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The Mood At Maison et Objet And Imm Cologne 2020

The global design scene never sleeps let alone takes it easy at the beginning of a new year. Beginning 13 January, Imm Cologne consumed the city of Cologne, Germany, with its week-long showcase of the furniture and interior trends of tomorrow. Meanwhile in Paris, France, interior design and decor fair, Maison et Objet was the place to be for the design-inclined from 17 to 21 January. Between them, Imm Cologne and Maison et Objet set the mood and milieu of the interiors industry for the year ahead. One such mood permeating both events was a strong sense of you do you. The Bauhaus-inspired modernist aesthetic – a stalwart on the interior design scene for over a century – presented at both trade fairs with an enlightened sense of eccentricity. Not as stern as purist Bauhaus pieces, nor as satirical as designs of the Memphis Movement, these pieces unveiled at Imm Cologne and Maison et Objet 2020 strike a healthy balance between practical and playful.  

WINK Chair by Masquespacio for Houtique

In its most practical sense, this is quirky dining chair bound to bring personality into any space it inhabits, but let it enliven your imagination and before long you’ll be seeing Saturn dressed in a Charleston dress. Houtique  

Carnival lamps by Design By Us for Reflections Copenhagen

With blasting colour combinations, a brave pattern mix, and sharp cut crystal these pendants moves in a field of excitement between decadence and theater. A series of lamps which push the norms and seduces its audience with the crystals magical reflections. Reflections Copenhagen  

Microcosmo wallpaper by Dainellistudio for Londonart

Presented during Maison et Object 2020, Microcosmo is a wallpaper marked by a sharp graphic and architectural sign and by a decorative soul. Londonart  

JUSTE console by Christian Haas for Schönbuch

The JUSTE console table is a luxurious statement piece.‎ The top consists of a single oversized ceramic tile, custom-made in Italy.‎ It comes in a choice of five colours — Ivory Black, Desert Sun, Sea Mist, Sandy Bay and Marinière — all of which can be found in the Le Corbusier colour range. Schönbuch  

Lines & Dots lamps by GOFI

Lines & Dots is at the same time a lamp and a sculpture. Designed after dozens of ink drawings, from those abstract silhouettes there emerged a series of eight shapes, then transformed into volumes using folded rods weld by local craftsmen. Eight different modules which are combined in thirty different ways using the cable as pivot. GOFI  

Gropius Chair by Kateryna Sokolova for Noom

A contemporary ode to Bauhaus ideals, the Gropius Chair from Noon is a synthesis of functionalism, conciseness, art and craft, formed by a composition of simple geometric shapes. Noom  

Soul Soft chair by Eugeni Quitllet for Pedrali

Soul Soft is a sophisticated armchair in which everyday conviviality turns chic. With flowing and enveloping shapes, characterised by the ergonomic polycarbonate seat padded and upholstered in leather or fabric, Soul Soft has been conceived to complete indoor environments and easily matchable thanks to a variety of colours and finishes. Pedrali  

New Town mosaics by Adam Nathaniel Furman for Botteganove

Available in any colour combination, in either smooth-surface finish that emphasises the clarity of the interconnected geometries, or with delicate grooves cast into the tile surfaces, or in a mixture of the two, New Town always creates a wall surface that is dynamic and bold, as well as subtle and restrained. Adam Nathaniel Furman  

Brut shelves by Ferréol Babin for pulpo

The brut shelves demonstrate a meeting point between clean lines and rough edges. Simple in appearance, they play with materiality to present a series that is visually light and structurally grounded. pulpoabc
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[Don’t] Lose Yourself At The Qantas First Lounge Singapore

