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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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CPD Live

Watermark Compliance Considerations – From A Drainage Perspective

Watermark Compliance Considerations – From A Drainage Perspective

25 June, 10.15 - 11.15am AEST

 

CPD Documents:

Download the CPD Questionnaire for this session here.

Download the Answer Sheet for this session here.

Please remember you are required to attend the full hour of the presentation in order to receive your formal CPD Certificate.

Session Synopsis:

There are major factors that should be considered with bathroom drainage, building compliance and building insurance with WaterMark Certification - Troy explains the implications and also details all of the drainage considerations you should consider in your projects.

Key Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this presentation you should be able to:
  • Identify code requirements
  • Evaluate practicalities
  • Apply knowledge and troubleshoot problems
  • Identify and define design solutions
  • Evaluate and apply knowledge for the best environmental outcomes
 

Competency Codes related to this session:

  • AACA Competency Standard/s Design: Schematic Design 4.1, 4.6 Documentation: Detailed Design 5.3
 

Presented by:

Troy Creighton, Managing Director of Stormtech Troy Creighton has been the Managing Director of Stormtech Pty Ltd since 2003. Stormtech was founded by Troy’s father John in 1989 and Troy has been involved in the design and functionalities of linear drains from then on. Troy he has developed the company to be the market leader in architectural drainage solutions in Australia and has grown extensive overseas markets.      abc
Architecture
Homes
Primary Slider

Three Stories North Is A House With Many Past Lives

The owners of this warehouse-style home, built circa 1894, in North Fitzroy knew they would eventually renovate and extend. Given they were occupying approximately one half of their current floor space, it was a matter of waiting for the neighbour’s home (also three levels) to come onto the market. Originally home to one of Melbourne’s grocery businesses Moran & Cato, a portion of the adjacent building included a corner store to sell produce. In the 1980s, the two became part of a larger development of 22 units. “We simply waited patiently for the ‘universe’ to be presented to us (read: ‘neighbour’s property’),” says owner Sheree Steele, a milliner, who shares this impressive home with her husband Gabriel and their two young children, Ethan and Annika.  

“We’ve tried to retain as much of the original fabric as possible, while still creating a contemporary home for a family.”

  While the couple was working through cosmetic renovations on their abode, removing bright yellow 1980s laminates, two-pack paint finishes, and ad hoc additions, they knew there was a need to engage an architect to stitch the two properties together in a seamless manner (no pun intended). The Steele’s aesthetic, one that is slightly raw and industrial, perfectly correlated with that of architecture studio Splinter Society, the latter also having a penchant for the dark and moody, with a juxtaposition of both raw and luxe combined in the one palette. “As we were given a reasonably modest budget, we had to establish a few rules, including making as few structural changes as possible. The idea was to expose as much as the building’s original grain as possible,” says architect Chris Stanley, director of Splinter Society, pointing out the rough and exposed brick walls and timber trusses now expressed at ground level. However, to create one from two required some strategic moves. A 10-metre-high void located at the main entrance was achieved by partially removing two of the upper floors, and inserting a steel and fluted glass staircase. “We were keen to have some level of separation from the children, but at the same time be able to easily keep an eye on them,” says Sheree, who wants to be able to stay in this house for the long term. “We’ve allowed space for a lift in our later years, but we also were mindful of how this place would work as the children become teenagers and young adults,” she adds. Along with three bedrooms, two living rooms and a studio, the space also now offers flexibility with areas being able to ‘mutate’ as the family grows. At ground level are the two children’s bedrooms, together with a shared bathroom, occupying the space of the original grocery store. There’s also Sheree’s studio, a place offering diffused western light and complete solitude. “As soon as I close that door, it’s like I’ve gone into another world,” says Sheree, who uses a billiard table as her workbench. The kitchen and dining area, located on the first floor, creates a buffer for the main bedroom suite and parents’ retreat on the top level. It’s also just a few steps below the television nook, used primarily by the children. Here the brief for dark and slightly raw is beautifully expressed by Splinter Society. The kitchen island bench is made from ‘leather’-finished black granite, the effect giving the surface an appearance of water droplets. Rather than a butler’s kitchen, Chris designed all the kitchen appliances to sit within a brooding curved alcove. With its perforated steel edge, there’s a subtle nod to Victorian lace. “As you can see, we’re not afraid to use black. It simply magnifies the leafy outlook,” says Sheree, referring to the established street trees, seen through the series of original arched windows. Reflective smoked mirrors also feature in the interior, amplifying the views of the verdant surrounds. “Eventually we want to add more indoor plants to green up this place,” she adds.  

The space now offers flexibility with areas being able to ‘mutate’ as the family grows.

