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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
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Bridging The Gap Between Exclusivity And Locality

Without a doubt, there is a level of unmasked duality that can be seen within the context of Bali’s hospitality scene. On one hand, the island thrives on tourism. On the other hand, it is also filled with rich local culture and traditions that go way back before Bali was ever on any tourist’s radar. The duality is often left undealt with, with many luxury hotel chains drawing a defined line between exclusive and luxurious enjoyment and the Bali’s local community. Potato Head Bali strives to be the antithesis to the detachment of the two sides of the Indonesian island. The OMA-designed hotel challenges the notion of ‘exclusivity’ with its integration into the local community via deliberate design decisions that facilitate openness and public engagement. Comprising one of the three buildings of Desa Potato Head – a village inclusive of a beach club and two hotels – the Potato Head Studios lifts off the ground to reveal a public plane providing an unobstructed path to the beach. The rooftop of the hotel, conceived as a sculptural park, also remains accessible via a route that connects public amenity spaces such as restaurants, spas and pools. Potato Head Studios aims to bring the authentic experience of contemporary Balinese culture to the hotel’s guests, and the general public alike, by organically setting up spaces conducive for exhibitions and cultural events. Or as OMA puts it, Potato Head Bali is a resort hotel for ‘open engagement rather than private consumption’. Throughout, locally sourced and recycled materials comprise the dominant palette of the resort, from woven recycled plastic ceiling panels, to handcrafted breezeblock walls, to concrete marked with reclaimed wooden boards. Greenery, featured prominently and integrated into the exteriors of the hotel, softens the concrete structure and wooden slats of the façade. Designed with its context in mind, Potato Head Bali challenges the traditional private resort typology that has dominated Bali thus far. OMA’s clever incorporation of the aspect of inclusivity in both the hotel’s distribution of its programme and introduction of large open spaces and vistas into the heart of the hotel’s design is, if not a redefining, then certainly an eye-opening moment for the Indonesian island’s hospitality scene. OMA oma.eu Photography by Kevin Mak We think you might also like this Brutalist café in Bali abc
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The Secret Ingredient For A Michelin-Star Kitchen

As the world’s first and foremost brand for the design and innovation of integrated appliances, there is no match for Gaggenau fitted kitchen. Led by a vision of a custom-designed kitchen, fitted with sophisticated, easy-to-use integrated appliances, the German brand has been the most influential manufacturer in the residential kitchen design space since 1956. Without Gaggenau, built-in ovens, glass ceramic cooktops and combi-steam ovens would never have made it into our kitchens. For every such iconic innovation, the brand’s pioneering approach to continuous development sees to it that each product generation exceeds its last. For its latest and greatest generation of cooktops and specialty appliances, Gaggenau has designed with a view to fulfil the many facets of a sophisticated, contemporary home. “Our next generation of Vario cooktops 200 series comes at a time when the rapidly evolving landscape of at home culinary culture has never been more apparent,” says the brands global head. “As the value of space and time increases, so too does the need for integrated appliances that can adapt without compromising sophisticated design and professional function.” Iconic in form and essential in function, one of the key aesthetic modifications to the Vario 200 series cooktops is the quintessential Gaggenau control knob and matching control panel in black, anodised, aluminium finish. Synonymous with minimalist design, the flexibility and humble size of this redesigned range responds to modern living aspirations and small space design trends. Design minimalism and modularity continues in the new Vario 400 cooling series. The first fully integrated, built-in modular family of refrigerators, freezers, fridge-freezer combinations and wine climate cabinets, the Vario 400 cooling series is most impressive when combined in countless variations to form an elegantly concealed cooling wall. Sven Baacke, Gaggenau’s head of design speaks of the Vario 400 series’ fridge/freezer variations with an assured sense of pride. “This is a very refined product,” he says, “we didn’t think about a refrigerator, we are talking about architecture that can actually cool.” In-situ, the Vario 400 cooling series is forms a ‘working wall’. Pragmatic, cohesive, and spatially intelligent, every bit of the modular system is in keeping with the defining trends of excellence in contemporary kitchen design – suffice it to say, refined indeed. Gaggenau gaggenau.com.au We think you might also like these three kitchens that intuitively respond to use needsabc
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Dialling In With Miriam Fanning Of Mim Design

