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Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Screen Time

The metallic, perforated façade of Chimney House challenges one to interpret what lies beyond. Changing character with the fluctuating light of day, the perforated screen artfully conceals a valuable off-street parking space and upper level apartment, which form part of the larger extension to an existing Edwardian terrace in Redfern, Sydney.  

“The owners were deeply considerate of the extension’s façade in terms of its urban contribution.”

  “The owners were deeply considerate of the extension’s façade in terms of its urban contribution,” explains Emma Rees-Raaijmakers, principal of Atelier DAU. “Whilst a terrace façade cannot alter dramatically, they wanted the veneer of the new addition to read tonally as a consistent surface to the street’s terraced row, resulting in a respectful but adventurous connection and one that would age gracefully.” In Chimney House, the clients – a couple with a young adult son – sought to create a “forever home”: one that would both extend their existing terrace house; provide valuable off-street parking; and a separate apartment and a gallery-like interior for their extensive art collection. “The ‘jigsawing’ of the two dwellings into one volume on a compact footprint enabled the terrace house to extend behind the garage (i.e. on the once vacant site),” explains Emma. “The clients requested ample glass to visually extend the footprint towards the rear courtyard and side easements enabling natural light to pool within, yet wanted to retain its cosy, private nature.”  

Given the owners’ extensive collection of contemporary art, the architects have opted for a white interior and a fluid layout that acts as a casual gallery-like milieu.

  The space to the rear of the site has been leveraged to allow for the creation of a spacious living and dining area with a fireplace, plus a large eat-in kitchen with a landscaped courtyard to the rear. Given the owners’ extensive collection of contemporary art, the architects have opted for a white interior and a fluid layout that acts as a casual gallery-like milieu for the impressive collection. Interior highlights include a generous width Piero Lissoni couch that appears to float in the centre of the light-filled living room and a high-ceilinged bathing room (with an antique French copper bathtub), which feels like it merges with the outdoors. “The clients wanted spaces that breathe, a calm sanctuary, enabling them to feel that amongst the ‘crunch’ of inner-city living,” says Emma. This effect is due in most part to the generous proportions of the rear living area extension, with its 2.8-metre-high ceiling and oversized steel-framed pivot doors that open onto the courtyard, affording seamless connections to the treetops and sky beyond. Additionally the doors make the room appear far larger than its spatial parameters. “It’s also quite magical ascending the curved central stair hall which provides spiraling organic relief within the taut geometries of the terrace’s internals with the skylight above on a sunny day. It brings a surprising scale and energy to the centre of the home,” continues Emma. And then there’s that sculptural facade. “From a security perspective, it’s a fortress – a metal sheath with small perforations, yet they read artistically,” says Emma. “It needed to provide an intriguing sculptural element to the street, yet not be disruptive or purely decorative. Above all, it needed to serve a practical purpose. It’s a kinetic construct given that its shutters are operable and it incorporates a Juliet balcony. It’s like a theatrical scrim – its diagonal graphic (enhanced at night via internal lighting) subtly references the pitched roof outline of the street – a sculptural element to be appreciated by those who pass by.” Atelier DAU atelierdau.com.au   Photography by Tom Ferguson Dissection Information Living Divani Piero Lissoni ‘Extrasoft’ Vintage Louis Poulsen VL45 Radiohus Pendant Super Modular SEMIH lighting Country Trader bathtub Tessellated Patricia Urquiola porcelain floor tiles Fisher & Paykal refrigerator Miele Appliances Vintec Bar fridge Moooi Container Table Artek Alvar Aalto Stool E60 George Nelson Nelson Saucer Bubble Pendant We think you might also like Concert Hall House by Pandolfini Architects abc
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Embrace: Sophisticated, Yet Refreshingly Relaxed

