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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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What’s In It For You? The Ultimate Design Hunter Package

Architects, designers and design enthusiasts alike know that great architecture can reach new heights when complemented by well-designed objects. In celebration of the great feats of architecture within the Habitus House of the Year 2019 selection, we’ve curated a prize pool of design objects capable of elevating your space and style to new heights! All you need to do to go in the running to win this Ultimate Design Hunter Package is cast your vote for your House of the Year. In case you need a little further encouragement, here’s a sneak peek at the curated prize pool up for grabs:

1. Agra rug, Armadillo & Co.

The Agra Collection of rugs from Armadillo & Co. balances visual restraint with sumptuous luxury. Select your choice of colour from the collection’s range of ten hues; Anthracite; Byzantine; Duchess; Juniper; Kingfisher; Marlin; Midnight; Moonstone; Oyster; and Pearl. Armadillo & Co. 

2. Flocca Linen bedding, Hale Mercantile Co.

Experience pure linen bedding from Australia's leading linen brand. Hale Mercantile Co.’s luxurious linen bedding is manufactured entirely in Europe from authentic, quality linen. Receive a Queen-size linen bedhead and bedding set including duvet cover, flat sheet and pillowcases. Hale Mercantile Co.

3. Bang & Olufsen Beosound Edge, Premium Sound

Compact and powerful wireless speaker with a timeless design, cutting edge acoustic innovation and magical interaction for a listening experience that inspires the imagination. Premium Sound [gallery size="medium" ids="94166,94172,94168"]

4. Anya Pesce artwork, Studio Gallery

Titled Gold Composition, 2019, this wall mounted sculpture by Sydney-based artist, Anya Pesce, is valued at $3,000. Anya’s work explores surface, colour and materiality, transforming plastic material from its industrial incipient state, to a form that is both illusive and real, arouses curiosity through juxtaposition. Studio Gallery

5. Georg Coat Stand, Top 3

Georg Coat Stand is two long legs attached to a centre section that leans against the wall. No screws, just a straightforward wardrobe solution for your lobby or bedroom. Shirts and trousers can go on hangers, while you can hang your scarves and jackets on the little bumps on one leg and your bag on the hook on the other. Top 3

6. Sedis Chair, Stylecraft

The Sedis seating collection designed by Anne-Claire Petre for Anaca Studio balances sculptural curves with strong, minimalist lines informed by Art Deco architecture. Stylecraft [gallery size="medium" ids="94169,94171,94170"]

7. Andy Chair, Project 82

The Andy occasional chair by Design Kiosk is an effortlessly comfortable chair that is modern and inviting. Available in 4 aniline leather options this armless chair is easy to slide into, and keeps a room feeling open. Project 82

8. Ceppo collection tiles, Earp Bros

Receive a $3,000 voucher to spend on any tiles in the Ceppo collection by Earp Bros. The collection includes three stunning colours, Antracita, Stone and Acero offering a diverse collage of complementing tones to easily blend with other materials and products. Earp Bros

9. Kanta Nested Cocktail Tables, Boyd Blue

This pair of nested cocktail tables is topped with a sunburst-patterned veneer in Smoked Eucalyptus finish with a brass-plated metal base. Boyd Blue [gallery size="medium" ids="94167,94174,94173"]

10. Shunan tables, Top 3

Bring the outside in with Shunan, the round metal and wood coffee table inspired by China’s serene forest. Ideal for use as a side or coffee table, Shunan’s curved ash top is supported by strong, vertical steel legs, creating an organic and elegant feel. This coffee table represents a perfect marriage of classic simplicity and contemporary flair. Top 3

11. Showers, tapware and accessories, Phoenix Tapware

Select up to $3,000 RRP worth of Phoenix branded collections including showers, taps and accessories from Phoenix Tapware. Phoenix Tapware

12. Dost lounge chair, Top 3

Named for the native word meaning ‘friendship’, the Dost wool lounge chair was inspired by one of our most basic human needs: comfort. Whether you’re having a bad day or just want to curl up with a good book, a few moments resting on a Dost chair will be as comforting as a cuddle from an old chum. Top 3 [gallery size="medium" ids="94178,94181,94176"]

13. Snoopy limited edition table lamp, Euroluce

Table lamp giving direct light with matte black embossing powder finishing reflector and white Carrara’s marble base. It was designed by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni in 1967.

14. Wardrobe and personal styling, Nique

Receive a $1,500 Nique wardrobe and a personal styling session with Nique creative director, Nadia Jones.

15. Lightning rug, TSAR Carpets

This TSAR Carpets rug, valued at $4,065 RRP, is an atypical representation of lightning; hidden behind a mass of dark clouds, an electrical storm is observable only by a thin glow in the distance. [gallery size="medium" ids="94179,94175,94177"]

Don't miss your chance to win all this and more! Vote for your choice of our 2019 Habitus House of the Year selection to be in the running. Competition closes October 28, 2019, Terms and Conditions apply.