Miriam Fanning has more than 20 years’ experience as an interior designer working across Australia from her studio in South Yarra, Melbourne. But for the next little while, Miriam and her team of nearly 30 will be working remotely out of their respective homes. On the one hand, with a portfolio of projects both near and far remote work has never been a challenge for the studio. On the flip side, as a highly communicative office the individual project teams frequently work through design workshops together. Navigating these workshops through a digital transition was one of their bigger challenges of late. Habitus recently spoke to Miriam about other adjustments Mim Design has recently made, as well as key takeaways that will continue to inform the behind the scenes of the practice well after the world returns to normal.   For a team of 29, working out of a central studio, what has the transition been like now that everyone is working from home? For us, it wasn’t just a matter of packing up and moving home to work remotely. We’re a highly communicative team and we run a lot of workshops as we work through the different phases of our projects. Moreover, we work from philosophy through to final documentation, so we needed to make sure that we could achieve that while working from home. We had to re-strategize the way our whole office communicates and thinks; we restructured our team and our programming to suit team catch-ups and flow-through on projects digitally. We arranged a lot of in-house design workshops and then set up projects across Microsoft Teams with the relevant staff in them so that they can communicate whenever they need. Technically anybody can look at everybody but the teams are working together and sharing information. My day, however, is very similar to what I was doing before – lots of workshops and discussing drawings over video calls and through Microsoft Teams. We’re all missing each other, because we are a pretty communicative team, but we are catching up in our project teams every morning and every afternoon via video conference. How do the design workshops run now that they are digital? Usually when we start a project, we do a workshop. And I open that workshop up to whoever is interested, not just the project team, so that we can all share. Ultimately it’s for the benefit of our grads and those who haven’t been as exposed to our way of working yet. The difference now is that those workshops are only comprised of the project team plus two or three others that might be able to bring something to the table. They’re more condensed – which is not a problem. Are you worried that this may hinder the opportunity to mentor, educate and grow the younger architects? This is why we set up teams remotely, so that they are still learning and not working solo but with a team of people. I think it’s really important: that it’s not “everybody out for themselves”, we are still working together. What about clients and suppliers? How are you anticipating staying in touch with them? We’ve got a librarian that looks after all our suppliers, and she’ll continue to do that remotely, but if we need things specifically for each project, we can contact them individually. Prior to recognising that we would be working remotely and finishing up in the studio, we went through the library at the studio and started flagging all the projects that were going to be in selection mode, and all the jobs that were on site. We populated take home finishes buckets for each project, and anything that was in pre-concept. Do you think this experience will change your processes and the way you work on projects? I’d be mad to say no. And I’d like to think that at the end of this we all get something really great out of it. It is different, but it’s also no different – I’ve just been on four conference calls this morning and I’ve got presentations with external clients tomorrow – we’re doing all of that anyway with our interstate work. So for me, that’s just another layer. I miss the camaraderie of having people around me, but at the same time, you’ve got to make sure that you can create that remotely with the tools that you’re given. Admittedly, you do feel a lot closer to your client when you are actually in the room with them, and that’s something that might be a bit more difficult, but we’ll see how that goes. How are you hoping that the teams will keep motivated? Having the time to organise the restructure to working from home has been fantastic. I’m glad we didn’t jump in at the first mention of the possibility of working remotely due to Covid-19. We all left [the office] with a level of comfort about how we’re going to do things. That was a really big undertaking for the team, but it made us feel like we weren’t entering the unknown. I guess we technically are in the unknown, but at least we knew how we were going to work, and that is really important. What is important to you to hold on to through all of this and where, if anywhere, do you think you might be able to find a silver lining? It comes down to a few things: making sure that your staff are comfortable and happy; making sure that your clients feel secure with what you’re doing; and importantly keeping connected. These things are important in any business and if you can get the tools to make all three happen, positive things will come. Mim Design mimdesign.com.au We think you might also like Australia’s Leading Interior Designersabc
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Japandi-Style Minimalism In A Singaporean HDB Apartment

The couple (and their two teenage children) staying in this HDB flat looked to the Japandi style minimalism of Japanese and Taiwanese apartments for inspiration when renovating their own home. To achieve a similar aesthetic, they engaged Artistroom to create a minimalist home with a neutral palette. The result is a home that exemplifies how minimalism can work in a local context. The designers from Artistoom modelled this BTO unit after the minimalist, neutral-toned apartments in Japan and Taiwan. They also introduced a touch of Scandinavian influence into the design. As such, the streamlined and clutter-free home boasts of a palette composed of white, beige and light wood. This palette forms the basis of an aesthetic that will never grow old or out of style. In fact, this neutral backdrop pairs well with many other decor styles, should the homeowners’ tastes evolve over time. A curved pillar houses a vertical display shelf. This custom addition also helps to visually soften the sharp edges of the walls that face the walkway into the bedroom. This simple, yet unorthodox architectural element aids the flow between the communal and private quarters of the abode. It also creates the illusion of openness in the narrow passageway. The Japandi style minimalism continues in the kitchen. Here, white cabinets and kitchen counters line the walls yet manage to maintain the brightness and airiness of the space. To keep it from becoming too bereft of personality, the designers introduced wood-look floor tiles laid in a herringbone pattern. Similarly, they cladded the kitchen island and one of the cabinets with light wood strips. These additions bring texture to the room while while fulfilling the occupants’ need for more storage. Most of the couple’s design preferences are guided by the principles of feng shui, which necessitated the reorientation of the living and dining areas. Mark Chen of Artistroom elaborates, “We tore down the existing non-structural walls to build new walls and create new spaces such as the common bedroom.” Such layout reconfigurations also make way for more storage space. In the son’s bedroom, the semi-concealed wardrobe has been built flush against the wall, which frees up floor space for other furnishings. Artistroom artistroom.com.sg We think you might also like Pine Ave by Cera Stribley Architects and The Stella Collective abc
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An Earthen Retreat In Byron Bay