This year, Tait introduces us to Embrace: an ethereal new colour palette informed by the Australian landscape. Ingrained in Tait’s DNA is their deep affinity with nature – informing the brand’s distinct designs and colourways that inspire the unique Australian lifestyle. While we continue to dream of our next overseas vacation, these last few months have allowed us to reconnect with the surrounding that are close to home. To Creative Director, Susan Tait, the Australian outdoors is filled with picturesque landscapes, rich colours and sumptuous textures that make it a destination like no other. As we enter the warmer months of spring and summer, the seasonal change invites us to reimagine our outdoor spaces with Embrace. Embrace takes us on a journey to our ideal getaway through the beauty of nature – embracing warmth, connection, style and substance; all from the comforts of your own home. The release of Embrace features six refreshing, sophisticated and earthy tones: Cerulean, Solis, Mineralis, Terra, Botanica and Arbor. The collection of hues are refined to bring a sense of relaxation and ease to your outdoor spaces. By combining tactile textures and vivid finishes, Embrace elevates the everyday garden, balcony or deck to the ultimate holiday destination. The range of seasonal colour palettes provide endless opportunities to personalise your outdoor breakout space for the perfect setting to rejuvenate after a long day. Paying homage to the radiant Australian sunsets is Terra: a palette of earth and fire. The bold colour scheme merges orange, burgundy clay and crisp surfmist together to create a bright and warm atmosphere to relax in. Continuing to illuminate the colour spectrum of Embrace, the Solis range brings a unique energy designed to reinvigorate the experience of the outdoors. Solis’ striking compilation of ochre hues takes us back to the raw purity of the natural lands. Susan notes, “Eliciting windswept shifting sand dunes dotted with native grasses, Solis radiates with the warmth of the sun.” To balance the heat of Terra and Solis are the soothing hues of Mineralis with its cool, neutral and calm personality. The combination of greys bring a sense of simplicity and elegance to the outdoors – meticulously crafted to epitomize rejuvenation, formality and practicality. With this in mind, Mineralis creates a base for a colourful, luminous scheme or a pared-back, minimal setting to complement the natural tones of the outside environment. Tait believes that green symbolises the colour of renewal, reinvigoration, nature and energy: the colours of life. “Botanica evokes the intoxicating scent of the bush, vivid with Banksi and Eucalyptus greens,” Susan adds. Reminiscent of the tones in the Australian bushlands, Botanica is rich with character; reinstating our innate connection to our surroundings. Arbor elicits a moment of contemplation, inspiration and reflection with a range of statement textures and distinct tobacco brown tones to complete the Embrace collection. Its earthy and natural hues take inspiration from the tree barks of the forests; the subtle hints of orange and yellow in the sand; and the deep, rich shades of the rocky shores. As we gradually shift, adapt and reimagine the way we interact with our spaces, our yearning for the great outdoors still remains constant. The Embrace colour palette by Tait celebrates the magic of the great Australian landscape – capturing the captivating, colourful soul of the natural, wild world. Tait. madebytait.com.au   abc
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Finishes

The Expansive Kitchen By Kennedy Nolan

Respected architects Kennedy Nolan have collaborated with Laminex to create this expansive family kitchen showcasing the beauty and design versatility of Laminex® laminate. Kennedy Nolan are no strangers to working with laminate, and they were given full creative licence here to push the boundaries and bring their most ambitious ideas to reality. As Kennedy Nolan Principal Rachel Nolan explains, her team began the design process by carefully considering the nature of laminate as a surface material. “We started by really thinking about what that material can do. We talked about the idea that you can cut it, that you can put two colours together to make a pattern, that it can be formed into different shapes,” she says. “We wanted to be able to show the product in ways it’s not typically used. And then we came back to, what are the colours that look great together.”  

“Often what you need in a good family kitchen is a beautiful central piece where everyone comes together.”

  Sweeping organic curves are a feature of the design, in the drum-shaped legs of the large island bench, in the splashback that flows seamlessly into the rear benchtop, and in the twin cylindrical rangehoods over the stovetop. These curved surfaces – all made possible with Laminex laminate – bring a sense of luxury and tactility. And they create an enticing play of shadow and light over the predominantly neutral colour palette, which is built around green-grey Laminex Paper Bark, yellow-based Laminex French Cream and light woodgrain Laminex Whitewashed Oak. The island bench is arguably the hero of the space. It’s visually stunning and, with its large square surface uninterrupted by a sink, also highly practical. “Often what you need in a good family kitchen is a beautiful central piece where everyone comes together. Something that's really easy to work at, with people on all sides,” Rachel says. “You can really imagine three people preparing a meal together or having a glass of wine.” Or indeed, doing schoolwork, or working from home.  

Sweeping organic curves are a feature of the design.

  This flexibility of use is supported by tower cabinetry in Paper Bark and Whitewashed Oak. Its beautifully scalloped doors open up on 180º hinges to reveal additional work surfaces, as well as storage for food and small appliances. The doors have been pushed slightly out of plane with the lower portion of the cabinetry, so their edges become door pulls, and we’re left with this beautiful repeated pattern, emphasised slightly and given a sense of depth by the shadow it throws. Design features like these elevate everyday tasks from mundane to magical, and Kennedy Nolan has blessed this kitchen with so many of them, all crafted from laminate. “People might aspire to have big marble benches in their dream kitchen,” says Nolan, “but this kitchen feels quite glamorous, it has a lovely scale about it, and it’s Laminex.” Laminex laminex.com.au Kennedy Nolan kennedynolan.com.au Photography by Derek Swalwell Dissections Laminex French Cream and Laminex Paper Bark on island benchtop Laminex Paper Bark and Laminex Whitewashed Oak for tower scallop cabinetry Laminex French Cream for rear benchtop, curved splashback and rangehood Laminex Paper Bark on rear cabinetry Laminex French Cream, Laminex Paper Bark and Laminex Whitewashed Oak surfaces Artedomus Inax Renga Border REB4 for rangehood splashback Fibonacci Pavlova flooring Miele KM 2334 GAS COOKTOP Miele H 7860 BPX Graphite Grey Sussex Voda Sink Mixer Square SS 316 Abey Sink Lago Inset Double Bowl LG200 In Good Company, Muuto Nerd Bar Stools abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Kitchen-Centred Design