One wouldn’t usually associate airports with a particularly generous amount of personal space. Nor would one think of an airport as a destination over a means to an end or vehicle of transport. But at 1000 square metres for 245 persons (roughly four square metre per person ­– at capacity), and designed collaboratively by Caon Studio and Akin Atelier, the Qantas First Lounge in Singapore challenges both these notions. Singapore is a hot spot for design, architecture, and their creators. We know it – we’re constantly on the ground over there. Changi itself is likewise no stranger to design or development, Moshie Safdie’s Changi Jewel 24-hour shopping centre famously opened last year with its instantly iconic central waterfall. Now we have one more reason to visit, and this time it feels like staying at a nice hotel, only to want never to leave it. The Qantas First Lounge Singapore was designed expressly with the people who would patronise it in mind: how would they need and want to use this space as they prepare to travel or pause in transit? For both Caon studio and Akin Aterlier, architecture and design’s impact on human experience grounds their respective practices. They landed on four core purposes that informed the design thinking: to relax, to refresh, to dine, and to work. Subsequently, there are five zones that comprise the First Lounge. There is a dining room, a lounge, a cocktail bar, a VIP quiet room and bathroom and shower suites. Perforated walls, banquettes and partitions subtly demarcate these zones. The fixed material palette was used as an opportunity to reinforce an atmosphere of luxury in an otherwise high-capacity, high-traffic, multi-functional space. There is Carrara marble on floors, walls and surfaces, European oak used for the walls and partitions, brass finishes, plush carpets and large-chip terrazzo in the wet spaces. The purposely-diverse tones and textures complement each other visually and physically. Loose pieces such as furniture and lighting work to the same end goal. The keen eyes of travelling Design Hunters will recognise iconic chairs and lounges such as the Gebrüder Thonet Targa chairs designed by GamFratesi, Carl Hansen & Søn Embrace dining and lounge chairs designed by EOOS, Walter Knoll Leadchairs, and Massproductions Crown easy chairs designed by Chris Martin. Custom designed furniture by Caon studio and their in-house BLOC brand is likewise dotted throughout the First Lounge. Henry Wilson sconces and custom ceiling pendants are a knowing nod to Australian travellers and homegrown design. They sit alongside OLUCE Coupé floor lamps designed by Joe Colombo and Flos IC wall lights designed by Michael Anastassiades. To support the wellbeing of travellers and their adjusting internal clocks, the Qantas First Lounge Singapore is fitted with CoeLux artificial skylights in the bathroom suites and VIP area, and lush greenery planted throughout. First patented in 2009 and released to market in 2015, the CoeLux skylights are designed for interiors that have no access to natural light. Think subways, parking lots – and airports. Filtering an artificial light source through a layer of nanoparticles is meant to mimic the feeling of the earth’s atmosphere. The biophillia, meanwhile, mirrors Singapore’s civic architecture in its strong integration of green pockets throughout the city. By all accounts a seamless collaboration between Caon studio, Akin Atelier and Qantas, the new Qantas First Lounge at Changi Airport is a study in luxury, meaningful design, and the power of collaboration. CAON Studio caonstudio.com Akin Atelier akinatelier.com Photography by Jovian Lim Dissection Information [include brand names, designers, and known product names in tags] Gebrüder Thonet Targa chairs designed by GamFratesi Carl Hansen & Søn Embrace dining and lounge chairs designed by EOOS Walter Knoll Leadchairs Massproductions Crown easy chairs designed by Chris Martin Henry Wilson sconces OLUCE Coupé floor lamps designed by Joe Colombo Flos IC wall lights designed by Michael Anastassiades CoeLux artificial skylights We think you might also like Kelvin Ho at home in Tamaramaabc
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ARC - Feature

An Architect’s Home In The Treetops

There’s a natural curiosity around architects’ own homes and a sense of satisfaction when they live up to expectations. As one of South Australia’s finest, Tess Pritchard champions elegantly resolved environmentally responsive residential architecture as a co-director of Max Pritchard Gunner Architects, the respected practice her father founded over 30 years ago. She recently designed her own home, which she shares with partner Michael Venning, in the Adelaide Hills and it’s all we hoped it would be. The two-storey house is located on a steep site with a large bisecting easement, which determined its positioning. As a result, the floor plan is stretched out across the block in line with the contours to minimise cut and fill to the site, as well as being angled to maximise winter sun. The garage sits at the top of the block and a bridge spans the easement by way of connection to the house’s upper level. “It’s a lovely feeling living in the treetops,” says Tess. “And although we wanted to be as connected to nature as possible, it was important we minimise disruption to the landscape. So we retained almost all the existing trees and revegetated the garden with native plants.”  

Building up instead of out kept the home’s footprint small.

  Building up instead of out kept the home’s footprint small and the roof’s folded planes and extended corners visually lightens the two-storey volume. Tess chose galvanised steel for the home’s exterior because she’s always loved its textural qualities and the way it looks within a bush setting. As she explains, “The light and shade of the steel’s corrugations provide a beautiful backdrop for the foliage. I wanted a house that was dynamic, but that didn’t compete with the surrounding landscape.” The industrial choice of cladding complements the adjustable external venetians too. Internally, the roof’s origami-like folds are mirrored in the living areas’ ceiling. The fresh white palette is punctuated by black fittings and fixtures and maple-coloured timber flooring. “Spatially, our main focus was to achieve a light, open kitchen, dining and lounge because it’s where we spend most of our time, so we wanted them to feel generous and inviting. The three bedrooms and bathrooms are downstairs and although they’re somewhat more modest, they’re still perfectly comfortable,” says Tess.  

“It’s a lovely feeling living in the treetops.”

  As the heart of the upstairs living areas, the kitchen draws friends and family to it, due to its angular configurations and dramatically sculptural island. Michael, who is a skilled metal fabricator, created the bespoke feature (along with the stairs, external bridge balustrades, joinery handles and entry canopy), which sparks genuine curiosity and appeal. This is a home that resonates for its strong sense of place and sensitive treatment of that place via a design that is as robust as it is refined. Max Pritchard Gunner Architects mpgarchitects.com.au Photography by Sam Noonan Dissection Information Blackbutt engineered flooring by Parmate Galvanised steel cladding by Revolution Roofing Tiles in Brooklyn Ash from Beaumont Tiles Adjustable external venetians by Maxim Bespoke hardware and fixtures by Michael Venning Ceiling fan by Beacon Lighting Light fitting by Havit We think you might also like Exoskeleton House by Studio Taktabc
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Adelaide Festival Exhibition Series Explores How Architecture Influences Experience