Byron Bay is that quintessential little piece of Aussie beachside paradise. It’s a small New South Wales coastal town popular for its surf beaches, music festivals and colourful mix of bohemian nature lovers, shrewd developers, holidaying backpackers and fun-loving creatives. It’s also where Brazilian architect Thais Pupio set up her practice, Thais Pupio Design, after relocating to Australia 11 years ago. Florianópolis, where she used to live in the south region of Brazil, shares the same sub-tropical climate as Byron Bay and so the move was undoubtedly a strategic one. Thais is adept at producing highly efficient yet humble environmentally responsive residential architecture and the same design principles that drive her projects in Brazil also drive those in Australia. It’s an expertise not lost on her recent clients, a husband and wife with three grown children who wanted a guest house next door to their own home. “They know I’m Brazilian and came to me with a sense that I could create something tropical in both appearance and feel,” says Thais. “They didn’t want anything too rustic – or anything that looked like a beach shack – but it did need to be inviting, earthy and modern.”  

Generous glazing, including strategically placed louvres to facilitate ample cross ventilation, ensures a strong connection with the outdoors.

  An ordinary house built in the 1980s already occupied the property and the idea was to dramatically re-work it. The new two-bedroom residence needed to be low maintenance and conducive to entertaining large groups of friends and family. More importantly, it needed to retain the original footprint and not encroach on the clients’ lush garden; their pride and joy. As Thais explains, “They also wanted this established garden to become a part of the house, which just wasn’t the case with the former dwelling. So I needed to connect to the landscaping without imposing on it.” Resolving how best to frame views of the garden soon became the priority, along with Thais’ desire to create a serene, immersive experience for anyone sitting inside and looking out. Generous glazing, and strategically placed louvres that facilitate ample cross ventilation, ensures a strong connection with the outdoors. As does the kitchen’s breakfast bar, which is positioned on the deck beneath the large window. Oversized eaves at the front and rear extend the house into the garden, this outreach truly embeds the structure in its natural surrounds while also protecting it against the area’s big rains. Internally, bedrooms, two ensuites and a powder room/laundry are positioned to the side to give over as much of the house’s relatively compact 124-square-metres as possible to the living areas. The kitchen, dining and lounge are in turn open plan and, together with the multiple full-height glass doors and clerestory windows, encourage that unobstructed connection with the outdoors that feels effortless.  

The rear of the property abuts a national park and bushfires are a concern, so a fireproof material like rammed earth was a logical choice.

  The beauty of Thais’ scheme rests in its simplicity and the architect is quick to champion a low-tech design approach. “It’s not a high-tech house and was never intended to be,” she states. “Architectural innovation doesn’t mean a home needs to be run by remote control. Nowadays, we’re innovating if we’re thinking about our impact on the earth and for me, innovation means using the simplest techniques, principles and materials. You can live modestly and easily, but still live in a beautiful house that’s well designed.” This home, like all of Thais’ projects, is informed by questions of environmental impact. What long-term effect will it have on its natural setting? How can it be sustainable without taking anything away from its location? Her resulting palette and decision to use rammed earth – an ancient building material she was very happy to discover the clients’ were likewise passionate about – offers a positive response. Its selected aggregates were sourced from a nearby quarry and compressed on site to form all but three of the building’s robust walls. The material itself has a low embodied energy and is low maintenance and – together with recycled timber used for the ceiling and cross beams – gives the home its most compelling design expression. “The clients wanted something earthy but not dark and I also wanted it to be light and warm,” says Thais. “In this respect, the raw materials and raw colour palette works, while also communicating well with the natural environment.” The rear of the property abuts a national park and bushfires are a concern, so a fireproof material like rammed earth was a logical choice. Not only does its high thermal mass and durability meet the brief, but it allows for a healthy house too. For Thais, knowing her clients and their friends and family are living in a home that breathes, constructed from a non-toxic and non-polluting material is an achievement of which she’s incredibly proud. To complement the rammed earth and timber palette, Thais incorporated custom copper detailing that provides visual accents throughout and together with bespoke joinery lends a handmade element to the design. The kitchen’s exhaust fan, bedroom doors and all the flashing will patina nicely over time, highlighting the timber’s rich maple hue and delicious surface imperfections of the rammed earth. A white marble island benchtop and splashback in the kitchen breaks up the earthy colour palette, as do the ivory-coloured floor tiles, which adds freshness to the interior’s overall scheme. This is a relaxed, comfortable home that also very much appeals to the imagination. Guests feel like they could be in a hidden villa in Mexico, a weekend getaway in Brazil or a retreat in Thailand, such is the design’s highly evocative nature. The fact they’re in Byron Bay isn’t too shabby a realisation either. Thais has created an exquisitely masterful study in passive design, sensitive to context and mindful of environment. And although her architecture is respectful and polite when it needs to be, it’s also bold, with an unapologetic confidence. As she reflects, “I like the idea that I can bring awareness to a way of living that embraces the use of simple passive design principles and smart, healthy materials. I’m hoping this house can be an example of that.” Thais Pupio Design Photography by Michael Nicholson Dissection Information Rammed earth walls from Rammed Earth National Porcelain floor tiles from Artedomus Timber windows and doors from Duce Timber Windows & Doors Recycled timber on decking, ceiling and roof structure with copper roofing Pivot doors in copper with finishes from artist David Kas Corian finish for walls and vanity at ensuites Marble splashback and kitchen bench top from Custom Stone Solutions All cabinetry custom made of solid timber from P C S Cabinets Dining table, chairs and stools from George Nakashima Woodworkers, Philadelphia Woven artwork custom-made locally by Zimmi from Weaving Nature Decorative items and ceramics from Uscha at Newyrbar Merchant, Byron Bay Handmade ceramic pendants from Natalie Page Studio, Philadelphia Copper wall lamps and pendant from Creative Lighting, Byron Bay Spot lights from Kreon Tapware, showers, hooks from Brodware Carved stone basin sourced in Bali Concrete tub in powder room from Slabshapers Copper rangehood from Qasair with art from David Kas Appliances from Gaggenau We think you might also like this rammed earth extension by Steffen Welsch abc
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Facing The Anthropocene: Design-Led Approaches To Sea Level Rise

