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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

Kate Berry Knows How To Feed Her Passion

When Kate Berry’s daughter was bullied at school for her homemade lunches, she took an unorthodox route to reinstate her daughter’s confidence and reclaim the conversation around her lunches. Drawing on her creative-agency past and lifelong passions: food, photography and the gift of the gab, she started the blog Lunch Lady. In this space she documented the food they were making together – from prepping to cooking and right through to crafty packaging – from their home in rural Victoria. Less than a year later, Kate was approached by Lara Burke and Louise Bannister of We Print Nice Things, to turn Lunch Lady the blog into Lunch Lady the magazine, which still exists today. “[It was] pretty crazy considering that if I was to do a magazine with anyone they probably would have been the people I would have chosen to do it with,” she says. What started out as a mother–daughter passion project with a cult following quickly became a story of entrepreneurial success. For two years, Kate was the editor and a major player in Lunch Lady finding the success it still enjoys today. She helped grow and develop the brand’s identity and was responsible for creating, photographing, designing and commissioning much of the content. “But I realised all of a sudden I was making a magazine about family but I never hung out with my own.” So she moved on. And out. Kate and her daughters have recently relocated back to Melbourne, in part for the opportunities city-living presents and proximity to clients and collaborators; and in part for the culture and atmosphere for which Victoria’s capital is known and loved. Like many creatives in and around the industry, Kate gets inspired by, and feeds off, the enthusiasm of others. Definitely one for collaboration, other people’s excitement fuels her own, “I love hearing other people’s ideas and I love helping other people make their ideas happen.” Having taken a new residence, she has also taken a new kitchen. Fortuitously – or perhaps purposefully – the kitchen living and dining rooms exist together in an open-plan format. Living with her kids, it was important that when she is in the kitchen preparing meals – either for mealtimes, work or research – that they are still able to feel connected in the different spaces. The kitchen itself, which she lovingly describes as “odd-looking”, features stainless steel benches – “great for cooking” – and a small window that lets natural light flow in. It also provides the perfect backdrop for Kate’s creations. “Previous kitchens haven’t had that beautiful little light pocket to take photos. Whereas my new kitchen has pretty little windows where I can put the food and take some photos,” she says. “Because our apartment is an old art deco apartment, it has character that our previous houses haven’t. So it’s nice to have a few bumps and weird little crooked angles.” When asked how her use of the kitchen has morphed over the years as influenced by her varying roles and experiences, Kate divulges a newfound frugality that informs her cooking. Adjusting to city prices among other things, Kate tries to run a kitchen that doesn’t waste. “I’m enjoying challenging my kids to think that way as well. We buy fruit and veggies every week and we challenge ourselves to use everything,” she says. Since wrapping up at Lunch Lady, Kate has gone on to write a book (which will be out later this year) and launch an event series, OK Motels, that was born out of a successful Instagram account that was essentially a platform for Kate to share her love of old motels and small rural townships. Back in a city full of “creative people doing cool things” and inspiring one another, only time can tell what Kate will do next. Kate Berry hellokateberry.comabc
Design Hunters
People