Time and space are two concepts that are irrevocably linked. They are the here and the now, the then and there, that frames our every experience – that much is intuitively understood. But to what extent does our here influence our experience of the now? What about vice versa? Curated by Samstag Museum of Art as part of the Adelaide Festival, 2020 Adelaide//International is a series of five discreet exhibitions and events that seek to explore the ways in which built environments can make us aware of the social, spatial and temporal present. 2020 Adelaide//International will be the second installation in what was conceived as a series of three projects – each an artist-lead inquiry into a particular aspect of the human experience of time. “In 2019 for instance the exhibitions looked at the way we behave looking at the past, the forthcoming exhibitions will look at the phenomenology of the present and, in 2021, we will consider future possibilities,” explains Gillian Brown, curator for Samstag Museum of Art. Comprised of contributions from a diverse range of creatives, 2020 Adelaide//International promises to be a thought-provoking study of architecture as a choreographer of experience. The centrepiece of the exhibition series will be a restaging of Somewhere Other – Australian architect John Wardle’s acclaimed contribution to the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. Designed in collaboration with New York-based artist, Natasha Johns-Messenger, this major work elaborates on architecture as a portal of experience by means of exploring the manner in which it frames perception. [gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="98488,98485,98484,98482"] Somewhere Other by John Wardle, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018 Complementing Somewhere Other will be a concise collaboration from artists Zöe Croggon, Helen Grogan and Georgia Saxelby. This group exhibition will comprise a collection of works by Zöe, Helen, and Georgia that examine juxtapositions between architecture and the human form. Through his contribution, Olympia, Belgian artist David Claerbout seeks to extrapolate the temporal reality of architecture, its legacy and fallibility. A monumental work of moving image, Olympia charts the disintegration of the Berlin Olympic Stadium over the course of a millennium. Bringing to the table a big-picture perspective of a societal scale is Brad Darkson. Through a combination of sound and sculpture Brad’s publicly situated work will be a critique of antagonistic systems and architectures. An experimental project by artist and architect Matthew Bird in collaboration with UniSA architecture students will form the final piece of the 2020 Adelaide//International puzzle. Presented at the nearby SASA Gallery, Inspiral reflects on and responds to the concepts and conclusions derived from Adelaide//International through an investigation into art, architecture, and performance. The exhibition series will be made all the more robust thanks to a number of accompanying talks and events. Such programs include: an artist talk by John Wardle; a keynote address by David Claerbout; a practice-based response by architects for students of art, architecture and design; and a special conversation between John Wardle and comedian, broadcaster and design advocate Tim Ross. An in-conversation between John Wardle and Matthew Bird at the MPavilion, Melbourne, titled Architecture of the present, will extend the conversation interstate in March 2020. Entry to the 2020 Adelaide//International exhibition series is free and will run from Friday 28 February until Friday 12 June 2020. Samstag Museum of Art unisa.edu.au/samstag-museumabc
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Could Your Project Be The Best Living Space Of The Decade?

Every studio has at least one. It’s that project that retains its position in your portfolio, lovingly presented to new clients year after year. It’s that project that you’re always proud of and ready to discuss, because its impact and relevance lasts. It’s a project that speaks equal volumes about what defines your practice and what defines the ways we live. Dust off your jpgs because team INDE wants to know all about it! The INDE.Awards 2020 will take INDEs gold to a whole new level with an era-defining accolade that honours the lasting impact of a single, influential piece of residential architecture or interior design in the Indo-Pacific region. Kiah House (Australia) by Austin Maynard Architects. Shortlisted, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2018. Photo by Tess Kelly. Presented by Living Edge, the Best of the Decade | The Living Space category marks the start of a new decade – and the twentieth anniversary of Indesign Media Asia Pacific – by celebrating a decade’s worth of outstanding work by our region’s architects and designers. Single residential or apartment, a living space has the power to connect us or closet us. Best of the Decade | The Living Space will award a home that has, through its concept, design and execution, redefined how we design for living in response to the stimuli of our times. This special 2020 accolade, alongside its companion award Best of the Decade | The Work Space, gives us reason to collectively look back on how we’ve progressed in our region, and to consider where we’ll go from here. PROJECT #13 (Singapore) by STUDIO WILLS + Architects. Winner, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2019. Photo by Finbarr Fallon. Over the span of the past decade, much has remained constant in terms of what we seek from our living spaces. “The basic requirements of a living environment are protection, comfort and privacy,” suggests INDE.Awards Jury member Eleena Jamil (Principal, Eleena Jamil Architects, Malaysia). But as times change, so do our demands and expectations. So what are the stimuli of our times? “I think our expectations for living spaces in this new decade have expanded quite dramatically,” says Jamil. “There is now a conscious need for spaces to be more inclusive of different ethoses, moralities and lifestyles. For example, criteria such as carbon neutrality, resistance against the effects of climate change, and new household compositions and human relationships will provide new stimuli for designing living spaces.” Family Holiday Structure, Imaduwa (Sri Lanka) by Palinda Kannangara Architects. Honourable Mention, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2019. Photo by Luka Alagiyawanna / Mahesh Mendis. For fellow Jury member Paul McGillick (McGillick Consulting, Australia), today’s demands are somewhat conflicting. He says, “Certain things remain constant in what we want of our living space – cosy, comfortable and private. What’s changed in ten years? Well, we want all of the above and its seeming opposite – connection, stimulation and location, location, location.” But in the entries to Best of the Decade | The Living Space, he’ll be looking – above all – for the intelligent use of space. “What I would like to see are ideas about how to optimise limited space when, throughout the region, space is at a premium in terms of affordability and availability.” A Home of Study (China) by Atelier TAO+C. Shortlisted, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2018. Photo by Shen Zhong Hai. Could your portfolio contain the INDE.Awards 2020’s best living space of the decade? How does your project demonstrate your deep understanding of lifestyle and how it’s evolving? How does it encapsulate best practice is residential design? How does it show inspirational sensitivity to context? And how does it embody the progressive spirit celebrated by the INDE.Awards? View the category criteria, dig out those images and enter now! To be eligible for this category your project and your studio must be located in the Indo-Pacific region. Your project must have been completed between 1 January 2010 and 21 February 2020. Best of the Decade | The Living Space, presented by Living Edge, will be Jury decided as well as being open to a people’s choice vote. It’s the ideal platform for generating a region-wide discussion about what matters to how we live in the Indo-Pacific. Be part of the conversation and make your best work count! INDE.Awards indeawards.com Mixed Use House (Australia) by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design with DDB Design Australia. Shortlisted, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2019. Photo by Shannon McGrath. St Andrews Beach House (Australia) by Austin Maynard Architects. Shortlisted, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2019. Photo by Derek Swalwell. Sandy Point House (Australia) by Kennedy Nolan. Shortlisted, The Living Space, INDE.Awards 2019. Photo by Derek Swalwell.abc
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HAP - Feature

