About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
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Dialling In With Habitus
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Podcasts

Dialling In With Melonie Bayl Smith

Melonie Bayl Smith is the founder and director of Bijl Architecture. She is also no stranger to Habitus having had Doorzien House published in issue #39, Blackwood Rest recently live on Habitus Living, and joining us not too long ago for our In Conversation With series. Before founding Bijl Architecture in 2012, Melonie had spent 10 years in partnership with another architect running a previous practice. That means that for almost all of her professional life she has not only been a practising architect but also a business owner and people manager. It comes as no surprise when she concedes that throughout her degree she always wanted to work for herself. Melonie mentors, lectures and works tirelessly to improve educational standards. This year she was appointed to the role of Associate Professor at UNSW Faculty of Built Environment (Architecture), having taught in the UTS School of Architecture for twelve years where she was Adjunct Professor. Today, Melonie has graciously Dialled In With Habitus to give her insights. Having run businesses for nearly two decades she has no doubt had some ups and downs and steps sideways. While it may feel like nothing can compare to what we’re going through today, past experience has certainly strengthened her resilience and adaptability muscles and she is only too happy to share her learnings. Download and listen to the second episode of Dialling In With Habitus below or on Spotify. Happy listening!
  We think you might also like Blackwood Rest by Bijl Architectureabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Couldrey House Challenges The Conventions Of Queensland Architecture

Think of the Brisbane house and you will think ‘Queenslander’. Like other tropical and sub-tropical housing types it is lifted up off the ground and employs shading and cross-ventilation to cope with a hot and humid climate. But architect Peter Besley notes that the climate is changing and becoming more hot and dry. Moreover, aren’t there better ways of dealing with the climate than using materials that retain heat and sweating it out under ceiling fans? Peter trained in Brisbane and later in Edinburgh before moving to London where he taught at the Bartlett School, setting up his own practice, Assemblage, in 2004. Back in Australia for a bit over 12 months he has designed a new house for a member of his family in the suburb of Mt Coot-tha.  

The west-facing street entry elevation is built from off-white bricks with the slightly extruded mortar creating a ribbed or ‘corduroy’ effect.

  Through Couldrey House he was keen to respond to the character of the suburb and its rocky substrate, as well as put into practice some climate control principles learned working in the Middle East, along with a few aesthetic touches from there as well. The west-facing street entry elevation (as well as the south elevation) is built from off-white bricks with the slightly extruded mortar creating a ribbed or ‘corduroy’ effect. This, with the stone steps and absence of windows, makes the house look a lot like a ziggurat. Backed by insulation, though, this masonry façade’s primary function is to protect the house from the sun. The east and north elevations are a lot more like you might expect to see in Brisbane with the two levels opening up to the view leading one of Peter’s friends to suggest that the building has a “Janus-headed” profile – two completely different faces – one side lightweight, the other heavy.  

Peter Besley was keen to respond to the character of the suburb and its rocky substrate, as well as put into practice some climate control principles learned working in the Middle East.

  Couldrey House is also heavy because of its use of concrete. It uses thirty 9-metre-long pre-cast concrete floor and roof units as part of its radiant cooling strategy. Peter points out that it was in the Middle East that he learned about “another tradition of cooling which is to do with thermal mass and radiant cooling”. It is something we have all experienced going into stone cathedrals that, even on the hottest days, remain cool inside because the stone has stored the cool from the night before. It is different from evaporative cooling or cross-ventilation because it exploits the principle of heat transfer, in this case making use, not just of stored cool night air, but also the cool of the rock substrate. Apart from the open elevations on the east and north, the closed south elevation does have a series of louvres or slots in the wall. Hidden behind them are glass louvres. This provides internal cross-ventilation while also lending privacy to the house and its neighbours. But Peter was also keen to build “an Australian house which could just sit there for hundreds of years”: hence the use of concrete and masonry rather than the traditional lightweight materials which quickly deteriorate. Couldrey House challenges convention in a number of other ways. For example, it inverts the usual organisation of spaces with the public areas – really just one continuous space – on the upper level and bedrooms downstairs. The upper level is accessed by a grand stairway that continues the ceremonial entry steps. “There is a great feeling when you come in and go up those stairs into a double height space,” says Peter. Downstairs the slab follows the topography of the hill so that every bedroom has its own floorplate with the linking corridor stepping down for each bedroom. One thing lost in reversing the standard lay-out is the immediate access to the landscape from the ground floor. Peter is compensating for this by using 25 metre-long planter boxes which will eventually grow up “like a jungle” and take over that whole elevation. Peter Besley peterbesley.com Photography by Rory Gardiner We think you might also like Midway Point House by Cumulus Studio abc
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Crème de la crème

