About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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HAP - Feature
Happenings
Parties

Leaders Of The Pack, Living Edge, Opens In Melbourne

The second showroom opening in under a year, Living Edge is committed to holding its position as one of the leading suppliers of designer furniture and lighting across Australia. More over, the brand is showcasing its dedication to the architecture and design industry not simply in the brands and designs it brings to our shores, but also the spaces in which these globally revered designs sit. Designed by Bates Smart and located in Richmond, Living Edge Melbourne showroom shows its understanding of a new immersive shopping experience architects, designers and design consumers are increasingly expecting. On display is a curated collection of furniture and lighting by world-renowned brands, including Herman Miller, Walter Knoll, Vitra, Muuto, BD Barcelona and Tom Dixon – the latter a recent addition. Each pocket of the showroom is a respectful coming together of Living Edge’s distinct visual identity and that of each particular brand. Each brand exists in harmony with another. Living Edge Melbourne Bates Smart “Melbourne has always had a creative spirit with a thriving architecture and design community that’s world renowned,” said Aidan Mawhinney, CEO of Living Edge. “We were inspired to create an inviting and authentic showroom experience that would meet the needs of the growing industry and provide the ultimate platform to showcase our iconic collection that’s focused on authentic, sustainable and conscious design.” For the special opening event, 400 guests gathered in a carpark transformed into a botanical haven, complete with hanging installations by Big Leaf Boutique from Byron Bay surrounding the new Tom Dixon Melt Copper lighting range. An inspired menu was provided by Ed Dixon Food Design and complemented by a Colonial Brewery beer truck and flowing Chandon. Upstairs the new commercial showroom space offered Gundog Estate wine tasting paired with matching local cheeses from Harper and Blohm. Living Edge is located at 650 Church Street, Richmond. livingedge.com.au [gallery size="medium" ids="99473,99474,99475,99477,99478,99479,99480,99481,99482,99483,99484"] [gallery size="medium" ids="99476,99486,99485"]abc
Architecture
Around The World
Design Hunters
Design Stories
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The Age-Old Material Needed To Build A Sustainable Future