Moving Beyond The Box

In multiple decades as a practising architect, Howard Tanner built himself a reputation specialising in the residential, educational and heritage market. Since 2014 he had been operating independently from Tanner Kibble Denton Architects formerly Tanner Architects – a practice he founded in 1974 – keeping his hand in the craft by consulting with private clients and younger practices here and there. His work on residential and heritage projects often crossed over, and city and rural projects alike comprise his professional folio. For the inaugural year of Habitus House of the Year in 2018, we were honoured to have Howard on our jury, superimposing his architectural insights and values – some shared, others unique – onto our collection of what we felt were the best current examples of residential architecture across the Indo Pacific Region. “In Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore there are some very good designers who are responding to generally sunny climates,” he says. “We are living in places where there are generally warmish clients and we have some top architects and therefore architecture.” In his work and the work of his contemporaries, Howard has a strong overall preference for architecture that incorporates the landscape in interesting and appropriate, ways. Any home needs its private spaces – the bedrooms, bathrooms and perhaps even a study for example – for which it’s beneficial to design in a level of separation and demarcation. It’s the public spaces throughout, such as the kitchen, lounge, and dining, where he feels architects have the opportunity to involve the surrounding landscape. In the 2018 selection Howard was most partial to the projects that did this. A residence that feels lived in and warm is another defining factor for what Howard considers successful architecture. This can be seen in the display of a favourite painting or a sofa that’s travelled from one house to the next. While this comes from the personality of the clients, an architect does have opportunity to add to it. “When you go into a house and there’s a lovely sunny corner with magazines – and probably the cat is sitting in that corner, too ­– you suddenly think ‘I’d like to sit over there, too’,” says Howard by way of example. Hence answering the implicit question of whether a residence looks like it could be lived in. “The houses we liked intrigued us in the way they worked or how they were made,” he adds. Likewise, thoughtful spatial planning, an architect’s consideration of materiality, and textural interest is immediately discernable – as is the reverse. As a reasonable person one would be remiss to ignore the reality of personal inclinations. For Howard, his are towards a sculptural build. Beautiful fluid forms in architecture can be achieved on both large and small scales via the walls, ceilings or even the material selection. Eager for the industry to move beyond the box – “the idea that a black box will solve everything I find disappointing,” – to Howard, handsome sculptural design cues show thought and consideration for forms and spaces which as we know, rate highly on his list. While a residence’s first and lasting impression can be cast from its look and feel, the behaviour and functionality of space is of equal importance. And in today’s political climate, that extends to its relationship with waste production and disposal, and energy sourcing and usage. So says Howard, “I’m interested in totally clean air, totally clean water and good behavior with waste.” It is imperative that architects and their clients seriously consider ways in which they can create a house that is as close to self-sustaining as possible. The best architects are those that can incorporate these sensibilities organically into the design – as opposed to tacking them on as an afterthought.   Habitus House of the Year wouldn’t exist without the support of our friends, colleagues and regular collaborators in the industry. We would like to extend our sincerest thanks to our Major Partners Gaggenau, StylecraftHOME and Zip and Supporting Partners Armadillo & Co and Earp Bros. Likewise we would like to recognise our Television Partners for joining us on our journey to a new medium. Meet the full 2019 Habitus House of the Year jury hereabc
Homes
Around The World
Architecture
ARC - Feature

K59 Atelier Creates A Dialogue With The Sun, Wind And Rain

Vernacular architecture emerges as a response to a specific location, adapted to climate and environment, and designed for local needs, traditions and resources. Tile Roof House by K59 Atelier is a contemporary interpretation of vernacular architecture in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Borrowing elements from traditional dwellings, it is designed to withstand the tropical monsoon climate and contribute to the cultural identity of the city. “The concept of ‘place’ is always the starting point for K59 Atelier,” says Phan Lâm Nhật Nam. “Tile Roof House reflects the direction of the design team when they think about the development of indigenous architecture of their motherland.” K59 Atelier designed Tile Roof House to have a dialogue with the sun, wind and rain; to connect with nature; to meet the needs of the client (three generations of the same family); and to reimagine the traditional tile-roof houses that lined Ho Chi Minh’s streets. “Terracotta is a material associated with the memory of many family generations and has become representative of the image of ancient cities in Vietnam,” Phan explains. Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | main entrance  

A terracotta-tile roof slopes towards the street, punctured by two balconies that bring in natural light and facilitate cross ventilation.

  Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | entrance A terracotta-tile roof slopes towards the street, punctured by two balconies that bring in natural light and facilitate cross ventilation. Rainwater cascades down the steep gradient during monsoon season and is collected in a water tank hidden inside a concrete beam and used to water the garden in summer. “Any overflowing water can fall over its edge to form a natural waterfall for the children to enjoy at the entrance of the home,” says Phan. The interior of Tile Roof House is divided into two volumes that relate to the path of the sun. The private and enclosed “stillness area” is positioned on the east side of the house where bedrooms, bathrooms and studies receive the afternoon sun. The lofty and open ‘action area’ is located on the west side so that it stays cool and airy in the afternoon. Its shared living spaces flow effortlessly from one room to the next to support relationships between family members, and to create a visual connection with the trees in the front and back yards. Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | foyer  

The interior of Tile Roof House is divided into two volumes that relate to the path of the sun.