  Although the house takes up most of the site, there’s a generous rooftop terrace and also a modest entry courtyard, with a newly planted magnolia tree. As with the former Victorian house that virtually abutted the pavement, there’s only a slither of space. The outdoor open fireplace would have formed part of a living room. “We’ve tried to retain as much of the original fabric as possible, while still creating a contemporary home for a family,” says Chris, who made it apparent at every turn what was original and what was added. A new brass-edged storage unit, for example, cuts a sharp swathe in the lobby, as does a Japanese-style 1.5- metre-wide paper lantern by ISM. Rather than smooth over the original bricks and doorways, there are clear indentations of where floors have been removed. Builder’s notes scribbled on walls also denote where the recent builders have forged new openings, ones that happen to align with the building’s original use. Some doorways, such as the one opening into Sheree’s studio, are framed in bluestone, considerably shorter than doorways today. “I loved revealing the old scars, celebrating them rather than burying them. These wall cables (no longer in use in Sheree’s studio) add another layer to the renovation,” says Chris. For Chris and his team, Sheree and Gabriel were a perfect fit. The Pinterest page presented in the initial meetings pointed to an aesthetic both architect and client could appreciate. “The images were generally dark and quite raw,” says Sheree, who loves the way natural light falls on the mild steel feature wall in the lobby, illuminated by a skylight. “There’s a continual play of light and shadow against the steel, particularly in the afternoon with the silhouette of the street trees,” she says. Splinter Society splintersociety.com Photography by Sharyn Cairns Dissection Information Mountain Timber Products solid blackbutt decking Mountain Timber Products solid blackbutt flooring with Loba matte finish Forbo Resilient linoleum flooring in black Pavers Plus Brazilian slate Ital Ceramics rock finish porcelain tiles SuperTuft Escape Twist carpet CSR Barestone Lysaght panelrib Tongue n Groove wire brushed mixed species hardwood in smokey grey Cerdomus black penny rounds Resene Karaka and Rascal Polytec thermo black natura laminate cupboards Mark Tuckey dining table P4 Arca Armchair Ligne Roset Grillage Chair from Domo Ligne Roset Oxydation low table from Domo Halcyon Lake Nobsa rug Ross Gardam Nebulae Vertical pendant ISM Grapho bubble pendant Studio Italia Strip lighting and Tommy and Arc barrel spotlights Studio Italia Stelzen lamp Fisher & Paykel appliances Par Taps Lugano range tapware Boyd Alternatives concrete basins Anthony Lynch curtain fabric from Warwick Fabrics We think you might also like Powell Street House by Robert Simeoni Architects abc
CPD Live

Wood & Wellbeing

Wood & Wellbeing

25 June, 11.30am - 12.30pm AEST

 

 

CPD Documents:

Download the CPD Questionnaire for this session here.

Download the Answer Sheet for this session here.

Please remember you are required to attend the full hour of the presentation in order to receive your formal CPD Certificate.

Session Synopsis:

How does Wellness & Health impact our working & living lives? With many new buildings under construction, how many of these can be described or certified healthy? Do we know how healthy buildings can lead to positive impacts on both immediate environments both internal and external? If so what are the implications? We need to understand how working spaces will be used and how connected they are to the natural & built environments. Can biophilic design achieve wellness and positive built environment outcomes? Can we achieve a sweet spot of living and working with increased health and wellness? How does timber and the use of timber in built environments achieve these positive outcomes? Are there existing examples of these to educate current design intents? How does the modern and post-COVID design paradigms allow us to eliminate a dichotomy of health & wellness with built environments?

Key Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this presentation you should be able to:
  • Identify what wellbeing is and why it matters
  • Identify and define what is meant by ‘Healthy Buildings’ and ‘Healthy Materials’
  • Evaluate and apply knowledge around the connection between wood and wellbeing in future projects

Competency Codes related to this session:

  • AACA Competency Standard/s
    Design: Conceptual Design 3.3
    Design: Schematic Design 4.2, 4.6, 4.7
    Documentation: Detailed Documentation 5.5
    Documentation: Documentation 6.5
 

Presented by:

Brent Calow, Strategic Accounts - APAC Havwoods International Since joining Havwoods International in 2016, Brent has propagated the global brand of Havwoods throughout APAC and has a greater focus on the strategic direction of Havwoods in all market sectors. By fostering relationships with key stakeholders, the continued growth of Havwoods has been realised through added emphasis on design driven product innovation & European manufacture. He has a keen passion for sustainability and solutions that lessen environmental impact, plus driving the quality paradigm that encapsulates the Havwoods brand. During his time at Havwoods he has gathered a wide-ranging knowledge of design & construction which enables him to confidently guide project delivery & installation implementation to industry-leading best practice outcomes.  abc
CPD Live

Specifying Hardwoods with Confidence

American Hardwoods: Specifying with confidence

25 June, 1.00pm - 2.00pm AEST

 

 

CPD Documents:

Download the CPD Questionnaire for this session here.

Download the Answer Sheet for this session here.