Scientists have warned of the dangers of anthropogenic climate change – increased global temperatures caused by human activity – for decades. These include sea-level rise; acidification of the oceans; and more extreme droughts, storms and bushfires. Last year, the Climate Council warned that “damage to property and infrastructure [would] likely to lead to painful market corrections and could trigger serious financial instability in Australia and the region .” The events of this past summer have led to Australia being viewed as the global canary in the coal mine. So how might we respond to this threat to our homes and communities: both to limit further damage, and to prepare for a climate-changed future? Several design experts have started exploring how cities and towns could adapt in future. Sydney-based architect and urban planner David Tickle of Hassell Studios was part of a team that developed resiliency plans for the San Francisco Bay Area, in a project funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. A second project then arose in South San Francisco, where a tech-hub and the city’s international airport are located beside the bay.

“Across government and communities, in relation to floods and bushfires, we need to ask: ‘Are we settling in the right places?’”

  “Our project has been funded by grants from Caltrans – which manages the freeways – and the regional planning agency, enabling us to continue working with communities around the catchment,” David says. “It’s particularly problematic where the creek hits the bay because the area was originally swampland that’s been industrialised and developed, and – as water comes through the creek line now – it causes flooding.” [gallery size="large" columns="2" ids="100473,100471"] Resilient By Design, Hassell Hassell’s design solution involves creating new green spaces along the creek line. “That helps to slow down flood waters by collecting rainwater to soak into the ground, and it creates more open space, sporting fields and playgrounds,” David says. “Projects where design can deliver multiple benefits – ecological and social resilience outcomes – create an easy win, by helping to mitigate disasters while creating better spaces.” Hassell is now working with Australian cities and states too, especially in Brisbane and South East Queensland, where recent news reports suggested that some properties are already uninsurable . “That area is incredibly vulnerable in terms of flooding, sea level rise and inundation, because there is a fast-growing urban population,” David says. Similar issues are impacting Western Sydney, he says, where cleared bushland and former agricultural land – the sponges of the city – are contributing to greater concentrations of water flows, and multiplier effects in big storms. [gallery size="medium" ids="100476,100474,100475"] Little Elliot Island project, Sobi Slingsby Meanwhile, on the Central Coast of New South Wales, storms in early February caused floods and inundation that left communities underwater (and without power for up to a week) placing further pressure on emergency responders after the region’s devastating bushfires. “One promising sign in Australia is that we have greater levels of integration,” David asserts, “including better co-ordination between infrastructure, planning and open space agencies, and better disaster responses around bushfire and flooding. “In our San Francisco project, so many people said: ‘I wouldn’t know what to do,’ but in Australia we have much better systems in place, and people know where to gather, and how to get information,” he said. Volunteer organisations such as the RFS, SES and Surf Life Saving Clubs – and emergency broadcasts by the ABC – played a key role over summer, and will become more important as climate change impacts increase.  

Last year, the Climate Council warned that “damage to property and infrastructure [would] likely to lead to painful market corrections and could trigger serious financial instability in Australia and the region .”