 
Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | kitchen & dining The underside of the terracotta riles are visible inside the home, as is the black metal supporting structure. The interior finishes, including white walls and polished concrete floor, are light and subdued to draw attention to the tiles, and timber furniture complements the bamboo shutter doors and joinery. “A modern lifestyle does not mean that we completely separate ourselves from nature. Rather living in harmony with the sun, wind, rain and trees should be prioritised,” Phan says. K59 Atelier k59atelier.com Photography courtesy of k59 atelier Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | open-plan kitchen/living Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | kitchen cabinetry Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | entry foyer Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | staircase Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | landing Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | stair railing Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | open foyer Tile Roof House Vietnam K59 Atelier | balcony We think you might also like K House by Norm Architects and Aim Architectureabc
Parties
Happenings
HAP - Feature

Cult Pop-Up Launch: They Came. They Curated. They Conquered.

The presence of the bespoke pop-up store in the inner-eastern Sydney suburb of Woollahra represents the breaching of a new frontier for Cult. For the rest of us who love, live and breath design, it represents a collaboration that is well-and-truly worth celebrating. It marks the coming together of some of Sydney’s most influential design figures and artistically inclined – Cult founder, Richard Munao; Infinite Design Studio’s Michelle Macarounas; Tim Olsen of Olsen art gallery; and .M Contemporary’s Michelle Paterson. Taking the mic to share a toast with attendees, Richard Munao gave credit to Michelle Macarounas for instigating the fortuitous collaboration. Reminiscing on the conversation that had ignited the idea, Richard recalled discussing with Michelle his desire to expand and diversify Cult's following. Her advice? “You need to be in Woollahra”. And Wednesday night – at the very least – was proof that she was right. “We are fortunate to be part of a wonderful community that has embraced our new way of bringing design ideas to the public,” says Michelle. If you happen to be in Sydney, we’d highly recommend taking a trip to Woollahra to visit the Cult Curated Edition by Infinite Design Studio yourself. A selection of furniture, lighting and accessories from international and local brands including Poltrona Frau, Carl Hansen, HAY, Gubi, &tradition, NAU, Zanotta and Cappellini, alongside artworks from Olsen Gallery, M Contemporary and Otomys and fabrics from Kvadrat and South Pacific Fabric are showcased and available to purchase in the pop-up store. If you were unable to make it there in person, never fear – you can always live vicariously through the pictures! Here are a few of our top pics. Cult cultdesign.com.au Infinite Design Studio infinitedesignstudio.com.au Olsen Gallery olsengallery.com .M Contemporary mcontemp.com Photography by Fiona Susanto [gallery columns="5" ids="92006,92007,92008,92009,92010,92011,92012,92013,92014,92015,92016,92017,92018,92019,92020,92021,92022,92023,92024,92026,92027,92030,92031,92032,92033,92035,92037,92038,92039,92040,92041,92042,92043"] We think you might also like Sydney's Pop-Up Cult Curated Storeabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Flumood: A State-Of-The-Art Material From antoniolupi

With a reputation of offering its customers all the means to create an elegant and refined look, antoniolupi's latest addition of Flumood encourages new forms and new product interpretations. Made from a mix of aluminium hydroxide and synthetic resins with low styrene content, Flumood embodies the ideal characteristics to make washbasins and bathtubs for contemporary bathroom designs. The added advantages of being easy to clean and easier to restore also ensures longevity in material and product performance with an impeccable aesthetic expression throughout its lifetime. Eco-friendly, compact, non-porous and non-toxic, Flumood is also pleasant to touch. Mastello, an ergonomic bathtub, Breccia, a round integrated washbasin, and Rim, a new ultra-thin sink are just a few products from antoniolupi that are now available using Flumood. [caption id="attachment_91839" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]antoniolupi_ Flumood_Breccia | Habitus Living Breccia[/caption] Mastello in Italian translates to an old wooden tub used in the past for bathing. The new Mastello in Flumood, designed by Mario Ferrarini, emanates the ritual of bathing in an era where running water was a luxury.  Without any visual interruptions, the Matello bathtub has been designed with consideration to fit into smaller bathrooms. The ergonomic bathtub also has an integrated internal step as well as an external wooden step to allow for easier access. Breccia, a made to measure round integrated washbasin, was designed by Mario Ferrarini to eliminate wasted space. The integrated Breccia in Flumood has an elegant form with a cut and groove that allows water to flow naturally. Functional and yet aesthetically pleasing, Breccia adds a light presence in the bathroom. The new ultra-thin sink that is available in round or oval, Rim incorporates a distinct and soft feature resting gently on the vanity top. In Flumood, Rim transforms into a contemporary addition with a sleek rounded edge. Flumood is available in a satin finish, perfectly smooth, or textured – marked by an embossed layer that mimics natural stone slabs. It is also available in white as well as other colours available from the antoniolupi range. [caption id="attachment_91840" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]antoniolupi_ Flumood_Breccia | Habitus Living Breccia[/caption] [caption id="attachment_91842" align="aligncenter" width="1170"]antoniolupi_ Flumood_Mastello | Habitus Living Mastello[/caption]   Antonio Lupi For enquiries: 1300 699 141 info@antoniolupidesign.com.au antoniolupi.it We think you might also like Hotel Bocage by Duangrit Bunnagabc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