Whether you subscribe to the kitchens sell houses or the kitchen is the heart of the home school of thought, there is no world in which a well-considered kitchen is not a priceless piece of residential design. Now, thanks to Zip Water, Maude Pilote of Hilliam Architects, and Elena Rajani of mckimm, there is a new gold standard in kitchen design to aspire to. The inaugural 2019 Zip Water Kitchen Design of the Year Competition – in which Maude and Elena were named winners – held an inundation of entries up to a set of criteria, inarguably critical to a kitchen’s success. Taking into consideration design effectiveness, ergonomics, traffic flow and work zones, storage, fixtures and fittings, lighting, visual appeal, and creativity, a blind judging panel of Australian kitchen design experts concluded that Maude’s Eden Display Suite kitchen design and Elena’s Sagamore House kitchen design ticked each of these boxes, and more. With fine finishes, subtly exquisite detailing, and hints of asymmetrical intrigue, the Eden Display Suite by Maude Pilot of Hilliam Architects was unrivalled when it came to naming the Best Multi-Residential Home Kitchen. A delightful juxtaposition of textures and finishes along with a well-considered use of space make the kitchen highly inviting, not to mention an effective sales tool. The award for Best Freestanding Home Kitchen may not have had such a clear-cut winner, with a hotly contested field of six finalists, but in the end, intelligent spatial planning and engaging materiality saw Elena Rajani’s Sagamore House take out the title. From the stunning sweep of the benchtop to the dramatic pendant light suspended overhead, everything about Sagamore House’s kitchen is breathtaking. Impeccably planned and harmoniously balanced it is an exceptional example of grand residential design. Light and bright, yet deep and moody all at once, this open-plan yet well-grounded kitchen is well and truly worthy of being the heart of the heart. Among the shortlist for the Best Freestanding Home Kitchen Award were another two projects by mckimm – one of which was another of Elena’s – and one from GIA Bathrooms and Kitchens, Cantilever Interiors, and Paul Clout Design respectively. “We’re thrilled with the high calibre of entries in our first ever Zip Water Kitchen Design of the Year Competition,” said Zip Water Marketing Director, Tom Fisher. “Working closely with kitchen designers is something we are passionate about at Zip and it’s been exciting to see the breadth of innovative designs using our HydroTap products.” abc
Architecture
Around The World
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A Row House With Two Faces In Hikone, Japan

Located in the city of Hikone in Japan’s Shiga Prefecture, this Japanese row house has the rare happenstance of abutting two streets – one to the north, another to the south. As designed by Hearth Architects, it has a different face for each. Facing the south, Hikone House appears shy. From behind a concrete perimeter wall, a single storey of dwelling is barely visible beneath the generous eave of a pitched roof. With more roof than house within view to the passerby, the most notable feature is an off-centre aperture in the corrugated iron roof, that delves deep into Hikone House’s heart.  

The skylight permeates the open-plan kitchen, living, and dining spaces that comprise the ground floor of the row house.

