About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Michele De Lucchi: Object Of Design History

Architect and designer Michele De Lucchi was in Sydney in March 2019 for the opening of the new UniFor Vitra showroom in Sydney. De Lucchi has been at the forefront of progressive design for more than four decades, producing work that has become seminal in the history of design. Michele De Lucchi has been a prominent figure in the Italian design world since the 1970s, crafting architecture, furniture, lamps, appliances, office equipment, and a variety of everyday products into bold, original and provocative designs. De Lucchi came of age at a time in the late 1960s and early 1970s when Italian designers were rebelling against the rationalism and rigidity of modernism that had reigned throughout the mid-twentieth century. Graduating from architecture in the 1970s, De Lucchi joined the radical Studio Alchimia group in 1978, and in 1981, he joined Ettore Sottsass and other Milanese architects and designers to form the Memphis Group. Together they created a fun, youthful and colourful world with expressive designs that challenged conventional furniture forms and encouraged new ways of living. Challenging the conventions of modernism, Memphis created provocative, fresh, and surprising designs, embracing the ephemeral rather than enduring. “If you think to create something for longevity, you fall into banality,” he says. And while Memphis pieces are undoubtedly a product of their time, De Lucchi’s Tolomeo desk lamp for Artemide, also designed in the mid-1980s, has become a timeless, lasting design. [caption id="attachment_92266" align="alignnone" width="1171"]Michele De Lucchi: Object Of Design History | Artedmide Tolomeo Micro Table Lamp Artedmide Tolomeo Micro Table Lamp by Michele De Lucci[/caption] [caption id="attachment_92267" align="alignnone" width="1171"]Michele De Lucchi: Object Of Design History | Memphis First Chair Memphis First Chair by Michele De Lucci[/caption] Memphis disbanded in 1988 and De Lucchi became Director of Design at Olivetti where he designed office furniture, cash registers, computers, fax machines, printers and an ATM, which have become iconic for their experimental and now classic, retro design. These days, De Lucchi is interested in how to harness the potential of technology, yet counter its isolating effects. “Civilization is always optimising what we have and creating a better world for generations to come. The imagination of the best possible lifestyle is much more ambitious today, and architecture and design reflect this ambition,” he says. His work has a strong connection to nature and is designed for both intimacy and sociability, as his workplace collections for UniFor demonstrate. Hatch and Secretello are delicately crafted with timber and have visual permeability to create public and private space. “The workplace today is a matter of independent objects as sculpture,” he says. “Every object needs to have a meaning, an attraction, a function, and we appreciate the artistic value.” Indeed, objects offer a window to understanding history and De Lucchi’s legacy of design work is significant and seminal. “When I see that my ideas, my objects, my design is influencing, I feel very happy that I was able to touch something and that I have something in common with other designers,” he says. UniFor unifor.it Cover photo UniFor Hatch by Michele De Lucci [caption id="attachment_92265" align="alignnone" width="1171"]Michele De Lucchi: Object Of Design History | Habitus Living Portrait of Michele. Photography by G. Gastel[/caption]   We think you might also like The Duality Of Designer Sabine Marcelisabc
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A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali

Bali has become a magnet for digital nomads with a growing community of remote workers taking the opportunity to live and work in paradise. Ruang Tekuni is a boutique, serviced apartment that is helping to make the digital nomad dream a reality for young expats. Designed by DDAP Architect, Ruang Tekuni is a tropical oasis on the outskirts of Kuta. Ruang Tekuni is surrounded by shops, houses and is a short walk to a local business site. It is located between a multi-storey building to one side and an empty lot to the other, and its height mediates the transition between the two, offering a view of the neighbouring rooftops.  

Pitched terracotta-tile roofs are inspired by the traditional Balinese rice-barn roof and help to create more interior space.