Come To This Art Auction, It’s For The Greater Good

11 million hectares. 2,000 homes. 23 human lives. 1 billion innocent animals. This is what the current climate crisis has cost Australia in the last few months alone. The need to create meaningful change has reached – no, surpassed – point critical, and without community, collaboration, and creativity, there is no hope such change will be made. While there is no quick fix to this issue (after all, let’s not pretend it occurred overnight), there are plenty of ways in which to start in the direction of positive change – and what better way than an art auction in support of bushfire relief efforts? The HOME Bushfire Relief Art Auction Fundraiser is an independent fundraising initiative produced by Sam Watson Wood (director of partnerships and programs for Sydney Contemporary) and Rae Begley (artist and director of Little Hero PR). Proudly sponsored by Major Partners, the National Art School, Sydney Contemporary, and Aon, the auction is the perfect forum for Sydney’s creatively inclined to come together in a show of solidarity for the communities and charities fighting fire head on. With an impressive catalogue featuring works from over fifty of Australia’s leading and emerging contemporary artists lined up to go under the hammer, and 100% of proceeds going directly to selected charities, this event could be the most philanthropical opportunity you have all year. Carefully selected due to their current and future responses to the bushfires and Australia’s climate, the charities nominated to receive the raised funds are WWF Australia, Climate Council, and Firesticks Alliance. Relief support for the wildlife, flora, the people and the planet as well as the long-term plan to instigate positive change were all of utmost importance to the producers and the artists themselves. The event is open to the public for one night only across the main gallery and courtyard of the National Art School, Darlinghurst and heroes art alongside a local music line up including DJ sets by Client Liaison, Gemma (Club Kooky), Marcus King and Tyson Koh, as well as food and drink offerings including Love Can, Cake Wines and Young Henrys. Donations for entry would be greatly appreciated and will be added to the proceeds raised. The auction exhibition will take place in the Main Gallery of the National Art School. Live auction works by invitation only at VIP Preview from 5-7pm, registration essential by request. Silent auction works open for bidding online from February 4 and close February 12 at 10pm. You can also sneak a peek at some of the artworks to auctioned below. For the love of Australia (and art!), get yourself to the National Art School, Corner Forbes & Burton Street, Darlinghurst, on Wednesday 12 February 2020. See you there, around 7pm! HOME Bushfire Relief Art Auction homebushfirerelief.com Photography courtesy of HOME Bushfire Relief Art Auction [gallery columns="5" ids="98286,98335,98334,98333,98332,98331,98330,98329,98328,98327,98326,98325,98324,98323,98322,98321,98320,98319,98318,98317,98316,98315,98313,98312,98311,98310,98309,98308,98307,98306,98305,98304,98303,98302,98301,98300,98299,98298,98297,98296,98295,98294,98293,98292,98291,98290,98289,98288,98287" orderby="rand"]   We think you might also like to know about the bushfire recovery efforts of Architects Assist.abc
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Behind Every Object Is A Story