  These growing challenges are top of mind for young architects, with two recent graduates winning major awards for design projects that tackled the issues of rising seas and water quality. Sobi Slingsby won the 2019 BlueScope Glenn Murcutt Student Prize for her Master’s thesis that addressed the threat of climate change on the remote Lady Elliot Island in the Great Barrier Reef. It built upon her earlier research that examined three ways of coping: retreat, consolidation or adaption. She proposed two elevated tent typologies to house scientists and researchers – one for over-water use and one for erection on land. “It’s not meant to be a solution,” she says. “It was designed to start a conversation, and it has, so that’s great.” After completing her studies, Sobi moved to Sydney to work at Peter Stutchbury Architecture, where she is integrating her research principles with live projects. She’s also involved with Architects Declare and is keen to see further action throughout the industry. “Each individual’s moral compass knows the responsible decision in any situation (or where to look for it),” she says, “and I don’t understand why that isn’t carried through current standards in our professional life.” [gallery size="medium" ids="100469,100467,100466"] Surface Tension, Victoria King Meanwhile, Victoria King’s award-winning project ‘Surface Tension’ examines how Sydney Harbour has been altered by European habitation, and the ongoing threats it faces as the climate changes. She won the RIBA President’s Silver Medal in 2019 and is now employed at Weston Williamson, where she has been working on large-scale concepts for faster rail transport infrastructure in New South Wales. “It has been an eye-opening experience for me to think more deeply about the pressures we are facing in regard to future city liveability and climate vulnerability,” Victoria says. “The threat of sea-level rise has definitely influenced this work, shaping alignment options along the eastern coastline, where the most of our urban and regional population growth is occurring. “I think that uncertainty around the impact of sea level rise will start to impact large nation shaping infrastructure development in Australia, with increased interest in how we can future proof our cities,” she adds, “In considering the future population growth of our cities, I think that we also need to start preparing for an influx of climate change refugees from neighbouring Pacific nations.”  

“It has been an eye-opening experience for me to think more deeply about the pressures we are facing in regard to future city liveability and climate vulnerability.”

  Victoria also acknowledges the responsibility that architects feel to mitigate the irreversible environmental impacts of climate change. “Navigating this dilemma in both professional and personal contexts has been a challenge, but it is one that we all collectively face,” she says. “An out-of-sight, out-of-mind mentality is no longer applicable in the current climate and social context. “Social media channels have enabled a platform for greater connectivity and that’s primarily how I have supported the great work being done by Architects Declare, who have quite swiftly mobilised collective support within the Architecture community. Victoria adds that turning the groundswell of support into concrete actions within practice is the next challenge. “But I think it is very positive that difficult conversations about environmental responsibility are happening more frequently,” she adds. “For me, another personal priority has been to gain as much knowledge as I can about tackling climate change from outside of the design disciplines, as I think that interdisciplinary thinking and working will be the key to driving new, ecologically responsive design solutions.” David Tickle says that his recent projects have underscored the importance of asking difficult questions, including where and how we should build in future. “Across government and communities, in relation to floods and bushfires, we need to ask: ‘Are we settling in the right places?’” he says. “We need to move our cities and communities out of these more vulnerable areas, and yes, it’s complicated and difficult, but we have to do it. Of course we need to involve communities in understanding climate-based risks, too so we can plan and build – and inform and respond – accordingly.” Photography courtesy of Hassell, Sobi Slingsby and Victoria King We think you might also like to learn about the age-old material needed to build a sustainable future.abc
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Showers Of Praise

In a welcome change of tune from the affairs of late, here’s a cause to celebrate: Phoenix Tapware have been crowned Best of the Best at the Red Dot Awards 2020. For the sixty-plus years it has been running, the Red Dot Awards programme has been an internationally recognised relic of product design and innovation, packing quite a punch to Phoenix Tapware’s feat. The Australian tapware designer and manufacturer took home not one, but four, of the esteemed awards in the Bathroom Taps and Shower category; one for each of its latest products: NX Iko with HydroSense, NX Orli with HydroSense, Zimi, and Axia – the latter being the one crowned crème de la crème. This uppermost accolade is for ground-breaking design, as voted by a panel of revered international designers. Designed by Phoenix’s in-house design team, Axia is cutting edge design from every perspective. Revolutionising the bathroom experience, the Axia collection has been meticulously crafted with crisp detailing and strong design presence. Unique design details include the ultra-thin outlet and lever-less handle. “It is a tremendous honour to be awarded four Red Dot Awards,” says the brand’s managing director, Steve Jackson. “The entire team is thrilled to be the first Australian tapware company to receive such a prestigious distinction.” The company is evidently on a winning streak. In the first three months of this year alone, Phoenix Tapware has celebrated 30 years since its inception and received 11 distinct awards for design and innovation in its category. Needless to say, the recognition and reward received from the Red Dot Awards 2020 is well-deserved. “We strive to create best-in-class products every time and winning this internationally renowned design award bears testimony to the unparalleled design quality of our products,” says Steve. We couldn’t agree more. Phoenix Tapware phoenixtapware.com.au We think you might also like the Axia collection by Phoenix Tapware abc
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What To Expect From The Cult Online Outlet