Abundant and resilient, rammed earth as a construction technique traces back thousands of years, having been used as a material everywhere from adobes of ancient African cities to the Great Wall of China. While there is still some hesitation in building with compressed soil due to its perceived structural limitations, the technique has been enjoying a resurgence of popularity in recent years, with architects and designers embracing rammed earth construction once again as an invaluable answer to sustainable construction. With rammed earth’s almost endless application possibilities coupled with recent innovative improvements in its durability and longevity, architects are adopting the technique within diverse climatic conditions and across rural and urban settings alike, particularly in countries where building materials are scarce or come at a high cost. “Rammed earth opens up exciting opportunities of bringing earth as a building material into sites that are urban and compact within cities,” says Shruthi Ramakrishna, one of the founders of India-based Made In Earth design studio that specialises in compressed soil construction and uses the technique in projects ranging from private residences to commercial buildings. Brick Kiln House by Made In Earth For Shruthi, rammed earth is the clear ecologically-friendly construction method that does not harm the surrounding ecosystem and can be easily adaptable to cold and hot climates through simple modifications of the basic material composition; such as additional insulation to make rammed earth more appropriate in cold climates. “While there is no dearth of curiosity, many are concerned with the strength and durability of earth as a construction material,” notes Shruthi about the misconceptions of utilising the technique in the native country of India where Made In Earth primarily operates. The firm’s four founders, brought together by their mutual commitment to making buildings built with natural materials desirable, durable and accessible, are pioneering the use of rammed earth in contemporary expressions that are both elemental and eco-friendly, with a drive to make the technique accessible, both culturally and economically. As some limitations to the use of the technique persist to the present day, firms like Made In Earth are discovering a realm of possibilities for rammed earth applications through experimentation and innovation driven by their conviction in the sustainable and cost-effective advantages of the technique. Ochre House by Made In Earth With clay-rich soil, water and natural stabilisers such as bitumen the main ingredients in rammed earth composition, the availability of materials locally can bring the transportation and construction costs down, making it an attractive choice of building material in cities and regions where other materials may not be easily accessible. Other clear advantages include the insulating properties acquired via the thick sturdy walls constructed with the rammed earth technique that can create comfortable indoor conditions in hot climates and regulate indoor humidity. With their significant thermal mass, rammed earth walls can keep a home cool during the daytime without the help of air conditioning, while additional insulation can improve the warmth of a house in cold climates, reducing the energy bill by using only one-third as much energy as a conventional home. Rammed earth’s high resistance to fire and rodents also makes the technique favourable from small to large-scale construction applications. Having built with rammed earth for years, Made In Earth continues to utilise the technique in specific conditions of the studio’s projects, challenging the misconceptions that the technique is inferior to the more traditional building materials. “There is no need to make it relevant in this part of the world [India], but there is a need to experiment more with it, to build more with it, and to bring a freshness to the kind of architecture that we make with it,” says Shruthi about the constant process of innovating by learning and improving the technique. Interior of Ochre House by Made In Earth The slew of rammed earth projects in Made In Earth’s expanding portfolio is a testament to the versatility of the construction method in residential and commercial applications. With the studio’s projects including a built-by-hand school, a denim research and design studio, and a cosy private residence, it is popularising rammed earth construction at sites where other techniques such as cob and compressed earth blocks are not possible due to challenges of space and time. Such is the case for one of the firm’s latest residential projects, Ochre House, where Made in Earth used rammed earth to build a three-storey high residence with load-bearing rammed earth walls and natural finishes to create a sustainable solution on a compact site in West Bangalore. “Rammed earth construction was a very relevant technique to adopt due to the compactness of the site and challenges of working within a city,” explains Shruthi. “The soil of Bangalore gives the typical red shade to the walls.” Similarly, the firm’s other rammed earth projects unveil site-specific, sustainable solutions that revolve among locally abundant materials. Shruthi brings up another recent example: “In one of our projects, there was an excess of soil excavated for the foundation but not enough to complete all the rammed earth walls for the project. Therefore, we decided to combine it with other local sources of soils to make layered rammed earth walls.” Aditi Organics Office by Made In Earth Though still facing the challenges of limited skilled labour knowledgeable in rammed earth construction, Made In Earth is continuing to build capacity within their internal team by diving into construction sites, testing out new techniques and training their mason teams. Currently working on a large college campus (Samvada Baduku Community College), the team hopes to popularise rammed earth construction beyond its reputation as a niche technique. Says Shruthi: “We hope to become a vector for reinforcing and nurturing the bold future of earth in architecture and look forward to building more and more public spaces, schools, colleges, hospitals as landmarks for people to discover these construction alternatives as viable and desirable options for all.” Made In Earth madeinearth.in We think you might also like the expandable house prototype by Future Cities Lab Aditi Organics Office by Made In Earth Little Green Cafe by Made In Earth Indigo Lab by Made In Earthabc
Happenings
Parties

Cheers To Bowled Over: Love Fest 2020, And Many More Industry Events To Come!

Having a calendar of evenings free of work-related events was nice while it lasted, but it’s just as nice to see the architecture and design scene of Sydney ramping up for 2020. In the spirit of the new year – and a new decade – Polytec, Milliken-Ontera, CSM, James Richardson Furniture, Talostone, and Diverse Products Agency had the splendid idea to bring the community together to reconvene over some beverages and bowls. With the weather still warm, the days still long, and the calendar not yet overpacked, the timing could not have been more opportune. Bondi Bowling Club was humming with an atmosphere of conviviality and friendly competition as architects, designers, and suppliers caught up with colleagues and acquaintances. Steve Morrison Jazz brought about an air of frivolity and fun, with the jazz trio adorned in whatever they could find in the costume box, while their funky, soulful tunes reverberated through the coastal surrounds. To those who were there, it was wonderful to see your friendly faces! And to those who couldn’t make it, feel free to live vicariously through the pics! Polytec polytec.com.au Photography courtesy Indesign Media Asia Pacific [gallery columns="5" ids="99461,99460,99459,99458,99457,99456,99455,99454,99453,99452,99451,99450,99449,99448,99447,99446,99445,99444,99443,99442,99441,99440,99439,99438,99437,99436,99435,99433" orderby="rand"]abc
Design Products
Finishes

