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Architecture
Around The World
Interiors
Places

Visit Shishi-Iwa House For A Social Retreat In The Japanese Mountainside

An idyllic resort within a mountainous, picturesque setting of the Nagano Prefecture, an hour away from Tokyo, Shishi-Iwa House sits like a well-fitted glove within its context. Crafted in a curvilinear formation with an undulating roof that mimics the treeline of the canopies of the surrounding forest, the retreat focuses on creating connections with nature from the outside inward and, likewise, from the inside to the outside, allowing the resort’s garden to set a living backdrop via strategic openings to encourage outdoor access and views. Designed by the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Shigeru Ban, Shishi-Iwa house anchors its design on the notion that architecture can create a restorative and rejuvenating atmosphere by reinforcing human connections to nature and to each other. Shigeru designed the resort to facilitate social interactions by planning the retreat around its social spaces. The resort’s Grand Room acts as an anchoring social area with direct access to a garden and links to three clusters of living quarters, each formed by a common area kitchenette and several guest rooms. Visitors can retreat to their guest rooms – envisioned as mini-sanctuaries by themselves – or choose to socialise in the plentiful common areas with each other and other guests. Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan grand room Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan balcony views Like with his other projects, Shigeru approached the design of the retreat with a sense of exploration and innovation. To minimise the impact on the surrounding environment, Shigeru used a building approach of transporting timber frames sandwiched by pre-fabricated plywood panels to the site to construct a modular, yet curvilinear, structure that enabled only a minimal disruption of the existing forest. A limited and warm palette of materials and textures adds consistency throughout the public and private quarters of the resort to enhance a seamless flow of spaces that all connect to the surrounding nature. Known for his experimentation with unusual materials, specifically cardboard, Shigeru fitted out the interiors of Shishi-Iwa House with timber and paper tubes to create a uniquely warm interior ambience. “I was interested in developing a distinct design language befitting to its beautiful location,” says Shigeru. “Timber was our material of choice for the design, used to heighten the sense of warmth and coherence throughout the boutique retreat.” Shigeru Ban Architects shigerubanarchitects.com Shishi-Iwa House shishiiwahouse.jp Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan library Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan guest room Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan guest room Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan exterior garden Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan roof surrounds Shishi-Iwa House Shigeru Ban Japan landscape We think you might also like Tsingpu Yangzhou Retreat by Neri & Huabc
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Furniture
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What's On

3 Furniture Brands To Know

Coastal furniture company FLOC Studio was established in 2015 in Torquay and Avoca Beach. The name Flock (with a k) in its original sense is defined by ‘a body of people,’ then later transferred to a group of animals/birds. FLOC is a place for adventurers, influenced by natural elements and coastal architecture. With this in mind, FLOC brings the best quality and functional brands from around the world. These products resonate deeply with the firm’s core values and beliefs in delivering a harmonious balance between living simply and living well. FLOC collaborates with furniture, homewares and lighting brands, designers and creatives that practice a holistic passion for exquisite craftsmanship and who share the same enthusiasm for life. From overseas to Australia and New Zealand, these three inspiring brands are an extension of the FLOC philosophy.   WOUD A love for honest design, Danish design brand WOUD offers a high range of quality furniture and interior design. Products are thoughtfully crafted and handpicked to share and strengthen the vision of the brand. Focusing on form, function and materiality, WOUD stays true to the simplicity and innovation ingrained in Nordic design tradition. Timeless Scandinavian design shines through with meaningful pieces by WOUD. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="89989,89991,89990"] Wewood A brand that strives for excellence, Wewood was established in 2010 under the brilliance of Carlos Alfredo. A wood furniture manufacturing company, this Portuguese brand’s heritage is grounded in more than five decades of production. Wewood is a brand that demonstrates the commitment to artistry and grace in traditional high-quality craftsmanship. The perfect blend of design and woodworking, each piece is born from the inspiration and creativity of the most talented artisans and designers and turned into reality by the wisdom of Wewood’s craftsmen. Wewood are expert, passionate in furniture that celebrates Portuguese culture through design. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="89992,89993,89994"] Kristina Dam Kristina Dam Studio designs are simple and graphic, paired with high levels of detail and craftsmanship. Architect and designer Kristina Dam founded her studio in 2012 with inspiration from great Danish designers twisted with her take on contemporary Nordic Minimalism. A penchant of art, travel and architecture, her designs speak to minimalist and sculptural elements shown through honest, genuine and natural materials. A legacy that thrives on its Nordic design inheritance, Kristina Dam Design Studio is purely and locally European in production. Simplicity with an attitude, Kristina Dam Studio believes in aesthetic, durable end elegantly bold design. [gallery ids="89995,89996,89997"] This year at Saturday Indesign, FLOC Studio is partnering with Eco Timber to create a winter wonderland. Set at 418 Burnley St, Richmond, the space will be decorated with a fire and warming festivities, making it the ideal space for a talk and workshop session this weekend. But wait, there’s more – FLOC Studio will be giving away two Mono Black Lounge Chairs by WOUD! Catch FLOC Studio and these impressive brands at Saturday Indesign 2019 this Saturday, Melbourne 22 June!