When it came to renovating Cherie Maxwell-Gulli’s family home, the kitchen came first. In previous homes the kitchen zone had always felt ‘cornered out’ of the house. For this space, Cherie’s vision was to put the kitchen front and centre, so every family member felt included in the daily rituals of home life. It also proved to be the tone-setter for Cherie’s working relationship with interior designer and project lead, Carole Whiting. “I like casual elegance,” comments Cherie. “We were inspired by Scandinavian design. I explained to Carole that I didn’t want anything too pretentious and that the kitchen would really be the hub of our home. I [originally] gave Carole a whole book [of visual references]. It must have given her a very clear overview of what we had in mind, because the kitchen we built was as per her very first drawing – without a single amendment.” As Carole reflects: “This is a family that likes to cook. We have renovated a good deal of their home over the last two years, but we started with the kitchen – it was the key to cementing our relationship.” The brief: to update an uninspiring kitchen which reached through an awkwardly angled hallway, and reconcile the small, impractical pantry area. Carole tackled the two main challenges by cleverly ‘squaring up’ the space through ‘packing out’ the hallway and pushing the kitchen forward, thus enabling a larger pantry. Essential appliances like fridge and freezer are placed practicably close to the entry area. The V-ZUG ovens – an important feature of the kitchen and central to the family’s cooking rituals – have been placed on a side wall, close to the Butler’s Pantry. “The brief was to go with steam for cooking,” notes Carole. Here, Cherie and family selected a V-ZUG Combi-Steam as well as a Combair oven; they also opted for V-ZUG’s 6 Star energy rated dishwasher – notable for its world-first heat pump technology. While the V-ZUG appliances were chosen for their superior functionality, they also brought Carole’s aesthetic concept to life. “Cherie gave us direction to design a clean and modern kitchen with a simple and natural palette,” says Carole. “We used larch wood panels in whitewash and black stain for the cabinetry, black large-format porcelain tile which houses the gas hobs, and marble and handmade tiles in the island bench to add texture,” she says. “The elegant mirror finish of the V-ZUG ovens sits in balance with the neutral palette. The V-ZUG appliances are really on show, while everything else is concealed or blends into the kitchen design.” Fitting with the clean-lined and minimal theme, Carole freed up some essential overhead space by selecting V-ZUG’s “sleek and discreet” down draft extractors. In doing so she has been able to bring natural light into the pantry through a glass panel inserted above the cooktop area. The result is a space that really sings, says Carole. And in more ways than one. As Cherie points out: “In my last home my kitchen was tucked in a corner and I always felt like I was the hired help. Now I’m at the centre of everything. It’s much more fun to entertain, and even the daily cooking grind is a more pleasant experience as I chat to my family, help with homework and get things done.” V-ZUG vzug.com Carole Whiting carolewhiting.com  abc
People
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Accessories