Ecommerce has had almost as many evolutions and reinventions as a pop star. First, it was foreign there were resounding feelings of uncertainty: could you trust the site with your details, how did you know if you would like the item in real life, what if the colours were different? Without too much delay it was embraced wholeheartedly as people began to see the convenience factor and ability to access brands on the other side of the world. Now, and for the next little while, ecommerce will be the only way we can shop. In what can only be attributed to fantastic timing, Cult recently launched a digital re-design of their entire site. This makes it easier to peruse, learn about and shop the full suite of global and local brands and designers Cult has to offer from the comfort of your new home office. Moreover, the brief included an outlet store, the Cult Online Outlet. The Cult Online Outlet is stocked with a huge range of ex-floor stock and discontinued designs from brands including Poltrona Frau, HAY Fritz Hansen, Gubi, nau, Carl Hansen, Cappellini, Zanotta, Magi, Emeco and Louis Poulsen. One has access to furniture, lighting and accessories designed and manufactured to last generations at up to 80 per cent off. More than that, these pieces are ready to ship immediately. Given the varying reasons these iconic brands and designs may appear on the Cult Online Outlet, their conditions will equally be varied. Cult is committed to full transparency and as such has introduced a comprehensive scale informing clients in the utmost detail. From brand new and boxed, to minor signs of wear and tear, to slightly more noticeable signs of wear, and all the way to requires repair: where items require a little love, you’ll find additional product imagery to help you make an informed purchase. Cult Online Outlet cultdesign.com.au We think you might also like the Hay online shop  The Cult Online Outlet The Cult Online Outletabc
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The Fresh Form Of Bellaire

King Living sees the elegant, modern sofa of your dreams and raises you Bellaire. Designed for style and engineered for luxury, every single item of King Living furniture has the built-in capability to enhance the comfort, liveability and beauty of any living space it calls home. Bellaire, the latest sofa to join the brand's product range, is not about to break with this tradition. Designed in Australia by King Living’s inimitable in-house design team, Bellaire is a sofa synonymous with sophisticated minimalism and contemporary design. Credit to its angular, sleek lines and soft, cylindrical headrests, Bellaire is guaranteed to elevate any room it lives in with an impeccable sense of style, comfort and longevity. “We are extremely excited about the new Bellaire Sofa from King Living,” says David Hardwick, head of product for iconic the Australian furniture design and manufacture brand. “Offering a contemporary and light aesthetic with supreme deep seated, combined with unique high-back, comfort, the Bellaire is set to be the next must have sofa suited to any home.” Supported by a slender, foam-padded steel frame platform with strength enough to last a lifetime, the modular, modern sofa is equal measures comfortable, durable and beautiful. Drawing inspiration from timeless architecture, King Living’s design team has instilled Bellaire with an effortless sense of sophistication that is translatable to almost any home. Cast stainless steel legs give the illusion that Bellaire hovers subtly above ground, elevating its design appeal further still. In addition to the modularity of its size and seating composition, the Bellaire sofa is entirely customisable in terms of its finishes. With the option of polished or PC black finish, the legs are able to be tailored to complement King Living’s wide range of premium fabrics and European Leathers. Low in profile, modular in form, deep in comfort, and tailor-made according to taste and space, Bellaire is everything a contemporary sofa should be, and more. King Living kingliving.com.au We think you might also like Doorzien House by Bijl Architecture abc
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A Hygge-Inspired House By studiofour

Even on one of Melbourne’s gloomier days, this linear mass of dark-grey brick has an air of warmth and hospitality. Originally a brown brick abode c1970s with small windows, dark interior spaces, and superfluously adorned walls, its owners enlisted studiofour to create an ambient home with the Nordic notion of Hygge at its core. Though on the surface there may have been little to love about the original house, the sentiment of the clients and studiofour alike was not to judge a book by its cover. Rather than opting to tear down the structure and start from scratch, studiofour embarked on a mission to repurpose and enhance the essence of the existing home. From the outside looking in, the horizontality of the architectural form makes a bold stand. An oversized eave demarcates the entry and emphasises the flatness of the building form. Further strengthening the house’s horizontality, vertical joint lines in the brickwork of its walls have been filled in and horizontal ones raked. The language of the exterior brickwork is continued throughout Central Park Road Residence to define interior volumes. Honest and unembellished the interiors celebrate the authentic beauty of imperfection.  

Vertical joint lines in the brickwork of its walls have been filled in and horizontal ones raked..

  A key consideration for studiofour was balancing the client’s longing for open-plan living while circumventing the acoustic and privacy shortcomings that come hand-in-hand with large, open spaces. Through layering interior spaces and connecting them with wide portal openings, studiofour has succeeded in isolating areas acoustically while promoting strategic visual connections throughout the house. Further connections are made between the adjacent garden and the space around the house, providing a layering of landscape and surrounding built form. The home is light filled with fresh air and aspect, yet there is an inner truth and stillness to the spaces that produces calm and a certain mindfulness. studiofour studiofour.net.au Photography by Shannon McGrath We think you might also like Powell Street House by Robert Simeoni Architects  

studiofour has succeeded in isolating areas acoustically while promoting strategic visual connections throughout the house.