With only a few days left until the weekend, don’t miss the excitement and make sure you register now!

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Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

Design According To Heritage And Climate: Shaun Lockyer

Leanne Amodeo: Can you describe your particular type of regional modernism? Shaun Lockyer: As a practice, we try to articulate the specific connection between what makes things unique to a particular place: its culture and architectural vernacular, and the experience of living in that place. We tend to focus on sub-tropical residential projects and definitely draw inspiration from their context. Having said that, I think what especially interests us is resilient forms of architecture, which is why we’ve been looking at modernist-inspired Brazilian homes that are appropriate to the Australian climate and South East Asia, where environmentally responsive design is prolific. What’s the most important consideration when designing for climate? We want to dispel the myth that ephemeral, lightweight structures floating on the edge of the landscape are a robust response to climate. I think this is a cultural narrative that exists, particularly in Brisbane, but for us, we’re trying to find more robust forms of architecture that are thermally consistent and resilient in the long term. To that end, we’re investigating materials and architectural forms that can endure harsher weather. So the emphasis is on solid constructions that fit within the landscape and have a sense of permanence that perhaps a lot of older buildings of this type don’t have.

We want to dispel the myth that ephemeral, lightweight structures floating on the edge of the landscape are a robust response to climate.

How soon in the design process do you determine a scheme’s materiality? It’s important not to approach a project with a preconceived idea of what it should or shouldn’t be because any project by necessity has to be responsive to budget, client interests, context and climate. The things we bring to every residence we design are an aspiration for honest materiality and a more relaxed yet robust aesthetic. Rather than use precious or glitzy materials, we’re drawn to stone, timber and concrete that embody natural colour and texture. And very early on in the project we glean from the clients their likes and dislikes so we’re all on the same page. In that way, we can achieve an outcome that’s much more holistic in its design response. [caption id="attachment_89838" align="alignnone" width="1170"]The Greenhouse CC Scott Burrows Shaun Lockyer Architects The Greenhouse[/caption] How did you arrive at the material palette for Z House’s kitchen? Z House’s clients had seen a number of our previous residences and were interested in what we do as a practice. They were very open to our approach, which gave us the opportunity to express things in a way that was different from a lot of our previous projects. Timber features heavily in the outdoor space and because the kitchen has such a strong connection to the outside, it made sense to extend this material indoors. Alongside the timber, we liked the idea of using the heavier blocks to give the space some gravity. The house is very light and bright and the combination of timber and black finishes provides a nice counterpoint to this.

The things we bring to every residence we design are an aspiration for honest materiality and a more relaxed yet robust aesthetic.

What’s the secret to reconciling old and new in the kitchen when dealing with heritage projects such as The Terrace?  It has to be project and client specific because we could have the same set of raw materials for two different clients and one will be drawn to preserving what’s already there and the other will want to build anew as much as heritage regulations allow. Of course, we have our own interests, but it would be irresponsible not to consider the interests of the clients. In the case of The Terrace, the clients absolutely loved the original fabric and felt it was important to preserve its history and cultural significance and retain as much of this as possible. It’s an old home that’s evolved over a number of iterations and so it afforded us a degree of pluralism, allowing us to draw inspiration from a number of different things in the one space. The outcome expresses a clear transition from the southern elevation, where we retained a lot of the existing materials, to the north, where a lot of new interventions were made. [gallery size="large" columns="2" ids="89841,89840"] In what way does the bathroom in the Greenhouse residence support the project’s sustainability agenda?  Greenhouse, more than any other residential project in our portfolio, has a strong sustainability agenda, thanks to the clients. Part of this is on a technical level in regards to materials selected and the decision to use low VOC applications. But from a lifestyle point of view, it’s on acreage and the clients wanted us to design spaces that engaged with the outside in a way that wouldn’t be possible in the city. The back of the main bathroom slides away completely, for example, and the clients can step straight into the shower from the land. It’s completely transparent, with a strong physical and visual connection to the landscape. So there’s no privacy whatsoever and this was deliberate, but there’s no necessity for it, because of its isolated location. What new trends will we be seeing in kitchen and bathroom design?  In the bathroom, we’re starting to see a massive shift towards the use of stone porcelain. And in the kitchen, there’s a desire for a stronger connection with the outdoors, so there will be a greater need to incorporate more kitchen infrastructure outside, which is as much a response to climate as anything else. Shaun Lockyer Architects lockyerarchitects.com.au Photography by Cathy Schusler and Scott Burrows [gallery columns="2" size="large" ids="89844,89843"] We think that you might also like Folkhouse by Shaun Lockyer Architects abc
What's On
Happenings
HAP - Feature

