squareness of a caravan, its dark wood detailing, amenable interiors and almost floor-to-ceiling windows make it feel more like a modern-day rustic cabin that drinks in the scenery. [gallery size="large" ids="87148,87151,87150,87147,87153,87154"] CABN. cabn.life    

House in Horinouchi, Japan

Tiny House Design House In Horinuchi Designed by Japanese architect Kota Mizuishi, House in Horinouchi is a two-storey (but still pocket-sized) home overlooking a river in the west of Tokyo. The home makes use of a narrow, triangular lot where the river and the road intersect. Not just a novelty space, Kota Mizuishi’s clients – a husband and wife and their young daughter – needed a design that could accommodate all the functions of a family home. The top-heavy home is divided into a number of small spaces with different vertical volumes: high ceilings for communal spaces such as the dining and kitchen area on the first floor and lower ceilings for bedrooms. Where height wasn’t possible, the architects enabled a sense of space through windows that open out in relation to the river. [gallery size="large" ids="87169,87165,87166,87171,87168,87167"] Photography by Hiroshi Tanigawa Mitzuishi Architecture Atelier miz-aa.com    

Tiny House Prototype, Australia

Tiny House Design Grimshaw Architects Australian firm, Grimshaw Architects, used a tiny house design to combat Australia’s housing crisis with their Tiny House Prototype. Built to raise money for homeless youth charity Kids Under Cover, the diminutive home – measuring just 35 square-metres – is a high-quality home that is also affordable. Created using laminated timber, the tiny house has a raised floor to allow for plumbing, electrical and building systems. This means it can be either used as an off-grid residence or can be plugged into a city’s infrastructure. The panelling that comprises the interior is light and highly flexible, enabling owners to customise living configurations according to their needs. As is, the micro dwelling was built to accommodate a queen-sized bed, kitchen, bathroom and living quarters.\ [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="87161,87162"] Grimshaw Architects grimshaw.global    

A Little Design Micro Flat, Taiwan

Tiny House Design A Little Design Designed by Taiwanese studio, A Little Design, in the high-density metropolis of Taipei, this micro-flat is tiny even by the principles of tiny house design. Formerly a piano studio, the flat measures 17.6 square metres. The architects made up for this footprint with a ceiling height of 3.4 metres and the inclusion of built-in furniture with plenty of storage space. Before it was converted into a home, the studio was too small to fit even the basics for living, such as a queen-sized bed and sufficient living space. By rearranging the floor plan, swapping the existing kitchen for a larger bathroom and combining the former with the entryway – the design team created more functional living proportions for their client. They even made use of the unwieldy concrete beam that ran through the centre of the studio, using it to create built-in cabinets. [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="87142,87143,87144,87146"] A Little Design Design.A.Little    

Hut on Sleds, New Zealand

Tiny House Design Crosson Designed by New Zealand firm Crosson Clarke, Hut on Sleds proves that tiny house design is not just for single living. The architects’ client – a family of five – required a beachside home that captured the simplicity of holiday living. Because of its location along the coastal erosion zone of the Coromandel Peninsula on New Zealand’s north island, all elements of the building had to be removable. This was a challenge that Crosson Clarke interpreted literally, placing the hut on its two thick wooden, namesake sleds that can move the dwelling inland, across the beach or onto a barge. Measuring 40 square-metres, the hut accommodates the family with a bathroom, two sleeping zones and a combined kitchen, living and dining area. It is also self-sustaining with the inclusion of rain-catchment tanks and a worm-tank waste system. Its raw material palette of timber cladding, flat sheet and glass is not only reminiscent of classic beach-style structures but is also well-equipped to the coastal conditions. When in use, Hut on Sleds connects to the view with a two-storey shutter on the front façade that winches open to form an awning above double-height steel-framed glass doors. When not in use, the tiny house can be completely closed up. [gallery size="large" ids="87159,87158,87157"] Crosson Architects crosson.co.nz We think you might also like Boneca Apartment by Brad Swartz Architectsabc
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The Two-Person Chair From Studio Folklore