The Secret Ingredient For A Modern, Minimalist Aesthetic

Contrary to its name, minimalism has many manifestations in interior design. From the crisp cleanliness of white on white, to the more industrial aesthetic of cavernous concrete spaces. No matter your aesthetic inclinations – be they toward opulence or wabi sabi – mastering the art of modern, minimalist aesthetic lies in material choices; furnishings and finishes alike. Arguably most important of these is a space’s architectural surfaces. They are to interior design what a blank canvas is to a work of art – not to mention, ever more enduring in nature. This is especially true of contemporary interior design, with the reign of plasterboard, paint, and wallpaper largely left to rest in the eighties. As well as aesthetic preferences, environmental issues have seen contemporary interiors acquire a taste for solid surfaces and natural finishes – in turn inspiring innovations in surface material production in pursuit of achieving the holy grail of surface solutions: that which is as lightweight and malleable as it is hard-wearing and wear-resistant. From its base in Spain, architectural surface manufacturer Cosentino has been at the forefront of this ever-evolving design and development process. Adopting a ‘think global, act local’ mindset, the family-owned company are continually hot on the pulse of macro-scale technological advances as well as local interior design and aesthetic trends. Among the latest and greatest of Cosentino’s products to be introduced to Australasian shores is Dekton Slim: an inimitable range of ultra-fine profile surface solutions. Specs-wise, it could very well be the holy grail of surfaces, measuring 4-millimetres in thickness and weighing in at 10-kilograms per square metre, without sacrificing on durability. Making its debut to market in nine classic colours, Dekton Slim can be imagined in any flavour of minimalist interior, no effort needed. Varying from indulgent to industrial in aesthetic, Dekton Slim surfaces are perfect for cladding, furniture, and joinery applications in either an indoor or outdoor space.  

Dekton Slim Natural Collection

Dekton Natural Collection emulates the elegance and beauty of natural stone with a faithful reproduction of the veining formed by geological processes. Kelya offers a dark shade, presenting like black marble with soft veins. Opera is inspired by elegant Carrara marble, while Kovic is inspired by natural stone with veins in clear grey over a neutral background.  

Dekton Slim Industrial Collection

Dekton Industrial Collection is ideal for modern, contemporary and industrial-style settings. Inspired by classic concrete flooring, Kreta has a calm appearance with a uniform and restrained design and a background that smoothly blends dark and light grey. Sirius from the Dekton Solid Collection provides a strong, simple surface with a solid black, leather-like finish. With Cosentino looking to build out the Dekton Slim range of architectural surfaces and finishes to eventually include a variety of special edition colours, this doesn’t end here. Cosentino cosentino.com We think you might also like Artedomus' Brisbane showroom by The Stella Collective abc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

A Contemporary Pavilion Elevates A Classic Queenslander

Albert Villa is located in Petrie Terrace, one of Brisbane’s oldest suburbs, where small, steeply sloping plots and homes sitting close to one another are typical. Homeowner and architect Terry McQuillan of bureau^proberts, recalls being struck by the beauty of the classic Queenslander cottage and its proximity to the city upon first seeing the house, named Albert Villa when it was built back in 1865. The challenges of transforming the heritage cottage on its steep, small 264-square-metre block seems to have only fueled the creativity of Terry and his interior designer wife Charlie. Though the “limitless” feeling of designing your own home was “interesting” concedes Terry. Albert Villa by Bureau Proberts is a contemporary garden pavilion addition to a classic Queenslander workers cottage “You don’t need to justify your ideas ... This can be both good and bad, as the process of articulating an idea allows it to develop. So I tasked Charlie to be rigorous in her critiques,” adds Terry. The couple decided to add a contemporary pavilion that is strongly connected yet distinctly separate to the existing heritage dwelling.  

“The extension utilised a deliberately different form however it borrows shapes, scale and materials from the original house.”

  The first consideration for the transformation of the property was to be respectful to the character of the original home. The pavilion is deliberately physically disconnected from the heritage cottage, with a covered external breezeway separating the two. “The extension utilised a deliberately different form however it borrows shapes, scale and materials from the original house,” says Terry. “While it does look quite new and different, it’s based on the forms and proportions of the existing house.” For example, the datum from the front verandah roof serves as a parapet line to the living level of the pavilion, while the verandah floor aligns with the kitchen louvres. The new Albert Villa embraces views of the area, ensuring a beautiful outlook to Mount Coot-tha to the west. It also contributes positively to the aesthetic of the street, working with the unusual three-street frontage of the site, while maximising living spaces in what is a small site. The scale of the home has been considered in relation to other taller buildings in the neighbourhood. Terry was conscious of ensuring Albert Villa doesn’t look too small in its location. And the new design literally stops people in the street, with impressed passersby sharing positive feedback with Terry and Charlie.  

