About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes
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The Victorian Terrace Dream House, Come True

To live in a thoughtfully restored Victorian terrace, in the inner-west suburbs of Sydney, has become something of an idyllic dream for the young, modern Australian family. At least, this is true of the family that engaged Baldwin & Bagnall to realise their dream, having fallen head-over-heels with a c1880s terrace home in Annandale, Sydney. “From the moment we walked through the front gates, we fell in love,” the client recalls. Annandale House fit the bill for their dream home from the outset. Not only was it beautiful and full of history and character; it was in close proximity to the children’s school and, surrounded by cafés, boutiques, and the Glebe foreshore, it promised a life lived in idyll. Seemingly, the thrill of Annandale House was contagious, for Baldwin & Bagnall soon came under its spell too. “There was a lot of excitement and positivity around this project,” interior designers Heath Baldwin and Hayden Bagnall share, “we were thrilled to be involved.” The client had been referred to Baldwin & Bagnall through a friend who had just finished a project with the Sydney-based design practice, so the relationship inherently had the firm foundations of a trusted recommendation. This turned out to be an essential ingredient for the project’s success, as embarking on the renovation of a 140-year-old Victorian terrace is no small quest. The stunning family abode resulting comes from two years of collaboration between architect, interior designer and client. As far as the project brief is concerned, it was as quintessential as an Australian inner-city terrace renovation project can be; create a home fit for the lifestyles of a modern, growing family, designed with longevity in mind and a carefully considered connection between old and new. In response, Baldwin & Bagnall have created a thoughtfully designed five-bedroom residence flavoured by an eloquently eclectic interior design language with an emphasis on bespoke, handmade details. Annandale House’s eclectic tastes were inherited from its residents, who Heath and Hayden recall as interested in exploring assorted design elements atop a neutral base. But the interior design style, reminiscent of the core values of the Arts & Crafts Movement of the age in which Annandale House was first built, represents more than a means of personal expression. “Although the new additions are of a different period, we wanted to create a language that spoke to the house as a whole,” Baldwin & Bagnall’s Heath and Hayden share. Fusing a heritage-listed Victorian terrace with a new build, Baldwin & Bagnall’s design is a tactful assimilation of traditional and contemporary. Finely crafted details anchor new features in old styles. Blackened steel window frames, balustrades and pendants, for instance, each evoke feelings of nostalgia. To come to the elegantly resolved aesthetic that characterises Annandale House with such nuance and grace, which Heath and Hayden describe as “bespoke executions, embedded in classicism, without being distracted by current trends,” the project’s every material, finish and fixture were specified with longevity and sustainability front of mind. “We have created a space that aids and contributes to the happiness and wellbeing of those who live there,” Heath and Hayden say with a warranted sense of conviction. Annandale House is the contemporary Australian family’s inner-city dream home come true. Baldwin & Bagnall has realised this with a profound commitment to retaining attributes of the past in conjunction with an applied due diligence for creating a modern family residence fit for longevity, and all that might entail. Baldwin & Bagnall baldwinbagnall.com Photography by Tom Ferguson. Styling by Anna Delprat. Dissection Information Tongue n Groove floorboards in Hekke Med Marble Calacatta Venato marble stair Med Marble Carrara Marble bathroom floor and vanity Seamless Surfaces XBond rendered finish Axolotl Slate Pseudo Smooth range hood cover and kitchen shelf Stainless steel countertop Academy Tiles Mutina Mews Tile in FOG Elton Group Cumulus Veneer shelving ACA Joinery Spence & Lyda Tribe Home Spenser Ivory Rug Spence & Lyda Eilersen Flap Sofa Space Furniture B&B Italia Husk Armchair Coco Republic Brighton Round Nesting Coffee Tables Space Furniture Cassina 524 Tabouret Berger Stool and 523 Tabouret Meribel Stool HG Furniture Solutions Mattiazzi MC8 Chiaro Chair Allied Maker NYC 3 Arc Island Pendant and Apeture 4 Pendant Spence & Lyda VALERIE OBJECT STANDING LAMP N1 Living Edge Buster & Punch cabinet door handles Gessi Oxygene Kitchen Mixer Astra Walker Icon Collection tapware in Iron Bronze We think you might also like Paddington Terrace by Porebski Architects abc
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Bespoke Design For A Volume Home Build