A Design-Led Stationery Brand Is Ready To Artfully Organise Your 2021

An Organised Life was founded by Beck Wadworth in 2013 in an effort to bring elegance and sophistication to the organisation of our busy lives. The brand offers a small selection of minimalist stationery (calendars, diaries, notebooks) and downloadable templates. For 2021, An Organised Life has collaborated with Ontario-based artist Elissa Barber for a bespoke and limited range of diaries, calendars and notebooks. We were able to speak to both Beck and Elissa about how the collaboration came about, what the process involved, and their favourite pieces.   Beck, tell us about the AOL range. BW. The new 2021 Collection includes a variety of functional diaries and calendars. To sit alongside our best selling collection this year we have also launched a brand new limited edition artist collaboration that expands into paper notebooks, vegan leather notebooks, diaries & calendars that feature beautiful single line illustrations by Elissa Barber. My goal whenever I design a product for An Organised Life is to make them functional yet aesthetically beautiful. Form meets function. This is one of our points of difference as a brand. We want to help organise busy lives. In our 2021 Diaries & AOL x EB Diaries you can expect to find educational pages dedicated to how to make the most of your diary, how to write a solid to-do list you will actually tick off and a thorough goal planning section with helpful tips. The diaries also include budgeting pages, yearly and monthly calendars, and a space every Monday for your focus / goal each week. Is 2021 your first collaboration? What made you want to do something different? This is the first time I have ever collaborated with someone specifically on diaries and calendars. Our past collaborations as a brand have been focused on Notebooks or new products like our Together Journal x AOL Wedding Planner. However when I discovered Elissa Barber on Instagram, I fell in love with her work and all I could think about was how beautiful it would look on the cover of our diaries or on a wall calendar. Tell us about working with Elissa. We didn’t know each other personally but followed each other on Instagram: I adored her work from afar. As I said, whenever I saw her work I constantly imagined it on a beautiful diary or notebook cover. One day, I decided to mock up a design of how I envisioned the artwork to look on AOL stationery. I reached out to Elissa and sent the mockup. We jumped on a call and got a long on a personal and professional level. Our values and love of minimalist design became clear and we decided to move ahead. I think because we both had such a clear vision of how we saw the collab from an aesthetic point of view, everything has been seamless and a ‘dream’ collab. It’s nice to bring our two worlds together. How did the range develop to the final designs available today? To be honest, it was very straightforward. Elissa loved the original mockups I sent through and we tweaked a few cover designs throughout the process. I wanted Elissa to feel comfortable and confident with the final designs and the whole process. I respect her work so much. Being me, (and living on separate sides of the world) I spammed her with lots of informative emails on timelines, updates, and more so that she was across every single detail! I wanted the process to be as easy as possible for her. How do you use pieces from the AOL range? Each of our products has been designed with a purpose in mind – our Gratitude Notebook was created for journaling, our diaries are created to manage your workload, schedule and year and our vegan leather notebooks have been designed for putting pen to paper in your own way – drawing, note-taking, to-do lists, manifesting, doodling, goal setting & more. Personally I use a variety of AOL products. My Daily Planner is used for goal setting, budgeting, managing my schedule & workload. I utilise a lined Vegan Leather Notebook (Monogrammed of course) as my personal journal. I have a blank Vegan Leather Notebook for sketching and note-taking new ideas for An Organised Life products. And on my desk I also have an A4 Weekly Notepad for when I’m working on a certain project and want to manage that task a little separately. What pieces from the collection will you be taking into 2021? Definitely a 2021 A4 Daily Planner (Gold & Monogrammed). I love having a day per page and I love how much space this diary gives me. Secondly, I’ll be using an Elissa Barber x AOL Lined Vegan Leather Notebook for my 2021 personal journal & one of the beautiful paper notebooks (I can’t decide out of the beige or black for project planning!). In my home office I love having a Wall Calendar as well and I think my eye is set on the Elissa Barber x AOL A2 Calendar in White. I can see that looking beautiful framed on the wall as a functional piece of art.   Elissa, for those who are unfamiliar with your work, tell us a little about yourself. EB. I studied art (with a focus on drawing) for five years but did about ten years of solid life drawing as an extension to this and it allows me to draw and distort the figure using a continuous line confidently and consistently. It is the foundation of what I do. My recurring use of three female figures as subject matter has personal significance but three is also a symbolically loaded number that represents themes that resonate on a universal level with a broad spectrum of women. For example, the idea of self-reflection on the passage of time - past, present and future - gives the viewer an access point to my work but still leaves room for interpretation. Working in different mediums keeps me excited about creating as the process is completely different from one to next. As someone who is pretty prolific in my output, the back and forth from drawing to printmaking to collage to ceramic works and (less now but more in the past) to painting builds momentum, a natural emergence of themes and draws constant inspiration from my own art practice. What drew you to An Organised Life? I’m constantly making notes, striving to be more streamlined and organized and am drawn to putting pen to paper over reaching for my phone for these things. I’ve also been a fan of Beck and AOL before she reached out so it felt meant to be. We share a love for timeless and minimal aesthetics. How did you find the process of collaboration Though regularly approached, I’m not one to readily license my work and am hesitant to collaborate but the opportunity to lend my work to something that is so functionally relevant in my life was pretty opportune. Working with them has been lovely – fairly effortless on my end (which I needed, I have my toddler home with me full time right now) and actually just really exciting and impressive. Everything Beck sent over was a “yes!” and seeing the quality and attention to detail first hand when the samples arrived was thrilling. What pieces from the collection will you be taking into 2021? Definitely the Daily Planner and blank notebooks (both vegan leather and paper) but I will also be gifting pieces from across the collection this holiday season. An Organised Life anorganisedlife.com Elissa Barber elissabarber.com Photography by Holly Burgess We think you might also like this Design Hunter interview with Pip Vassett of IN BED abc
Happenings
What's On