Habitus and Indesign Media Asia Pacific would like to thank our partners for the Design Hunter Package: Armadillo & Co., Hale Mercantile Co., Boyd Blue, Premium Sound, StylecraftHOME, Euroluce, Nique, Top 3, Earp Bros, Studio Gallery, Phoenix Tapware, Project 82, and Tsar Carpets. Habitus House Of The Year wouldn’t exist without the support of our friends, colleagues and regular collaborators in the industry. We would like to extend our sincerest thanks to our Major Partners Gaggenau, StylecraftHOME and Zip and Supporting Partners Armadillo & Co and Earp Bros. Our Trophy Partner Axolotl and our Accommodation Partner Ovolo Laneways. abc
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Win $3,000 worth of Ceppo Collection tiles from Earp Bros with Habitus House of the Year

Here at Habitus, we know that good design starts with the basics. Having good design foundations makes all the difference in creating a space that works as both a style statement and a practical and workable space. This mentality is brought to life at various stages of the design process; it starts in the architecture and the bones of a building, and comes through as we choose each of the essential elements. From flooring to walls, we look for brands and products that can deliver on the practicality every home needs, but can also offer beautiful design. Ceppo Collection 2 A collision of style and pragmatic sensibility, the Ceppo Collection from Earp Bros is our go-to in luxe flooring and surface solutions. Available in three stunning colourways (Antracita, Stone, Acero), the collection is a master class in tone and materiality, with the elemental interplay in the tiles offering a unique complexity in design. Backing up its looks, the Ceppo Collection brings the same commitment to sustainability and longevity that has come to define the Earp Bros offerings more broadly. Built on a philosophy of sustainable development and ethical design, Earp Bros ensure all their materials are the product of responsible and considered manufacturing, with many ranges resistant to scratches, fire, water and frost while also being green certified. The lucky winner of the Habitus House of the Year Design Hunter prize will win $3,000 worth of Ceppo Collection tiles from Earp Bros. The tiles are available in 3 colourways and can be selected in both matt and slip resistant finishes*. To help you with your entry, the team at Earp Bros have selected their top three houses from the Habitus House of the Year selection, with a special focus on homes that achieve the same balance of beautiful and liveable design which speaks to the Earp ethos. [gallery type="rectangular" size="full" ids="94255,94253,94254"] *Conditions: The Ceppo collection is imported from the Porcelanosa Group in Spain and as such lead times may apply if current stock in your chosen tile is committed. The value of the prize does not include any shipping costs incurred to deliver your tiles to your property - Earp Bros do offer pickup from their warehouse facilities in Sydney, Newcastle and Melbourne free of charge. ** Full terms and conditions apply. Please see Habitus House of the Year page.abc
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The Latest In Fritz Hansen Lounge Chairs

The result of the latest collaboration between Fritz Hansen and Jaime Hayon, the Lounge Chair JH97 strikes the perfect balance between past and future, making lounging a new art form. When the design team at Fritz Hansen turned to Hayon for the creation of a new, modern style lounge chair, the Spanish designer looked to the world of classical Danish design for inspiration. The resulting chair marries a relaxed style with supreme comfort and design simplicity – sophisticated yet versatile, perfectly embodying the two worlds of tradition and technology. “We wanted to create a modern lounge chair that was light and sculptural in its expression; fusing Fritz Hansen’s expertise with Jaime Hayon’s sculptural design language,” explains Christian Andresen, Head of Design at Fritz Hansen. JH97 is a lounge chair that exudes elegance from every angle, with the open, low-slung silhouette presenting a contemporary feel despite its classical Danish design roots. Exaggerated armrests – wide and flat – embrace and support the body along with the curved backrest, angled in an upright position for comfort when lounging. The generously sized and comfortable cushions of the chair appear to float within the design, upholstered with detachable covers that allow for easily changeable expressions depending on mood or the surroundings of the chair. The softness of these cushions is juxtaposed by the naturally solid wood frame of the design, with the gently rounded joints being assembled by hand in reference to Fritz Hansen’s Danish design heritage. Design in perfect proportion with a solid frame available in natural oak, stained oak and black ash, the JH97 provides ideal comfort for comfort for long moments of relaxation, no matter the setting. The Fritz Hansen Lounge Chair JH97 by Jaime Hayon is available in Australia now, exclusively through Cult. Explore the JH97 along with the full Fritz Hansen collection at Cult. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="94236,94239"] Cult cultdesign.com.auabc
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ARC - Feature