  Internally, the skylight permeates the open-plan kitchen, living, and dining spaces that comprise the ground floor of the row house with an abundance of natural light. The interior materiality envelopes inhabitants in a warmth of timber paneling and ochre-coloured walls offset by greenery. “I tried to make a house where the family can deepen family ties, and where the family can be integrated with the external environment by the large roof,” says architect Yoshitaka Kuga of Hearth Architects. This sentiment seems to reverberate throughout the ground floor public spaces of Hikone House, as if carried by the light streaming in from overhead. Moving through the interior volumes, the divine sense of tranquility resounds further still. In line with the ideologies of geomancy, the north east corner of the abode is something of a sacred space. Here, a traditional tatami room provides residents with a tranquil respite from the rest of the house; a dedicated space for peace, quiet, and meditation.

A traditional tatami room provides residents with a dedicated space for peace, quiet, and meditation.

  A private, Japanese-style Zen garden, accessible from the tatami room through a set of floor-to-ceiling timber bifold doors, amplifies the mindfulness of Hearth Architects’ design for the row house. Meanwhile, the family’s private quarters comprise the upper floor. Beyond the Zen garden, a second residential street skirts the outer length of the concrete northern boundary, above which, the façade of a double height elevation. If it weren’t for their distinctive materiality – a contemporary contrast to that of the neighbours on either side – you would be forgiven for mistaking Hikone House’s two façades to be two different houses entirely. “These two appearances are symbolic but fit into the surroundings well,” says Yoshitaka. It is true – each face of Hikone House harmoniously integrates with its respective surrounding streetscape, acting as a subtle testament to Hearth Architects’ design versatility. Above and beyond appearances, the juxtaposing façades do more than fit in with their surrounds – by design, they respond to them. In sync, they work to supply Hikone House with just the right amount of privacy, sun protection, natural light, and fresh air, in just the right places. Hearth Architects hearth-a.com Photography by Yuta Yamada We think you might also like Midway Point House by Cumulus Studio abc
Architecture
Around The World
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10 Modern Zen Home Design Case Studies Across the Asia Pacific

A house serves our primal and most basic needs – it provides shelter. But as we evolved we realised that there is so much more one can get out of a residence. Modern zen home design, although it may seem like a nice-to-have extra, can in fact be the difference between in living in a house and a house that lives for you. Architecture, industrial and product design have a huge impact on our daily lives and as we spend increased amounts of time at home, the difference between a well designed house and a negligibly planned one becomes glaringly obvious. For starters, an architecturally designed house can create ease and facilitate a natural flow for the utilitarian nature of a house – kitchens and bathrooms being prime examples as they are highly functional spaces. Interior architecture can offer open plan living to keep us connected as a family; encourage indoor-outdoor living for those who like to live next to nature; and gently demarcate spaces for intergenerational living or living and work from home spaces. Most interestingly, modern zen home design can create a home base that in additional to all of the above offers us a place to rest and regenerate. Habitus has curated a list of 10 case studies of modern home design across the Asia Pacific that not only offer diversity in culture and climate, but also size and urban proximity. Here they are.  

Rain Tree House by ONG&ONG

Singapore

ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living The magnificence of the rain tree could not be ignored, and it would be a shame to do so, so the architects have embraced the historic feature. “Its presence is ingrained within the very architecture of the house itself,” says Maria Arango, Director at ONG&ONG. Read the full article here  

Chempenai House by WHBC Architects

Kuala Lumpur

Situated on a slope in the affluent suburb of Damansara Heights, the Chempenai House is something of a diamond in the rough of a neighbourhood dominated by nouveau riche mansions and luxury condominiums. In contrast to the architecture of its more flamboyant counterparts, its stripped down concrete surfaces don’t vie for attention, and if its steep, off-the-beaten-track location is any indication, it doesn’t want to be found either. Read the full article here  

Cornwall Gardens by Chang Architects

Singapore

This stunning example of modern zen home design is shrouded in greenery and features a swimming pool, waterfall, Koi carp pond and a terraced roof garden. As with most of Chang Architects’ projects, it embraces biophilic design to enhance the wellbeing of its inhabitants by reconnecting them to nature. Read the full article here  