To put it succinctly, Ballarat House serves as a residence in which to settle into retirement. In design, it is a homage to mid-century modernism and the American Case Study Houses. In execution, it represents the built debut of Melbourne-based practice, Eldridge Anderson – and a highly resolved residence, for the outlay of a volume home, at that. As the first project Scott Eldridge and Jeremy Anderson collaborated on together, in many ways, Ballarat House has had just as much of a hand in designing Eldridge Anderson, as Scott and Jeremy did in designing Ballarat House. Commissioned by Jeremy’s parents shortly after purchasing a subdivision plot, the brief called for a comfortable abode for a couple beginning the motions of transition to retirement. In addition to meeting contemporary standards of design for ageing in place, they wanted their new house to have apt room to accommodate visiting loved ones as well as plentiful garden space.  

Heralding a distinctly modernist perspective, Ballarat House is low in elevation and linear in form.

  Amidst a suburban golfing estate along the western fringe of Ballarat in regional Victoria, the monotony of cookie-cutter houses is interposed by one that’s notably not like the others. In a sea of houses that strive to stretch out as close to their properties’ boundaries as possible, Ballarat House holds back, leaving ample space for a garden to flourish around three sides of the house. Heralding a distinctly modernist perspective, Ballarat House is low in elevation and linear in form. A robust material palette of concrete block and timber cladding brings a subtle sense of monumentality to the otherwise modest street-facing elevation. With much restraint, Eldridge Anderson achieves the same sense of composure throughout the interior. The wide entry hallway extends through the middle of the plan, lined with cypress cladding concealing utility spaces, and pitches in height toward the living spaces. In the generous living volume, the ceiling continues to rake to the north, enhancing the humble scale of the entry, whilst allowing sunlight deep into the concrete slab underfoot through winter.  

A robust material palette of concrete block and timber cladding brings a subtle sense of monumentality to the otherwise modest street-facing elevation.

  With the same pared-back simplicity applied to the exterior, Ballarat House’s interior is characterised by burnished grey concrete floors and custom ply joinery. The only surprise being the juxtaposition of raw concrete blocks topped with fine Carrara marble to form the kitchen island. All in all, the clients’ brief was reasonable – even quaint – but not without its challenges. Already working within a lean budget, Eldridge Anderson was under added pressure to keep build costs of design down. The resulting abode is a harmonious architectural reconciliation between conflicting ideals. Robust yet refined; rational while sympathetic; disciplined but not austere; a bespoke design for a volume home build. Eldridge Anderson eldridgeanderson.com.au Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissection Information Boral blockwork walls in standard grey Frencham Cypress timber cladding in Cabot’s Hacienda Grey Boral plasterboard in Dulux Natural White Plyco plywood in Osmo Polyx-Oil Raw Valley Windows timber frames in Cabot’s Light Oak Aneeta sashless windows Burnished concrete by Geelong Concrete Grinding Beyond Tiles honed bluestone tiles CDK Stone Elba marble benchtop and splashback Gubi Semi pendant Smeg oven, cooktop, rangehood and dishwasher Astra Walker Icon mixer, bathroom tapware, showers and accessories Franke Ariane kitchen sink Studio Bagno Unlimited 70 basin We think you might also like Matilda House by Templeton Architecture abc
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BluPerformance By Liebherr Is So Fresh And So Clean

The value of a good fridge is second to none. Good, not merely in the simplistic sense that ‘it does the job’, but good in that it does the job quietly and energy efficiently, with space for plenty. Going by this, the BluPerformance freestanding fridge/freezer range by Liebherr is decidedly grand. Optimised to cultivate freshness and designed with energy efficiency, ergonomics, acoustics and aesthetics in mind, the BluPerformance range is the acme of domestic refrigeration. To the naked eye, Liebherr’s quietest and most energy efficient range yet presents a linear, minimalist appearance with timeless appeal. Subtly embedded design details make all the difference. An invisible hinge or ergonomic door handle may seem somewhat unremarkable considered in isolation, but its features such as these that make BluPerformance far greater than the sum of its parts. Internally, the freestanding fridge/freezer has been designed with the expertise of a spatial designer meet visual merchandiser. Compartments are composed to provide the optimum overview of stored foods, complete with GlassLine fittings and a VarioSafe – the ideal storage answer for all small foodstuffs, packages, tubes and jars. LED lighting in the ceiling and rear wall provides a beautiful illumination for the entire interior. Meanwhile, an LED light mounted in the underside of the refrigerator compartment door achieves optimum lighting for the freezer drawers. But wait, there’s more. The innovative new BioFreshPlus BluPerformance refrigerators offer significantly larger BioFresh compartments and with flexible temperature controls can be used as either a HydroSafe (with a higher humidity level for fruit and vegetables) or as a DrySafe (with a lower humidity level for meat, fish and dairy). I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: BluPerformance by Liebherr represents everything you could possibly want from a freestanding fridge/freezer range – and more. Liebherr liebherr.com abc
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Partu (Skin) Brings Diversity In Design And Culture Together