WORKSHOPPED19: A Chance To See The Latest In Emerging Design

What do we covet, keep and reference as contemporary examples of great design? This June and July at the Australian Design Centre, WORKSHOPPED19 will be showcasing the very best in new Australian design by emerging and established designers. For WORKSHOPPED19, 37 designers have been selected to showcase their work in answering the brief: Fit for Purpose. Does the chair, table or lamp do what you’d hoped it would? Is it comfortable, functional, do you smile when you look at it? Since launching in 2001, the annual WORKSHOPPED exhibition has presented the work of over 450 Australian designers through its 18 exhibitions. ADC and Workshopped have joined together in 2018 to present the exhibition and awards at the ADC in Darlinghurst. Awards will be presented for the WORKSHOPPED19 winning design, along with a people’s choice, mentorship and other awards. The exhibition is a wonderful platform for both emerging and established designers, whether working in product, furniture and lighting. Established in 1964, Australian Design Centre (ADC) is one of Australia’s most important and innovative arts organisations, that creates opportunities for people to engage with design, craft and creativity through dynamic and high quality touring exhibitions and workshops. WORKSHOPPED19 runs from June 14 to July 24, 2019 at the Australian Design Centre, 101 -115 William Street, Darlinghurst. [gallery columns="4" ids="89923,89924,89925,89926,89927,89928,89929,89930,89931,89932,89933,89934,89935,89936,89937,89938,89939,89940,89941,89942"] WORKSHOPPED workshopped.com.au  abc
Architecture
Around The World
Interiors
Places

Timeless, Elegant Interiors At St Regis, Hong Kong

One of the most celebrated of Hong Kong’s new generation of designers, André Fu (founder of AFSO), has completed what is perhaps his most ambitious project yet – the interiors for a landmark hotel in the city’s legendary (and bustling) Wan Chai district. Fu’s St Regis interior evokes the hotel brand’s origins in turn-of-the-century US opulence as well as some of Hong Kong’s traditional, but perhaps lesser known, design icons. Fu began the interior design process for the 27-storey tower by looking at the first St Regis built in New York by John Jacob Astor IV in 1904. But he brought the hotel into twenty-first century Hong Kong by delving into his personal childhood memories of Wan Chai – the traditional pawnshops, the old police station and the Bauhaus-style market. André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong lobby fireplace André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong elevator corridor Guests step off the busy Wan Chai streets into an aesthetic reminiscent of a luxurious private Manhattan mansion. The 580-square-meter port cochere has stone-clad walls more than eight meters high. Ornate lanterns and sconces were inspired by the nineteenth-century gas lamps of old Hong Kong. Oversized bronze panelled doors and a majestic indoor waterfall add to the opulence. Upstairs, the hotel’s main public area is the Great Room. Soaring ceilings and expansive windows flood the room with light. Fu opted for a palette of cool grey and sage green complemented by lush foliage. Two massive solid silver marble reception desks bring an architectural symmetry to the space. Equally over-sized is the statement chandelier – designed as a bespoke arrangement of Fu’s Tac/Tile lighting collection for Lasvit in tribute to Hong Kong’s renowned striking skyline. André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong staircase André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong seating Outside, the terrace incorporates a 2.5-meter traditional moon gate. Here, chairs and tables from Fu’s Rock Garden collection for Janus et Cie establish a feeling of peaceful respite. Inside, the St Regis Bar evokes New York with rich tweeds, brass, bronze, oak and leather. A hand-painted mural by Beijing artist Zhang Gong celebrates some of Hong Kong’s icons. Upstairs, the hotel’s 129 guest rooms are decked out in chalky white, mineral grey, taupe and mauve. In some of the rooms, Fu adds a shock of colour with orange-lacquered doors. One of the best examples of Fu’s homage to New York while playing off the locality is the hotel’s lighting. The designer juxtaposes Hong Kong’s famous glittering skyline and neon signboards with dim, sultry lighting. Fu is ‘unafraid of the mystery of shadows’. He refracts light through the layered fabric and coloured glass shades. Cut glass pendants in steel allude to traditional Hong Kong gas street lighting while sconces and table lamps in bronze and marble evoke twentieth-century New York. AFSO afso.net André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong suite André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong bedroom André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong outdoor seating André Fu Design AFSO St Regis Hong Kong reception We think you might also like how André Fu Brings Relaxed Luxury To Milanabc
Architecture
Homes
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Taking Cues From Cottages And Courtyards