David Hansford Is A Pragmatist

David Hansford accredits his hardworking father for his [own] strong work ethic and intentionally fuss-free approach to the practice of architecture. David is the founder of DAH Architecture, a Brisbane-based boutique practice, known for its striking portfolio of residential and mixed use projects. “My old man was a tradesman and small business owner, which I feel has influenced my approach to architecture and practice,” Hansford offers. “I have worked full-time since 2nd year university and learnt like an apprenticeship of sorts.” David’s seminal project - Church House - in which he deftly transformed a historic Brisbane church into a dynamic and contemporary family residence, formed the impetus for David’s leap into private practice. It is here, in the running of his own business, that David is able to leverage his inter-personal skills and love for the pre-planning and brief development stages of a project. “I feel that my niche skills are connecting and understanding what my clients want to achieve in their projects and delivering that in the simplest and most enjoyable manner achievable,” David explains. “My interest in architecture lies in the psychology of people and how they interact and inhabit spaces.” As the father of a young son, David thrives on working closely with many of his clients, many of whom are at a similar life stage. “I really enjoy being invited in to their lives, to design flexible houses that change with their growing families.” A lifelong Brisbane resident, David is inspired by his hometown, so much so, that his favourite pursuit is to walk through its diverse neighbourhoods, taking in its ever changing streetscape. “I have lived in various houses all over the city and love the way that different suburbs can be identified by typologies and topography,” he says. “I feel this makes Brisbane such an interesting place to work as I rarely find any two sites the same. I think coming from a city like Brisbane and seeing amazing architecture, music, art, etc., produced locally, has influenced an ethos of supporting the young and unheralded talent that surrounds us.” Predictably, David is a team player, and the success of many of his projects can be attributed to the collaborative spirit he fosters in each team. However, the single person he cites as his main source of inspiration is his wife, Lucy. “She’s a very talented architect and always offers the perfect critique that unfortunately usually takes me another day or two to realise,” he admits. In addition, the designer lives and breathes design, through the way in which he interacts with his environment. “My lifestyle and day-to-day activities have an influence on the design we produce whether it’s watching my son interact with a space or walking the streets of different suburbs looking at houses with my family,” he continues. “I also feel that the more people I meet and interact with, the more equipped I am to extract their vision for their home and design spaces for them to inhabit." David’s pragmatism extends to his thoughts about the future of the industry. “The biggest challenge we currently run into [in our practice], is the rising cost of trades and materials which seems to be magnified by market expectations for bigger spaces and protecting the ‘re-sale value’,” he says. “As for trends in residential design,” he continues, “I think as density and costs increase, the importance of efficient and resourceful design will take precedence.” And predictably, it’s a forecast that the architect actively translates into real and sustainable strategies within his own work. DAH Architecture daharchitecture.com.au Photography by Cathy Schusler David Hansford DAH Architecture cc Cathy Schusler | Habitus Living We think you might also like Church House by DAH Architectureabc
Architecture
Interiors
Places
Primary Slider

SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop

A good bookstore is more than the sum of its books. It’s an inviting hangout; a comfortable environment to linger; and an inspiring place to share and gain knowledge. Wanting to write a new chapter for UNSW Bookshop, the UNSW Development Team engaged SJB to transform the aging store into a dynamic retail space that encourages people to spend time in a setting that fosters ideas and discussion. “UNSW had a vision for the bookshop to be a beacon; the campus honeypot,” says Monica Edwards, Senior Associate, SJB. The existing bookshop was dark, hidden and uninviting, with a maze of densely packed bookshelves and overbearing fluorescent light. UNSW wanted to modernise the bookshop to optimise the display and sale of books, and to provide a space that fosters discussion, learning and growth. “We wanted to create a place that you could lose yourself in,” says Adam Haddow, Director, SJB. “You don’t always go in to a bookshop to buy something. You go in there and end up buying something.” The design team looked to memorable bookshops around the world and considered what captured their imagination. “We concluded that our favourite spaces were ones with tall bookshelves lining the walls and low-level display in between, providing space to breathe, to enjoy lingering and exploration,” says Monica. SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | entrance The bookshop activates a formerly underutilised courtyard with the storefront, coffee servery and outdoor seating, and a mirror-finished stainless-steel awning that serves as a beacon and draws people in. The interior is divided into three distinct rooms, including a café, that are lined with bookshelves, evoking the familiarity of classic bookstores and keeping sightlines open for the retail space. An open central zone can be used for events and book launches, and built-in benches and lounge chairs around the edges of the rooms provide cosier nooks for small groups or individuals. Natural materials and earthy colours also feel familiar and comfortable, as well as hiding wear and tear and encouraging light and reflection in the south-facing space. Timber joinery and flooring references the archetypal bookstore, and terracotta tiles clad joinery and define transitions between rooms. Exposed walls and ceilings are painted in a spectrum of pinks, with lighter tints in the entry and café, and darker shades in the reading room to create a sense of warmth and comfort to encourage people to linger. Transforming UNSW Bookshop has also transformed the way people use it. “I am surprised and elated by how inventive people are with the space, exploring myriad of different ways to create a dynamic retail experience and event venue,” says Monica. SJB  sjb.com.au Photography by Anson Smart Dissection Information No. 18 Chair from Thonet Darlinghurst Lambert & Files Laurent light from Living Edge Arper Sled chair from Stylecraft Stirrup table from Koskela Marble tiles from Bisanna Tiles Terracotta tiles from Academy Tiles Porcelain tiles from Surface Gallery SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | window seat SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | archway SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | share table SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | cafe SJB Writes A New Chapter For UNSW Bookshop | streetview We think you might also like The Architect's Bookshop by SJBabc
Design Products
Accessories

HouseLab Launches Defect Management Tool

HouseLab has revealed a new defect module in its app, which is part of its Digital Handover Kits. The new inclusion is a welcome update aimed at builders and architects working alongside homeowners where the building and handover process comes together seamlessly inside a single product – the HouseLab platform. The new addition is set to alleviate a part of the industry that is in dire need of attention, particularly as defects and and defect management continue to come under the spotlight. When sharing insights into the new tool, Chris Rennie, co-founder of HouseLab, says, “We have been working with a wide range of builders and architects over the past two years to develop a system that is aimed at reducing the growing friction and concern around how defects are managed post-occupancy. And to reduce the significant inefficiencies that plague defect management. “Homeowners are increasingly alarmed about defects leading to a substantial increase in phone calls, emails and messages through social media platforms to their builders or architects, often leading to unnecessarily poor reviews and pulling construction staff off current jobs. HouseLab’s defect module provides a user-friendly platform where residents can log, track and discuss defects in a completely transparent manner. Current industry users are reporting a reduction of 40 per cent or more in communication to site supervisors and construction managers, which is leading to significant cost savings post-occupancy.” HouseLab Launches Defect Management Tool | defect While there are many defect tools currently available, none are focused on facilitating better relationships with new residents, which has been noted as a pain point for builders. Raj Nandan, CEO of Indesign Media and director of HouseLab, adds, “Defect management and remediation is being mentioned on a daily basis not only across the industry but it’s now front page news. We knew that something could be, and should be, done to improve the relationship between the new homeowners and the construction industry. It’s another step that we are taking in order to offer practical support to a range of businesses across the design and construction landscape.” During the past two years of testing, HouseLab has noticed some surprising outcomes from users. Rennie goes onto say, “While instinctively our industry users were initially concerned that providing an open and transparent platform would encourage a large increase in defect submissions, the opposite has been true in many cases. Current practice sees residents having to complete a defect submissions form on a particular day often leading to high anxiety and an unnecessary push to find and record every minor issue, often leading to conflict with the builders or architects. “This is not happening on the HouseLab platform. Residents submit defects as they come across them, and because they can track them in real time, it reduces the need to call the office. Another benefit is that as residents are self-serving on the platform, it has dramatically reduced the need for construction staff to visit the homeowners to assist in recording the defects.” Rennie adds, “In some cases we have seen time savings of up to four hours per day for construction staff, as they don’t need to visit the new homes, rather they’re managing the whole process online, leaving more time to focus on the next job.” HouseLab houselab.com.au HouseLab Launches Defect Management Tool | iPad We think you might also like How HouseLab Revolutionises House Management And Handoversabc
Architecture
Homes
Primary Slider