Please remember you are required to attend the full hour of the presentation in order to receive your formal CPD Certificate.

Session Synopsis:

The aim of this presentation is to give architects and designers an understanding of where American hardwoods come from, what they are, what their environmental credentials and impact are and how to use them and specify them realistically. After a brief introduction to the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) and its non-commercial role in improving understanding of American hardwoods worldwide, the presentation is split in to three distinct parts, as follows: Part one focuses on provenance, legality and sustainability, looking hardwood resource management in the United States and its practice today. It covers the size and spread of the resource and its ownership and how this determines harvesting and production. It provides an overview of the American Hardwood Environmental Profile (AHEP) and how this looks at proof of legality, sustainability and the low environmental impact of kiln-dried hardwood lumber and veneer through cradle-to-gate Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Part two provides a brief overview of production, looking at sawmilling and kiln-drying and then focuses on the key American hardwood species in terms of commercial availability, their physical attributes and their potential for applications, demonstrated through real life projects from around the world. Part three covers two recent developments in timber technology, which can be applied to U.S. hardwoods – namely thermal modification (TMT) and cross-laminated timber (CLT). It looks at the species and processes involved in these technologies and how the material can be applied in construction, along with some of its benefits. In essence, this presentation is designed to provide the listener with enough of a degree of knowledge and confidence in order to make an informed choice when specifying American hardwoods.

Key Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this presentation you should be able to:
  • Assess and integrate construction systems and materials consistent with the project brief
  • Evaluate design options against values of physical, environmental and cultural contexts
  • Apply creative imagination and aesthetic judgement to produce coherent design
  • Investigate and integrate appropriate material selection for the project design

Competency Codes related to this session:

• AACA Competency: Design; Conceptual Design 3.7 • AACA Competency: Design; Schematic Design 4.2 • AACA Competency: Design; Schematic Design 4.3 • AACA Competency: Design; Schematic Design 4.6  

Presented by:

Roderick Wiles, AHEC Director (Oceania)   Roderick Wiles has more than twenty years of experience in market research, marketing, marketing strategy & promotion with particular emphasis on the wood products sector. With a special interest in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Australasia and Europe, he has provided market intelligence, expert advice, market entry assistance and full service promotional campaign management to a range of clients, including both government-funded non-profits and private companies. He has worked with the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) since 1999, running a cross-regional campaign to raise awareness and knowledge levels of American hardwood products. In recent years, this work has involved high profile collaborations with leading architects, furniture and interior designers in Africa, the Middle East and Australasia. He is a regular contributor to a range of media associated with both the trade in wood products and the architectural and design community. He has also addressed a wide spectrum of audiences at conferences, seminars and workshops, including the UNECE/FAO Timber Committee, the Indian Institute of Architects and the International Federation of Interior Architects & Designers.

abc
CPD Live

Hydration In The Workplace Specification Considerations 2020

Hydration In The Workplace Specification Considerations 2020

25 June, 2.15 - 3.15pm AEST

 

 

CPD Documents:

Download the CPD Questionnaire for this session here.

Download the Answer Sheet for this session here.

Please remember you are required to attend the full hour of the presentation in order to receive your formal CPD Certificate.

Session Synopsis:

This CPD is intended to provide Designers with a comprehensive overview of the areas that effect the specification of plumbed in boiling and chilled drinking water appliances in the workplace. This CPD seminar will focus on four key areas: Client Needs, Product Selection & types, Water Filtration, Installation This CPD seminar aims to provide attendees with an understanding of: Product Selection:
  • Efficient Hydration in the workplace meeting the requirements of WHS Act
  • Products selection & understanding water options “meeting your clients expectations”
  • Understanding water filters
  • Energy efficiency meeting the requirements of National Construction code of Australia.
Installation:
  • Plumbing requirements of AS 3500, Water pressures, Providing an accessible solution; how to specify to meet the requirements of AS 1428.1&.2 accessibility in tea point design/public access drinking water
  • General siting and installation requirements

Key Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this panel, attendees will be able to:
  • Select efficient products meeting the requirements of the WHS Act (Design 4.1)
  • Explain how water filters work and describe their attributes (Design 4.6)
  • Apply the energy efficiency principles as required by the National Construction Code (Documentation 5.3)
  • Recognise the plumbing requirements of Australian Standards for installation (Documentation 5.3)

Competency Codes related to this session:

  • Design 4.1
  • Design 4.6
  • Documentation 5.3
  • Documentation 5.3
 

Presented by:

Colin Walker – Zip Technical Support & Training, Zip Water Colin's experience at Zip encompasses: 15 years Appliance service 2 years Hospital equipment service 14 Years at Zip Water – 2 years Servicing, 3 years Business Development Manager (Major commercial end users) 9 years Technical Support & Training – training staff , external service providers , wholesalers & Specifiers and providing technical support to Australia & NZ on all Zip products

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