CPD-Live By Indesign Is Returning October 1 and 2

CPD-Live is back! Following an incredible first installment in June, the industry’s best digital CPD program is set to return this October. On October 1 and 2, get ready to earn up to 7 formal CPD points in our interactive virtual sessions. You’ll be able to engage with the presentations and ask questions – all from the comfort of your digital device. Free, easy and 100 per cent digital, this is your chance to enrich your knowledge and refine your expertise. Enjoy presentations from brands such as Alspec, Autex, James Hardie, Tilt Industrial Design, CDK & Neolith, Active Metal and Ergotron & Elevar for one formal CPD point each, or stick around for the entire program for a huge 7 formal CPD points across two days! Part of the AIA Refuel program, CPD-Live is brought to you by Indesign Media. Given our changing environment, we believe it is more important than ever for our industry to share knowledge and ideas and are looking forward to CPD-Live to be an ongoing staple in the way we learn in future. Full program to be announced 3 September. Pre-register here to receive updates and have the full program delivered directly to your inbox.abc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes
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Against All Odds, Spacecraft Architects’ Triumph

“We have this much money, and you know us, what do you think we should do with it?” said Suni and Maz to their friends and architects Tim Gittos and Caro Robertson of Spacecraft Architects in Wellington. All four had been friends for years and even neighbours at one stage. While Tim and Caro were building their own house, they were also unwittingly planting seeds for a future project. “Suni found us a rental house next to their flat while we designed and built our own house,” says Caro. “Their observation of this process gave them the idea that while buying an existing house was out of reach, building new was possible.”  

The Court House is designed to respond to the climate and made with durable, hardwearing materials.

  The client’s budget was tight so anything beyond the non-negotiables – a kitchen, a living room, a bathroom and two bedrooms – was seen as a bonus. However the site itself gave somewhat of it’s own brief, Te Whanganui-a-Tara, in Wellington, is a very windy area so that strongly influenced the design. The project had been on the cards for a while before the two parties were able to commence. This worked out to be highly beneficial for the end product as it gave both architects and client an elongated design stage. Initial conversations had included the idea of a tower as the site was small at just 164 square metres but had a generous height limit of eight metres. But being able to sit with the project gave the architects time to refine their ideas before needing to progress.  

“Being able to open all the rooms onto a sheltered court also results in a greater sense of space for a small house.”

  “By that stage we’d worked on other houses for the climate, including living in our own house, and we realised that a courtyard would be an excellent architectural response to the weather. Being able to open all the rooms onto a sheltered court also results in a greater sense of space for a small house, because it groups and makes usable all the outdoor area,” says Caro. Moreover, a central courtyard affords sightlines between the communal areas within the house so that the residents can feel connected even when they are engaging in independent activities. The studio accessed via the courtyard extends on this idea offering privacy and separation when Suni or Maz need some space from the hustle and bustle of daily life. It can also transition into a third bedroom for an older child in later years. The boundary-facing walls are clad in fire-resistant cement sheet while internally the walls facing the central courtyard are clad in timber shiplap. This offers a warm textured façade for the living space, which works well with the clear corrugate walls and partial roof of the central courtyard that filters in soft light and protects residents from the strong winds. “We didn’t think we’d see the day that deck chairs can be left outside year round in Wellington!” says Caro. The gate at the boundary acts as the front door so the central courtyard (whether in use or as part of the progression of entry) forms part of daily life at the Court House. But Suni is making it her own, “treating it like a landscape gallery, with a revolving plant installation,” adds Caro. “She founded a tiny gallery space called The See Here in which contemporary jewellers design installations. I see this as a continuation of her curating instincts.” For Spacecraft Architects sustainability is acknowledged first and foremost by creating site-specific and malleable residences that will continue to be relevant as the needs of its occupant’s ebb and flow. The Court House is designed to respond to the climate and made with durable, hardwearing materials. As Suni, Maz and their children continue evolve as a family this house is set up to meet theirs needs. Spacecraft Architects spacecraftarchitects.co.nz Photography by David Straight We think you might also like X-Marks House by Spacecraft Architects  

“We didn’t think we’d see the day that deck chairs can be left outside year round in Wellington!”

  abc
Homes
Around The World
Architecture
ARC - Feature

An Urban Escape

In a popular district within Ho Chi Minh City, one of Vietnam’s most densely populated cities, a new build by MDA Architecture looks more like a compact forest than it does a family residence. The roof was conceived as a hybrid “terrace park” and lush planter boxes are overflowing with greenery on both the external and internal walls. This is in direct response to what the clients of the Vietnamese architecture studio had requested in their brief. They wanted a serene environment in which they could enjoy their weekends at home: benefiting from a break from their professional lives in an environment that encouraged them to honour their downtime.  