Patom Organic Living by Nitaprow

Thailand

Patom Organic Living Nitaprow cc Ketsiree Wongwan exterior Patom Organic Living Nitaprow cc Ketsiree Wongwan timber Patom Organic Living Nitaprow cc Ketsiree Wongwan nature Not technically a home, but nonetheless a worthy example of zen design perhaps where we need it most - in the retail sphere! Located in a prime Bangkok neighbourhood, this small wood-framed glass building sits on a raised mound covered by wild grass and ferns, its glass transparency softened by the lush surroundings. Read the full article here  

Type Street Apartment By Tsai Design

Australia

Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly living Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly dining Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly study space To overcome the constraints of updating a 35 square metre apartment and transforming it into a comfortable one-bedroom apartment with a home office, Tsai Design concentrated on creating multi-functional spaces, de-cluttering, and maximising natural light. Read the full article here  

Atrium House by RT+Q Architects

Singapore

With the courtyard and its two-storey high green wall, the configuration of the communal spaces around the inviting atrium became a logical choice is this example of modern zen home design in Sinagpore. Read the full story here  

Cloister House by Formwerkz Architecture

Singapore

Cloister House Formwerkz CC Fabian Ong roof Cloister House Formwerkz CC Fabian Ong birds eye view Cloister House Formwerkz CC Fabian Ong open plan With a client who self-describes as a "feng-shui master", Cloister House employed the strategy of keeping the residence entirely to a single story which realised multiple benefits: it adheres to geomancy principles, keeps the building cost low, is elderly friendly, and sets it apart from the multi-storey houses in the neighbourhood. Read the full article here  

Matilda House by Templeton Architecture

Australia

Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Hill view Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Decking Matilda House Photography by Bon Hosking Kitchen Matilda House is a residential project by Melbourne-based architecture firm Templeton Architecture. The name refers to both the Australian bushland setting among the granite hills of northeast Victoria, but also – if one looks beyond this to its etymological roots, Matilda, meaning ‘container for personal belongings’ – also refers to the deep personal resonance of the project. Read the full article here   Clifftop House by Nik Karalis Australia Clifftop House itself comprises three interconnecting forms. The lowest level is constructed in off-formed concrete, with concrete walls extending to the interior. Directly above is a glazed pavilion, with large sliding glass doors leading to a terrace and swimming pool. The third element, the Blackbutt-clad form containing the stairs and circulation, links the other two. Read the full article here  

Rammed Earth Retreat by Thais Pupio Design

Australia

An ordinary house built in the 1980s already occupied this property and the idea was to dramatically re-work it. The new two-bedroom residence needed to be low maintenance and conducive to entertaining large groups of friends and family. More importantly, it needed to retain the original footprint and not encroach on the clients’ lush garden; their pride and joy. Read the full article hereabc
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

The Landscape Brings This House To Life

Homeowners Matt and Leanne, who are vets and keen gardeners, fell in love with this site, set within the bushy and scenic Dandenong Ranges. Wanting to immerse themselves in the green surrounds, they engaged BENT Architecture to design a house that brought a sense of the outdoors inside. “It is impossible to visit this site without being overcome by its natural beauty,” says Paul Porjazoski, director of BENT Architecture. “The key challenge was to design a house that would limit site disturbance whilst also working in harmony with its natural setting and employing efficient passive solar design principles.”  

Olinda House is broadly built on the existing footprint to minimise site disturbance and maintain existing trees.

  The house is broadly built on the existing footprint to minimise site disturbance and maintain existing trees, while the long and narrow form optimises passive solar design. Stretching from east to west, the house has windows along the north and south to capture daylight and cross breezes. This creates an efficient, comfortable interior year-round, being warmer in winter and cooler in summer. “Add 60 solar panels and hydronic heating, and the home is not just comfortable, but low energy. Matt and Leanne estimate their yearly power bill at around $300,” says Paul. Being set in an area of moderate bushfire risk, the BAL-29 requirements influenced the design and material palette. The home is built on a solid podium of concrete and Timbercrete – a lightweight, sustainable building block fabricated with waste timber content – and clad in locally sourced Ironbark, which is naturally fire resistant and helps the home blend into its bush setting. The materials continue inside with polished concrete floors and blockwork providing thermal mass, and local hardwood adding warmth, colour and texture.  