Studio Folklore comprises five senior year students from King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology in Ladkrabang in Thailand; Lalita Kitchachanchaikul, Watcharin Pornrungruangkul, Ekburut Mee-Im, Chayakorn Phumchumphol and Sarach Kunapermisiri. And as it happens, the Marn Marn Chair is the result of a university project, launched for the first time during Chiang Mai Design Week exhibition in 2018. With the central theme of Karn-Kra-Tum which translates in English to “to do, to perform, and to carry out” the Marn Marn chair was categorised under the topic of Vernacular, prompting exhibitors to focus their art and products on a dialect spoken around Thailand. The exhibition aims to showcase local knowledge adapted and designed to suit and respond to today’s social contexts.  Marn Marn Chair Studio Folklore The Marn Marn chair is inspired by the Poo-Marn Yah-Marn mural by local Thai painter, Nan Bua, on the walls of the Thai Temple, Wat Phoomin in Nan province northern Thailand. Painted during the reign of the fifth monarch in Thailand in the 1800s, it quickly obtained a reputation of being called “whispering the love of the world” between husband and wife as the subjects in the painting was perceived as being slightly in physical contact. It was this perception that drove the five students behind Studio Folklore to come up with a concept for Marn Marn Chair. With the changing social behaviour and sexual orientation in Thailand today, the students questioned whether or not the two people within the mural were, in fact, spouses – and represented this through product design. “As humans, we have the ability to create suspicion and thought amongst behaviours within the society,” says Lalita.  Marn Marn Chair Studio Folklore The structure of the chair is formed in a way that allows people to discover interaction and intimacy amongst friends or strangers. Sitting two people at the same time, not one, Marn Marn uses steel to form bold lines, corresponding to its initial concept. Fabric and colour were used to juxtapose the gaunt characteristics of steel. Instead of designing the chair purely for functional purposes, Studio Folklore focused on the form and function of the chair to create new experiences for users. Following similar principles of designing for social impact, the success of the Marn Marn chair is not marked by its production, but through observation based on the user’s experience and response – one that is measured through organic changes occurring when people engage with it.  Marn Marn Chair Studio Folklore The Marn Marn chair is exemplary in its ability to balance design experimentation, social contexts and perception. Chiang Mai Design Week kmitlshowcase Marn Marn Chair behance.ne  Marn Marn Chair Studio Folklore  Marn Marn Chair Studio Folklore We think you might also like Framemust by Femme Atelier abc
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Architecture
ARC - Feature