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Bringing Sustainable Design To The Heart Of Jakarta

Jakarta-based practice, AGo Architecture, is passionate about sustainable design. Founded in 2018, the company believes in not just sustainable buildings, but also creating a healthy life for their clients by looking holistically at the complete design or project. “In recent years, we have observed the new trends and practices in architecture that take into account its impact on the environment and the society it lives in,” says AGo Architecture co-founder Osrithalita Gabriela (Gabi Osri). “This holistic approach ensures that architecture is not merely a physical experience, but rather an aesthetic interpretation of harmonic relationship between human and its physical environment.” Joining Gabi is Abimantra Pradhana – the two architects have a combined experience of almost 25 years in the design industry. After both completed a Bachelor of Architecture at Trisakti University, Jakarta, Abimantra went on to receive a Master of Urban Design from the National University of Singapore. Gabi continued her studies with a Master of Science in Building Performance and Sustainability at NUS, going on to use her sustainability knowledge directly at the university. As a principal member, she contributed to thermal comfort standards efforts in naturally ventilated buildings in Singapore. “These were then adopted in Singapore’s sustainable design building code for GreenMark certification," says the architect.  

Throughout Abimantra’s career, he has focused on creating and teaching architecture that reflects a nourishing approach.

  Today, Gabi channels her experience into the firm’s sustainable technical know-how, while Abimantra brings his personal experiences with healthy lifestyles to the company. Throughout Abimantra’s career, he has focused on creating and teaching architecture that reflects a nourishing approach. This is evident through his work at the active lifestyle hub SANA Studio in Jakarta – which he co-founded and designed. Bringing their experiences in the two fields, at the heart of the firm is the careful curation of materials, efficient design, and sustainability. To ensure these philosophies, AGo Architects focuses on a connection with the project and client; they have to speak the same language and imagine the same outcomes. “With these principles, our architecture anticipates the challenges of the future – socially, environmentally, and economically,” says Gabi Osri. AGo’s values have been applied to projects such as the 3500mm house in Jakarta, a compact home that maximises passive and sustainability factors by capturing natural sunlight and using efficient 'M-system' foam paneling material. Looking forward, the eco-minded team wants to bring more positive impacts to society, the environment, and their clients. In their master plan are city homes that run efficiently, and more public spaces that encourage a sustainable mind frame ­– for the population on Jakarta and the universal implications. AGo Architecture agoarchitecture.com We think you might also like Blossom Restaurant by Brewin Design Office  

AGo Architects focuses on a connection with the project and client; they have to speak the same language and imagine the same outcomes.

 

Smart Home Cigadung

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Pejaten Barat

 

Masterplan Sragen Park

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Light Mosque

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GORDI HQ

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Dialling In with Rebekah Clayton and Michelle Orszaczky of Clayton Orszaczky