Johnny Nargoodah and Trent Jansen first met in 2016 when Trent went to Johnny’s hometown, Fitzroy Crossing, as part of the In Cahoots project by Fremantle Art Centre. Working with fellow Mangkaja artist, Rita Minga, the group designed an armchair from their interpretation of local mythical creature. The piece is called Jangarra (2017) and now sits as part of the National Gallery of Victoria’s permanent collection alongside Collision Collection (2017) – a piece created through experimentation with leather panels and old car panels found locally. It’s the latter object of design that inspired their latest joint venture, Partu (Skin) that is currently on exhibition at Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert in Sydney from 11 June-5 July 2020. Partu is the Walmajarri word for skin and Johnny is a Nyikina man who has spent much of his life working with leather as a saddler on remote cattle stations. Trent is a research-based object designer, or a design anthropologist, based on the south coast of New South Wales who has frequently worked with leather and pelts in previous work. The body of work that comprises Partu has been designed by Johnny and Trent who each bring different – yet open and accepting – lenses to the other’s design background. For Trent, Partu challenges Material Culture Theory that understands human-made artefacts to be an embodiment of that person’s culture (values, ideas, assumptions). Partu however is human-made artefacts created by two people of different cultures – do they then reflect the values of both cultures? For Johnny, the project represents a few key ideas, the first being the notion of making. Partu is the manufacture of functional pieces of furniture such as chairs and cabinets that look good and work well. The work also explores the ability to recycle materials such as old frames and materials otherwise discarded as rubbish that can be restored and dressed up with leather. The leather also gives a sense of history to the furniture, evoking Fitzroy Crossing and life on a cattle station. Equally leather offers a sensory aspect: the smell of leather sparking memories and evoking a strong sensory response. Unlike their previous work together, Partu was designed exploring new methods of collaborative design with equal co-authorship. One such method was Sketch Exchange – a process by which the two designers send a single sketch back and forth allowing the idea to evolve with equal input. Another method explored was Design By Making, this involved working with materials at full scale – effectively designing the piece as it is being physically made. Both collaborators work together as they carve, construct, manipulate and join multiple materials to make a single whole. Saddle (2020) is an example of a piece made from Sketch Exchange while Ngumu Jangka Warnti (2020) (the Walmajarri phrase for ‘whole lot from rubbish’) was designed by Trent and Johnny as they made them. Partu (Skin) will be on exhibition at Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert from 11 June 2020 to 5 July 2020. Trent Jansen trentjansen.com Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert gallerysallydancuthbert.com Photography by Romello Pereira Johnny Nargoodah and Trent Jansen are represented by Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert. The creation of this body of work was funded by the Australia Council for the Arts, the National Gallery of Victoria via Melbourne Design Week, UNSW Art & Design, the Western Australian Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries and Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency. We think you might also like this profile on Trent Jansen.  

Saddle (2020)

 

Ngumu Jangka Warnti (2020)

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Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

What Does A “Sustainable House” Mean To You?

What does a “sustainable house” mean? A sustainable house doesn’t mean the same thing to all people, but with more education and awareness, houses are moving in a more sustainable direction. The name Sustainable Homes Melbourne sparked the interest of this homeowner, Anna, and the building company referred them to Gardiner Architects. “It was an unusual way to be engaged by a residential client, but not uncommon to see someone seeking ways to ensure their project is sustainable – although not quite sure how to go about it,” says Paul Gardiner, director of Gardiner Architects.  

Gardiner Architects created a modern, comfortable and energy- and space-efficient two-bedroom house.