GB House Embraces The Spirit Of Its Seaside Site

Tucked away on a corner block, surrounded by native Australian bushland, Gordons Bay House by Renato D’Ettorre Architects boasts front-row seats to a breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean and the rugged coastline of Sydney’s eastern suburbs. But such a priceless piece of landscape, ironically, comes at a price: to exist amongst it, one must be able to withstand the salt, wind, and sea of the corrosive coastal atmosphere. Choosing to whole-heartedly embrace the site, elements and all, the owner’s brief to Renato D’Ettorre, lead-architect for this new build, was for a hard-wearing, no-fuss four bedroom family residence, with a just few simple frills such as a gym, music room, and cellar. In response, Renato has designed a home that simultaneously conveys strength and sensitivity, truly embodying the spirit of seaside living. From the street, the three and a half story residence is deceptively discreet. To the passer-by, the house reveals little more than a double garage lined in unglazed terracotta breeze blocks and a view into a void that cuts right through the minimalist white brick exterior. The resulting appearance is of a modest two-storey home. Inside, the street-level floor features an entry passage, a home office, and a mezzanine study area for the children, which enjoys a framed view of the ocean via a bay window with a built-in day bed. GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects Internally, the mezzanine study area overlooks the ground level, which is dedicated to the living spaces, with expansive views of the bay, the cliff face, and the ocean beyond. The layout of this level is designed to grant the kitchen, living, family, dining, gym and powder rooms each its own pristine view of the outside world. Moving down into the lower-ground level, the space houses three children’s bedrooms with ensuites and their common living spaces, complete with a theatre room for casual socialising. Sharing the lower-ground level is the double-height music room that evolved in direct response to the site's excavation and its unveiling of subterranean sandstone rock, deep within the site. A cavernous cellar built entirely from dark face bricks is visible and accessible from the music room through glass sliding doors. Leveraging passive design elements, the cellar is naturally cooled from the sandstone cavity, which is kept cool and moist by the water constantly seeping from the rock crevices. GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects “Every detail of the house is geared toward creating a haven from the hectic pace of day-to-day life,” says Renato. This is particularly evident on the upper-most floor of the residence, which serves as a place of privacy and retreat for the parents. The master suite has direct access to two terraces and utilises the entire top floor, featuring a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite. Throughout these private spaces there are elements of quiet yet confident luxury, such as the walk-in wardrobe, which is lined with American Oak, finished with a luminous white sinuous lime plastered wall and naturally illuminated via a circular skylight. On the north end of the ensuite, a large bay window provides expansive views over the ocean. The private south terrace, accessible from the master suite via a small, perforated metal bridge spanning the stairwell, offers a sensory experience thanks to the dabbled light cast through the vines that frame the surrounding views. On the north-eastern front, a larger terrace enjoys panoramic views of the surrounding bay and ocean environs. “Both terraces help to contribute to the home’s design objective of creating an architecture parlante – that is, architecture that explains its own function or identity,” explains Renato D’Ettorre, “in this case a House By The Sea.” GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects That said, GB House’s affinity with the ocean was not Renato’s sole source of inspiration for the project. “It would have been too easy to treat the ocean as the only design influence,” he muses, “it would have been one-dimensional.” Underpinning the design of GB House is a search for clarity, necessity, and order, achieved through selections and orientations intended to forge and harmonise relationships between inside and out, materials and spaces, communal and private. Materials such as brick and terracotta were chosen for their inherent simplicity, honesty and low-maintenance qualities. The architect collaborated with PGH Bricks to create the custom terracotta breezeblocks that met the client’s functional and aesthetic desires, providing a dynamic play of light to the interior while letting the house breath and tempering the views as well as the weather. Through close collaboration between architect, interior designer, structural engineer, local suppliers, and client, GB House by Renato D’Ettorre Architects has been a great success all around. For Renato and his team, the residence has taken home the Horbury Hunt Residential Award from Think Brick; the NSW Best Of State title in the Australian Interior Design Awards; the 2019 Wilkinson Award (NSW) from the Australian Institute of Architects; and is one of seven houses shortlisted for the Australian Institute of Architects National Awards in the new residence category. Perhaps most importantly, having lived twelve months now in their new home, the clients are over the moon. “Renato and Belinda (interior designer) have created our dream house, which truly fits us like a glove,” say the residents. Renato D’Ettorre Architects dettorrearchitects.com.au Photography by Justin Alexander Dissection Information Custom PGH brick walls Eterno Grande European Oak floorboards in Graupa from Tongue & Groove flooring Ming’s Heart armchairs by Polyrona Frau from Cult Ile Club sofas by Living Divani from Space Furniture. Wind Low outdoor rug by Paola Lenti from dedece Ceiling fan from Pure Interiors Eileen Carrara marble dining table by B&B Italia from Space Furniture Hide Leather Seattle dining chairs with oak legs from Poliform Furniture Cappellini High Pad kitchen stools from Cult GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects We think you might also like 80ADR-House by ONG&ONGabc
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Australian Fashion Label Nique Lets You Do You