“60 solar panels and hydronic heating, and the home is not just comfortable, but low energy. Matt and Leanne estimate their yearly power bill at around $300.”

  The split-level design follows the natural slope of the land; the roof slopes in the opposite direction to create dramatically higher ceilings in the living area. Windows frame views of the landscape when inside, and the narrow footprint enables a view of the bush through the house when outside. The windows also reflect the greenery, creating a sense of semi-transparency and allowing the house to nestle into the site. “The landscape brings the house to life and brings the occupants closer to nature,” says Paul. “It is surrounded by views of greenery, harnesses the warmth of the sun, captures summer breezes and the fragrance of the wildflowers outside. It demonstrates that architecture and nature can happily coexist and have a mutually beneficial relationship.” BENT Architecture bentarchitecture.com.au Photography by Tatjana Plitt Dissection Information Pacific Energy, Pivot Stone and Heating ‘Neo 2.5’ freestanding, single front view, wood burning fireplace Darkon Blouse wall light Porcelume Conga pendant & Bass Drum pendant Opaque Hand Crafted Mini dreamer pendant Neff induction cooktop and wall oven ACS bathrooms Moda ‘Aletta’ countertop basin and Chloe Freestanding Bath We think you might also like these houses designed for off grid living abc
Design Products
Furniture

Pedrali’s Ode To Indoor-Outdoor Living

Creativity knows no boundaries. Artists and design-thinkers have an inimitable power to tell a story through a myriad of artistic mediums; each one unique to their own specialised craft. Italian furniture brand, Pedrali aims to convey the elegance and inspiring soul of the historic brand and its lifestyle in their new campaign, #Pedralitales in Casa 3000. The story of Casa 3000 is one that is reminiscent of a long-lost fairy tale. Unfolding in a breathtaking location, a striking form soars in solitude within a wild landscape of cork oaks and umbrella pines in the Portuguese region of Alentejo. Designed by Rebelo de Andrade, the house is brought to life with Pedrali’s new indoor and outdoor collection – captured by Italian photographer, Andrea Garuti in collaboration with Studio FM and Studio Slaris. #Pedralitales showcases the products eloquently expressing their interaction with the local surroundings at Casa 3000. The archetypical shape of the house is characterised by rectilinear lines and a bold red colour, creating an ethereal atmosphere that’s both dramatic and romantic amidst the woods. Telling the collection’s story in eight scenes, #Pedralitales showcases a combination of settings for indoor-outdoor living; one that embodies the warm feeling of coming home with a leafy, ethereal backdrop of the natural surroundings. [gallery type="rectangular" columns="2" size="medium" ids="101587,101585"]   The first shot greets the visitor with Soul Outdoor; a delicate armchair designed by Eugeni Quitlett that expresses pure and genuine creativity. The aluminium tubular frame is organic in form – curved with classical shapes and a solid proportion of a slatted ergonomic seat to maximise comfort in a minimal chair. Standing in between the chairs, the Concrete table by Pio and Tito Toso – playful and sleek with its concrete base and steel column, completing the scene with a simple form. The Tribeca collection by CMP Design is seen in the next chapter of the story. Sitting delicately on the patio, this true icon is a modern reinterpretation of a classic 60s design – revitalised in a new material story of a steel frame, combined with the elasticity of a profile in vertically-woven plastic material. Durable, dynamic and inviting, the chairs are handcrafted with meticulous attention to detail – putting a contemporary twist on the traditional chair. Suitable for any environment, Tribeca can flexibly move from a veranda to an open-air garden, embracing you in as you watch the sunset. To complete the shot, the Giravolta wireless outdoor lamp by Basaglia Rota Nodari stands tall – accompanied by the sophisticated character of the Reva lounge setting for a relaxing atmosphere. The four tapered legs support a thin aluminium frame, allowing for a generous seating area. The Buddy table is the perfect companion – unobtrusive and charming with a versatile and welcoming shape to complete the scene. Inside Casa 3000, a new chapter unfolds with a warm, homogenous interior to match the vibrancy of the outdoor shell. Eclectic and undeniably enticing, large windows frame the landscape – allowing natural light to flow seamlessly throughout the home. The Jamaica armchair by CMP Design boasts a tubular steel backrest softened by the warmth of the ash plywood seating and backrest as a nod to the traditions of modernism. The Babila table takes pride of place in the centre of the photograph with its distinctive charm to complement the Jamaica chairs. Eugeni Quitllet continues his story into the indoors with Remind – a soft armchair with sinuous curves reminiscent of late Nineteenth century designs. Crafted from polypropylene, a breathable seat and backrest highlights Quitllet’s exceptional attention to intricate and functional details in ensuring total comfort and superior versatility. The Fluxo table by Luca Casini is a rounded-edge table that seeks to bring a sense of lightness to any space, while also being the perfect pairing for any chair. Set against the red backdrop sits the Folk chair by CMP Design – one of the campaign’s hallmark elements of fusing the extraordinary energy of the colour red with the comforting warmth of wood and its timeless quality. Folk is more than just your traditional chair – Folk accentuates the concept of simplicity with all of its parts seamlessly blending into one compact chair. [gallery type="rectangular" columns="2" size="medium" ids="101589,101586"]   In the last scene of the story, the elegant and cosy chair, Vic makes its debut. Created by the French designer, Patrick Norguet, Vic reimagines the concept of a chair with a movable backrest which lifts from the seat while remaining tied only at the ends. As a result, the opening provides Vic with a design lightness that is outstandingly distinctive. Sitting gracefully next to Vic is the Inox table, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. Above, the Tamara suspension lamp by Basaglia Rota Nodari completes the story with its inimitable style and elegance. #Pedralitales at Casa 3000 transcends the visitor to another realm through a beautiful story that celebrates creativity, design and artistry in its purest form. A notable feat of Italian contemporary design, Pedrali’s new collection continues to reshape the way we experience our everyday spaces. Pedrali pedrali.it Photography by Andrea Garuti We think you might also like this Tait and Mokum design collaboration  abc
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People