The first project that Michelle Orszaczky and Rebekah Clayton worked on and completed as Clayton Orszaczky – Barn House – won the Contemporary Design Award at the 2016 Waverley Design and Heritage Awards. And since founding the studio in 2015, the pair has worked from their respective homes. Not only has it clearly been anything but a challenge to overcome, but it’s allowed them to offer their clients a level of flexibility that according to Rebekah is plays a major part in their unique point of difference. So while the way they work hasn’t changed in the tumultuous past few weeks, the environment in which they do so has. Habitus spoke to Rebekah and Michelle about what it’s like working in amongst kids and partners, and navigating sensitive topics with clients over the web.   Habitus: You both already work from home, and it’s just the two of you at Clayton Orszaczy, is that correct? Rebekah: Yes, separately though, we each work from our own homes. What does that pre-existing set up look like and how does it work? Michelle: At times we work individually on projects and at times we consult each other for projects. We have an electronic server we upload to and are able to see each other’s files almost immediately. That’s how we have always worked and it works pretty well. R: All of our office filing systems and admin are on dropbox, we’re constantly uploading all the time, so at any moment Michelle could call me and say could you open that file on one of my jobs and I can open it and see what she is seeing on my screen. I guess the good part about what’s happened recently is that is hasn’t adjusted technically the way we work or how our business runs. The big changes really are to our family life. That’s a really interesting point, I imagine now you would have more people at home during the day. What has that transition been like? M: That’s been different for both of us because we’re at different stages of our lives. My husband works in airlines so you can imagine our life over the last few weeks has been fairly stressful. There has been a lot of conference calls and decision making around the impact of covid 19 on an airline. I’ve never been a music listener while I’ve worked but I’ve become one. I went out and got myself headphones and have tried to create a bubble to focus. I have teenage children who are trying to home school, including one who is doing the HSC. Yesterday I interrupted my work to help my daughter, who is doing art, and needed some guidance on a painting. I spent a portion of my day out on the porch with her, when I had my own deadline. The number of interruptions during the day for me has been the biggest impact. R: As Michelle said we’re at different stages, I have a one year old and a three year old so when they’re home I basically can’t work unless my partner isn’t working. His job is a bit more team focused with shorter, sharper deadlines, in some ways he gets priority over being at his desk. We work with longer deadlines – some of our packages of work take three or four months to complete – so if I’m not at my desk for a couple of hours no one is really impacted. Usually we have two days a week where the kids are with grandparents and two days a week where the kids are at day care, so I can almost have a full work week. It’s drastically reduced the amount of time I can work. Those four hours that you’re away from your desk that no one notices, does that then mean that you make that up later into the night or early morning when kids are sleeping? Are those hours compounding? R: Not yet, but I’ve got rid of my weekends. We’re not socialising, going to parks, doing all the things that we normally do, so I’m starting to work more on the weekends while my husband is around to look after the kids. I’ve dropped to three days a week; we’re going to still send the kids to day care so I’ll work those two days plus a weekend day. The other thing is that when you’re at all home all day every day there’s just mess everywhere. For me I need that zen, muddy desk muddy mind, if my house isn’t tidy I really struggle to focus. Having a serene work environment, I’ve realised, is so critical to my ability to concentrate. Once the kids are in bed we clean, we get ready for the next day of chaos! And we live in a terrace house in Erskinville in the city. We do so much with our kids outside of the house so at the moment being confined to a terrace house with a small backyard is really tricky. M: whereas we’re the opposite, we’re in 1000 square-metres with access to the bush and water. I spent three hours Sunday afternoon just working in the garden and it was quite a relief to get out of the house. It’s interesting; a recent article on IndesignLive is about how a lot of modern residences aren’t really designed for occupants to spend a lot of time at home. So much of our lifestyle is spent at work, socialising, eating out, in nature that prior to now that would have really easily gone unnoticed. M: That’s very true, when you consider the rise in the number of apartments within closer proximity to things a city can offer. Also though, in the past there has been poor attention to environment in a lot of housing: houses were built with little consideration to natural light and connection to the outside. In contrast, well designed houses allow you to have that connection, space, light, and freedom of mind that Rebekah was talking about. It’s been a week or so of having people around at home with you, Rebekah you mentioned you’re veering more towards working on the weekends, Michelle is there anything you’ve considering changing in your routine? M: I’ve got my headphones, I’m not really changing my routine because my family are older. We just need to carve out our own space a little better within the house. The biggest impact for me is the fact that some councils have cancelled planning meetings, until they work out how to proceed safely. We had a project to be considered at council on Wednesday, with a recommendation for approval. The council meeting was postponed so we haven’t received that milestone allowing us to progress with the project, so it leaves us a bit in limbo. Normally we wouldn’t progress a project onto the next stage until we had the certainty of approval. But this client has decided (because we had recommendation for approval) to proceed in any case. There are certain flexibilities that we have to take and build into our process in order to keep work flowing smoothly when normal processes are not taking place. R: We’ve got another project that’s about to move into construction and I’ve actually built a mechanism into that contract which is that we will grant an extension of time without cost for any situation that stalls the project related to Covid 19 : if they can’t get the materials or the labour they need, for example. The client doesn’t need to pay for the builder’s time per day but also the builder gets an extension of time so it’s win-win. M: The biggest worry for us is if the government moves to shut down non-essential businesses, for example, the construction industry. It’s a moving beast and seems to be changing every day. How are you keeping in touch with clients and suppliers, and contractors like builders and carpenters? Has that changed yet? R: Michelle and I are very mobile. Because we don’t have an office people don’t come to us we always go to them. We can offer that level of flexibility, which I think people really appreciate, especially if they’re trying to fit in a meeting around their own workday. Until about a week and a half ago I was still meeting builders and on site and at a safe distance. We had a cost report come back the other day and it was quite high, so we needed to have a critical meeting with the client to sit down and nut through the design and work out where we could pull back. We used Google Meet to do that meeting with the builder, Michelle and I and the client. And look it worked well. Admittedly, face-to-face I could have got a better gauge on their feelings, but you know we had the meeting and the decisions were made. M: You do realise in that scenario how often you rely on your butter paper and pencil in a meeting, because quite often you’d spread out your paper and start sketching over the top of a drawing to take things in a new direction to solve an issue. That’s just not possible when you’re on a screen. What about things like products, materials and finishes? It might be early days yet but how do you think you’ll specify things like that? R: A lot of companies are really good at sending samples. I’ve got six or seven boxes of hardware, timber, and tiles that are my go-to materials in some ways. And I’ll order samples if I’m picking something new for a project. Our suppliers are really good about sending out product, and the online resources are so good. If you were talking 10 or 15 years ago it would have been a disaster, we had a whole product library at PopovBass it had an index system, almost the Dewey Decimal System! I don’t feel like we’re majorly impacted because the suppliers are fantastic at sending out samples when you need them. Clayton Orszaczky coarchitecture.co We think you might also like Barn House by Clayton Orszaczky Portrait by Leila Jeffriesabc