One Australian fashion label that is particularly well attuned to this – and their tribe of millennial Australians – is Nique. This Spring, the Melbourne label by creatives, for creatives, is launching its debut unisex collection, U by Nique. As the name would suggest, the curated capsule of gender-neutral lifestyle pieces celebrates the global movement of individuality and androgyny and empowers wearers to forge their own unique sense of style, without subscribing to gendered fashion-norms. Nadia Jones, the label's creative director, describes the launch of the distinct unisex range as a natural progression for the brand. “We were inspired by our customers and the way that they shop,” Nadia explains, “men are drawn to our women’s trousers; women [are drawn] to our men’s shirts. They are naturally gender fluid and know what suits them, irreverent of how we have designed the collection.” [gallery size="medium" ids="94026,94025,94024,94029,94028,94031"] Staying true to the brand’s architectural aesthetic and cultured clientele, U by Nique is fittingly modern, monochrome, and minimalist – elevated by clean lines and distinctive tailoring with innovative techniques. A few pieces that are well worth getting excited about include a hooded anorak, tailored jacket and elasticated suit pant. On the whole, U by Nique brings a youthful yet sophisticated sense of high-fashion finesse to your everyday wardrobe with an innovative collection of ready-to-wear pieces made up of natural fibres, in a monochrome palette with crushed metallic and heat seal detail. To that, I’d like to say thank you, Nique, for bringing us U by Nique. Nique nique.com.au Images courtesy of Nique U by Niqueabc
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According To Hogg & Lamb, There Are Two Types Of Architects

This is intentional, as one client may not share the same needs, or aesthetic intentions, as another. Michael Hogg and Greg Lamb, the co-founders of Hogg & Lamb, say their approach to architecture and design is predominantly informed by the client rather than a set style they are known for and engaged to roll out time after time. Those two approaches form the basis of the two camps Michael calls the foxes and the hedgehogs. “The fox can adapt to any situation and make the best out of it, whereas the hedgehog has one idea of how to survive, and that’s what they do every time,” he says, aligning their studio with the foxes. With each new ‘situation’ they are adapting to, (i.e. the client they are working with) they’ll ask the client to consider what they like, not necessarily what they need: as often the client may not know this explicitly yet. They’ll begin designing options early on with a general size and overall purpose in mind, which is usually informed by the client’s present situation and possible future evolutions. Michael and Greg use this period to refine the brief, exploring possibilities in and around it. While this holistic approach considers the entire house, it very much zeroes in on the kitchen. “There’s an architectural idea for the house, and then we transfer that idea to the kitchen, being one of the most important rooms of the house: what is the idea of the house, and how does the kitchen reinforce that idea?” says Michael. “The benchtops aren’t made out of stone because I like stone, they’re made out of stone because the idea for the house is reinforced by using stone,” he adds by way of example. One of their recent projects was a house for a minimalist couple and their children. Michael and Greg honoured their clients by designing the major appliances – ovens, fridges and a microwave – out of view into a butler’s pantry. Additionally, the legs of the kitchen island mirror that of the dining table, making it easily thought of as furniture. “Because of the way the island bench has been detailed, it can operate in a lot of different ways,” says Michael. For one of their current projects, Michael and Greg have designed an outdoor shower atmosphere in the middle of the house. Accessible from one of the bedrooms, this particular shower is completely uncovered and open to the sky, although a more traditional covered shower remains an option beside it. Across all the spaces they’ve worked on, from residences to hospitality projects and even a church, one lesson that stands out to them is to never lose sight of purpose and usability. “Things have to work functionally in order for the architectural idea to be experienced,” says Michael. Perhaps in one, single way, all their projects do share a common thread.  Hogg & Lamb hoggandlamb.com Photography by Holly Graham We think you might also like to get to know David Hansfordabc
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Looking Back, Moving Forward