Sibling Architecture Tackles Spatial Awareness

No matter how subconsciously, the spaces we live and move in have a profound influence on the ways in which we think and behave. If these spaces are compartmentalised, we can become less social and our activities more rigidly defined. This is the framework of control that many older housing typologies – in which the functions of individual rooms are set in stone, locked in by walls and utilities – maintain over us. But when this physical framework is shifted and opened up, our mental frameworks also have the capacity to become more creative -  Sibling Architecture proves this in Family Framework House. When Sibling Architecture was commissioned to rebuild the home of Melbourne-based artist couple Nadine Christensen and James Lynch (and their three children), it was exactly this combination of creativity and experimental frame-working that was built into the project’s core. Aptly named Family Framework House, the project rethought the compartmentalised grid of the old home, adding more space that can be reimagined and reconfigured by the family according to their needs throughout the day, and over the years. Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis balcony The original structure was a suburban brick home that was traditional right down to the wallpaper. Although James and Nadine had nurtured a garden around the house, after almost a decade of their ownership and several additions to their family, it was time to nurture the home itself. The front of the home – sitting behind a handsome brick façade – had a more formal arrangement of rooms, with a secluded sitting room and bedrooms coming off the hallway. Sibling Architecture decided to leave this half as it was, focusing instead on the back of the house with a vision to transform it into a more useable, flexible and communal area for the family of five. Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis kitchen A simple yet effective gesture, the main design coup was the relocation of the bathroom, which originally sat in the entrance corridor and blocked the flow from the front to the back of the house. By doing this, the architects invited sunlight into the house, which is now permeated by a morning glow each day. Eschewing exotic materials in favour of functional ones, Sibling Architecture opted for a utilitarian palette of standardised plywood panel and fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) – the latter a lightweight, low-cost and colourful material that provides privacy screening for the occupants. Although durable in nature, the choice of FRP also allowed playfulness into the house through its pop-colour potential. In the bathroom, for instance, the palette flips between white and watermelon and, throughout the home, layered meshes and transparent films come together in blocks of blue and watermelon. Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis dining Not only does the material palette allow for an unpretentious sense of retro playfulness, but its durability also opens up the opportunity for constant rearrangement. It also pays homage to the vernacular of modernism and mid-century design as it was manifested in Melbourne – an era that James was particularly interested in, having used its references for his own work previously. “The brief asked for this condition – the ability for the spatial configuration to nurture family connection whilst maintaining individual sanity,” says Jane Caught, director and co-founder of Sibling Architecture. “The person making dinner can still parlay with the homework undertaken on the dining room table, and the person enjoying a glass of wine and the view to the garden on the couch. If the dinner becomes all-absorbing, or the homework and wine drinking gets rowdy, they can create an illusion of peace by manipulating a series of gridded pink screens along the kitchen joinery. Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis interior “The coloured films on the layers of glazing not only bring a strong yet intangible wash of colour into the rooms, but their graphic outlines allowed us to reference some tropes of mid-century architecture – the butterfly roof, the dome, the diagonal gestures. Layered on the sliding doors, these also provide a sense of movement.” Sibling Architecture siblingarchitecture.com Photography by Christine Francis Dissection Information Cladding in 'Shadowclad' from Carter Holt Harvey Feta stain to cladding from Aqua Oil Persimmon benchtop by Laminex Voga 'Rosa' tiles by Classic Ceramics Sphera Evolution in Lapis vinyl flooring by Forbo Bathroom tiles in White and Dark Salmon supplied by Cerdomus Bathroom fixtures in white Mizu Drift collection from Reece Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis shower Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis shower Family Framework House Sibling Architecture cc Christine Francis courtyard We think you might also like The Spirit Of Place According To Palinda Kannangaraabc
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Furniture

m.a.d. And Their Honest Way Of Designing

Established in 2010 by a team of likeminded, internationally experienced product designers and manufacturers, m.a.d. furniture emerges year on year with a suite of products that are inspiring, functional and affordable for the modern urban dweller. The company's operations are based in Asia and include the ‘m.a.d. lab' product development and testing facility, combined with a stand-alone product assembly plant and over 20 employees. After years of fluidly working together and alongside each other for big retailers distributing around the world, Matt Cole and Daniel Given wanted to start designing and manufacturing products that they could take ownership over and find a passion for. But mainly, they wanted to create pieces that they would want to live with. m.a.d. furniture | Habitus Living Chicago-based Mark Daniel of Slate Design soon joined the m.a.d. and the trio began releasing two or three, 20-piece collections a year. Mark, the creative mind who has a background in architecture, focuses on distilling design to a true elemental form. "Our designs are rooted in a classically modern design style. You look at the piece and immediately understand how it’s made. It’s the structure that’s the beauty of the piece," he explains. "What that does is create a line of furniture that can go in a lot of different interior settings because it is so classically simple,” he continues. The result? A timeless, bulletproof quality. m.a.d. furniture | Habitus Living As workspaces continue to appear casual and even domesticated, there is less disparity between the two once greatly different commercial and domestic markets. And that is globally observed by the team at m.a.d. As a result of this, the later collections blur the line between being at once suitable for a residential environment and other landscapes, too – such as hospitality and educational interiors in projects like Domain Chandon in Yarra Valley and the University of Adelaide. As timelessness is a key ingredient for the m.a.d. team, the design integrity of each piece is maintained through its materiality and production techniques. Currently shipping products to over 20 countries worldwide, the team have been experts in the manufacturing processes in China for over a decade, allowing them to construct products with a remarkable quality and a competitive price point. Excited about the years to come and further into other industries, “it is difficult to stop doing something you really enjoy doing, and that’s what drives us,” says Dan. m.a.d. madfurnituredesign.com m.a.d. furniture | Habitus Living   m.a.d. furniture | Habitus Living m.a.d. furniture | Habitus Living We think you might also like Domain Chandon Winery by Foolscap Studioabc
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Robson Rak Brings A Heritage Home Into The 21st Century