Trent Jansen calls himself a design anthropologist and anyone who is familiar with his work, and certainly anyone who has shared words with the man, can surely attest to this. His folio is varied yet every object or collection he has designed reveals the same depth of research. Although one wouldn’t expect anything less, within the first five minutes visiting him at his recently completed studio in Thirroul on the New South Wales south coast, I understood this on a whole new level. Towards the end of his time at UNSW Art & Design (formerly COFA) studying design, Trent was granted the opportunity to intern with the inimitable Marcel Wanders in Amsterdam. Trent’s first “proper taste of this kind of world” was a positive experience by all accounts and he is still in touch with the iconic Dutch designer today. Crucially, the experience helped him realise something very important: “I learned that he was my favourite designer, but I didn’t want to work for him,” he says. Trent’s love of storytelling and anthropological research frequently comes into play in forming the basis of his projects. “It definitely starts off with research; it’s often something I want to learn more about or that I think is an important thing to talk about,” he says. “For me, it’s about telling stories that are otherwise untold.” A lot of the information he acquires comes from history books and academic texts but he also makes a concerted effort to engage with people who form a part of the story either directly or through their lineage. Of course there is a sensitivity to be observed around the sharing of other people’s and cultures’ stories, of which he is acutely aware. From his perspective it is a great way to use his skillset to share important narratives with a greater audience. “It’s also important to me that the people that own those stories have the right to say yes or no as to whether I use them,” he notes. Some of the more iconic projects he has worked on over the years can be seen as key examples of the depth of research that informs his work and the seriousness and sensitivity with which he takes sharing narratives. In 2013 Trent designed and produced, working with Adam Price of JP Finsbury, the Chinaman’s File Rocking Chair for Broached East by Broached Commissions. The limited-edition collection was an exploration of Asia’s influence on Australia – especially China’s and Japan’s – since the industrial revolution. It had a particular focus on the mid-19th century. The design theory is informed by a history lesson, it’s what inspired Trent to design what he did. And why close collaborators such as Adam and local carpenter Chris Nicholoson, who made the second edition in 2019, need to share his passion for making with purpose. Chinaman’s File Rocking Chair is designed to simulate the movement a child experiences when carried in a traditional Chinese baby sling on the mother’s back. The rocking mechanism mimics the distinct rocking motion of the sling – the exact arc – which was something Trent was able to observe in a filmic study and is very different to that of a normal rocking chair. It was also designed with a rural aesthetic in mind rather than a regal one, in accord with the class of economic migrants. More recently, The Shaker Family Home is the physical result of an anthropological interest in Shaker-style furniture and, zooming out, Shaker culture. It was first seen at Salone del Mobile.Milano 2019. The cabinet that Trent has created, once again working with Chris Nicholson, represents a Shaker home with elements that are disparate from the cabinet as a whole. The drawers pop out and operate as autonomous objects. The top drawer, for example, becomes a desk, another drawer becomes a candelabra, and another becomes a mirror. Trent was intrigued to note dual meanings within Shaker religion, crafting by hand, for example, also being understood as an act of prayer. And the furniture makers within the faith would certainly spend many hours ‘praying’ in this way, it became clear to Chris, working on this project with Trent, that the level of detail comes from an incredible amount of time spent and devotion to the craft. Critically, Trent and Chris share these values. “It’s not a story that could’ve happened with someone that was doing it on the clock. There’s so much time, so much precision, and so much detail. But, also, so much understanding of the history and the way that that culture manifests in those details,” says Trent. Most recently, Trent has been working with Johnny Nargoodah, a Nykina man and studio technician who he first met in 2016 through the Fremantle Art Centre project, In Cahoots. During 2016 and 2017 Trent worked with several artists at the Mangkaja Art Centre in Fitzroy Crossing to create new work with locals. Both Trent and Johnny enjoyed working together and have continued to do so in the time since. Their latest project, supported by funding from the Australia Council for the Arts, questions the notion that artefacts are conveyors of a singular set of values, attitudes and the cultural heritage of the maker/designer. Untitled at the time of writing, this work is the creation of an artefact from two people of different cultures. It can also be seen as an exploration in ethical, cross-cultural collaboration and what that looks like: in practice as much as in the final product. Each time Trent and Johnny have worked together, this being the third, they endeavour to ensure authorship is entirely equal. With different personalities, skillsets, working habits and methods of idea generation, level collaboration can be seen as a skillset in itself. The pair often experiments with different methods of collaborative design and making, such as sketch exchange. “Sketch exchange is a process whereby one collaborator produces a sketch and sends it to the second collaborator. The second collaborator then interprets the sketch, adding and subtracting elements based on their own sensibility, and then sends it back to the first collaborator… The process goes back and forth until neither collaborator can recognise their authorship, and the idea is a true co-authorship,” explains Trent. This explicitly equally authored work will be shown through Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert and Arc One in Melbourne, during Melbourne Design Week 2020. Trent Jansen Studio trentjansen.com Photography by Tony Amos We think you might also like Broached Goulder by Jon Goulder for Broached Commissionsabc
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Sarah Ellison Takes Cues From Creature Comforts

Leading Australian interior and fashion stylist Sarah Ellison is renowned for her modern, innovative aesthetic and distinctly antipodean down-to-earth simplicity. Having launched her namesake furniture and home accessories label in 2017, her third – and most recent – collection, SOL, takes inspiration from Roman mythology’s personification of the sun. “Globally, the world feels fragile right now. The pieces within SOL have a grounding quality, monolithic even,” says Sarah, “Like the sun’s consistency in our lives, this collection is designed with permanence in mind. I want the owners of these products to feel a sense of calm, warmth and safety.” Bold proportions, sculptural forms, and sensual textiles define SOL, which in its entirety is a gallery-worthy collection with an aesthetic most aptly described as warm-minimalism. In a first for Sarah’s body of work, timber makes a star appearance throughout the SOL collection, with warm oak tones permeating the playfully proportioned Earth dining table and chairs. Playing into Sarah’s affection for the interior schemes of the seventies, key pieces such as the Huggy occasional chair and Muse modular are characterised by their comfortingly bulbous proportions. Meanwhile, use of limestone, glass, and textural upholstery combine throughout the collection to make for a truly sensory experience. SOL includes an extension of Sarah’s popular ceramic offering with décor objects, vases, and a table lamp. Inspired by the recurring undulation motif of Jean Royère, the wiggly-armed Royère lamp is a whimsical piece of classic-contemporary design. On the whole, SOL by Sarah Ellison is a light-hearted take on modern minimalism, imbued with a great sense of calm, warmth, and humility. At once bold yet refined, SOL is dramatic by design yet wholesome in palette and materiality – a collection that takes its cues from the creature comforts that make a house a home. Sarah Ellison sarahellison.com.au Photography by David Wheeler We think you might also like Weekend by Jardanabc
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ARC - Feature