Jardan has been designing, prototyping and manufacturing furniture out of its Melbourne studio and warehouse for 30 years. That length of time may surprise you, Nick Garnham and his brother Mike Garnham who together run the company can fly somewhat under the radar. And while the new collection, Weekend, is likewise understated it certainly isn’t flying under anyone’s radar. Weekend by Jardan started as a retrospective of the values Jardan furniture has exhibited over the years. In the design stage, the team poured over old photographs and design archives. But the point was to look – and move – forward. The idea was to use the brand’s experience and what it has along the way to inform a collection that drew on strong suits of the past yet remained relevant in the home of today. Furthermore, the design team was charged to consider what an Australian weekend looked like. “On the weekend our lives are relieved of unwanted detail. We’re comfortable and relaxed. We make time for breakfast, time to read, and time to talk. We value the company of friends and loved ones.” So Weekend by Jardan needed to comfortably and organically facilitate this lifestyle: nothing precious, nothing ostentatious. Instead, the collection of sofas, chairs, tables, lighting and a bed ­– all products for which Jardan has become known – exudes an understated elegance in its appreciation for design. This collection doesn’t scream 'latest trends', rather it’s the bones to your home that will grow with you, age gracefully. Weekend by Jardan Beautiful and tactile materials such as timber, travertine stone, textured plain/woven fabrics and pure aniline leathers marry strength, beauty, and the ability to patina. Although Weekend by Jardan may well look effortless, the process belies a lot more detail. Paper sketches become 2D elevations before they were 3D printed and then ultimately prototyped in the Jardan warehouse. From there, the production team joined forces with the design team to further develop the final designs. According to Nick, such a collaborative, inclusive approach is what gives Jardan its unique edge. “With every passing year our production gets better because we keep bringing things in house to improve our quality. Our designers walk out into the factory with our production team and talk about how to improve things. We all speak the same language,” he says. The entire collection is quite exhaustive, covering all bases. Miller is a timeless sofa that works easily into modular configurations. Alice is a travertine coffee table with fine steel legs. Banjo is an armchair that beckons irresistibly with its leather upholstery and swivel base. Billie is an understatedly elegant coffee table with subtle joinery and an inset rattan top. Finally, Willow is an American Oak bed that builds on Billie’s form and composition. Weekend by Jardan certainly has a few hero pieces – Willow, Miller, and Banjo are hard to go past – however, the entire collection is rounded out with pieces that just as equally showcase Jardan’s 30-year past and promising future. Jardan jardan.com.au Weekend by Jardan Weekend by Jardan Weekend by Jardan We think you might also like Richards Stanisich On Reinvention, Reinvigoration, And Client Relationshipsabc
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What Is Hidden Behind The Walls Of This Apartment In Clovelly?

Doing less is easier than doing more, of course. But restraining oneself when you’re exploding with ideas and you are your own client so you essentially have carte blanche? That’s certainly something different altogether. Yet this was the challenge that architect James Garvan of James Garvan Architecture faced when he was designing Clovelly Apartment, he and his wife’s own apartment. They had lived here for some time prior, in fact they were married in the front garden, making the best of a stunning location despite lacking visual connectivity to the views beyond. “My wife and I had been living in this 1960s apartment, perched on top of the clifftops at Clovelly, for a few years. We loved its intense connection to the ocean and landscape,” says James, yet programmatically it left much to be desired. The project accounts for many firsts: it was the first time James and his wife had worked together in such an intense and personal – but also formal – capacity. It was also the first time James had experienced the process not as an architect but from the point of view of the client. Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure One of the key components in the brief was to resolve standard patterns and behaviours within the home from 1965, when the apartment was built, with how those behaviours have evolved and what they look like now, in 2019. Formerly, the kitchen was at the rear of the apartment and the rooms felt small and compartmentalised, not to mention there was little advantage taken of the ocean views. “The new floorplan prioritises the living spaces and connects them strongly with the view,” says James. It was also necessary to maximise the space available. The 62 square metres it was allocated as a single-bedroom apartment is generous by today’s standards, but redistributing that metreage to add an extra room (to accommodate their growing family) meant it was a touch smaller than the average 75-square-metre, two-bedroom apartments of today. Ultimately it resulted in a complete rework of the original floor plan. Another requirement within the brief that James and his wife felt strongly about was to clearly demarcate the public and privates spaces within whilst ensuring all spaces actively engaged with, and benefited from, natural light, ocean views, and the landscape. This is expressed in the ‘secret’ pivoting panel walls down the centre line of the apartment that divide the kitchen/living/dining from the private sleeping quarters. Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure “Although the bedrooms and bathroom are immediately adjacent to the living spaces, you don’t have a sense that they are there,” says James. “It is only the bespoke brass finger-pulls that bely the fact that there are rooms beyond the panelled joinery wall.” In contrast to the openness of the kitchen/living/dining space the two bedrooms have been designed to feel intimate. “It has taken some of our visitors some time to learn which ‘secret’ door goes to which room, but that is all part of the fun,” adds James. Given the east-west orientation of the apartment, dividing it down the centre allows both public and private spaces to benefit from the views and access natural light, as per the brief. It also has the added benefit of negating the need for mechanical ventilation: each room enjoys natural cross-ventilation. Furthermore, heavy automated window coverings protect the apartment from direct sunlight in the warmer months and retain heat when the weather is cool. Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure The solution to storage in the Clovelly Apartment is just as clever and innovative as the new programme. Joinery units, both open and closed, are used in place of walls to separate the series of spaces within. For example, the open unit between the dining and lounge spaces subtly delineates these spaces without disconnecting them. Finally, and poignantly, James adds, “This project might be looked at as an effective development model for units in other 1950s/60s apartment blocks. The ordeal of undertaking major structural, plumbing and electrical modifications has been vastly outweighed by the upside of additional amenity, increased functionality and the improved light, space, views and quality of life for the inhabitants.” James Garvan Architecture jamesgarvan.com Photography by Katherine Lu Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure We think you might also like Challis Avenue Apartment by Retallack Thompson Architectsabc
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Outdoor Styling Is A Breeze With These Bamboo Planters