The brief for this courtyard house in Woollahra, Sydney, called for a light-filled environment that would provide adequate accommodation multiple generations of extended family visitors as well as disabled access for an empty nester couple who were downsizing. Taking cues from the original 1970s single-story courtyard house that existed on the site, as well as the neighbouring weatherboard cottages, CO-AP Architects have created a contemporary courtyard home with a street elevation that responds to the original gable-ended property and fenestration pattern of the adjacent houses. “The striking steel window hoods give vertical articulation to the facade as well as providing sun-shading and privacy to windows in summer and motorised external blinds add shading in the trans-seasonal and winter months,” explains Will Fung, co-founder of the architecture practice. Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett The plan configuration and the dynamics of the internal (and external) flow respond directly to the need for disabled access and the connection to the newly formed courtyard. “Our response was to ensure the main (ground) floor of the house was fully accessible with level access to indoor and outdoor spaces which meant flush thresholds and generous circulation spaces,” Will continues. “Programmatically, this meant that in addition to the living spaces, the architects have accommodated a master bedroom and ensuite with a direct connection to a secondary bedroom, earmarked for a future live-in carer. There is also lift access to all levels of the house, including the garage, laundry, cellar and storage on the basement level.

All spaces are flooded with natural light via skylights and north-facing clerestory windows.

“When designing for accessibility we were very careful to not make the spaces feel institutional and retain a strong residential feel,” adds Will. As a result, the furnishings are particularly contemporary, paired with a strong palette of accent materials (like veined stone) and the injection of green spaces throughout. Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett Moreover, all spaces are flooded with natural light via skylights and north-facing clerestory windows, which are strategically angled to capture all-day sunlight. In addition, passive cooling and heating is achieved through the optimum orientation of the aforementioned elements, with air-conditioning and underfloor heating installed merely as supplementary devices for climate control.

“We very much wanted a colourful element in the home that contrasts with the more robust palette of board-form concrete and terrazzo.”

The upper level accommodates two guest bedrooms and a study, with the latter overlooking the new green roof and “borrowed landscape” of neighbouring properties. Aside from the articulated street façade, a standout feature in the home is the sculptural, minty object staircase that connects all levels of the home. “We very much wanted a colourful element in the home that contrasts with the more robust palette of board-form concrete and terrazzo,” Will explains. “It adds freshness to the interiors.” CO-AP Architects co-ap.com Photography by Ross Honeysett Dissection Information Zackenprofil extruded aluminium cladding from Prefa Como handbasin from Flaminia Terrazzo from Australian Marble Timber flooring Ispa basin mixer and wall mixer from Gessi Mero shower from Rogerseller Sunnyled track spot and surface spot from Reggiani Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett  

“When designing for accessibility we were very careful to not make the spaces feel institutional and retain a strong residential feel.”

  Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett Courtyard House CO-AP Architects CC Ross Honeysett We think you might also like Portman Street Terraces by CO-APabc
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Fixed & Fitted