At present the roof is simply a garden to enjoy, but it is equally suitable to be used as a vegetable garden.

  From early on the architects saw this project as an opportunity to highlight the potential of roof spaces to provide supplementary green spaces in densely populated cities. “The family members can stay indoors and experience their early morning activities such as doing exercises or relaxing under the shade of trees right on top of their house,” say the architects. At present the roof is simply a garden to enjoy, but it is designed in a way that is equally suitable to be used as a vegetable garden where the residents can grow and harvest their own crops. More complicated however, was the client’s request for floods of natural light without sacrificing privacy. MDA Architecture responded by suggesting a split-level design – a popular architectural choice in Vietnam for numerous reasons ranging from spatial advantages to improved thermal performance.  

Behind large feature windows internal balconies hinder the view inwards.

 
Natural light follows an interesting path inside, navigating through the cracks between leaves, branches and trees resulting in curious light play and shadows. Sightlines inwards from either the street or neighbours’ windows are obstructed by this same foliage; even behind large feature windows internal balconies hinder the view inwards. The internal balcony boxes float above the stairs and internal voids. Made with red bricks the intent is to mirror traditional planter boxes, as both lush greenery and the residents themselves peek out over the top. “The house is always covered with greenish colour which brings relaxation and stress relief for the family,” say the architects. As we continue to navigate ever increasing urban densities and the question of housing affordability across the world, many architects and their motivated clients use their own personal situations as hopeful case studies for future architects to draw upon. MDA Architecture have provided one such example in which a medium-sized block feels large; a light-filled open plan interior feels private; and a large outdoor area does not impinge on internal living spaces. MDA Architecture Photography by Quang Tran We think you might also like Bewboc House by Fabian Tan Architect   abc
Happenings

Why INDE 2020 was our Best Yet!

August 13 saw the 2020 INDE Program reach its crescendo, with a digital gala that brought all corners of the globe together for a night of virtual celebrations. In a year that has presented so many challenges, it was incredible to see the community connect and acknowledge all the incredible achievements from architects and designers across the Indo Pacific. In the time since entries opened in November 2019, we knew we were in for a big INDE season. With 473 entries from 14 countries in the region, our jury were set the difficult task of selecting a shortlist from some of the outstanding entries the INDE’s had ever seen. Their job was made more challenging with the introduction of two decade defining categories: Best of the Decade in the Work Space and the Living Space. Recognising projects that display exceptional execution and lasting impact in each sector, these new categories paid special acknowledgement to the contribution our region has made to global design narratives over the past 10 years. [caption id="attachment_556" align="alignnone" width="1100"] The 2020 INDE.Awards trophies[/caption] From our pool of entrants, a shortlist of 162 was announced, taking the INDE program to its next stage. As shortlisters began their celebrations, we opened People’s Choice voting for our two Best of the Decade categories, with over 5,954 votes lodged from across the world. At last, the INDE.Awards gala evening arrived, bringing with it the promise of a wholly digital event which would see the INDE community expand to an unprecedented level. While we may be in an environment that is keeping us apart, the INDE Digital Gala brought us together, with over 27 countries tuning in to discover the 2020 winners. [caption id="attachment_552" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Manfred Yuen (Groundwork Architects and Associates) participating in the INDE.Awards Digital Gala Inner Circle stream[/caption] Throughout the evening, partners, judges, ambassadors and short listers came together to view the awards in an engaging and interactive format. With a virtual networking session and live chat, the “inner circle” stream was an opportunity to see some old and new faces and congratulate the winners in real time. This session was an overwhelming success, with over 397 registered viewers and multiple viewing parties. “We were blown away by the seamlessness, the joyful representation of design and the presence of your team in the messaging and the presenting” – Robyn Lindsey, Geyer. Running alongside the inner circle stream, the broader community engaged with a live stream of the gala that saw the largest ever INDE gala audience since its inception four years ago. From 6:30pm (AEST), 942 people from 27 countries joined in to watch the ceremony, with an additional 8,493 views (and counting!) across social media, Youtube and on-demand catchup. Click here to watch the gala and relive our industry’s night of nights. [caption id="attachment_555" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Office of Palinda Kannangara Architects enjoying an INDE.Awards Digital Gala watch party from Sri Lanka[/caption] In a night that puts the spotlight on our great industry, the entire INDE.Awards team would like to offer a special congratulations to the 2020 award recipients: Andra Matin (The Luminary), Bates Smart (The Wellness Space), CHAT Architects (The Building), David Flack and Mark Robinson (The Prodigy), Design Collective Architects (Best of the Decade: The Living Space – People’s Choice), Essential Design Integrated (Best of the Decade: The Living Space – People’s Choice), Geyer (Best of the Decade: The Work Space – People’s Choice), Goy Architects (Best of the Best, The Social Space), Hogg & Lamb (The Multi-Residential Building, The Shopping Space), IBUKU (The Influencer), International Towers (Best of the Decade: The Work Space – People’s Choice), John Wardle Architects (The Learning Space), LAAB Architects (The Design Studio), Palinda Kannangara Architects (Best of the Decade: The Living Space), Partners Hill (The Multi-Residential Building), Urban Rural System (The Living Space), Woods Bagot (Best of the Decade: The Work Space, The Work Space) and Zachary Hanna for nau (The Object). “Thankyou to the INDE.Awards and the INDE.Awards Jury for this recognition. We felt so honoured to be nominated alongside amazing projects from across the Asia Pacific. For our small and young team, this is an amazing affirmation and we sincerely thank you once again for this award” – Goy Architects Click here to see the full list of winners and honourable mentions. [caption id="attachment_553" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Goy Zhenru, Sam Loetman and Dessy Anggadewi (Goy Architects) accepting their Best of the Best award from Singapore, Thailand and Indonesia[/caption] We have been overwhelmed by the support and encouragement we received from the industry as we realised the INDE.Awards in a digital format. We would like to thank our Jury, ambassadors and all our entrants for continuing to support Indo Pacific design and contribute to a program that celebrates our region on a global stage. We would especially like to thank our INDE partners for their ongoing commitment to our industry, from the Platinum Partner Zenith, to AHEC, Alspec, Bosch, Gaggenau, Haworth, Herman Miller, James Richardson Furniture, Living Edge, Luxxbox, Maxton Fox, Tongue n Groove, Verosol, Wilkhahn, Woven Image and Zip Water. Entries for the 2021 INDE.Awards will open again in November 2020. More information on entries and next year’s program will be announced shortly, or be the first to know by subscribing to the INDE.Awards database.abc
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The Serene And Elegant Nature Of Art Deco In The Circ Collection