A Voluminous And Organic Home Set In A Subtropical Garden

Homage to Oscar from Luigi Rosselli Architects is a restoration of a George Reeves house in Bellevue Hill built in 1962. With influences from Brazilian architects, Oscar Niemeyer and Lúcio Costa, Luigi Rosselli shares, “[George] felt an affinity to subtropical architecture which is very open, voluminous, organic.” The architects wanted to ensure the build was honouring the Brazilian modern architecture influence of Oscar Niemeyer, hence the name: Homage to Oscar. Luigi explains, “we think that was the inspiration for the original architect, and we kept quite clear in our mind that was going to be the guiding motif.” The architects didn’t want to change too much, and the alterations were mindful of the client’s brief: to create an open family home. They also realised they would need to refinish everything to improve the quality of construction. Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | garden & landscape They started by moving a wall to open up the living space, opening the kitchen to the whole house. However, the benefits of the house with its former staff quarters, meant an entire hidden area could be used for the pantry and a veggie patch and herb garden which leads into the laundry, a mess room, and a little study for the children to do homework – which connects to the garage by one of the circular staircases. The other grand staircase in the house, with blue-black granite steps, was updated with a new gold handrail. “You had to keep the good bits and just remove the bad ones – that was a continuous exercise though the build,” says Luigi. Another example of this was the outdoor fireplace: the architects placed the original plans on a photocopier and blew it up by 50 per cent so it was finally useable. Another element of the brief was an all-white aesthetic; the architects worked closely with the interior designer, Romaine Alwill, to add textures and pieces that enhance the architecture and surrounding tropical garden from Will Dangar brought in the colour. Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | Kitchen island Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | casual dining Sustainability and passive elements were essential to the house with its ample indoor/outdoor living. The walls become huge glass windows that can be opened for cross-ventilation; for this reason, the architects reduced the air conditioning unit so it can never be set to one fixed temperature. Luigi adds, “it’s just not that kind of house to have all the windows shut.” They also removed tonnes of paving, made the pool smaller, and covered the roof with solar panels. In the bedrooms that faced north, they put bespoke electrical shutters over the windows and added high-performance glass. Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | kitchen & dining Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | entertaining & dining The master bedroom can also be completely opened up to a balcony overlooking the garden, with ten metres of windows. “You open the windows if you feel like sleeping outside, it’s like camping basically,” concludes Luigi. Luigi Rosselli Architects luigirosselli.com Photography by Prue Ruscoe Dissection Information Window Design from Enviro Window Design Tiles from Artedomus Lights from Lidsey Adelman Stone surfaces from Fibonacci Stone Timber supplied by Woodstock Resources Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | staircase Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | bathroom vanity Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | spiral staircase Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | landscape Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | outdoor living Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | landscaping Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | outdoor bbq Homage to Oscar Luigi Rosselli Architects cc Prue Ruscoe | front entrance We think you might also like Luigi Rosselli at homeabc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
Happenings
People
What's On