Dissolving The Boundaries Between Indoors And Out

Nature undoubtedly has benefits for our health and wellbeing, yet in modern life we spend about 90 per cent of our time indoors. Sahi W&D is a homestay for tourists visiting Huế in Vietnam, and it is designed to physically and figuratively break down the barriers between people and nature. With minimal walls and translucent materials, it dissolves the boundaries between in- and outdoors. Sahi W&D House is only four kilometres from the centre of Huế, but it feels a world away. Nguyễn Hữu Son Duong of SILAA Architects designed the homestay to encourage engagement between people and their setting. “Guests have the experience of living in a garden atmosphere, while also having more enclosed, private spaces,” Nguyễn explains.  

Guests feel part of the natural world rather than the suburban streetscape.

  He created this experience by reducing the timber structure to its essentials, blocking views of the neighbours and focusing sightlines on the trees so that guests feel part of the natural world rather than the suburban streetscape. The communal kitchen, dining and living area is on the ground floor, and there are no walls so that it opens directly to the garden and outdoors. The first floor, accessed via ladders, is a series of timber boxes with dorm-style accommodation to sleep six people. The boxes are alternated with voids, which provide terraces and common areas to encourage interaction between guests and with the surrounding environment. Polycarbonate panels on the walls of the timber boxes blur the boundaries of the hut and garden and allow an opaque view of the tree canopy. “This material provides a translucent barrier that connects the interior spaces with the exterior garden and brings in natural light and colour, yet keeps the spaces closed and private,” says Nguyễn. It also reflects light and colour to create an almost kaleidoscopic perspective in places. Taking an environmental and economical approach to the build, Nguyễn used an easy, low-cost construction process and recycled, recyclable and natural materials, such as stone, terracotta blocks and reclaimed wood from old buildings in the city. The large sloping thatch roof caters for Huế’s tropical climate, providing protection from harsh summer sunlight and heavy winter rain. Void and windows allow for natural ventilation in high humidity, and bamboo curtains protect against the cold wind in winter. “Sahi W&D adapts to the local climate and allows guests to connect each another and with nature, whether they or inside or outdoors,” Nguyễn says. SILAA Architects silaa.vn Photography by HoangLe Photography We think you might also like Four Leaves Villa by Kentaro Ishida Architects Studioabc
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2020 And The Future Of Design And Architecture