  There are 12 studios across two levels and a penthouse apartment for the owner. Balconies circulate around and look over a central courtyard filled with fern trees and a pool with tricking water. “We proposed the idea of a tropical rainforest by placing green and zen elements in the centre to create a sensory experience in terms of the visual and in the rustling of leaves in the trees and light breeze that blows on to the skin,” says Dirgantara I Ketut, director of DDAP Architect. There is a communal swimming pool and rooftop garden to enjoy the sunrise, watch the stars or enjoy the prevailing breeze. Greenery cascades throughout Ruang Tekuni to amplify the tropical feel. DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | breeze blocks Natural materials enhance the sense of calm and connect to the vernacular Balinese architecture. Pitched terracotta-tile roofs are inspired by the traditional Balinese rice-barn roof and help to create more interior space. Terracotta is also used for the façade screen, with the small openings in the breeze brocks allowing light and air to filter through and giving intricate pattern to the building. The studios are rustic and comfortable with insulated reinforced-concrete wall panels (used in conjunction with a steel structure to increase construction time and minimise waste) and recycled timber for the staircases and herringbone floors. The client’s penthouse – an ancient Chinese house – crowns the building, with his private library and workspace on the top floor. His artwork collection is also accommodated throughout Ruang Tekuni creating a homely feel for the expats who now call this paradise home. DDAP Architect ddaparchitect.com Photography by Sonny Sandjaya and DDAP Architect Dissection Information Wall panelling from B Panel Swimming pool by Desjoyaux Kitchen fixtures from Hafele & Teka Lamp from Ong Cen Kuang Furniture from Vivere DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | living room DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | dining room DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | stairs DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | sitting room DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | bedroom DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | communal pool  

Greenery cascades throughout Ruang Tekuni to amplify the tropical feel.

  DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | outdoor area DDAP Architect Create A Tropical Oasis For Working Expats In Bali | streetscape We think you might also like Tile Roof House by K59 Atelierabc
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Philip Stejskal On The Science Of Design

“Each project presents new opportunities to examine the brief, clients, situation and site – and to grow a project out of that soil,” begins Perth-based architect Philip Stejskal. “We start each job with as few preconceptions as possible, which helps to keep it interesting for us.” Kitchens and bathrooms are viewed as components within an overall scheme, Philip explains. “We like to tease out a strong concept – something that’s relevant to the project and personal for the clients – and then make decisions regarding planning and materials that are contextualised within that concept, so they are not arbitrary.” Phil’s own house is a case in point: designed as a new-build on a sub-divided site, it was constructed ten years ago using precast concrete panels. The external walls are sited on the boundaries to create an internal courtyard, meaning the only bathroom has no window, so Philip installed a section of translucent roof to draw in natural light. He set out to build his own home without tiles or plasterboard, so the bathroom is a ‘wet’ room, with concrete floors and walls, and tempered Masonite wall cladding. It contains a bath, shower, toilet and vanity, and serves the family of five, plus a new puppy who sometimes needs to be hosed down! The kitchen is also experimental: Philip was testing the idea of incorporating all of the main appliances in a central island bench, measuring 2.5metres by 1.3metres. “The plan allows and promotes interaction and helps to define the kitchen within the larger open-plan living space,” he says. An adjacent wall houses pantry storage and a window seat, where family and friends can sit and chat with the cooks. “We are really happy with the way it functions,” he says. “Although now we are a family of five, we sometimes wish we had a bigger fridge, but it forces us to eat more fresh food.” Getting the balance right between functional and social requirements is an issue that arises often with clients, Philip says, noting that Perth’s mild climate – which is great for outdoor entertaining – leads many to request a second outdoor kitchen. “There is a bit of an obsession about al fresco kitchens here, but whether the main considerations relate to cost or space, we believe that every room should play its part in a complementary relationship to other spaces,” says Philip. “So rather than having an outdoor kitchen, we prefer to make the internal perimeter of the kitchen permeable, with sliding walls and windows to connect to al fresco areas, which is much more efficient. Philip’s own experimental kitchen has helped to inform his design approach with clients. “Over the years, we’ve taken a few things from my experiments into clients’ homes, although it’s pretty extreme to have the whole kitchen as an island; we haven’t done that for a client,” he says. “But it means that when clients are questioning what’s possible, we’re well placed to discuss all the alternatives and see what arises from those conversations.” Philip Stejskal Architecture architectureps.com Photography by Bo Wong Philip Stejskal On The Science Of Design We think you might also like ConceptSpace by HouseLab and Philip Stejskalabc
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The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge

Solitude and scenic beauty are the dream combination for hoteliers and proprietors, but when the scenery is out-of-this-world stunning, it can also pose a unique problem. How does one design a holiday stay that feels in harmony with its natural surroundings, but also creates the impression that the building is a destination in its own right? For anyone pondering the issue, Lindis Lodge, in New Zealand’s Southern Alps, provides the blueprint for this delicate design dance. Christopher Kelly, principal architect at Architecture Workshop, approached the design of Lindis Lodge with an ‘if you can’t beat them, join them’ attitude. “The vast glacial landscape is the precedent for the building,” Christopher says. The property – a five-bedroom luxury lodge in the remote and glacial Ahuriri Valley – draws inspiration from the imposing grandeur of the landscape. The roof contours – made from Spotted Gum hardwood lamella – is designed to mimic the weaves and folds of the valley.  

The property has all the trappings of a five-star resort, but the biggest luxury at Lindis Lodge is the opportunity to quietly enjoy – in comfort and complete solitude – its striking 2700-hectare surrounds.

  The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | riverside at dusk Both the exteriors and interiors at Lindis Lodge don’t subscribe to the archetypal cabin style. Any opportunities to showcase a unique view or nod to the unspoiled vastness of the area, from the window framing to the curvature of the building itself, were jumped upon. “I saw this as an opportunity to create something special rather than a standard American lodge, which has its appeal, but both the building and the experience is different here,” Christopher says.  

“I saw this as an opportunity to create something special rather than a standard American lodge.”

  To temper the extreme climate range (it can get as hot at 35 degrees celsius in summer and minus 16 degrees celsius in winter) a series of sustainable solutions were introduced to the site. A geothermal heat pump system provides heating and hot water, while an energy efficient hydronic underfloor heating system along with insulated roofing regulates the temperature. Potable water is filtered through from the on-site bore and rainwater harvesting system. The property has all the trappings of a five-star resort, complete with a grand billiard room, elegant bedrooms and living spaces, even a private chef, but the biggest luxury at Lindis Lodge is the opportunity to quietly enjoy – in comfort and complete solitude – its striking 2700-hectare surrounds. Architecture Workshop architectureworkshop.co.nz Photography by Patrick Reynolds The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | Great Hall The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | bar The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | bedsuite The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | landscape The Power Of One: Solitude Done Right At Lindis Lodge | view We think you might also like 5 Architect-Designed Homes You Can Stay Inabc
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On The Hunt For Design Solutions And Sensual Expression

A love for architecture and curiosity for design have been driving forces for design editor, commentator and curator David Clark since a young age – and there is no doubt they’ve taken him places. He has lived in London, where he made his way in the textiles trade; he has earned two bachelor degrees from the University of Queensland – one in Design Studies (Architecture), the other in Commerce; and he has worked in an architecture office in Brisbane. He has even dabbled in design tutoring. Realising that he was more passionate about studying architecture than practising in the field, David eventually – perhaps fatefully – pivoted into the world of publishing. And Australia’s residential design discourse was changed for good. A couple of David’s most notable roles include his time as design editor of Belle and his ten-year tenure as editor-in-chief of Vogue Living. Suffice to say that, over the years, David has established himself a keen eye and an influential voice in the industry. And with an eye as keen and a voice as influential as his, we thought it quite fitting that he join us on the jury for Habitus House Of The Year. One obvious thread of consistency throughout David’s career as a design-chameleon it is that it’s always been about design as a way of life. Coincidentally, David has similar things to say when it comes to his macro-view of Australia’s built-environment fields. “Architecture [and interior design] in Australia expresses its uniqueness in that interstitial space between inside and outside… it reflects a way of living, which is very relaxed,” he observes. Though designing houses is something that David considers to be the predominant form of architectural expression in Australia – and something Australian architects are very good at – it’s not all sunshine and daisies in the field of residential design. As David puts it, “we have a really critical issue to face now, which is in the realm of affordable housing.” While there is no pleasure in acknowledging the void left in affordable housing solutions in the absence of critical architectural and design thinking, David sees nothing but great potential. Off the top of his head, he cites a number of intriguing solutions to issue emerging locally, such as The Tiny Homes Foundation on the Central Coast of NSW. “I think these are really interesting developments. These are things that can be driven by architecture.” Rome wasn’t built in a day, nor do effective solutions to global issues appear overnight. With this in mind, David is not seeking such when evaluating the 20 outstanding examples of residential design we’ve selected from our Region completed within the last 18 months. Instead, David’s approach to judging will be much more sensual than ideological. “For me, living in a house is all about sensuality,” he shares, “so I’m looking for houses that express their human side”. As for what that looks like, stay tuned to find out!   Habitus House Of The Year wouldn’t exist without the support of our friends, colleagues and regular collaborators in the industry. We would like to extend our sincerest thanks to our Major Partners Gaggenau, StylecraftHOME and Zip and Supporting Partners Armadillo & Co and Earp Bros. Likewise we would like to recognise our Television Partners for joining us on our journey to a new medium. Meet the full 2019 Habitus House of the Year jury hereabc
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How Architecture Can Improve Connections