For over three decades, TSAR Carpets has consistently delivered high-quality, custom-made carpets and rugs across the residential, commercial and hospitality sectors worldwide. The design-led business reimagines the way we experience our everyday spaces with sophistication and knowledge that meets the highest standards of great design. Driven by the beauty of meticulous craftsmanship and a deep passion for textiles, TSAR products are renowned for their distinctive creations that balance the world of art, design and functionality. The new Circ collection does no less. Designed by Teresa Ceberek, the Senior in-house Designer at TSAR Carpets, Circ is a playful exploration of the elegance of Art Deco imbued in fine lines, curves and layers. In collaboration with 3D animator, Joe Mortell, the Circ collection takes you on a journey through a dreamy, tranquil wonderland. Brought to life with the Huggy chair by Sarah Ellison and a table lamp by Jumbo, the world of Circ invites people in to feel welcome and uplifted – enhancing the human experience of great design. “Our built environment has a profound impact on our state of mind and wellbeing, now more than ever,” Teresa expresses. “Circ is an artistic expression with human experience at the centre of the design process.” Influenced by the Art Deco movement, its iconic features have been distilled to bring a refreshed soul to this new, contemporary collection and the result is a range of smooth, simple and streamlined designs. Each piece employs soft features and mono-materials that are comforting, calming and welcoming, allowing individuals to feel a sense of ease in any space. TSAR Carpets also prides itself on the role and impact of design on the natural world. Crafted from an environmentally conscious fibre, the Circ collection is a combination of natural undyed wool – free from dyes and treatments. The wool is part of the Heather yarn collection – showcasing neutral hues that blend soundly together and create a grounding palette of softer, more authentic colours that occur naturally over time. From warm butterscotch brown to cool grey hues, the Circ collection champions a fibre alternative for a bold statement in any environment. Great design has an inimitable power to create an emotional connection with the spaces around us, while uplifting the art of everyday living. Dreamy, nostalgic and a nod to times past, the Circ collection invites us into a place of warmth and tranquillity – restoring our relationship with the built environment in a new, refreshed light. TSAR Carpets tsarcarpets.com abc
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The 2020 Projects For Habitus House Of The Year Are A True Cause For Celebration