Out of This World Interiors From Danielle Brustman

Danielle Brustman’s work (spanning interior, product and set design) is eccentric, fantastical, and out of this world. Most intriguingly, however, is how it exists as the polar opposite to her personality: understated, modest, and quietly spoken. So I found when I met Danielle earlier this year at Melbourne Design Week. Even still there are certainly shared characteristics that link Danielle to her work: she’s warm, colourful, friendly, and exudes a genuine love for design and its power. Danielle studied Interior Design at RMIT in Melbourne, however she began her career as a set designer. “There was something very appealing to me about temporal space: those areas of design that would appear and disappear seemed to be quite exciting for me at that time.” During this period, she worked predominantly on theatre set and the occasional job in film or styling work. It was nearly a decade ago, in 2012 that Danielle pivoted back to the world of interior design. The need for a set to tell a story, and design’s ability to fill that need, coupled with a greater capacity to work beyond the realms of reality, is what initially attracted Danielle to set design. But over time she began to feel more confident and assured in her work – “ I was ready to commit to spaces that wouldn’t be pulled down,” she recalls. Now Danielle is known for her interior design practice across the residential and commercial spheres, although she is quick to credit the influence set design has had on her interior design practice. “I try to create a visual spectacle – spaces that are stimulating and exciting,” she says. The more theatrical or fantastic a space, the more likely it may offer a form of escapism or emotional experience. Some of her most well-known and celebrated projects that demonstrate her unique aesthetic include The Amelia Shaw Bar & Salon: shortlisted for Best Bar Design at the Eat Drink Design Awards in 2012, The Salty Dog Hotel: shortlisted for Best Restaurant Design at the Eat Drink Design Awards in 2016, and The Matlock House: a finalist in the Dulux Colour Award 2018, Single Residential Category. In 2018, Danielle was asked by the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to participate in the Rigg Design Prize. Her submission, Inner-Terrior, sat alongside those of Amber Road, Arent & Pyke, Flack Studio, David Hicks, Hecker Guthrie, Martyn Thompson Studio, Scott Weston Architecture Design, The Society Inc by Sibella Court and Richards Stanisich. Unlike working with a client, the Rigg Design Prize gave Danielle complete freedom. “I learnt so much about what I was actually interested in. If I don’t have a [client] brief, I have to give myself the brief. It’s up to me to create a world that I want to create – it required a lot of thought and self-examination. All of a sudden it made sense how things along the way had shaped me and made me the interior designer that I am,” she says. Jump forward to 2020, and once again Danielle was working with the NGV. Having been invited by the gallerist, Sophie Gannon, to exhibit at her pop-up for Melbourne Design Week 2020, the exhibition Chromatic Fantastic was born. “Chromatic Fantastic started off as sketches and datagrams looking at the idea of colour and chromatic scale. I’m interested in the way colours mix together and I like to work with combinations of colour that are harmonious and discordant,” says Danielle. “There’s an electricity that can rest between colours that shouldn’t be next to each, but are.” This year, Melbourne Design Week asked participants to consider the question: How does design shape life? While one might first think of the functionality of design and its ability to functionally improve the way we live, work, socialise and relax, Danielle’s work responds with how design can add joy to life. Eighteen differently coloured individual components connect to form a 6-metre, monolithic sculptural piece that champions the exhibition. All together, they create a spectrum of colour that in some