“Improving connections” is a common client request for residential alterations and additions; between old and new and inside and out and between family members occupying the house. Kuzman Architecture’s renovation of Lucky House improved these connections, as well as establishing a great connection between the architect and client, and even the clients’ dog, Lucky, for whom the house is named. The clients, Mick and Felicity, engaged Kuzman Architecture to refresh and modernise their double-fronted Victorian home where they live with their teenage daughters, Stella and Louisa, and Lucky. They wanted the house to meet the family’s changing needs and better reflect their lifestyle. Communal spaces needed to be more liveable and better connected and to complement Mick and Felicity’s collection of mid-century furniture and art. “With a love of design, they had very clear ideas about their dream home, and wanted to be involved in the design process and to enjoy it,” says Sandi Kuzman.  

The rectangular form was developed to connect and blur the boundaries between old and new and inside and outside.

  How Architecture Can Improve Connections | porch Sandi designed a new rear addition to accommodate the kitchen, dining, lounge, TV den and deck. The flat roof, open-plan interior and built-in furniture are a nod to mid-century architecture. The material palette of timber, black cabinetry and ceramic tiles has the warmth and craftsmanship associated with mid-century design.  

The flat roof, open-plan interior and built-in furniture are a nod to mid-century architecture.

  The rectangular form was developed to connect and blur the boundaries between old and new and inside and outside. “These framed transitional spaces invite the inhabitants to rest between domains, enjoying the best of both worlds,” says Sandi. Timber battens fold over the covered deck, and a built-in window seat has prime aspect of the much-loved pear tree and is used for multiple purposes: “As a quiet reading nook, a spill-out space at parties, a platform to catch the morning sun, a stage for their daughters’ performances, a debriefing station at the end of the day, and also a handy storage space,” Sandi says. How Architecture Can Improve Connections | living / dining room Ceiling heights and materials define different functional spaces within the interior. A lofty white ceiling with high-level windows over the lounge to bring in shafts of light throughout the day. Lowered timber ceilings create a cosier sense of space over the kitchen, dining table and den. A double-sided fireplace separates the lounge and den where a built-in daybed and pull-out trundle bed cater for family movie nights and kids’ slumber parties. The fireplace provides heat to both spaces and allows for a visual connection to the backyard and swimming pool. Sandi conceived the black kitchen with butler pantry as an object or pod inserted into the room. “Felicity loves to cook and enjoys the girls getting involved around the island bench, so the cooktop is front and centre and with a view to their garden,” she says. “We are proud of these personal connections this house has created: between family members and friends, and between architect and client ­– and dog too! It was a pleasure working on this project with this family and we still share a glass of wine from time to time.” Kuzman Architecture kuzman.com Photography by Tatjana Plitt Dissection Information Lysaght panel rib cladding in Night Sky Blackbutt timber battens Stringy bark strip timber flooring Stringy bark strip timber ceiling lining Blackbutt timber veneer joinery Matte black laminate joinery Inax wall tiles from Artedomus Custom architectural steelwork in matte black Cheminees Philippe double-sided fireplace White subway tiles Faucet Strommen tapware AWS glazed stacking doors and retractable insect screens ISM Objects wall lighting Mark Douglass Design pendant light How Architecture Can Improve Connections | window seat How Architecture Can Improve Connections | living room How Architecture Can Improve Connections | dining room How Architecture Can Improve Connections | kitchen island How Architecture Can Improve Connections | walk-in pantry How Architecture Can Improve Connections | TV den How Architecture Can Improve Connections | daybed How Architecture Can Improve Connections | bathroom How Architecture Can Improve Connections | porch We think you might also like Auchenflower House by Kelder Architectsabc
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Caroma Is Hosting A Property Masterclass For Women To Get Ahead