Contemporary, quintessentially Australian style is synonymous with indoor-outdoor living. After all, who wouldn’t want to make the most out of the natural environment we’ve been blessed with? Blurring the boundaries between indoors and out allows us not only to maximise the area of our living spaces (which are keep getting smaller), but also to experience the benefits of biophilia. But achieving this level of synergy between our landscapes and interiors – and doing so with style – is much easier said than done, simply because suitable styling products are few and far between. This is something that Adam Robinson, award-winning landscape and interior designer, understands more than most. “I’ve [often] been frustrated at not being able to find modern shapes in a contemporary timber pot or planter,” Adam shares, “there have been many times when a pot in a natural, organic and earthy material such as timber would have really suited the space that I’ve been designing, yet I’ve searched in vain.” Not one settle for anything short of styling perfection, Adam set out to design a solution to his predicament. Having worked closely with House of Bamboo on a number of projects over the last ten or so years, Adam reached out to Jennifer Snyders, House of Bamboo’s chief executive officer, to help bring his vision to life. The resulting collaboration was a match made in heaven. “[Bamboo] is the answer I was looking for,” says Adam. “Not only is bamboo the perfect material for a contemporary pot design with the warmth and texture of timber, but it’s an eco-friendly, sustainable material too.” The collaboration with Adam was a no-brainer for Jennifer too. “I saw it as an opportunity to bring the skills of great design together with our experience in bamboo manufacturing to produce an innovative collection of architectural sustainable solutions,” she says, “I saw that Adam and I could combine our passions to provide our clients with a product range that ticks all the boxes.” [gallery size="large" ids="94136,94139,94133"] And so they did. The Pleat Collection is a range of bamboo planters that are modern and simple, with smart architectural detailing. Consisting of square and round planters as well as a rounded trough, each available in two sizes and three finishes (natural, white-wash and charcoal-wash), the range has something to suit any space – whether it be indoors, outdoors, or transitioning between. Adam Robinson Design and House of Bamboo’s Pleat Collection is all the more accessible thanks to Outdoor Designer Store. The exclusive industry platform is designed to connect landscapers, designers and architects to products from leading brands and boutique manufacturers, making styling for outdoor design projects a breeze. Outdoor Designer Store outdoordesignerstore.com.au House of Bamboo houseofbamboo.com.au We think you might also like RZB House by CAPA Studioabc
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Getting To Know Bitte Design Studio