meetings feels harmonious and in others fights for attention. The connected spectrum can be broken up into single sideboards or series’ of three: revealing themselves as functional pieces of furniture. Taken as a whole, Danielle Brustman’s repertoire of past projects may seem to have as much in common as apples and oranges (and perhaps that is indeed intended), but what links them together is the ability to offer an emotional experience. “[My work] is about creating spaces that make you feel a certain way. I’m interested in lightness and play, and spaces of enlightenment,” says Danielle. Regardless of the medium in which she has worked, all of her work to date rings true to this sentiment. Danielle Brustman daniellebrustman.com abc
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Dialling In With Myers Ellyet

William Ellyet and Jade Meyers are the founders and directors of Myers Ellyet. Five years ago when they established the practise it didn’t seem like the best time to do so, coincidently they were both beginning families and buying houses. Now, they recognise those first 12-18 months as a crucial learning period setting them up to become the business owners and managers on top of architects that they are today. More than that, key learning from that time have carried over giving them the ability to sit relatively comfortably in the uncertainty we currently find ourselves in. On episode 1 of Dialling In With Habitus, we speak to Bill and Jade about how their practice – with the notion of collaboration at its core ­– is navigating remote working. We talk about the benefits of increased efficiency compared to the reduced capacity to casually tease out ideas and possible ways we might be able to get the best of both worlds in the future. Download and listen to the first episode of Dialling In With Habitus below or on Spotify. Happy listening!
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What’s Within With.It House?

Home to a fashion designer and entrepreneur, With.It House by BodinChapa Architects is a residential project anchored in an appreciation for both the practicalities and the joys of modern living. Prior to its renovation at the hands of the Thai architecture practice, With.It House was not so with-it at all. Beginning the project with an audit of the way things were, it wasn’t long before BodinChapa became well acquainted with the ins and outs of how the house’s existing spaces were – or were not – befitting for daily life. “The original area was not consistent with usability,” says Phitchapa Lothong, co-founder of BodinChapa. From the main entrance throughout its entire floorplan, the original house was flawed in terms of both use and flow of space. Functionally, the previous layout of spaces was riddled with obstructions and wasted space, putting reconfiguration high on the design agenda. The genesis of BodinChapa’s design resolution for With.It House was to transform stifling spaces into ones that inherently stimulate the lives, energies, and activities of its residents. Working within the footprint of the existing house, BodinChapa was fastidious in opening and optimizing the interior layout in pursuit of harmonious spatial flow. On the ground floor of With.It House, grand proportions and malleable boundaries characterise the common spaces. Deliberately designed for flexible use, the ground floor features a grand double-height entrance hall which opens seamlessly out into a living room or, through a pair of open archways, leads through into the singular yet separable kitchen and dining/multipurpose space. A large guest bedroom consumes the rear of the ground floor, while a set of stairs leads up to the second storey via the double-height living room. Upstairs, a choose-your-own-adventure begins from the landing. The first door on the left leads out to an expansive rooftop terrace; the second is a walk-in-robe that culminates in a bedroom. Across the landing, a grand archway acts as the mouth of the corridor to which another two generous bedroom suites are attached.  