  Anna wanted to transform her weatherboard worker’s cottage into a considered, practical and comfortable home with a focus on sustainability. “A sustainable house begins with its design. Anna was open to finding the best sustainable solutions tailored to her project, and we sought to ensure the design did everything it could to positively impact the environment and neighbourhood,” Paul explains. Keeping the house small and single storey was the first and most effective sustainable action and met Anna’s requirements for the house as she is the sole occupant. Creating a house that optimises passive solar design improves the energy efficiency and comfort of Anna’s home, while solar panels and water tanks reduce use of mains electricity and water.  

Eaves shield the interior from the high summer sun and the concrete slab floor (topped with timber) provides thermal mass to maintain a temperate climate inside.

  By retaining and reusing existing building stock and services where possible, landfill and the need for additional materials is minimised, while construction practices, such as reducing waste, using ethically sourced materials and engaging eco-friendly demolition companies, also increase the sustainability factor of a house. Guided by these principles, Gardiner Architects created a modern, comfortable and energy- and space-efficient two-bedroom house. The front of the cottage has been retained, with the period feature of the façade restored, and the bedrooms refurbished. “Repairing the old house was respectful of the streetscape and allowed for the budget and new architectural gesture to be left for the addition to the house,” says Paul. Removing the run-down lean-to, Gardiner Architects designed a new addition that wraps around a central courtyard and opens to the rear garden. An awkward walk-through living room has been replaced by a new bathroom, study and hallway – the study and hall receiving light and air through the courtyard. A separate toilet, laundry and storage flank the corridor, and the kitchen bench extends partway through the corridor into the living area. The raised ceiling above the open-plan dining and lounge enhances the spaciousness of the room and allows for high-level windows and louvres to capture the sun and prevailing breeze. Eaves shield the interior from the high summer sun and the concrete slab floor (topped with timber) provides thermal mass to maintain a temperate climate inside. A simple palette of timber and white provides a subdued backdrop to Anna’s collection of art and furniture – special pieces from her family and travels around the world. “Most people will only renovate or build a home once in their life. This house aligns with Anna’s needs and lifestyle and provides a sustainable solution that will see it perform well into the future,” says Paul. Gardiner Architects gardinerarch.com.au Photography by Tess Kelly Dissection Information Timber Revival Recycled Messmate flooring Provans Timber Hardware Radial Sawn cladding in Silvertop Ash Ventech NFG Ironbark timber veneer kitchen joinery unit Ventech NFG Blackbutt timber veneer bathroom unit Faucet Strommen Chisel tapware in Brushed Chrome Kethy New Aero hardware in Walnut Academy Tiles 834408 Mosaic Tiles splashback De Fazio Bianco Carrara C Marble bathroom tiles Dulux Natural White SW1F4 We think you might also like Exoskeleton House by Studio Takt abc
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Artist Hedy Ritterman In Her Natural Habitat