“The process of articulating an idea allows it to develop.”

  One of Terry’s favourite features is the landscaped central courtyard; their own urban oasis was important. “It’s lush and green and gives the sense of a backyard, it's pretty special.” However it is arguably the varying shapes and spaces that make this project so unique and the home so liveable – from the angular modern forms of the pavilion to the original style of the front verandah, to the breezy outdoor connection between old and new buildings, and the fact that when you cook in the kitchen with the windows open, the homeowners feel as though they are outside enjoying a barbecue. bureau^proberts bureauproberts.com.au Photography by Alicia Taylor Dissection Information Interior design, Charlie McQuillan Engineered timber floor, Tongue and Groove Zinc roofing, VM Zinc Stone external walls, Eco Outdoor Artwork, Charlie Mcquillan Feature lighting, Beacon Lighting and Lucretia Lighting Bathroom basin, Roger Seller Fireplaces, Jetmaster We think you might also like Bardon House by bureau^proberts. Albert Villa by Bureau Proberts is a contemporary garden pavilion addition to a classic Queenslander workers cottage abc
Happenings

The Official Launch of Women Indesign

Brought to you by the women of Indesign Media, Women Indesign is a program created to build a community within the design industry, where women are invited to take a seat at the table. The cornerstone of the program is a travelling supper club, held quarterly in spaces made to inspire. Small and evocative, each supper will be for just 30 women, allowing for conversations to be had and connections to be formed. Each supper will be hosted by leading women in our industry who will curate the evening, sharing their voice, their space and their experience. Bespoke, intimate and meticulously curated, each evening is different from the next, resembling less of an industry event and more of a private dinner party hosted by inspiring women. With a holistic approach to elevating the voices and experiences of women, Women Indesign will expand through a series of education seminars and mixers. The network will also be built on content, with podcasting, active newsletters and mixer events all in the pipeline. Each element to the series is about creating a live dialogue, where conversation is always community led and relationships are built on the experiential. Following Women Indesign’s official launch on February 20nd, tickets for the 2020 Supper Series have gone on sale, with limited spaces available for the following events: 08/04/2020, Via Porta (Melbourne) Hosted by Sarah Cosentino and Felicity Slattery of Studio Esteta 23/07/2020, Example (Sydney) Hosted by Caroline Choker of ACME and Rebecca Gibbs of Example 29/10/2020, no.92 (Sydney) Hosted by Lily Goodwin of Pattern Studio and Angela Kasimis of no.92

Purchase tickets or make an enquiry here.

Additional images from the launch here.

Credits Photography – Good Thanks Media Host – Design Nation Catering – The Blonde Butler Gift bags – Morrocanoil, Edwards and Co [gallery columns="2" size="medium" ids="99370,99371,99372,99373,99374,99375,99376,99377,99378,99379" orderby="rand"]abc
Happenings
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What's On

Here Are The Facts About Salone del Mobile 2020

 

UPDATE: New dates for Salone del Mobile 13-18.03.2021

  Original article published 26.02.2020 It has been confirmed that the world’s largest annual furniture and design fair, which has been running for 58 years, Salone del Mobile postponed until June 16-21, a delay of approximately 2 months. Following an outbreak of more than 200 cases of the Coronavirus (Covid-19) in the Lombardy region in Italy, of which Milan is the capital, the decision by festival organisers to postpone has been made with the full support of the mayor of Milan, Giuseppe Sala. Italy has the largest number of reported cases in Europe and seven deaths have been reported so far. In a video statement released overnight on twitter, Mayor Sala, who stood between Emanuele Orsini, President of Federlegno Arredo Eventi, and Claudio Luti, President of the Salone del Mobile, said: “I am calling on our colleagues in the furnishing sector and the Salone del Mobile to pull together to make sure Milan doesn’t grind to a halt. We need to work objectively to stop this virus spreading, but we must also take care not to spread the virus of distrust.” He went on to implore hoteliers not to spike accommodation prices during the new June dates and called on the Italian government to provide support. In addition to the tragic loss of life, Coronavirus has caused, 2,700 at the time of writing, the virus is set to severely impact the global economy in its aftermath. Watch the official statement here. Stay tuned as more unfolds...abc
Design Hunters
DH - Feature
People