Continuing To Inspire And Innovate: Gaggenau

As cities grow, population increases and people move to live closer to work, space becomes restricted in dense suburbs. Reflected in the size per dwelling, having space is considered a luxury ­– compelling a lot of designers and architects to look for solutions that accommodate the change in lifestyles. This led to the rise in open plan living, where the kitchen, dining and living spaces flow into one. Encouraging architects and residents to rigorously consider the function of each space, the residential sector has seen an uprise in multifunctional design and individualisation. For this reason, today’s kitchens are not just a place for cooking; it is a place for kids to do their homework, for the family to congregate and eat dinner, or a place to socialise and entertain. Transformed to become a site of technological advancements, avant-garde materials, luxuriant design and supreme functionality, the kitchen has become the hub of personal and familial lives. In order to find the ideal cooking solution for the home, no matter the size, it can be tempting to compromise between aesthetics and functionality. Based on the size of the benchtop or on personal cooking styles and cuisines, Gaggenau’s modular kitchen solution ensures that the kitchen is still the heart of the home without any compromises. Founded in 1683, in the Black Forest region of Germany, Gaggenau has a rich heritage in designing and manufacturing domestic appliances with timeless beauty and functional aestheticism. With over three centuries of experience, Gaggenau has cultivated an extensive portfolio of appliances to meet everyone’s needs with one thing in mind: enabling culinary perfection in the home kitchen. Drawing inspiration from the professional kitchen and injecting those characteristics into every facet of its appliances, Gaggenau continues to pave the way for authenticity in form, function and innovation. This is evident in Gaggenau’s two modular kitchen solutions; the Vario 200 series and the Vario 400 series. These two modular systems have been designed around the ideology that even though the cooking area in a kitchen may be limited, culinary ambitions do not have to be.   Vario cooktops 400 series Gaggenau Vario 400 Series Cooktop Offering a professional culinary experience for the private kitchen, the modular Vario 400 series cooktops fit together perfectly and extend almost infinitely. Uniquely the grill, Teppan Yaki and downdraft ventilation can sit together as one cohesive workspace, alongside the gas and induction. The rotary control knobs are an instrument of precision. Superbly crafted and reassuringly weighty in solid stainless steel, they are subtly illuminated when in use. This is intuitive control at its finest. The exquisite Vario 400 series can be either surface or flush mounted, having a 3mm visible perfect edge or sitting level, embedded in a countertop. The Vario 400 series gas cooktops are inspired by professional kitchens, where precision in temperature control is desired to achieve perfect culinary results. Precise electronic flames automatically re-ignite if ever they are blown. The single wok or paella burner is all-consuming with several flame rings so you can push the boundaries, all the way up to five brass burners. Gaggenau Vario 400 Series Cooktop The induction cooktops extend from 38cm single wok option through to 60cm flex induction and 80cm full-surface induction cooktop. The smart booster function can turn large volumes of liquid from tepid to tempestuous in seconds. Wherever the pan is positioned, that is where it will cook, intelligently remembering the heat settings if the pan were to be removed. Complementing the cooktops is the downdraft ventilation that has been fitted with space-saving ducts that do not impede upon the use of the cupboard space below. The downdraft ventilation defies physics, drawing the heat, steam and vapours down at the source before they pervade the atmosphere. Offering maximum flexibility with different configurations, the entire Vario 400 series has earned the name for being an imaginative and flexible worktop.   Vario cooktops 200 series Gaggenau Vario 200 Series Cooktop Differing slightly in size, the Vario 200 series is the perfect fusion between state-of-the-art performance and intelligent design. Sitting alongside the induction or gas cooktop, the electric grill, Teppan Yaki and matching downdraft ventilation completes the professional kitchen look. In addition to the personalised option of mixing and matching components to suit design and functionality, the Vario 200 series is the ideal cooktop range for entertainment. The gas cooktop has two rings with a wok burner for a variety of dishes, whereas, the induction cooktop produces a burst of power decreasing wait time. Ranging in scale from 28 cm to 60 cm, the Vario 200 series purely emphasises that although the modular system is small in size, it does not compromise culinary ambition. Gaggenau Vario 200 Series Cooktop Synonymous to Gaggenau’s other appliances, the Vario series remains quintessential in its minimalistic black anodised aluminium finish ­– aligning to the aesthetics of the wider Gaggenau range to create a unified presence in any contemporary kitchen.   Gaggenau gaggenau.com.au INDE.Awards indeawards.com We think you might also like Reshaping The Concept Of A 21st Century Homeabc
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Finishes

The Warmth And Environmentalism Of Oak

In the interests of enhancing the environmental awareness of the design world, Royal Oak Floors has been dedicated to bringing its customers the best of both worlds – the generosity of wide oak boards sourced sustainably and superiorly manufactured with the warmth that nature offers to any interior. Illegal harvesting of timber is a major concern globally with great efforts being undertaken through international governments to protect endangered species and wildlife through arrangements such as CITES. Royal Oak Floors takes pride in establishing relationships that focus on sustainably sourcing all it’s products. For years they have taken steps for best practice to bring its customers great products that lead the industry for not only design aesthetic and quality, but also for sustainability. Through this development they have curated three new colours to fit into their Architect Collection. Natural White, Toasted Oak, and Dark Oak. The trio of new colours adds to their already existing collection, giving design-conscious consumers good “neutrals” to work with in their homes. These new colours give their customers added light, medium and dark colours to the range. It takes the challenge out of selecting your floors when they’ve already done most of the hard work to develop such a tight colour range to choose from. Royal Oak Floors have established themselves as the leading brand of engineered timber flooring across Australia and have completed numerous projects throughout the world, on all scales. Royal Oa​k Floors royaloakfloors.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