It’s no secret that our house prices have enjoyed inflation since the eighties, causing significant barriers for first-time buyers and almost anyone whose birth date falls this side of Generation X. But with our population aging rapidly, our younger generations are not the only ones suffering. In 2016, the national Census recorded a homeless population of 116,427 Australians. If you zoom in on that population, you’ll find that over a third are female, and one in four are over 55 years of age. With women retiring with an average of 40 per cent less in their superannuation than men, Australian women are facing their own unique set of challenges when it comes to these issues. This is something Caroma is not willing to overlook. The iconic Australian company and industry leader in kitchen and bathroom design is hosting a masterclass to inform and empower Australian women to secure their future in property. Held at their flagship Sydney showroom, Caroma on Collins, the event on August 29 will feature a Tiny House display alongside various talks on how to get into, and make gain from property – in a number of ways. For Tim Salt, CEO of Caroma’s parent company, GWA, the issue is one that hits close to home. As a father of two girls, female empowerment is something that Tim proudly champions in his professional and personal life. “This purpose was borne from a desire to ensure that my daughters have the power to choose any path they want in life, and to feel secure in that they have control over their own future,” says Tim, “our upcoming Women in Property Masterclass is a great example of how we can help… to break the terrible cycle of poverty and homelessness we are seeing with our current ageing female population.” Hosting the event will be Caroma on Collins’ Flagship Engagement Manager, Deborah de Jong – author, co-founder of Fantastic Furniture and an admirable woman in property herself. “Knowledge is power, and informed decisions can be made if we provide viable solutions for prospective challenges that may be faced as we leave the workforce,” says Deborah, emphasising the need for women to secure their futures while in a position of power financially. With a line-up of speakers including Lesley Gregg, founder of Women and Wealth Club; interior designer and property / event stylist for Domayne Hire, Donna Harris; architect and affordable housing specialist, Issac Smeke; wealth management specialist, Matthew Moussa; finance and mortgage broking specialist, Maree Blakemore; and Kylie Crelley, from Nifty Homes, speaking on multi-generational living and the tiny house movement, the Women in Property Masterclass is not one to miss. “I would encourage any woman interested in property investment, renovation and design to get along to the expo to gain some valuable insights,” concludes Tim. The event is open to the public and tickets are currently on sale. Caroma caroma.com.au Photography by Dan Gosse We think you might also like The Many Faces Of Tiny House Designabc
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Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design