In Waltz, The Powers Of Design Integrity And Longevity Combine

Meet Brisbane-based partners and seasoned Design Hunters, Surya Graf and Lindy Shaw; together, they are the founders of Waltz. Surya – an industrial designer by trade – and Lindy, an architect, met when Lindy crashed Surya’s work Christmas Party in 2009. Hitting it off, it wasn’t long before they had moved into a heritage listed terrace apartment in West End Brisbane together and their connection blossomed as they “enjoyed immersing themselves in the world of design, working hard and learning from each other, peers and mentors”. Ten years on, Surya and Lindy have traded in their West End terrace in favour of a quieter life with their three-year-old son and a quaint family home up in the hills of Queensland’s Currumbin Valley. In response to their personal craving for simple objects with integrity that would last a lifetime, Surya and Lindy began producing unique lifestyle objects for themselves and their home. What followed was a desire to then share these objects with the world. And so it was; Waltz was born. Launching with the Place shelf in July 2018, Waltz’ budding collection has since expanded to include the Place hook and Ceremony range of candle and incense holders. Perhaps an ode to Surya’s inclination toward function over form, Waltz’ aesthetic is streamlined, minimalist and timeless. Meanwhile Lindy’s desire to design for longevity is apparent in Waltz’ mindful choice of robust and recyclable materials such as stainless steel, sheet metal and brass. Each Waltz product has been inspired by a genuine need of Surya or Lindy’s and performs its own unique function, while as a collection they are connected by a shared sense of purpose; to contribute positively to the lifestyle of the people that use them. For instance, the Place hook and shelf are designed to keep the things you need close at hand, or perhaps showcase those items to which you have a deep connection. Meanwhile the Ceremony range serves as a reminder to slow down, take some time for yourself and to honour the everyday. It’s important to Lindy and Surya that they strive to keep well-designed, Australian-made products accessible and affordable. Staying true to this virtue means Waltz manufacture locally in small batches and products can only be purchased directly from their online store. And with no desire to be driven by trends or to enter mass-production, the plan is to keep things that way. Lindy and Surya continue to practice in their respective fields and look forward to growing their Waltz offering organically over time in response to any needs that arise in their home life, their studio, and their family. Waltz wearewaltz.com We think you might also like this profile on furniture designer and maker Martin Johnston. abc
Architecture
Around The World
Places
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Oui J’aime Hotel By Wallasia Has A Multitasking Design

It’s true what they say – that there’s no such thing as problems, only opportunities. For a case in point, look no further than Oui J’aime Hotel, located on a skinny slice of land in one of south-east Thailand’s most popular tourist towns, Chachoengsao. The unconventionally long, narrow, and angular site, upon which Oui J’aime Hotel is built, would generally be considered problem plagued. For Bangkok-based architecture and landscape design practice, Wallasia, it became the source of design inspiration. From one side, Oui J’aime Hotel appears to be not much more than a slither of a building – but turn left at the corner and its monumental aspect will be revealed. Fronted by street trees that protect the building’s patrons from prying eyes, its first two floors are made mainly of glass. In its translucence this bottom portion of Oui J’aime Hotel almost seems to disappear into its surrounds. In fact, if it weren’t for the magnificent rusted metal façade of the floors above, it mightn’t be noticed at all.  

Street trees protect the building’s patrons from prying eyes.

  Ironically, in its demand to be seen, the façade serves the dual function of ensuring things are not seen. There for much more than aesthetic impact, the perforated metal screens of the façade provide guests with privacy and sunshade during the day. “This dual-function approach is always a high priority for Wallasia, at once addressing design issues while maximising space,” says the architect. The awning suspended from the height of the first floor is another example of this in practice. Doubling as a reservoir for wastewater it contributes to the passive solar design of Oui J’aime Hotel while offering guests a tranquil pond view from the rooms above.  