StylecraftHOME With The Goods At Saturday Indesign

In just under a week, Saturday Indesign 2019 is taking over Melbourne for one day only. Amongst the growing list of exhibitors, StylecraftHOME is opening its showroom for everyone to experience. The completely revamped four storey showroom on Flinders Lane and Russell Street in the CBD has won awards this past year because of its ability to momentarily transport visitors to a refined courtyard in Europe. Partnering with StylecraftHOME for Saturday Indesign, Manuela Millan of Meanwhile In Melbourne will bring together a myriad of local artists and creative through a pop-up exhibition of artworks and sculptures. “What makes Saturday Indesign different is that it feels a bit more like being invited to the designers’ homes rather than just visiting a showroom, it’s more unfiltered and intimate,” says Manuela. Having started Meanwhile In Melbourne as a way of uncovering upcoming designers and local talent, Manuela’s platform offer’s Melbourne’s designers the exposure that they need. In this light, the collaboration between StylecraftHOME and Meanwhile In Melbourne for Saturday Indesign is the perfect backdrop for a pop-up exhibition in three distinct areas of the StylecraftHOME showroom; the Kitchen, Library and Den. [caption id="attachment_89826" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]StylecraftHOME StylecraftHOME x Meanwhile In Melbourne. Photography by Caitlin Mills[/caption] “You will be able to move through the space and appreciate the curated works, with StylecraftHOME serving as the perfect backdrop to see it all in context,” Manuela continues. This includes objects, ceramics and artwork by Fellow Mobiles, Stephanie Rooney from Moona + Co, Anna Varendhoff from ACV Studio, Philippa A Taylor and Capra Designs. Complementing each setting is also StylecraftHOME’s iconic designs; Tacchini and lighting by Ross Gardam. “People will get the opportunity to see some of the great Melbourne makers in situ and hopefully get inspired to bring them into their homes. I hope they get ideas of how to mix and match styles to suit their individual tastes, but also try something new,” Manuela concludes. Additionally, as part of the countdown to the event, StylecraftHOME is offering everyone who registers (and attends on the day) a chance to win two Libera Armchairs, valued at over $4000. Stylecraft Stylecraft HOME Libera Armchair Saturday Indesign Recently launched at StylecraftHOME as part of the HOME / WORK / LEARN concept, the Libera Armchair designed by Jesus & Jon Gasca resonates with a quote by Mies Van Der Rohe “God is in the details.” With a classic wooden frame available in solid Walnut or Ash stained in black, the legs are connected with the generously sized armrests in a fluid way. Fostering not only comfort but also ergonomics in the way that the back seat and the chair connects, the Libera Armchair is suitable for residential, hospitality or workplace settings. To win two Libera Armchairs, make sure that you register and attend Saturday Indesign on Saturday 22 June. Then take a picture of you and your crew in the StylecraftHOME showroom to win the Libera Armchairs. Make sure you tag the showroom as well as four other friends, to go in the draw to win the prize! Stylecraft Stylecraft HOME Libera Armchair Saturday Indesign Find out what else is up for grabs and register for Saturday Indesign.  StylecraftHOME stylecraft.com.au Meanwhile In Melbourne meanwhileinmelbourne.com We think you might also like Stylecraft Joins Saturday Indesignabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

A Testimony To Craft, Tradition And Nature: Cielo

Located in Civita Castellana, 65 km north of Rome, Cielo designs and manufactures products using ceramics to revolutionise the bathroom experience. Antonio Coramusi, CEO of Cielo started the company as a tribute to his roots. “Our company is what I call a real laboratory of ceramics,” he explains. “The production is characterised by a sartorial approach and a strong link with the values of craftsmanship. Through constant stylistic research and an innovative approach to the choice of materials and shapes, we place the quality of our product and design at the centre of our research.” The company’s ethos and core values are informed by the desire to restore ‘the culture of hand-made’ products. Known in Italian as cultura delle mani, master craftsmen at Cielo create with care and professionalism, giving life to an ancient artistic tradition. Each exclusive range of sanitary ware, wash basins, shower trays, baths and toilets highlight how Cielo have taken ceramics beyond the material’s known limits ­– resulting in unprecedented designs. When in a bathroom setting, these products are able to enhance its interior as a place of well being while exuding a modern and contemporary mood. Reputed for coloured bathware, Cielo’s colour palette ‘Le Terre di Ceilo’ – defined as colours from the earth – consists of 16 imitable nuances. For this reason, collections by Cielo, including the recent additions of Modulo, Kyros, Siwa and Duo, are characterised by its ability to be personalised to suit project requirements. Modulo is a modular bathroom furnishing system that allows for bespoke bathroom designs. Designed to optimise space without sacrificing style, it can be paired with the Narciso washbasin and cabinets or drawers of different colours and finishes. Cielo Design Precinct Saturday Indesign Kyros, an oval washbasin, is designed and proposed in all colours of the Le Terre di Celio palette. With a depth of 18 cm, its clear geometric and minimal form makes it the ideal addition to any contemporary bathroom backdrop. It can also be complemented by a wooden towel rail, which strikes a balance between textures. Cielo Design Precinct Saturday Indesign The perfect synthesis of a material that is not often associated with being light, the Siwa washbasin has been designed with a refined yet minimalistic style. Rectangular and deep, the washbasin is visually balanced with the sophisticated system of mirrors behind, echoing a colonial characteristic.  Cielo Design Precinct Saturday Indesign Duo washbasins are characterised by two contrasting colours that add a decorative and sculptural component to the bathroom. Designed to be generous in size and form, the washbasin enhances the harmony of form and expressiveness of ceramic. Two elliptical bands decorate the washbasins are available in six colour combinations, chosen from the Le Terre di Celio palette.  Cielo Design Precinct Saturday Indesign To see the rest of Cielo’s range and observe the brand’s craftsmanship up close and personal, sign up for Saturday Indesign, Melbourne 22 June. In Australia, Cielo is available from Design Precinct. Saturday Indesign saturdayindesign.com Design Precinct designprecinct.com.au We think you might also like Saturday Indesign 2019 Ambassadorsabc
Architecture
Homes
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Architecture As A Backdrop For People And Life