Any form of high-density housing comes with the inevitable ongoing negotiation of shared spaces. In Singapore’s public housing, that negotiation has been more pronounced with the presence (to larger and lesser degrees over the years) of common outdoor corridors that provide access to units in the so-called ‘slab block’ typology and also serve as communal spaces. But the changing behaviour of residents over time has seen the interface between residential units and the corridors they face take new definitions. The corridors serving Housing and Development Board (HDB) flats, explains Singaporean architect William Ng, “were originally envisioned as social interaction spaces.” The so-called ‘corridor units’ of lengthy slab blocks were common from the 1960s through to the 1980s. “However, over time,” says Ng, “many units have been observed to have their curtains permanently drawn as a result of changing behavioural patterns and the increased desire for privacy.” Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | living room “Corridor units form a substantial portion of the existing housing stock and it is thus necessary to explore ways to repurpose them, so they remain relevant to the needs of people today and in the future,” he says. Certainly, there is room for innovation, as exemplified by Ng and his firm STUDIO WILLS + Architects with Project #13 – winner of the Living Space category in the INDE.Awards 2019. Project #13 is the renovation of a 1988 HDB corridor unit that seeks to re-examine the interface between the flat and the corridor and to create a sense of space within. But beyond these goals, it also has a future-proofing agenda in mind. It was designed as a way of bringing two programs into one flat – a home and an office – and creating a framework to enable the long-term adaptability of the apartment. The agenda was aided by the good fortune of a raised roofline above the flat (which sits on the top floor of a low-rise block). This allowed for high ceilings and an enhanced perception of space within small floor areas, as well as the placement of raised sleeping platforms – conveniently positioned above eye level and therefore appropriately private. Ng and his colleague Kho Keguang divided the flat down the middle to create two units, one of which (with an open-plan approach) serves as a workspace, and the other (with a cellular plan) provides living quarters. Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | staircase The two units share a single point of entry from the corridor, thanks to a new semi-private foyer space that acts as a buffer between the more public and private zones within. Dual-key access is enabled by the foyer, with each unit able to operate independently – serviced by its own door. Each unit measures 30 square metres, while the lobby occupies just 4 square metres. It’s a compact footprint, and space-saving design strategies (such as hidden storage and grouped functions) were adopted throughout. In future, the flat could operate as two homes given that each side incorporates a kitchen, bathroom and sleeping platform. At present, the living room of the ‘home’ unit serves as the reception area of the office, the dining room hosts meetings, and the bedroom doubles as a tea sanctuary. The occupants are able to adjust their relationship with the corridor by varying the degree of openness or enclosure with vernacular aluminium louvres and curtains. Materials such as epoxy flooring (common in such flats) encourage a sense of assimilation with the context, while white finishes reflect daylight and oak plywood creates a warm appearance. Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | study nook Says Kho, “We hope this exploration of typology will encourage people to think about buying a resale HDB unit instead of going straight for BTO [Built To Order, or new units]. I hope they’ll discover the potential.” Adds Ng, “And the older flats have a lot more potential. Back then [in past decades], lifestyle was not so defined and things were a lot looser. But these days, everything is very defined; for example, a closet will be 1.5 metres or 1.8 metres by 600.” Ng continues, “Clients tell us they want to have 90-per-cent efficiency and that’s it. You can’t have a hallway; you just have to branch off straight to the rooms [from the living area]. That’s the reality.” Project #13 demonstrates a viable alternative with older HDB housing stock. Though small in size, the project demonstrates the potential for the meaningful evolution of an aged HDB typology. Congratulations to STUDIO WILLS. STUDIO WILLS + Architects studio-wills.com Photography by Finbarr Fallon and Khoo Guo Jie Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | home / office Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | bed / tea room Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | foyer Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | entry Project #13 Redefines Adaptable Living Space Design | multi-purpose spaces We think you might also like The Expandable House Prototype by Future Cities Laboratoryabc
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The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards

In Australia, the brick industry is worth $2.8 billion and employs over 30,000. As the industry’s peak body, Think Brick Australia exists to represent Australia’s clay brick and paver manufacturers and inspire brick architecture in all areas of the built environment. This sentiment is the foundation of the Think Brick Awards – an elaborate annual celebration of innovation and craftsmanship through building with brick. It all began in 2005, when Think Brick decided to engage seven architects to deliver their visions of what a brick home of the future might look like. Since then the Think Brick Awards have continuously encouraged architects to push boundaries and reimagine the application of brick, block, pavers and roof tiles in contemporary design. What started out as a humble project to reimagine the use of brick in Australian residential architecture quickly grew. In 2008 Think Brick introduced two new award categories rewarding innovation and craftsmanship in brickwork in the context of commercial and urban / landscape architecture. The Kevin Borland Masonry Award was later introduced in 2013, followed by the inclusion of the Robin Dods Roof Tile Excellence Award in 2014. In celebration of these five award categories and the 2019 nominees for each, a sizable – not to mention reputable – crowd congregated at The Crown Palladium, Melbourne, last Thursday evening for the annual Think Brick Awards. And what an impressive occasion it was. Following the event, Think Brick Australia’s CEO, Elizabeth McIntyre commented, “The winners last night displayed some of the boldest and bravest designs ever submitted to the Think Brick Awards.” Amongst the winners were the likes of Koichi Takada Architects’ Arc and ROC by Smart Design Studio; two such exceptional and inspiring examples of how brick can be used that the two practices were named joint winners of the Horbury Hunt Commercial Award. Meanwhile, Renato D’Ettorre Architects took home the Horbury Hunt Residential Award, thanks to GB House’s ‘unexpected use of brick’. “The perforated design of the terracotta bricks allows light to flow in and open up the property, creating a stunning house which sits perfectly in its locality,” said Elizabeth. Here’s your full list of the 2019 Think Brick Award category winners: The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | Arc by Koichi Takada Architects Arc by Koichi Takada Architects  | Joint winner of the Horbury Hunt Commercial Award “A sign of maturity of the use of brick in Australia. A very special contribution to the city of Sydney.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | ROC by Smart Design Studio ROC by Smart Design Studio  |  Joint winner of the Horbury Hunt Commercial Award “Bold, brave and harkens back to the glory days of public infrastructure. The brickwork is incredibly sculptural, and the project has a lovely human scale.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D’Ettorre Architects  |  Winner of the Horbury Hunt Residential Award “This project does things which you don’t expect with brick. It has a diaphanous, translucent quality as well as more traditional elements of mass.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | Doubleground by MUIR Architecture + OPENWORK Doubleground by MUIR Architecture + OPENWORK  |  Winner of the Bruce Mackenzie Landscape Award “Brick is used as a tapestry to weave within the confines and context of the art gallery space. It’s surprising in its context and is a generous public gesture.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | House at Otago Bay by Topology Studio House at Otago Bay by Topology Studio  |  Winner of the Kevin Borland Masonry Award “This project had a thorough understanding of the constraints and possibilities of masonry. It sits quietly in the landscape, incredibly resolved.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | Subiaco House by Vokes and Peters Subiaco House by Vokes and Peters  |  Winner of the Robin Dods Roof Tile Excellence Award “Spatially and geometrically nuanced. It showcases the elegance and complex forms of a roof tile when detailed correctly with care.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   The Bold And Beautiful Think Brick Awards | 1+2 House by Curious Practice 1+2 House by Curious Practice  |  Winner of the New Entrant Award “Humble with a beautifully considered composition. This project approaches the basics of construction and is able to find delight and invention in them.” – 2019 Think Brick Awards Jury   [gallery columns="4" ids="92229,92232,92231,92227,92226,92225,92224,92223,92222,92221,92220,92219,92218,92216"] Think Brick thinkbrick.com.au Photography courtesy Think Brick Awards and the respective architecture studios. We think you might also like to meet your 2019 INDE.Awards winnersabc
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Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting

Bucky Vitrine pendant from Christopher Boots Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | BUCKY VITRINE by Christopher Boots Bucky Vitrine diffuses light through vertical geometric surfaces of fluted glass sheets, creating subtle gradations of transparency. Exploring both natural geometry and industrial manufacturing, Bucky Vitrine is a subtle yet complex inquiry into elemental geometry. Christopher Boots   Flask 1.0 from Copper Design Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | Flask 1.0 from Copper Design Flask 1.0 is a customisable lighting system that combines the diverse colour range of tempered scientific glass with hand finished metal tubing. A variety of metal tube lengths, joins and bends can be matched with either clear or sandblasted glass flasks that are illuminated from within. Copper Design   Dawn to Dusk table lamp from VELA Habitus Loves Lounging Around VELA | Habitus Living Dawn to Dusk provides an iconic design statement through its minimal aesthetic, and an opportunity to bring a mood changing flood of colour into your space helping to recreate that magical moment of connection with the rising or setting sun that has fascinated humans for aeons. VELA   D’Arc Suspension Light from Espo Lighting Espo Lighting D'Arc D’Arc shines an even, beautiful light under the space it embraces, evoking both traditional and modern appearances with the warm appearance of the bronze body and the ultra-modern, smooth LEDs inside. Espo Lighting   Pebble Series from ANDlight [caption id="attachment_92161" align="alignnone" width="1171"]Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | ANDLight Pebble Series Photography by Andre Paul Pinces[/caption]

The Pebble series celebrates the inexplicable and beautiful qualities of stones. Enhancing their simple yet sculptural form through translucency, two glass blown shapes come together entering a dialogue. The result is a seemingly bespoke pendant fixture—endlessly evolving in shape as it appears from different angles. 