Oui J’aime Hotel appears to be not much more than a slither of a building – but turn left at the corner and its monumental aspect will be revealed.

  Likewise, the trees inset into apertures in the building’s façade and walls enhance the sense of space internally while bringing elements of biophilia into the design and maintaining guests’ privacy. Oui J’aime Hotel is the result of enlightened solutions and meticulous planning on behalf of Wallasia. In responding to spatial restrictions and unconventional site dimensions, every element of its multitasking design does more than meets the eye. Wallasia walllasia.com Photography by Spaceshift Studio We think you might also like Aman Kyoto by Kerry Hill Architects abc
Architecture
Homes
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A House, A Laboratory And 10-Car Garage

With surgical precision – and a sympathetic hand – Ian Moore of Ian Moore Architects, has converted the interior of an existing 1950’s brick warehouse in the Sydney inner-city suburb of Redfern into a four bedroom family home, complete with small laboratory and multi-car garage. “The original warehouse was in generally good condition externally and the brickwork sits comfortably amongst the other brick warehouses and Mounted Police complex,” says Ian. “I have known the building for many years and always admired it. I therefore did not want to make any significant changes to its external appearance, other than to remove elements added in a 1990s renovation. It really does come back to that old saying that if it is not broken, don’t fix it.”

A re-orientation of the spaces to the internal courtyard was needed to ensure adequate, natural, cross ventilation.

  Open plan modern minimalist kitchen design in Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects Metallico dining table by Porro adds a pop of red to the white and grey minimalist colour palette of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects As a result, very little has been done to the exterior of the warehouse, with the bulk of the changes occurring internally. Fundamentally, the conversion seeks to retain all the industrial warehouse particularities, serving the client’s fundamental desire to live in a Redfern warehouse versus a Redfern house. From a planning perspective, Ian leveraged the gridded layout of the brick piers supporting the existing trussed roof-space to apportion bedrooms and associated spaces. The lower level houses the garage, an equine laboratory, a self-contained guest suite and a landscaped, internal courtyard – complete with lap pool(!). As a result, the main house occupies the entire upper level. The removal of a single bay of roof at the northern end has allowed for a terrace off the living area, while the bedrooms are located at the southern end, with the bathrooms, a tv/study room and the laundry situated on the western side of the building.  

Very little has been done to the exterior of the warehouse, the bulk of the changes occurring internally.

  Whilst the internal planning offered up minimal design challenges, bringing the building up to a habitable state required significant attention. “The clients had lived in the space for a year before I started work on the project and their major issues with it were that it was boiling hot in summer, freezing cold in winter and when it rained they could not hear anything due to the noise from the tin roof,” explains Ian. The roof required new heavy insulation and a re-orientation of the spaces to the internal courtyard was needed to ensure adequate, natural, cross ventilation. To this end, a series of glass louvred windows were added and the original double-hung timber windows around the perimeter were retained. In addition, ceiling fans and a hydronic radiator system were installed. Functionally and from a sustainability perspective, the house integrates a number of sustainability measures, all of which work cohesively to weather-proof the house. Hot water is supplied via evacuated tube solar heating on the eastern half of the roof, which also heats the pool. Solar panels on the western half of the roof provide power to the house, including an electric vehicle charging point in the garage. “Rainwater is collected from the roof and stored in a tank in the garage for garden irrigation, toilet flushing and topping up the pool, and all north and west facing glazing is shaded by adjustable external aluminium louvres and all glazing is high performance glass,” adds Ian. The large natural cork floor sheets (which include a grey solid colour pigment) are worth dwelling on, not only for their sleep concrete-like appearance, but inherent properties. They are soft underfoot, provide good acoustics (even when it rains), are cool in summer and warm in winter, and set the tone for the house’s restrained palette. “The clients did not want to include any overly precious materials and finishes, so no marble or timber veneer,” explains Ian, which also explains the exceptionally white finish palette and stark overall aesthetic. (The clients also requested no black finishes.) Hence, all new steel elements are coloured in a similar grey to the flooring which also distinguishes from the original brick walls and white roof trusses, leaving the large-scale furniture pieces as the only splashes of colour in this carefully curated, yet surprisingly practical family home. Ian Moore Architects ianmoorearchitects.com Photography by Rory Gardiner Dissection Information Walk Easy Smooth Profile cork sheet flooring from Comcork Extra Soft sofa by Living Divani Metallico dining table by Porro Hola dining chairs by Cassina Hi Pad bar stools by Capellini Passe Partout outdoor dining table by Magis Boffi Pipe tapware and towel hooks We think you might also like Hello Fitzroy by HOLA Projects Modern industrial minimalist interior design aesthetic in bathroom of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects Modern industrial minimalist interior design aesthetic in bathroom of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects Modern minimalist interior design aesthetic in bedroom of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects A modern minimalist interior design aesthetic in the conversion of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects Modern industrial minimalist interior design aesthetic of Redfern Warehouse by Ian Moore Architects Brick warehouse in Redfern Sydney converted into a four bedroom family house with a laboratory and 10 car garage by Ian Moore Architectsabc
Happenings
What's On