I first met Bitte Design Studio at Osteria Gia where the ceiling, painted just the night before, was still being adjusted for the right shade of red. The restaurant had barely opened but business was brisk and the atmosphere enjoyably boisterous. After lunch, we took a short walk to Mr Fox, housed in a corner on the ground floor of an office tower. Visiting it during off-peak hours presented the opportunity to examine some of its details. The detailing in the odd-shaped space is impressive. Although this was an older project completed in 2017, it felt fresh. Like Osteria Gia, it was also a very comfortable space to stay in, a quality that is, unfortunately, missing in many new places that look nice through the screens of Instagram and Pinterest but disappoint when actually experienced. Both Osteria Gia and Mr Fox left a great impression on me. [caption id="attachment_93972" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Djournal House by Bitte Design Studio Djournal Coffee House[/caption] Bitte was set up by peers Agatha Carolina and Chrisye Octaviani in 2012. They had been fellow architecture undergraduates at Parahyangan Catholic University and colleagues at andramatin studio. Today as creative partners they lead a team of five including three interior designers, a senior architect and a product designer to undertake a range of interior and architecture projects. The team works out of a creative compound called The Lapan Office in Jakarta’s South Tangerang alongside branding and graphic design agency SOSJ, UI and UX developer Antikode, and Monstore, a clothing label that Carolina co-founded. Work has been plenty for Bitte. Completions in the first half of this year have included an impressive number of residential, hotel and F&B projects such as Alchemist Anonymous, Arrack & Spice, Artotel Wahid Hasyim, Artotel Thamrin, Djournal Coffee & Pizza E Birra, and Osteria Gia. Outside of Jakarta, the studio also counts Rumours Bar and Grill in Bali, Magosaburo in Singapore, as well as Dragonfly KL and Black Byrd in Kuala Lumpur as new additions to their portfolio. [caption id="attachment_93970" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Djournal House by Bitte Design Studio Djournal Coffee House[/caption] The hardworking studio is also busy developing a Bitte product line that will include seating, lighting, and other accessories. Here are some snippets from my conversation with Carolina and Octaviani: Bitte’s mission is to “create a sustainable space for people”. Tell us more about your approach.  Agatha Carolina (AC): In design, the most important thing is to research. The designer is a problem solver, we need to make sure the design will accommodate all the needs of the client. We also need to make sure that the design will be functional and sustainable for long-term use. Chrisye Octaviani (CO): At the beginning of projects, we do research about the physical qualities and context of the site. We also find the early stages of any project is a critical time to talk with our clients, ask many questions, and most importantly, to listen. By learning about the site and listening to our clients, we hope that the outcomes can be fit with the context and the function. Bitte has worked on so many hospitality concepts. What are some trends you see in our region today? CO: At the moment, architecture and interior design are getting a lot more attention from many businesses. In the hospitality sector, people are not only looking at service, taste, quality, and the price of the food and drink, they are also looking for the right ambience. We view this trend as a good opportunity for designers. But when the competition is high, you need to work hard in order to be a better designer. [caption id="attachment_93967" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Bar AA by Bitte Design Studio Bar AA[/caption] How do you improve design skills? CO: Listen to feedback, self-assess, ask questions, adjust, focus, and continue. We have to be willing to keep learning. We love having projects of varying scales and complexities within the studio. We find that the processes, explorations, and learnings from each project typology can help improve our skills. In Indonesia, designers are leaving their jobs and setting up their own practices relatively early in their careers. How has this impacted the design profession?  AC: It is one of the concerns of our time. People are very exposed to social media, so it is very easy for people to set up their own business and tell the world about their works. This definitely has positive and negative impacts on the industry. The positive thing is that the industry is growing rapidly. Many people are really aware of the importance of good design because they are exposed to so much information on social media. However, one of the negative things about this is, as mentioned, designers are leaving their jobs and setting up their own practices relatively early because of the ease of creating a firm. Their lack of experience will impact the quality of the design. [caption id="attachment_93966" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Bar AA by Bitte Design Studio Bar AA[/caption] We also talked about how this was due to low salaries of designers in Indonesia, as well as the wider trend of how entrepreneurship is attractive to millennials and Gen Z. You started Bitte after working at andramatin studio for two years. Having gone down this road and achieving success with Bitte, what advice do you have for designers with similar aspirations, and, on the other hand, for studio directors facing challenges from the outflow of talent? AC: Yes, salary is one of the biggest problems. The new generation tends to think ‘instantly’. Some even want to achieve success in the shortest time. This is causing entrepreneurship to boom in Indonesia. Everyone wants to have their own business. We personally think that it’s a good problem to have. But, the thing that also needs to be considered is the responsibility behind it. Because sometimes we want to get more but we forget about the responsibility and effort behind each process. CO: Our personal experience is that we started Bitte from the bottom. It is like walking on the staircase. We need to start from the very bottom to reach the top. That way we can appreciate more, and the most important thing is we can get more control of things because we’ve overcome all those steps before. So our advice is, there’s no instant way to success. If you want to be successful there’s always a price to pay. It requires hard work, commitment, and persistence – never give up. Bitte Design Studio bitte-design.com Images courtesy of Bitte Design Studio [caption id="attachment_93963" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Arrack n Spice by Bitte Design Studio Arrack & Spice[/caption] [caption id="attachment_93962" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Arrack n Spice by Bitte Design Studio Arrack & Spice[/caption] [caption id="attachment_93975" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Mago Shaburo by Bitte Design Studio Magoshaburo[/caption] We think you might also like Duck & Rice by Hogg & Lambabc
Design Products
Furniture

Win an Agra Rug from Armadillo & Co with Habitus House of the Year

Dedicated to craftsmanship and ethical design, Armadillo & Co’s sumptuous rugs are made to elevate every space. Combining modern designs with the charm of decades past, each piece is crafted by hand, preserving a lineage of craftsmanship that has been passed down through generations. With traditional manufacturing methods core to the brand, founders Sally Pottharst and Jodie Fried use design and materiality to connect each rug to a quintessentially Australian context. Focused on relaxed living and coastal sensibilities, these are rugs that are made to be used, with neutral colours worked in materials that offer luxury and usability. One of our favourite pieces from their collection, the Agra Rug speaks to easy elegance and contemporary styling. Made in a sumptuous deep cut pile, the rug feels beautiful underfoot, taking your living space to the next level. Worked in a single colour with tonal complexities, the rug changes with the light, bringing life and character to every space. Versatile and timeless, you can also rest easy knowing the rug is part of Pottharst and Fried’s commitment to sustainability and ethical manufacturing. Proud supporters of Care & Fair (an initiative against child labour in the carpet industry), proceeds from each sale are donated to The Armadillo & Co Foundation, which is dedicated to building a brighter future for children in the villages where the rugs are made. The lucky winner of this prize will take home an Agra rug in the size 2.4 x 3m. To make sure the winner can effortlessly incorporate the rug into their home, they will be able to select a colour from 10 available hues (Anthracite, Byzantine, Duchess, Juniper, Kingfisher, Marlin, Midnight, Moonstone, Oyster and Pearl). All you need to do is vote for your favourite house in Habitus House of the Year 2019 selection (terms and conditions apply). To help you out, the Armadilllo & Co team have picked their top three homes. [gallery type="rectangular" size="full" ids="94080,94082,94081"]abc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Three Kitchens That Belong At The Heart Of The Home

It goes without saying that when it comes to contemporary residential architecture, kitchen design is integral to setting the tone for and the flow of a house’s shared spaces. In Habitus #44 for our 2019 Kitchen and Bathroom issue we explored the ways in which architects and designers nourish themselves and their clients through the work they do and the places and spaces they create – specifically in these spaces in which we often gather, and to which we like to retreat. For your kitchen design inspiration, here are three architect-designed kitchens that are truly heart-of-the-home-worthy.