A Love For The Fundamentals Of Design

Shelley Penn has been running her eponymous practice, Shelley Penn Architect since 1993. Her expertise and interest developed in the residential sphere and for a number of years this is where she focused her work. It wasn’t long, however, until Shelley began working with the government and over the past 20 years she has practised architecture; worked as an advocate, design reviewer, evaluator and strategic advisor to achieve excellent outcomes on public projects. And if that wasn’t enough, she has also reviewed large-scale developments in the private sector. Shelley’s passion for designing houses hasn’t ever waned, and dotted in amongst the architecture advocacy, every few years is a residential project to keep her creative side satisfied. Given the rarity of these and the demands on her time from other sources, it follows that she’d need to be quite selective. Currently a sole practitioner, although in the past she’s had a team support her studio, a potential client can’t be in a hurry. Good communication between client and architect, as well as openness to ideas and trust are also defining factors when deciding to take on a job. Likewise, consistency between vision and budget is non negotiable – whichever end of the spectrum a client has in mind. Speaking about future cities and the industry’s capacity – and responsibility – to positively impact the direction we take, it’s Shelley’s opinion that architecture needs to facilitate compact living, and houses and apartments that are “less lazy in their planning”. This is relevant for medium and high density builds as well as single residences and individual apartment renovations. On the singular level, architecture has the ability to personalise and adapt a residence to the occupants’ unique way of living. While on a larger scale, the spatial planning of interiors in medium-large scale developments has opportunity to address changing behaviours for many at once and ease pressure on the demands of a city. Even though conceptually Shelley appreciates the value developments have to offer, she’s quick to add the caveat that they need to be responsive and respectful to the context in which they sit. They also need to be made with appropriately enduring materials. “People are afraid of developments for pretty good reason; there’s a lot of really awful development.” Ultimately, there needs to be a shift both in how the community views development and government policies that support design quality and integrity of a project. Hopefully one will encourage the other. Clever spatial planning is certainly something Shelley will be looking for in the 20 houses that comprise the 2019 Habitus House of the Year selection. “I’m not at all prolific, but I do love exploring fundamental design challenges, how to really optimise and get the best out of everything you can in an efficient and elegant way,” she says. And while that’s something that excites her in her own practice, the prospect of seeing how other architects in and around Australia have approached this is perhaps even more exciting. Shelley’s support and genuine interest in the architecture community, both established and emerging, is immediately apparent and it’s inspiring to hear. She loves to see young and emerging practices that have been working hard and doing great work begin to get some recognition, and is equally excited by the notion of architects and studios she might encounter, that she otherwise wouldn’t, through Habitus House of the Year. “What I am looking forward to seeing is breadth and diversity of new work, including the new ideas coming through and more people doing good work. I always love it when I see a lovely project and it’s by an architect or designer that I’ve never heard of,” says Shelley. Being regionally spread she is also looking forward to seeing ideas come out of different places and the diversity in architecture and architectural response they will reflect. And certainly, the houses she’ll value the most are those that respond in a meaningful way to their particular circumstances, be they an existing building in an alterations and additions project or the surrounding landscape in a rural environment. A profound respect for authenticity in architecture and the desire to promote and give a platform to local and emerging architects are two themes that our conversation weaves in and out of from beginning to end. It’s reassuring to see Habitus’ values mirrored in vibrant members of the industry. Shelley Penn Architect shelleypenn.com.au   Habitus House of the Year wouldn’t exist without the support of our friends, colleagues and regular collaborators in the industry. We would like to extend our sincerest thanks to our Major Partners Gaggenau, StylecraftHOME and Zip and Supporting Partners Armadillo & Co and Earp Bros. Likewise we would like to recognise our Television Partners for joining us on our journey to a new medium. Meet the full 2019 Habitus House of the Year jury hereabc
Homes
Around The World