Oftentimes the smallest changes can be the most meaningful. Take the time to put a jumper on when it starts to cool down our muscles and minds relax. Turn on the lights as the sun sets and as the light reappears our eyes ease. Give a drink of water to a wilting plant and 10 minutes later its leaves spring to life. The same can be said of architecture. Certainly, Mark Szczerbicki of Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio knows this to be the case. His work on this extension of a traditional cottage is exemplary of the subtle art of architecture and little change going a long way. Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson organised kitchen dining walnut Ben, Rose and their two Dalmatians (the residents of Collectors Cottage) had been living in the cottage before they were recommended Mark as an architect by a mutual friend. The former layout, four bedrooms and a single bathroom, had served them well in years prior but the time came to extend outwards into the garden. The brief was for a new living area, a seamless flow to the backyard, and a pottery studio at the rear. It was important that the new architecture honour the existing, that it be an atmospheric extension of the space as much as a literal one. Mark and the team were immediately taken by the character of the old cottage so respecting its history was never going to be an issue. The new addition comprises a new open plan kitchen, dining area and seamless transition to a second alfresco dining area. A feature wall of exposed brick of the side of the new kitchen references the original build and offers a raw touch to an otherwise finely finished interior. In a similar vein, rafters inside are left exposed (but painted white) and the exterior of the extension – hidden from the streetscape thanks to a sloping site – is clad in Cedar, left to patina over time to an anticipated silvery-grey effect. Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson open kitchen and dining There is also a flexible space that, while primarily acting as a music room, can be sectioned off to double as an additional guest bedroom. Overall, it proves to be a highly considered extension. While extra space was created for the clients to breathe and move more comfortably, there were no liberties taken and both client and architect have evidently felt comfortable in taking and creating only what they need, nothing more. “The house is compact and there are no unused or spare rooms – it is flexible enough to suit two people but can accommodate larger groups of friend and visitors as needed,” says Mark. Passive design was key to the brief and manifests in various forms throughout the residence. To begin with, windows have been placed strategically throughout the new extension to optimise natural light and naturally warm the interiors. There is a large skylight cut into the roof and highlight windows that face north. The western-facing windows are fitted with external blinds and shutters to control the sun’s impact inside. Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson dining The detail to which Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio has given to designing in natural light has been replicated for artificial light, too, when the need arises. “As the abundant natural light starts to diminish, a series of concealed and feature hand-made lighting solutions allow the clients to control the lighting.” Such as the ceramic pendant lights hanging over the new dining area: functionally relevant while referencing Rose’s penchant for pottery. Capitalising on natural light is the hero of a series of passive systems put in place in order to organically maintain a level of thermal comfort year round. There is no air conditioning in the house. “High and low-level openings and ceiling fans ventilate the space in the summer, with external shutters and blinds protecting the western façade from the afternoon sun,” says Mark. “In the winter, the concrete slab on the ground passively heats the spaces, while the southern wall has double the required insulation to stop heat loss.” There is also a rainwater tank connected to the toilet and garden taps. Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson open kitchen and dining Now, more than a year since the completion of the extension and the clients more than familiar with their new surrounds, they couldn’t feel more at home. “The reasons we wanted to work with an architect are justified,” they enthuse. “Living in a space we love, with clever design details that are both subtle and surprising, we are delighted with the outcome.” Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio markszczerbicki.com Photography by Tom Ferguson Dissection Information Hand-made glazed tiles and pendants from Anchor Ceramics Haiku ceiling fans from Big Ass Fans Custom-made black steel kitchen pendant from The Lighting Guild Bathroom floor and wall tiles from Skheme Taps from Phoenix Tapware Cedar cladding from Cedar Sales Zero Clearance stacking sliding door tracks from Centor Kitchen appliances from Bosch Round barstools in Black from Thonet Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson bench shelf Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson open living Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson bathroom Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson pottery nook Collectors Cottage Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio CC Tom Ferguson street view We think you might also like Assembled House by Park + Associatesabc
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Changing Perceptions: Phillip Nielsen On Working In Regional NSW

First up, Phillip Nielsen – we got to pin Phillip down before he jetted off for the 2019 Dulux Study Tour! Phillip is the design director of Regional Design Service, a young practice that is breaking new ground in Corowa. Here Phillip shares what it’s like to practice regionally, what his design process is and a building that has left an indelible mark.  