Habitus House of The Year 2020 is fasting approaching and behind the scenes we are busy putting it all together for you, our loyal republic of Design Hunters. The immaculate standards to which we hold ourselves – to which you have rightly come to expect – are constantly front of mind for us and while we launch in just two short months (22 October), this has been a year in the making. We started Habitus House of the Year in 2018 to celebrate 10 years of the title. In that time Habitus – across print, digital and social media platforms – has made it its mission to seek out, showcase, and celebrate the achievements of architects, designers and product designers across the Indo Pacific Region. We have sought to celebrate the people that continue to respond to our unique way of living and to design for our distinct climatic and environmental conditions. We are commending those that design in response to our varying cultural traditions and that have propelled design from our corner of the world onto a global stage. [caption id="attachment_94255" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Bivvy House by Vaughn McQuarrie Architects[/caption] Each year, with a special Habitus House of the Year print edition, the Habitus editorial desk presents a carefully curated, and meticulously considered list of 20 recently completed residential projects that we feel are outstanding examples of what the Region can accomplish. Each project is considered for its ability to meet its occupants’ needs; for its architectural connection to the landscape (be it urban or rural); and for its social and environmental sustainability. These are our Habitus Houses of the Year, and they are all deserving of the title. But we check our work, and every year we engage an independent jury of industry leaders to consult with us on our list. We host a judging and round table discussion in which ultimately our independent jury name an overall winner for Habitus House of the Year. Additional projects are recognised with the following awards: Interior Architecture; Interior And Exterior Connection; Architecture And Landscape. The annual special edition of Habitus House of the Year will be out 22 October. You can subscribe to the magazine HERE. Subscribe to our newsletter HERE for regular updates. And make sure you’re following us Instagram and Facebook. Habitus would like to acknowledge the support of our Major Partners for 2020: Gaggenau, StylecraftHOME and Zip; and our Supporting Partner: Rocks On. Our Trophy Partner, Axolotl, and our Design Hunter Partners: About Space, Didier, Euroluce, Phoenix Tapware, The Green Room, Savage Design, Stylecraft and Top3 By Design.  

Stay tuned for more key dates!

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Get The Best House In Your Ideal Location

All too often we can find ourselves in an area we love, but in a house that could do with a considerable bit of work. Or perhaps our lives have changed and with it what we need and how we use our homes. Alternatively, one could work hard to become a homeowner only to find a site for sale in the perfect location – but with a house that leaves much to the imagination. Or perhaps you’re an investor looking to make a RTI in a great location. For those who resonate with any of the above, Habitus has reached out to Metricon, one of Australia's most popular home builders to provide a better understanding of the options available, namely, the benefits of a knockdown rebuild. Metricon was established more than 40 years ago and in the time since built a reputation building homes that reflect our uniquely Australian way of living. From the company's experienced perspective, they offer the following advice to Habitus and our loyal republic of Design Hunters. Benefits Of A Knockdown Rebuild A knockdown rebuild is where you simply knock down the building that’s currently on a property and replace it with a new building to suit your requirements. It could be that you want to replace an old home with a new home, build two or more homes on one block, or you might be downsizing or upsizing. According to the Housing Industry Association (HIA), almost 10 per cent of homes built in Australia are knockdown rebuilds. This process is often favoured because it’s more cost-effective than renovating. Knockdown rebuilds help to limit any problems renovators face, such as leaky pipes, asbestos and bad wiring. These are known to cause a lot of stress and financial concerns, so by removing the problem completely, you’re eliminating the risk. Knockdown rebuilds also mean you can keep your land, but change your home. This saves you from leaving your neighbourhood friends, changing schools for the kids, and trying to work out new routes to get to work or the stores. The biggest benefit of a knockdown rebuild is that the options are endless. It doesn’t matter if you’re a first home buyer, a young family, the kids have just flown the coop or you’ve recently retired – a knockdown rebuild allows you to start the building process from scratch, on your own land. You get to choose the home’s design, layout, fittings and furnishings; you can make the home sustainable, add additional features such as a pool or outdoor space, and design the interior with everything you need (and want). The Knockdown Rebuild Process If you decide to go down the knockdown rebuild path, here’s a quick overview of the process: Step One: Do your research. Consider what you want to do with the property, versus what you can do. Check with the local city council if you need to, or simply ask your chosen builder for advice. Step Two: Choose your dream home design. View floor plans, photos, videos and 3D virtual tours for different options and see what features stand out for you. Step Three: Decide on the finer details. At this stage, your builder will be contacting the council for you, presenting tenders and site plans, and conducting thorough assessments of the site. While they do that, start looking at the options your build can include, such as paint colours and flooring options. Step Four: Sign the contract with your new builder, and start the demolition of your old property. Once complete, the builder will order site surveys and soil tests, as well as final slab designs. Step Five: Construction commences. And finally, don’t forget, the Australian Government is also providing an incentive of $25,000 for those who renovate or build new. Knockdown rebuilds are considered, in this instance, to be a major renovation. You can check to see if you qualify by clicking here. If you want to find out more about knockdown rebuilds, get in touch with the team at Metricon today. Metricon metricon.com.au abc