As we head into the twenties, we find ourselves looking for brands and designers that can lead the way, speaking to a wider social and ecological context whilst still satisfying our innate desire for self-expression, exploration and the allure of the unique. Of these, Sydney based Designer Rugs has long topped our list. Family owned and operated since its inception in 1986, the brand has carved out its own place in the industry, riding through each decade with an enduring commitment to quality, craftsmanship and design innovation. Beginning in a small factory in Sydney’s Inner West, the Tal family founded the company to introduce a new breed of offering to the market, focusing on rugs that combined traditional techniques with designs that showcased the very best of Australia. Keeping this ethos front of mind, the family grew the business over the proceeding three decades, becoming a globally recognised name with rugs in the most prominent projects in Australia and beyond. With a new decade dawning, we caught up with Yosi Tal – Managing Director of Designer Rugs, to discuss where the industry has been, where it’s going and how Designer Rugs plans to stay in front of the pack. Habitus Living: What drove you and your family to start Designer Rugs and what kind of climate was the industry in when you started? Yosi Tal: We just saw a gap in the market that hand made rugs weren’t being made in Australia. We had an opportunity through an overseas connection to start manufacturing rugs here. Previously, all premium end, custom made rugs were being made offshore and designed offshore so they didn’t have an Australian design flavour or an Australian design direction and we felt like there was a gap in the marketplace both for custom made and locally designed rugs that were influenced by an Australian design aesthetic. Did people take to the concept straight away? No. At the time in the 80’s Australian design and Australian product in that space either didn’t exist or was seen as being inferior. If it was imported from overseas it was seen as being superior in quality and superior in design aspect. If it was designed and made in Europe or America it was highly thought of and Australian design and quality was not seen as being good so it was very, very difficult to penetrate the market. Do you think it’s a different sort of climate now? Of course, the climate today is incredible. We have incredible manufacturing and production here of so many different products and Australian design is celebrated around the world, as are Australian designers. It’s a totally different climate. Designer Rugs has craftsmanship at the centre of its ethos. As sustainability and ethical manufacturing dominates conversations in the industry, are you seeing a wider uptake of those philosophies? Very much so. We’re very aware of it and we practice it. We try and minimise dying of colours, which leads to reduce use of energy, of colours, of effluence. If someone comes to me and asked for a 4sqm rug with 20 colours in it, I’ll refuse to make it. To dye all those colours for such a small rug is just crazy. We have certain guidelines that we use within our business when it comes to manufacturing. And the thing is, the raw material that we mainly use in our production is wool. That is a natural product! A lot of carpets, particularly those overseas, are produced using nylon or synthetic materials and that’s based on petroleum products. Whereas wool is not, wool is a natural product, produced by nature. We also use New Zealand wool - a product that is internationally recognised for its quality and commitment to sustainability. This adds another layer to our own ethos of ethical manufacturing. [caption id="attachment_98494" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Etched by Designer Rugs x Hare & Klein[/caption] Do you feel, on the other side of things, that there is a shift in the way people are responding to products and that they’re more aware and more considerate in the way they are purchasing? Yes, very much so. People certainly want to specify products that are environmentally sound and don’t overburden the earth in their production and it’s a conscious effort by most designers to do so – as it should be. Designer Rugs is featured in a lot of the premier buildings that are going up around the world. Are you seeing any particular trends or movements in the way projects are being produced and the products that are being used inside them? There are always trends in colour, design and textures. But because we custom make, we’re not necessarily specific, we see everything and that’s the beauty of what we do – we can do anything that they envision. On the other hand, we have 30 collections with Australian designers that are unique to us. On many occasions, designers will use those collections as a basis for their designs. So we’re not really a custom made house, we are a design house for full custom made carpets and also we have in house design collections. We have a lot that we’ve developed over the years. We’re very collaborative – we’ve worked with some of the best designers in Australia, interior designers, industrial designers, graphic designers and artists. So we’re immersed in the world of design every day. We eat and breathe design. When you’re talking about those collections, how do you go about picking the people you want to work with? We get approached and then we pick who we want to work with. How long is the turnaround? Usually from starting to talk to someone to launching to the market it takes about 12 months. We’re not a company that’s been to a trade fair, found a product offshore with all the marketing collateral and everything already done. We have to build a product from the ground up: the design; the photography; the branding; the manufacturing; the distribution. We’re not a distribution company, we’re not a franchise, we’re not an importer as such. We the company, we are the brand, we are the creators, we are the product and we have been for 33 years since the first day we started making rugs in a little factory in Marrickville.   [caption id="attachment_98495" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Custom Project for PWC Sydney by Designer Rugs x Future Space[/caption] I’m quite interested in how people are interacting with products now we are moving into a digital space. This is especially interesting when it comes to rugs as they’re such a sensory product and being able to feel the texture and see the colours is so important. What are your insights into how that merging of digital and real spaces is going to affect products and product design moving forward? It just enables people to see how a product is going to be used much more easily. The end user doesn’t need to imagine in their mind, they can insert it using a program and don’t need to take a chance on what it will look like. A lot of the time, someone will order a fabric for curtains or sofas from a little swatch. Once it arrives, they might not like it because they couldn’t imagine what it was going to look like. Yet, when you can digitise and put it into a space, or a room or a foyer, and you can see the colours and what the design looks like as a whole and how it relates to other products and finishes it becomes much simpler. In actual fact, the digital age has made it easier for designers to show their clients what’s going to happen and what they can expect – there’s no surprises. If we’re looking 20-30 years into the future, do you still see a space for the physical retail outlet? Yes, because people want to experience it. Cinemas have shown that people want to be with people, they don’t want to be isolated. People are tribal; they want to be with people. I think retail will still have that draw to it. Maybe it won’t in 20 or 30 years because the people coming behind us won’t have the experience of what it used to be like and therefore won’t know any better and they’ll be poorer for it. If everything is experienced through the phone or iPad you lose the smells, the sounds, the feeling of being with people. It will be very sterile. Where do you think, given your position in the industry, architecture and design is heading through the next decade and what the future is going to look like in that space? I think it’s more about individual customised design. If you look at the proliferation of custom made of everything, it’s clear that people don’t want to buy mass produced and don’t want other people to necessarily have exactly what they have. People want something specially made – custom has gone through the roof for all products: fabric; wallpapers; flooring. If not custom made, they want small, limited runs. A decorator doesn’t want to use the same piece of furniture in 100 fit outs, nor do they want to use the same rug again and again. They want to reflect the customer’s personality, the property’s personality, and the individuality of the space. So I think the custom made story is only going to get bigger. [caption id="attachment_98496" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Carousel Collection by Designer Rugs[/caption] What about in relation to social media? Are you seeing the way people come across your brand change? I actually think social media is changing. We’ve certainly noticed a difference in the way people are using social media. I think people are becoming a bit more selective in the time they’re spending on social media and what they’re looking at. The likes on Instagram have plummeted, and I know from myself, I used to be on Facebook nearly every hour and now use it once a day. Same with Instagram – I’m actually becoming quite bored of it and I’m also trying to minimise the use of my mobile phone. This could be a trait of my generation but maybe the younger generation will also start realising that they’re wasting their time on the phone when they could be talking to the person next to them. So I think this might be creeping in, social media took the world by storm and I think it’s still important and still relevant to people’s lives but I think it’s going to be consumed in a different way, people will be more selective and spend less time on it. It is also understood that there is some connection to people’s wellbeing as well. I think it will evolve like everything else… When you look at where Designer Rugs is heading, what are you most excited about? Well, we’re totally focused on Australian Design: all our collections are Australian, everything we do is here, we get influenced by what is happening here not by what is going on overseas. We are totally and uniquely an Australian design company. We’re driven just by Australian design, we don’t look at offshore trends, we do our own thing all the time and that’s what excites me the most because I still think Australian design has a long way to grow in terms of capturing more markets overseas. The influx of so many people who want to live here will lead to greater opportunities and new design narratives, the globalisation of everything and the facts that there’s lots of Aussies working offshore means more Australian design will get out there. We’re constantly exporting products all over the world. We’ve been used everywhere, hotels in China and Vietnam, homes all over America, Hong Kong, Singapore, London, the Philippines and Mexico. We’re exporting all over the world, that’s very exciting for us. We’re also very excited to continue working with local designers like Steve and Louise from Dinosaur Designs, Catherine Martin, Greg Natale and Megan Hess.abc
Architecture
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Elevating Everyday Experience Through Architecture