ANDLight   Pine Cone pendant from BoConcept Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | BoConcept - Pine Cone Pendant Named for it’s inspiration, the Pine Cone light is available in both a pendant and a table lamp. It’s modern aesthetic is clean yet intriguing sparking curiosity. Available in both a satin silver finish and satin copper finish. BoConcept   Wink lamp from Masquespacio and Houtique Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | WINK pendant from Masquespacio and Houtique The result of a collaboration between Masquespacio and Houtique, the “Wink” lamp is composed of different elements intended to remind us of the past and the future - winking to the use of bangs, gold and the observation. Masquespacio   Arch Pendant 02 from Douglas & Bec Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | Arch Pendant 02 by Douglas and Bec In this statement pendant, a trio of elongated tinted glass or brushed brass panels encase a custom-made glass lighting tube, finished with brass detailing. Douglas & Bec   Ovolo pendant from Articolo Habitus Loves… Mood Lighting | Articolo Lighting Oval Pendant Ovolo is a sculptural form that typifies the artistry of Articolo’s design philosophy. Its organic shape conceals a custom light source; a handcrafted disc encased in brass that floats with weightlessness behind a striking glass form, mouth-blown in Murano, Italy. Articoloabc
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Aneeta: Bringing You Uninterrupted Views And Unparalleled Possibilities

Likewise is the term ‘unparalleled’ when it comes to the possibilities provided by their product range. Founded in 1994 and now proudly owned by the Jeld-Wen Group, Aneeta has been broadening horizons since day dot. How? By offering a range of window inserts that offer complete freedom of choice. Choice to combine their sashless window inserts with any window or door frame product, from whichever fabricator you please. At first, it might not sound ground-breaking, but it only takes a moment's consideration to realise the design power (not to mention possibilities) unleashed by this kind of choice. It is literally as unparalleled as the views are uninterrupted. 25 years on Aneeta is still delivering sashless window variations with an understated sophistication, inviting architects and specifiers to let their unique design styles shine. Some of the most breathtaking applications are those that provide seamless connections between a building, its inhabitants, and the great-wide-world outside – just see for yourself. Aneeta Sashless Windows aneetawindows.com.au [caption id="attachment_91828" align="alignnone" width="1171"]Aneeta Sashless Windows | 3 pane servery This considered use of Aneeta 3 pane servery style windows, provide uninterrupted water views for diners at this restaurant.[/caption] We think you might also like Stealth House by Teeland Architectsabc
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NikolaTesla – Cooking Inspired By Genius

The first sign of the NikolaTesla Flame was in prototype form at Milan’s Eurocucina in 2018, generating much interest from designers and design enthusiasts alike. The Flame edition builds on the existing NikolaTesla range of induction cooktops, offering a home cooking product that that’s brilliant as its namesake inventor. Fusing hood and cooking surface into a single domestic appliance, the NikolaTesla Flame induction cooktop is a fully integrated cooking and suction system. The fan and cooker hood are both perfectly integrated into the cooktop itself, resulting in an appliance that’s sleek, stylish and guarantees high performance in terms of fume capture, silence and energy efficiency. “Elica are globally recognised as the leaders of air extraction technology and this beautiful design-led product provides an exciting first for the gas cooktop segment,” remarked Nathan Cary, Managing Director for Residentia Group Australia. “The NikolaTesla Flame combines beautiful design, quality materials, high performance and precision gas cooking as well as the best extraction performance — which only Elica rangehoods can guarantee. As with all Elica products, this range will be supported by our comprehensive 5-year guarantee.” The range includes both Recirculating and Ducted solutions, both available in either a classic Black and stylish Grey durable ceramic glass finish. The design geniuses at Residentia Group are the exclusive distributor of the Elica brand for Australia and New Zealand, and the range is available from selected kitchen specialists such as Freedom Kitchens and leading appliance retailers including Winning Appliances. More info on the inspired new Flame collection can be seen here. Residentia residentia.groupabc