This unusual warehouse-style home in Melbourne, formerly occupying part of a 1930s mechanic’s workshop and designed by the late architect Richard Swansson, celebrates not only the history of the building, but the memories of loved ones. Designed for the owner, Hedy Ritterman, an installation and photographic artist, each object and artefact within this home is curated, ready to be captured on film. A founding member of the cultural collective, Contemporary Collective, with a number of individual and group exhibitions, Hedy’s home is a visual and tactile environment. With Swansson’s passing in 2015, creating his vision for this home (his last to be designed) was a milestone for Hedy. Work and home are intertwined in Hedy’s house, which she shares with her son Anton, a recent graduate in industrial design from RMIT University. His final year project is sprawled across a table-tennis table, which also doubles as a dining table. “I’m just waiting for him to clear up his models before I start spreading my own work out,” says Hedy, who keeps most of her tools concealed behind large sliding plywood doors in the studio. A sink, shelves and extensive joinery can be shut off completely when the studio is given over to entertaining. One thing that immediately stands out is Hedy’s love of objects that carry meaning, many of which belonged to her late husband. Some of his items, such as dental records of his patients lined up on a shelf, are captured in one of her photographs. “Now, everything is computerised,” says Hedy, who created a book dedicated to her husband’s personal belongings including simple items, such as his CD collection. Another work demonstrates her fine eye for buildings (she studied interior design as well as art). One work shows an art nouveau building in Barcelona, partially concealed by a gauze-like shroud. “I like materials to be expressed in an honest way, not ‘tricked up’,” she adds. The past, whether it’s memories of loved ones or the history of her home, is an important part of her psyche and the way she approaches her work. There’s a sign across one of the worn timber trusses in the studio as to part of the home’s history saying ‘Cars garaged at driver’s own risk’. As whimsical are the original stacked timber planks suspended from the rafters. “The builders were going to ditch the original left over timber (for the renovation), but I was keen to retain as much of the original fabric as possible,” says Hedy. Initially Hedy purchased the mechanic’s workshop, an 180-square-metre-footprint with the intention of renovating this shell with Swansson to create a home. However, before plans were stamped for approval, the neighbouring Victorian terrace came onto the market. Some of the initial discussions remained pertinent, such as creating a self-contained-style apartment, along with expressing the original fabric of the garage. “I didn’t want to have too many level changes. The idea is that I can live here for the long term,” says Hedy, whose brief included a lift. “I wanted spaces that were also flexible, so the private part of this place can be easily screened,” she adds. The kitchen demonstrates a similar ingenuity. The stained oak timber table aligned to the stainless steel island kitchen bench can be separated and used independently. Likewise, the steel shugg-style windows on either side of the kitchen can be opened to serve up drinks to guests outside. “I love these steel windows [to the north]. I can just reach out and pick a few herbs,” says Hedy, who is as fond of her kitchen armoire, filled with all-white crockery once belonging to her parents. “I don’t love every piece of crockery, but when you display them en masse, all white, they say a lot more than if they were on their own.” Hedy’s ability to take simple items and transform them into something considerably more extends well beyond her photographic lens. “I can see something in a gallery shop and think there’s more to it.” Although there’s a clear delineation between the past and present, the use of materials in both is what Hedy refers to as honest. Recycled brick walls appear in the kitchen and steel lintels are exposed, as are the concrete floors that run across the entire ground floor. The in-situ concrete walls, expressed, rather than concealed, add to the industrial aesthetic, with cane window awnings adding a level of softness, as well as diffusing the northern light. The first floor was always going to be designed as a self-contained apartment, rather than having endless bedrooms and bathrooms that are gradually closed up as children move out of home. Comprising the main bedroom, walk-in dressing area and ensuite, there’s also a large home office/retreat that benefits from cross-ventilation and northern light. “The house isn’t precious in terms of materials, but the memories and collections surrounding me certainly are,” says Hedy, who has a number of designer furniture classics from the 1960s, including chairs by Pierre Paulin and Gaetano Pesce, once owned by her parents. “My approach is to photograph what I see, not trick things up to create the right image,” she says, regularly looking up at the fluorescent sign displayed above the rafters ‘And one man in his time’ a line taken from Shakespeare. “These things are almost portraits of the people who have surrounded me. They’ll continue to resonate, just like Swansson’s designs.” HedsPaceProjects hedyritterman.com Photography by Benjamin Hosking We think you might also like the home of architect Andrew Benn of Benn+Penna abc
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At Home With Staron Solid Surfaces

The home is a place of shelter and refuge. More than that, it is one of the few spaces we should be able to go to feel completely safe and at ease without question. In times like these, feeling safe at home is more important physically and emotionally than ever. In fact at any period it’s important that the materials and finishes we choose for our place of residence not only make us feel good but keep us healthy, too. Few products can offer this, but Staron Solid Surfaces is most certainly one of them. Made from a safe natural mineral refined from bauxite and blended with pure acrylic resin, Staron Solid Surfaces are non-porous materials that are easy to clean, easy to keep clean, and a breeze to disinfect. The non-porous-nature of Staron means no stain can penetrate and after years of use it can be sanded back to its original state with ease. Safe and suitable for specification all throughout the home, one will most often find the premium solid surfaces in the kitchen, bathroom and laundry. It’s durable and hardwearing nature means it’s also commonly found in commercial projects, too. Flexibility is equally a drawcard attracting many architects to the Staron product offering. With more than 90 colourways to choose from, it’s near guaranteed that Staron Solid Surfaces will be able to match a pre-existing interior or carefully calculated colour palette. Known for its ability to offer the beauty of natural stone alongside the reality of easy maintenance, the colour range now extends to include Terrazzo Venezia, evoking the terrazzo effect. Staron Solid Surfaces can be finished to any edge profile desired, including drop down edges, depending on the interior design or personal preferences of the residents. The surface can be specified as a splashback, tile cover or even design feature – the translucent colourways can be backlit. For a seamless, colour-blocked look – be it bold or neutral in nature – Staron joins are inconspicuous. Long, wide, or continuous surfaces are completely within the realms of possibility for those who wish for the kitchen bench surface to extend up to the splashback, or have the walls, floors and surfaces joined in the bathroom or laundry. In the kitchen or laundry include a fully integrated Staron sink for a smooth transition. With no open joins the fear of trapping germs or dirt is eliminated, but so too is the fear of toxic chemicals and unhealthy emissions in the home. Staron Solid Surfaces are non-toxic, Greenguard, and Greenguard Gold certified and do not contain any harmful Silica. Beautiful to look at, safe to live amongst, and easy to maintain, the question is not why Staron, but which of the 90+ colour options will I choose. Staron Solid Surfaces austaron.com.au abc
Design Hunters
Dialling In With Habitus
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Dialling In With Carole Whiting