Portsea Beach Shack by Pleysier Perkins

Kitchen design inspiration | Portsea Beach Shack by Pleysier Perkins The kitchen in Portsea Beach Shack, by Pleysier Perkins, is open, relaxed and robust enough for family and friends to casually gather around. Beach houses are all about enjoying laidback times with family and friends. Portsea Beach Shack on the Mornington Peninsula is the holiday home of a fun, creative, professional couple with a young daughter. They engaged Pleysier Perkins to update and extend their classic 1960s beach house to improve the function and internal flow of the kitchen and living area and to create a better connection to the outdoors. The kitchen is relaxed and robust; an open and comfortable space for family and friends to gather around. A play of coloured and textured materials – glazed tiles, timber joinery, stainless steel, white painted brick and V-groove boards – maintain the beach house vibe and evoke the spirit of mid-century architecture and design. “The client loved the handcrafted ideology of mid-century design and the subtle cracked effect of the glazed Japanese tiles are in keeping with the charm of the house,” says interior designer Elise Burton. The blue-tiled benchtop and timber joinery hug the existing brick chimney, and curved corners visually soften the straight lines of the architecture. A stainless-steel bench provides a hardwearing surface for food preparation and dishes. The pantry and fridge are located where kids can easily come and go. And a freestanding cooker is large enough for casual summer soirées. “It’s all about sharing good times,” says Elise. Pleysier Perkins pleysierperkins.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross | Photography by Michael Kai  

YT House by rear studio

Kitchen design inspiration | YT House by rear studio Situated in a small village northwest of Dak Lak province, Vietnam, spaces within YT House by rear studio are influenced by the surrounding vernacular. Differing from kitchens in the western world, Asian kitchens often feature a classic charm with simple lines and a soft elegance that works to preserve cultural traditions that have been passed on from generations. Based in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, architecture practice rear studio harnesses design in a way that maintains privacy in the kitchen, but conveys the spirit of a modern user. Opening up to more than one common area within the house, the spatial configuration of the kitchen also caters for connectivity and conversation between family members. Subtly juxtaposing with the rectangular form of the houses’ four walls and floor plan, rear studio designs the formal entryway within YT House as a circular structure, repeating. The circular block that houses the kitchen and the bathroom also works as a central core of the residence and frees up the common spaces to reveal a light, open-plan design. Framing the kitchen are curved solid walls, but carving out a rectangular doorway in the centre creates a sense of symmetry, similar to the timber batten screens that frame the exterior of the house. In YT House, the kitchen really is the heart of the home – as it creates an important link with other functional spaces. Kitchen design inspiration | YT House by rear studio rear studio rearstudio.com Words by Thida Sachathep | Photography by Quang Dam  

Leichardt Oaks by Benn+Penna

Kitchen design inspiration | Leichardt Oaks by Benn+Penna Benn+Penna designed the Leichhardt Oaks kitchen like a piece of furniture, creating a holistic backdrop in a calm and contemplative space. As our kitchens become an increasingly integrated component of dining and lounge areas, they are being designed to quietly fade into the background to create a cohesive sense of space. The clients of Leichhardt Oaks wanted a calm and contemplative kitchen, dining and living room, and engaged Benn+Penna to design one long volume that flowed seamlessly out to the garden. “Because it is one room we were conscious of it not reading simply as a kitchen, but more as living room joinery, almost like a piece of furniture,” says Andrew Benn, director of Benn+Penna. The kitchen has a pared-back design and minimal material palette. Joinery on the rear wall sits flush with the door and hallway openings to provide a smooth timber backdrop. Overhead cupboards have white timber door fronts to visually recede into the fully tiled wall, and under-bench cupboards lockstep with the stairs, which offer a subtle division of space. Shelving tucked into the ends of the cupboards provides display space for the living room. As the soft tones of the materials catch the afternoon sun through the high-level windows and the morning sun filtering in from the garden, they reflect the light around the room and cast a soft atmosphere across the space. Kitchen design inspiration | Leichardt Oaks by Benn+Penna Benn+Penna bennandpenna.com Words by Rebecca Gross | Photography by Tom Ferguson   We think you might also like Stewart Street Residence by Stavrias Architecture and Cantilever Interiorsabc