Expanding old houses is often a solution for the needs of a growing family, but it can be challenging to find equilibrium between the old and new. For an architect, that means considering and respecting the home’s original footprint and responding to that with a carefully curated spatial configuration. Reflecting the family’s love for the mid-century architecture, Robson Rak has designed Pavilion house with a particular composition that balances the integrity of its existing 1888 Victorian residence with a modern new glass pavilion. The brief for the architects was to design a welcoming and expansive home that would not only connect to the surroundings but also elevate the existing fabric features. Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath corridor Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath living After spending significant time in L.A., the clients grew fond of mid-century modernist architecture. So when they returned to Melbourne, they sought out Robson Rak architects to renovate their Melbourne home with the desire to add a pavilion that enabled a close connection to the outdoors – a feature that the existing Victorian home did not provide. L.A.-style Pavilion and the existing Victorian terrace are more aligned internally than they may appear at first glance. Separating the two structures with two internal courtyards also brought lush greenery into every room, giving it a sense of space and an abundance of natural light. Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath open plan living Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath dining “In honour of the home’s original features, we chose to adopt a classical and somewhat elegant approach when selecting the new finishes and fittings for the house,” explains the Robson Rak team. With rose gold highlights by way of the tapware, herringbone floor tiles in the bathroom, and Ashlar-patterned limestone internal and external walls, the details serve to reference many of the dwelling’s heritage characteristics. With an appreciation for the high level of craftsmanship behind the Victorian home, Robson Rak Architects restored the grand marble fireplace, ornate Victorian cornices, arches and high ceilings – and recreated the interior to function appropriately for a contemporary family lifestyle. Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath living Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath bath Robson Rak’s approach to Pavilion House allows each distinct architectural style to appear in conversation rather than in competition. Robson Rak robsonrak.com.au Photography by Shannon McGrath Styling by Swee Lim Dissection Information Sculptures by Mark Galea, Caleb Shea, Ewen Coat Vessels by Emma Davies Wiggle chair from Vitra supplied by Space Furniture Ligne Roset Grillage settee and armchair from Domo Butterfly chair and Tio table and chair set from Luke Furniture Vitra tripod clock from Domo Lunar and Bowie vase by Sarah Ellison Studio Edvard mirror from Domo Provence bowl from Great Dane Tricolour vase from Great Dane Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath indoor outdoor Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath outdoor Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath pool Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath pool pavilion Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath courtyard Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath backyard Pavilion House Robson Rak Architects CC Shannon McGrath nook window We think you might also like MH House by Architects Inkabc
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The Resourceful Zero Waste Bistro Pop-Up