Carole Whiting has been running her self titled, multi-disciplinary design studio for 3.5 years. Before then, she had worked in a range of workplaces and within a variety of set ups. During her time working in film, television and advertising she travelled immensely and got very used to working on the go. Following this there was a period spent working out of a home office. Recent years have seen her work alongside her team of 4-5 in a cosy studio space in Melbourne. Fast forward to now and, like most of us, suddenly they’re all working from home. With change comes challenges but also revelations says Carole and while the rhythm is different it’s not necessarily better or worse. Today, we welcome Carole Whiting on Dialling In With Habitus as she shares lessons in adaptability alongside colleagues, collaborators and clients. Download and listen to Dialling In With Habitus below, on Apple Podcasts, or on Spotify. Happy listening!
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A Welcome Return To A Previous Project

Often an alts and ads project marks the beginning of a new life for a residence, but in the case of this project, it is but another milestone in the life of an Edwardian house in North Fitzroy, Melbourne. Prior to venturing into private practice, Imogen Pullar was a project architect at Nest Architects. It was during this time that she first met and worked with the clients of North Fitzroy Cave, a space which, prior to becoming a wine cellar and artist’s studio, was a pool. Presumably, before that, the pool had been the rear garden of the Edwardian residence whose property it shared.  

“Family and friends are often visiting from overseas and interstate, and the space needed to provide autonomy from the main house.”

  Situated opposite Edinburgh Gardens in one of Melbourne’s most candidly cultural suburbs, North Fitzroy, the house belongs to a creative entrepreneur with a young family. When the client – a lover of art, wine and entertaining – first purchased the home, he engaged Nest Architects to renovate the main dwelling, and plug the hole that was once the pool with a new stand-alone building comprising a basement wine cellar with an artist’s studio on top. As project architect at Nest at the time, Imogen helped to make it happen. Seven years on, and things had changed; Imogen had set up a private architectural practice of her own and the clients’ lifestyle and needs had evolved. “The client enjoys hosting soirees in the impressive underground cellar but often needed more space for people to gather and spread out of the cavernous cellar space,” says Imogen of what initiated the project’s second phase. “Family and friends are often visiting from overseas and interstate, and the space needed to provide a private place for people to stay with autonomy from the main house.”

Blackbutt plywood panels were chosen for their rich brown hues, figurative flame and inherent sustainability credentials.