Rethinking Tradition In Bangalore, India

The residents of this house lived in it happily for twelve years. But, as their lives gradually evolved, and their three children grew up alongside their three dogs, the house became less and less suitable to their needs. However having known and been close friends with the previous owners, an elder couple who loved to entertain, they were sentimental about the house. Architecture studio, Collective Project, was engaged by the not-so-new residents for what would be the team’s first project following the studio’s relocation from the U.S. to Bangalore, India. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking entrance The architects and clients began the process intending to preserve elements of the original building. But key deliverables of the brief – five bedrooms, a formal living room, family room, bar area and an open/closed kitchen – ended up conflicting with the original intent. The decision was eventually made to pivot to a new build. As a result, Collective Projects prioritised creating a space that celebrated the memory of the original house, while also providing a versatile space that responded to the clients’ and their family’s needs now and into the future. And despite a 10,000 square-foot site, the architects didn’t extend beyond the footprint of the original house in order to maintain the spacious nature of the open lawn. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking outdoor living The ground floor responds to the kids’ active nature as an open and connected space, both between the various interior zones and between the interior and exterior zones. The latter is achieved with large sliding glass doors that can be opened to allow for free-flowing circulation. “Bangalore is known for its mild weather, so on most days all the large glass sliding doors are open and one can walk from the living room through the courtyard to opposite dining space,” says Eliza Higgins of Collective Project. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking living room Upstairs comprises the private bedrooms. The staircase landing delivers residents to a family room adjacent to the atrium and drenched in natural light. But it’s here that the floor plan splits: the children’s bedrooms are north, south and west of the family room, while the parents’ bedroom is accessed through the library and via a thin metal bridge. This affords a sense of separation and privacy between the generations while maintaining a public level below, and private level above. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking | library Brick was a request of the clients as was a sloped roof. Hand-moulded table bricks were used in place of standard wire-cut bricks, which offer soft edges and welcome imperfections. “We felt these bricks told more of a story and in this case, we were keen on creating a project that was both precise and contemporary (the building geometry) and imperfect (the hand-moulded brick),” says Eliza. All the materials (brick, stone and wood) were locally sourced. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking master bedroom The brickwork, including the traditional perforated jaali screen, characterises the new house and offers a strong visual identity. Inside, the brickwork interacts with cream white plastered wall surfaces, thus avoiding repetition of the exterior whilst still referencing it. In response to the clients’ desire for a pitched roof, Collective Projects utilised a series of sloped roofs with clerestory windows to capture natural light and convey a sense of loftiness in the space. “This also helped by giving a playful lightness to the heavy masonry form,” adds Eliza. Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking exterior Having moved back in late December 2018, it remains uncertain who is most excited the new space: the family or their four-legged friends. Collective Projects collective-project.com Photography by Benjamin Hosking Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking indoor-outdoor Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking hallway Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking brick detail Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking landscape Brick House Collective Project cc Benjamin Hosking outdoor-indoor We think you might also like Chavvi House by Abraham John Architectsabc
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Hard Surface Solutions From Rocks On So Far

For over two decades, Rocks On has supplied luxurious porcelain stoneware to the design and architecture industry. Australian owned and operated, Rocks On prides itself on sourcing the highest quality and most technologically advanced products from around the world. Taking inspiration from regions such as Italy and Spain, Rocks On specialises in bespoke solutions for a range of interior and landscaping builds within the residential and commercial realm. Having already launched over 45 new products in 2019, here are a few examples that emphasise the way Rocks On has led the industry with innovative and inspiring hard surface solutions.

Bristol

[gallery columns="2" size="medium" ids="91848,91849"] Allowing designers to recreate a typical brick facade, Bristol emanates a post-industrial heritage aesthetic. This new tile series is suitable for floor and wall applications while bringing back the feel of traditional brick in this porcelain stoneware. It also is nostalgic of the vibrant and contemporary nature of its namesake in the UK. Bristol is available in a range of sizes for both internal and external applications – with the addition of adding a slip-resistant finish (R10 and R11) for commercial pedestrian projects.  

Flodsten

[gallery columns="2" size="medium" ids="91851,91850"] Inspired by a natural stone found in Northern Italy called Ceppe di Gre, Flodsten is a matt porcelain tile that comes in a range of colours and formats to be adapted to any minimalistic interior. The full body glazed porcelain tile is scratch-resistant, stain-resistant and frost-resistant, making it ideal for residential and commercial uses.  

Stone Mix

[gallery columns="2" size="medium" ids="91854,91855"] Stone Mix is a collection from Rocks On that features chromatic colours that recreate the natural variation of natural stone. The shade variations, colours and mineral complexion of this collection resembles real stones but has been manufactured using hard-wearing porcelain tiles that are scratch-resistant and water-resistant. Available in 7 sizes (200 x 200 millimetres up to 1200 x 1200 millimetres), the Stone Mix range is the faultless answer to achieve any natural floor or wall design with two surface finishes. Additionally, the landscape surface finish is slip-resistant too (R11/P5). Rocks On rockson.com.auabc