On the ground floor, grand proportions and malleable boundaries characterise the common spaces.

  From the street, With.It House flaunts its grandiose scale and open, free-flowing spirit with pride and poise to passersby; distinguished by a translucent white steel façade that seems to float one up from the ground. Not merely a design statement, from a practical perspective this show-stopping façade serves as a privacy screen for the expansive porch at the forefront of With.It House’s upper floor. The operable façade enables residents to open and close its wide vertical shutters according to any given moment’s desire to retreat from or engage with the world beyond. “The translucent façade changed the look of the original building to look more modern, while creating a new open-air living area and helping to increase the privacy of the residents as they please,” says Phitchapa. In terms of material and colour palette, With.It House has the austerity and finesse archetypal of modern minimalism at its best. The white steel of the perforated façade is carried through in structural posts, window frames, and outdoor furniture. Polished concrete grounds With.It House in a sense of monumentality and permanence, while timber floorboards and wall paneling offsets the otherwise monochrome spaces with just the right amount of warmth. BodinChapa Architects bodinchapa.com Photography by Rungkit Charoenwat We think you might also like GB House by Renato D'Ettorre Architects  

From the street, With.It House is distinguished by a translucent white steel façade that seems to float one up from the ground.

   abc
Architecture
Places

Space Enough For Ethics And Aesthetics

“At once soothingly intimate and undeniably luxurious,” are the words Jodie Fried uses to describe the Armadillo & Co Sydney showroom. As the luxury rug brand’s co-founder, she might be a touch biased, but there are no grounds on which one could reasonably disagree. As the brand’s first Australian retail store, the Armadillo & Co Sydney showroom has garnered a lot of attention since it opened its doors early November 2019. Designed by David Goss of the eponymous Studio Goss, the 385-square-metre, gallery-esque space is an apt representation of the brand. Through subtle shifts in light, texture and Le Corbusier’s Chandigarh and concrete palettes, David has designed an unmatched retail experience. “We wanted to create a sensory spatial environment that represents the Armadillo & Co of today and the future at the forefront of contemporary design,” says the brand’s other half, Sally Pottharst. Jodie and Sally founded Armadillo & Co in 2009, driven by a desire to honour age-old methods of craftsmanship. All rugs from Armadillo & Co are infused with rich history and artisanship of the hands that created them. To amplify the quality and beauty of the rugs, David designed the space to harness the abundance of natural light that showers in from the six-metre floor-to-ceiling shopfront window. Armadillo & Co is driven by ethics, the same way it is inspired by aesthetics. It prides itself in using natural and sustainable fibres, using Fair Trade practices – a value that David has reflected in the Armadillo & Co Sydney showroom through his use of FSC-certified oak. “David really hit the brief of conjuring the emotion of the space,” Jodie says. “The interior is at once soothingly intimate and undeniably luxurious, a true reflection of our brand’s design philosophy and application that invites visitors to immerse themselves in this refuge from the outside world.” To protect the health and safety of customers, employees and the community during the unfolding events of COVID-19, the Armadillo & Co Sydney showroom is open by appointment only. Armadillo & Co. armadillo-co.com We think you might also like the Sundae Collection by DesignByThem abc