  At the beginning of the project, the client suggested turning the studio space into a more traditional living area – with carpet, wallpaper and pendant lighting – however the prism shaped space called for a different treatment. As a way of expressing and celebrating the volume of the space Imogen suggested using a single material: the project became an exercise in materiality, by way of expressing form. Rather than divide up the space into smaller areas, the space is designed as one room with a bed, storage and cooling hidden in the walls. “When the owner is entertaining friends, there is no sense of the space being a bedroom, and when the bed is made up, the space becomes a lovely spacious studio apartment,” says Imogen. Blackbutt plywood panels were chosen for their rich brown hues, figurative flame and inherent sustainability credentials. The expressed shadowlines are matched with the details of the existing space – drawing the eye to the skylight, down the wall to the window and around the walls to help make sense of the geometry of the space. The flooring is also blackbutt and picks up all the different colours present in the wall and ceiling panels. The same material is used in the cabinetry that conceals a wall bed, air conditioning system and storage. Towards the end of the project, the client announced to Imogen that he had sourced a painting by Will MacKinnon to adorn the studio. “At two-point-two by three-point-three metres in size, we weren’t sure if it would fit,” says Imogen. As it turns out, it fit like a glove. “When you are in the studio it looks like the side of the room opens up to a landscape beyond the mouth of a cave – transporting you to another place altogether,” says Imogen. Imogen Pullar imogenpullar.com Photography by Dan Fuge Photography Dissection Information Blackbutt armourply and floorboards from Big River Timber Vintage pendants from Angelucci 20th Century Furniture from Angelucci 20th Century Ej315 sofa by Erik Jorgensen for Jorgensen Mobler c1970 Spotlights from Brightgreen Invicta Alcor fireplace from Oblica Rug from Halcyon Lakes Artwork by Will MacKinnon Leather coat hooks by Made Measure Luna pull handle black from Lo and Co We think you might also like Type Street Apartment by Tsai Design abc
CPD Live

Introducing Indesign’s CPD Live Program

Announcing CPD Live, a brand new dynamic digital platform that will help to keep every architect updated with the latest CPD content. Hosted by IndesignMedia and presented by leading brands, CPD Live will offer free CPD content exploring leading topics and areas to inform specification. We’ve made it easier than ever to earn CPD points in a simple digital format, allowing you to ensure your continued learning is covered, anywhere you have an internet connection. Running for two days in 2020 – June 25th and October 1st – CPD Live will present key learnings through an innovative, real-time digital event that will include an interactive Q&A that promises to offer pertinent and detailed information. This is the time to increase your knowledge and add to your CPD points before the new year for CPD commences in July. Don’t miss the first event on June 25th, where five session times provide a total of 5 CPD points on offer! Leading brands such as AHEC, Zip, Havwoods, Alspec and Stormtech will be presenting in depth analysis pertaining to their products, that includes background, codes, sustainability initiatives, material and application to help you make informed choices. From the comfort of your home or office these CPD accredited sessions meet the National Standard of Competency for architects and also offer the opportunity to earn multiple CPD points in a day. All sessions are FREE to attend but best of all CPD Live will inform and provide next level information invaluable in your day-to-day work. Despite the digital format, CPD Live will offer opportunities for you and other attendees to ask questions and engage to ensure you receive the maximum benefits and knowledge though the experience. Indesign media is committed to offering specifiers meaningful CPD content and have so for 20 years. Part of the AIA Refuel program. Given our changing environment, we believe it is more important than ever for our industry to share knowledge and ideas and are looking forward to CPD Live to be an ongoing staple in the way we learn in future.

Videos for each session from June, now available to view online – see the links below to watch:

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CPD Live

Understanding Section J NCC 2019 for Windows and Doors

Understanding Section J NCC 2019 for Windows and Doors

25 June, 9.00am - 10.00am AEST

 

 

CPD Documents:

Download the CPD Questionnaire for this session here.

Download the Answer Sheet for this session here.

Please remember you are required to attend the full hour of the presentation in order to receive your formal CPD Certificate.

 

Session Synopsis:

This CPD is designed to understand the requirements of Section J NCC 2019 and its implications on Window and Door selections. What are the impacts of different products on overall Façade performance and how they can affect building design.  

Key Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this presentation you should be able to:
  • Identify and apply the new requirements for External Facades in NCC 2019
  • Evaluate and apply knowledge about the performance of windows and walls
  • Define the impacts of different products on overall facade performance
  • Define the impacts of NCC 2019 on building design and apply to future projects
 

Competency Codes related to this session:

AACA Competency Standard/s
Design: Project Briefing 1.4
Design: Pre Design 2.1
Design: Conceptual Design 3.3, 3.4
Design: Schematic Design 4.1, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7
 

Presented by:

Ross Baynham, National Specification Manager at Alspec Ross Baynham is the National Specification Manager for Alspec. With over 20 years of experience in the Construction Industry, Ross has worked with the Architecture and Design community for well over a decade. With experience across multiple sectors, Ross has supported the Architectural and Construction teams in the delivery of some the biggest projects across Australia; from large Multi-Residential to Hospitals and everything in between. Having been engaged in the Sustainable Buildings Products sector for many years, Ross is well placed to discuss the implications of high performance building products.  

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