The brief to Taylor Knights this project was nothing new. If you’re from – or familiar with – Australia, the name Fitzroy Terrace pretty much says it all; a terrace in one of Melbourne’s grittier inner-suburbs in disrepair, with a need of being brought up to speed with its resident’s modern lifestyles and expectations. Part in parcel, of course, is the task of tackling a deep, narrow site, locked on both sides by double-height party walls, and inherently plagued with issues of darkness, dampness, and poor ventilation. It’s an all-too-familiar brief for anyone operating in Australia’s architecture and design fields. What’s intriguing about this archetypal terrace alts and ads project however, is Taylor Knights’ response. Behind a very traditional façade, the residence’s interior spaces have been inverted; flipping the original arrangement by lifting the living spaces to the upper floors in a deliberate play of thresholds and journeys through spaces. These ideas of discovery and arrival are best described by the concept of the stair as one navigates the stacking and shifting floorplates; it is the experience as one emerges into an expansive upper level with filtered light from an unknown source overhead, contrasted against the immersive descent into the sunken lounge. The layering of spaces throughout Fitzroy Terrace’s interior serves the dual purpose of controlling the house’s microclimate, as well as accommodating for both moments of privacy and stillness, and times shared with treasured family and friends. In elevating the living spaces onto the first floor, Taylor Knights has exponentially increased the accessibility of natural light and ventilation, meanwhile making the best use of the valuable aspect to the north. “Our approach quickly focussed on injecting light deep into the footprint of the home through a series of light-catching volumes and openings…” say Peter Knights and James Taylor of Taylor Knights, “by removing walls, stepping the levels and elevating the roof we created greater control of the passive environment.” Apertures to the interior are deliberate and controlled, allowing gentle washes of light in certain spaces throughout the day, while others reveal themselves only fleetingly.  

There is an increasing awareness of – and expectation for – highly considered, aspirational design within residential architecture.

  Also inherent in Taylor Knights’ thoughtful rendition of Fitzroy Terrace are notions of longevity and sustainability. “A sustainable building to us is one with great longevity, a clever program and a variety of spatial complexity. A building which uses materials with high embodied energy needs to work harder spatially to outlive its less considered opponent,” say Peter and James. “From the outset, our preference was to opt for traditional materials that would stand the test of time. We wanted to explore how simple materials such as concrete and brick could be used to catch light and tie the contemporary form into the existing dwelling – hoping to last another 100 years.” Not ones to take all the credit for themselves, Peter and James note, “this complex interplay of form, pragmatism and craft has made the project a rewarding experience to work on with our valued consultants and tradespeople.” But perhaps even more pivotal to the success of this project was a client well attuned to the relationship between the built environment and human wellbeing.  

Apertures to the interior are deliberate and controlled, allowing gentle washes of light in certain spaces throughout the day.

  “There is an increasing awareness of – and expectation for – highly considered, aspirational design within residential architecture,” say Peter and James, “the client was also acutely aware of the positive impacts that visual access to nature can have to one’s sense of wellbeing. This project is a true reflection of society’s collective yearning for architecture that elevates our everyday experience.” Taylor Knights taylorknights.com.au Photography by Peter Clarke Dissection Information Engineered timber floorboards from Tongue n Groove Endicott Crazy Paving from Eco Outdoor Recycled bricks from Paddy’s Bricks Sashless sliding windows from Dayview Window Company Painted steel window and door frames with shroud by Tescher Forge Timber doors from Steptoes Designer White kitchen benchtop from Corian Kitchen island bench in black granite Elba stone bathroom benchtops from Artedomus Oak veneer bathroom cabinetry by Tescher Forge Terrazzo tile in bathroom from Signorino Inax Biyusai tile from Artedomus Rugs from Halcyon Lakes Cooktop from Asko Rangehood from Smeg Fridge, dishwasher and oven from Miele Wine cabinet from Vintec Gessi tapware in kitchen from Abey Australia Bathroom tapware from Astra Walker We think you might also like Storybook House by Folk Architectsabc