The Scandinavians have done it again! Commissioned by the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York as part of the NYCxDesign program, the Zero Waste Bistro breathed new life into the largely oversaturated sustainability conversation. Co-curated by Harri Koskinen and Linda Bergroth, and designed by Bergroth, the pop-up restaurant focused on new material innovations and making sustainable design cool again. Guests walked into a mottled silver-blue space composed of Durat panels made from recycled Tetra Pack – a packaging material commonly used for milk cartons. Durat is a unique, sustainable solid surface material that contains recycled plastic and is 100 per cent recyclable. The whole concept behind the four-day project was to pop-up and disappear without a trace. The Zero Waste Bistro managed to achieve this in every conceivable way, including the completely repulpable coffee cups by Koktamills. From the long communal dining table, which has since been rehomed to The Cooper Hewitt Museum garden. The construction materials themselves, such as the Durat panels have been donated and given another life. Zero Waste Bistro New York cafe seating The Finnish company has been pioneering in the circular economy, minimising the need for virgin raw materials. As an additional nod to sustainable design through longevity, famed Finnish design brand Artek, known for its clean and minimalist pieces that last for generations, provided the furniture for the space (also now being reused). This project highlights through its careful materials selection and acute attention to detail just how easy (and cool) it can be to design sustainably for a circular economy. Artek artek.fi Photography by Nicholas Calcott Zero Waste Bistro New York tetra pack recycled Zero Waste Bistro New York recycled architecture We think you might also like Infinity Spa by Space Popularabc
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Chan Architecture Leverages A Unique Urban Context

Boundary Street House by Chan Architecture is undeniably striking. Its unabashedly angular composition sets up a bold but appropriate architectural tension with the adjacent Victorian Worker’s cottage. “The conceptual framework of the project was to draw inspiration from the industrial warehouse building type, and re-work it to suit a residential brief,” explains Anthony Chan. “The project is unique in its context and so provided an opportunity for a distinctive design.” Bold, angled geometries define the façade which features recycled brickwork and black sheet metal cladding. “The façade was then ‘peeled open’ via the use of perforated mesh exposing the steel structure underneath,” Anthony adds. “This created varying levels of transparency and privacy whilst allowing natural light into the entrance area.” Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt facade Anthony’s clients sought a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house with flexible, open-plan, living spaces. The Chan Architecture team gained intimate understanding of how the clients planned to use each space in order to craft a fully bespoke response. Despite the triangulated nature of the site, every living space benefits from access to sunlight and natural ventilation, ensuring a holistic level of comfort throughout the house. “Due to the passive design principles that we employed, the house is comfortable all year round, only requiring minimal heating and cooling,” says Anthony. “In addition, the downstairs living spaces wrap around a north-facing internal courtyard, providing natural light and ventilation to the main living spaces and the double height entry area allows for hot air to be flushed out of the house during summer.” Other passive design principles that Chan Architecture adopted include the strategic positioning of living spaces and windows for solar gain in winter, and sliding doors for cross ventilation in summer. “Extensive brickwork was also used on the eastern façade to add to the thermal mass of the building in winter,” continues Anthony. “This was all to minimise the amount of energy required to heat and cool the house throughout the year.” Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt kitchen Overall, Boundary Street House proves what a thoughtful, valiant and holistic response to context, site and environment can achieve for its inhabitants. Chan Architecture chanarchitecture.com.au Photography by Tatjana Plitt Dissection Information Recycled brickwork from Paddy’s Bricks Perforated metal from Locker Group Tiles by Classic Ceramics Stone tops by Caesarstone Timber flooring supplied by Tait Flooring Windows from AWS Windows Appliances from Miele Bathroom fittings from E&S Trading, Bentons, Rogerseller and Parisi Carpets by Normal Ellison Carpets Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt dining Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt dining outdoor Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt stairs Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt hanging light Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt stairs down Boundary Street House Chan Architecture CC Tatjana Plitt exterior We think you might also like Frankel House by Aamer Architectsabc
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Habitus Loves

Habitus Loves… Habitus House Of The Year

Lau Console from Stylecraft

Both simplistic and timeless, the Lau Console features an inclined leg with a refined curve connecting the top. Used as a decorative piece in a living room, hallway or bedroom. It can also be paired with a stool to form a discreet, functional work surface or modern bedroom vanity. Manufactured from solid Ash, finished in a choice of four timber stains; black, natural, grey and white.  Stylecraft Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Living  

Lowtide from ECC Lighting & Furniture

Lowtide is one of a kind, a robust and natural coffee table. The marks left in the sand on the beach at low tide gave designer Roderick Vos the idea to resemble these fascinating structures with help of a computer controlled milling technique. Lowtide is available in natural, white wash or smoked oak (anthracite). ECC Lighting & Furniture