What inspired you to study architecture?

From a young age, I was curious about how buildings and cities were built with a real interest in all the different ways a house could be planned. From the age of six, we lived in the first home of a housing estate in Townsville and I would wander through the various construction sites trying to work out how everything went together.

What is life and work like in regional Australia, what are you finding that’s different and what might people not be aware of?

There is a cliché that ‘people in the country move slower’ and that you can’t expect things to change so fast in regional Australia. What I have found since moving back to the ‘country’ is that this sentiment could not be further from the truth – in fact, I am starting to believe it is the city that is in the slow lane… how was your commute today? Many of our residential clients are current or former farmers and when you see how much innovation is taking place to responsibly manage the impacts of climate change, drought and rehabilitate the land it is truly remarkable. [caption id="attachment_89524" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Phillip Nielsen Saturday Indesign Ambassador Morgans Lookout, competition. Render by Regional Design Office.[/caption]

What’s something you wish you had known when you started your career?

One of the best pieces of advice I was given as a young graduate was ‘don’t become good at something you don’t want to do’. It made absolute sense but I wish I had known how I could use architecture to give back to the community earlier.

What inspires you?

I have lost count of the times I have been stopped in the street and thanked for the contribution we are making to our rural community. The happiest moment was having a local woman show me how a Kartell Generic C chair could be lifted and balanced on the edge of a table to then mop the floor. The look on her face when she realised we specified it for this exact reason and that good design could make life easier was priceless. Reflecting on these moments inspires me to get into the office every day and make meaningful change through design. [caption id="attachment_89525" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Phillip Nielsen Saturday Indesign Ambassador Docs, a local café in Corowa, designed by Regional Design Service. Photo by Georgie James.[/caption]

Can you talk through your design process – is it always the same or different, do you hand draw, research, come back to old ideas?

Our design process is founded in talking about how and why we’re doing something. One of our first residential clients approached us with the brief for a Mid Century Modern inspired home on their rural block. Rather than replicate the ‘style’ of MCM houses we worked with our client to explore what influenced the era from the Eames moulded ply leg splint through to construction techniques of the Case Study Houses.

How do you see the design industry changing?

Leaving Melbourne and viewing the industry from afar has offered time to contemplate and reflect on my experiences. I’m comforted to see more of the industry standing up to unpaid work or internships. As a student, I dreamt of working for one of my design idols but being from a lower socio-economic background I would have never been able to afford the luxury of being unpaid. I believe the industry is moving towards more equitable practice. [caption id="attachment_89527" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Phillip Nielsen Saturday Indesign Ambassador Federation Cinema, Corowa, designed by Regional Design Service.[/caption]

What is your favourite building/interior fit-out in the world and why?

The Eddie Koiki Mabo Library at James Cook University by James Birrell is one of the first buildings I fell in love with. I was 11 when I first visited the Library on a grade seven trip to use the Internet for the first time – I researched the Spice Girls on 1997 dial-up! The library is formed from board-marked concrete with the most incredible arched forms that truncate from diamond-shaped columns into beams for the mezzanine level of the library. I love going back to the library when I visit home.

Which projects are you most proud of?

I’m most proud of the opportunities we have to engage and share our skills with various community-led projects around regional New South Wales and Victoria. We are currently working pro-bono on a masterplan for a village of around 100 residents with the aim to inspire current and past residents to get involved more in their hometown and attract tourists to the region. [caption id="attachment_89523" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]Phillip Nielsen Saturday Indesign Ambassador Library at the University College of Townsville, Queensland. The library was designed by James Birrell and constructed in 1968. The building later renamed the Eddie Koiki Mabo Library, and The University is now known as the James Cook University. Collection 6523 RAIA photographs, 1968-1975. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.[/caption]   Stay tuned for more profiles from all of our Ambassadors, as well as their top picks and insights into Saturday Indesign. Register now for SID, 22 June.  Saturday Indesign saturdayindesign.com We think you might also like Movers & Shakers: The Saturday Indesign 2019 Ambassadors abc