Cult Design Knows When It’s Time To Up The Ante

Richard Munao, founder and CEO of Cult has led his business and its success for more than 20 years. In that time he has learned a thing or two about when to push, when to wait, when to innovate, when to let go, and – most importantly – how to read a room, or in this case, the market. February 2020 marked a new beginning for cultdesign.com.au with the launch of a carefully considered new website design. Authored by TOKO, an Australian design studio based out of the Netherlands, the new website boasts an updated functionality to the site. This ranges from a positive user experience viewing Cult’s extensive collection of designer furniture and lighting brands from local and international designers, to an e-commerce functionality previously not offered. Depending on where your predilections lie – and in acknowledgment of how they may change project to project – users can search for products by type, designer or brand. At the online store, much of Cult’s portfolio of accessories and lighting products is available, as well as key furniture pieces. Anything that can be bought online can be shipped Australia-wide, so our tree-change and sea-change friends suffer no disadvantage. Furthermore, architects and interior designers working to a tight deadline have a generous supply of in-stock items available for immediate despatch. And for those who like to use their lunch breaks and commutes to keep informed, the newly invigorated Cult News section offers inspiration in the form of designers profiles and coverage across completed projects, product launches and industry events. To add to the celebrations, all customers of any online transaction made throughout the month of February will be automatically entered into the draw to win a $500 voucher to spend at cultdesign.com.au. So, let’s get shopping. Head here : cultdesign.com.au abc
Architecture
Around The World
HAP - Feature
Happenings
Homes
What's On

What Will You Learn From Habitus House Of The Year Season 2?

Habitus House of the Year TV returns this March for a second season on Channel 7, visiting a select few of the 2019 Habitus House of the Year projects across the Indo Pacific Region. Once again, join host and landscape architect Jamie Durie and presenters architect Peter Colquhoun and Habitus SE Asia editor Narelle Yabuka as we go on a journey through Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam. With episode 1 set to air Sunday 8th March, can you guess which houses we will be visiting this year? Some were crowd favourites, others brought controversy to the judging table, and others inspired us to completely re think the way we approached multi-generation living. Tune in for the 4-part, cross continental series Sunday afternoons from March 8th. This year we’ve got longer segments for each of the projects allowing richer conversations and a deeper understanding of how each project is representative of its residents’ way of living through design. Habitus would like to thank our TV partners BOSCH, Living Edge, Zip, Artedomus, Design Nation, James Richardson Furniture and Verosol for enabling this exclusive tour of some of the Asia Pacific Region’s most stunning, architecturally-designed residences.  

Tune into Channel 7 on Sunday the 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th March, 2020.

 

Episode 1  |  Sunday - 8th March

Sydney - 1:30pm Melbourne - 1:30pm Brisbane - 1:30pm Adelaide - 1:30pm Perth - 4:00pm

Episode 2  |  Sunday - 15th March

Sydney - 1:30pm Melbourne - 1:30pm Brisbane - 1:30pm Adelaide - 1:30pm Perth - 1:30pm

Episode 3  |  Sunday - 22th March

Sydney - 1:30pm Melbourne - 1:30pm Brisbane - 1:30pm Adelaide - TBC Perth - TBC

Episode 4  |  Sunday - 29th March

Sydney - 1:30pm Brisbane - 4:00pm Melbourne - TBC Adelaide - TBC Perth - TBC

 

Refresh your memory of the 2019 projects here.

Teneriffe House by Vokes & Peters. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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