Savannah Collection by CULT

Monica Förster has joined forces with Erik Jørgensen to create Savannah - a sofa, armchair and set of side tables of uncompromising quality hand-constructed in choice natural materials. Savannah comprises a wooden structure wrapped with heavy saddleback leather, creating a beautiful framework for the upholstery. CULT Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Living  

Three Positions Multipurpose Lamp by Living Edge

The Beaubien Collection’s strong black lines bend in and out of space, moving effortlessly between simplicity and ornamentation. Round and cubic brass connectors complete the lamps’ structures and add a rich material contrast to the powder coated rods. Living Edge  

Brichello Stools from Fanuli

Brichello stools are all completely unique made using the beautiful and charming timber from the canals of Venice. A Brichello barstool makes a vibrant statement in a private residence, in the bar area or the sit-up kitchen bench, or equally in a contract commercial setting: a bar, bistro, restaurant, cafe or corporate space. Fanuli Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Living  

IC Lights F2 by Euroluce

Designed by Michael Anastassiades for FLOS, it comprises an aluminium base and tubular stem, fitted with a blown glass opal diffuser. There is a choice of brushed brass or chrome body, and the fitting is supplied with a dimmer control on the power cord. Euroluce

Antique Black Granite from CDK Stone

Providing a statement in texture, Antique Black Granite adds a subtle depth to any design. With intricate tonal details, Antique Black Granite offers a sophisticated balance to any colour palette. CDK Stone Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Living  

HydroTap from Zip Water 

The appliance features a single under bench command centre including full colour interactive touch screen display with pin code protection, boiling water safety mode, 3 energy saving modes including sensor activated "sleep when its dark" and 0.2 micron water filtration. Zip Water   

Built-In Side-By-Side Refrigerator / Freezer from Sub-Zero Wolf

The Sub-Zero Built-in side-by-side refrigerator keeps food fresher with dual refrigeration and an advanced air purification system inspired by NASA technology, featuring an intelligently-designed ice and water dispenser. Sub-Zero Wolf Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Living  

BO 45 Ovens from Gaggenau

Driven by principles within the professional kitchen, inspired by the needs and experiences of the professional chef, Gaggenau has introduced the same senses and standards into the home with the 400 oven series. Gaggenau Habitus Loves... Habitus House Of The Year | Habitus Livingabc
Fixed & Fitted
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Accessories

Teel’s Functionality Complements Classical Design

Phoenix Tapware’s newest collection, Teel, is about proportion and form, striking a balance that will truly stand the test of time. “Teel originated through the exploration of how two shapes organically flow together,” says Ban Liu, Phoenix’s senior industrial designer. “I started to blend an oval into a circle, which resulted in the basis of Teel’s unique and dynamic form.” Ban has thoroughly considered each element in order to maintain Teel’s slender profile. The body, internal cartridge, aerator, outlet height and width, as a result, are all in proportion to one another. “I wanted to convey sophistication and draw on my manufacturing knowledge to create seamless, highly finished tapware designs which are pleasing to the eye,” says Ban. Teel Phoenix Tapware | Habitus Living The neat seam detail that connects the mixer handle to its body has a sleek and low-profile with a concealed dome. Available in four finishes, chrome, brushed nickel, gunmetal and matte black, Teel’s versatility ensures that it will fit into a wide range of interiors, kitchens and bathrooms. In line with the company’s values, Teel is manufactured with high-quality precision and durability. Since 1989, Phoenix Tapware has garnered the reputation of being a leader within the Australian plumbing and bathroom industry, winning multiple awards as recognition of their consistent commitment to excellence and innovation. Phoenix Tapware phoenixtapware.com.au Teel Phoenix Tapware | Habitus Living   Teel Phoenix Tapware | Habitus Living Teel Phoenix Tapware | Habitus Living We think you might also like Phoenix's Contemporary Finishes Collectionabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

In The Limelight: Bronte House By Nick Bell Architects

There is a mutually dependent relationship between light and materials. Light draws out textures and contrasts in materials, and the finish and colour of materials can affect the distribution of light in a room. Nick Bell Architects used a combination of warm and cold materials in Bronte House, working in harmony with natural light to create a warm and welcoming environment. Bronte House is home to a family with three children. They returned to Australia after 10 years abroad and purchased a property in Bronte to be close to the beach. They engaged Nick Bell Architects to design a new house that would see the children through their teenage years and beyond, and accommodate their large extended family for entertaining and overnight visits. Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson open window Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson pool “I know the area well and was conscious of the context,” says Nick, founder of Nick Bell Architects. “I wanted to develop a design that would sit comfortably in the streetscape, which features a lot of wide, gabled period homes and Californian bungalows.” The design team, therefore, kept the house fairly understated with a gabled roof and dark cladding, and timber and bricks recycled from the demolition to add texture and colour. This form and palette informed the interior of the house, as did the need for as much natural light as possible, despite the constraints of the site. The rear of the house faces east, and the property slopes from north to south with close neighbours either side. Consequently, the house to the north sits at a higher level, making sunlight, privacy and overlooking an issue. To resolve this, a double-height brick void extends along the side of the lounge and dining area, with large skylights on the northern edge and wrapping around to the east. This brings morning and all-day sun into the living area, as well as the upper-level study that floats above. Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson dining Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson living dining “The natural light washes the feature face-brick wall, creating different lighting effects throughout the day,” says Nick. The light also reflects off the polished concrete floor, brightening the space and providing thermal mass. The recycled bricks and concrete floor form part of a low-maintenance material palette that offers a complementary contrast of cool and warm surfaces. Timber joinery provides texture and colour in the kitchen, designed to be the focal point of the house for the family who enjoy cooking, and warms the cooler materials of natural stone, polished concrete, aluminium and glass. The timber-lined ceiling stretches across the dining room and covered courtyard, with a lower height and dark colour creating a more intimate sense of space next to the light and open lounge and kitchen. The timber and glass also blur the lines between interior and exterior space, as well as the face-brick wall as it extends the length of the backyard. Nick Bell Architects nickbellarchitects.com

PMD Build (builder) pmdbuild.com.au

Photography by Tom Ferguson Dissection Information Carra marble tiles in Brass and Stone from Skheme Rich Brilliant Willing Palindrom pendant from Koda Ligne Roset Ruche Sette Sofa from DOMO High utility barstool by Stellar Works from Living Edge PP130 Circle Chair by Hans J. Wegner from CULT Molloy coffee table by Adam Goodrum from CULT Farfalla rug by Emma Elizabeth from Designer Rugs Bel mirror from Jardan Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson living Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson kitchen living Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson breakfast bench Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson study Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson bedroom Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson bedside table Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson bath Bronte House Nick Bell Architects CC Tom Ferguson sink We think you might also like Split End House by Mártires Doyleabc
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An Iron Collection By Magis

Building on a wealth of shared research and experience, French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec launched Officina as part of a long-standing partnership with Magis. Consisting of sofas, dining and occasional chairs, tables and accessories, the form of the collection visibly references the marriage between a new contemporary, creative language and an ancient fabrication process – iron forging. Throughout history, the iron forging process has been used to shape metal by pressing it between the hammer and the anvil, to result in a production of everyday objects and decorative artefacts. Officina Collection Magis Dedece outdoor table As a result, the simplicity of the design is combined with an allure of raw material, ensuring that every piece in the collection is unique. With a distinct industrial characteristic and refined silhouette, the Officina collection from Magis will elevate the interiors of any residential environment. The Officina collection from Magis is now available from Dedece showrooms and online. Dedece dedece.com Officina Collection Magis Dedece candle holder Officina Collection Magis Dedece chairs Officina Collection Magis Dedece chair We think you might also like Iron Maiden House by CplusCabc