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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Homes
Around The World
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Cove House Is A Shrouded Sanctuary

Designed by Ming Architects, this unassuming house sits on an odd-shaped plot in the heart of central Singapore. The site is surrounded by an arterial road leading to an expressway across the main length of the site. In response, the house is shielded off from the traffic by the use of vertical off-form concrete fin walls, which are placed strategically to allow views of the lap pool and landscaping as a buffer element while blocking out the undesirable traffic. The brief was to design a home that is a sanctuary, a place of respite. Planned across the ground floor, the living, dining and dry kitchen open onto views of the water feature, lap pool and lush landscape garden beyond. A sculptural spiral staircase has been purposefully positioned between the concrete walls, partly overhanging the pool below, to appear as if floating above the water.  

The name ‘Cove House’ was chosen by the architects to reflect the fact that the home nestles into the site, creating a sanctuary-like escarpment.

  The design of the house is very site-specific, given the unique urban context positioned right next to a busy arterial road leading to a major expressway. There are high concrete retaining walls abutting one whole side, essentially forming a small enclosed ‘enclave’ to protect the house. These massive walls shield and shelter the house within a secure cradle. The name ‘Cove House’ was chosen by the architects to reflect the fact that the home nestles into the site, creating a sanctuary-like escarpment. The side elevation is designed as a series of fin walls, with windows strategically placed to allow views from the living spaces towards the pool and peripheral garden. The concrete walls not only convey an image of monolithic strength, a safe fortress against the man-made elements but also brings about the notion of a ‘back-to-basic’ architecture, where the building is presented in its most bare-bone form and every space serves its primary purpose.  

A sculptural spiral staircase is purposefully positioned between the concrete walls, partly overhanging the pool below, to appear as if floating above the water.

  Taking respite and privacy into consideration, all three bedrooms including the main bedroom were located on the second storey. Taking advantage of the concrete forms that wrap the pool, the main bedroom’s balcony overhangs, creating a vantage point to which the owners can retreat. Other luxuries include a generously sized gym, which is located in the attic where users are greeted by unencumbered views while exercising. Softening the heaviness of the concrete, oak timber has been introduced to both the ceiling and flooring. The overall building form reflects a raw yet refined construction, supplemented by natural finishes and water elements. The material palette consists of four thoughtfully chosen materials – off-form concrete, oak timber, grey gravel-washed walls and white powder-coated metal screens. A protective place of respite, the materiality at Cove House reflects the mood of the whole home, which is contemporary yet subtle and refined in nature. Ming Architects mingarchitects.com Photography courtesy the architect We think you would also like this home that nestles into the landscape, by Ben Walker Architect abc
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Let Your True Colours Fly

With a legacy that spans over 100 years, Herman Miller is a company steeped in history. But that doesn’t mean it rests on its laurels. Drawing upon a rich heritage, Herman Miller is constantly looking for ways to improve not just its products, but also how it operates. Creating a diverse, inclusive and equitable working environment has been front and centre for Herman Miller. It’s an approach that has seen the business be rewarded through several accolades, including a 100 per cent score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Corporate Equality Index since 2008, as well as earning a perfect score as the ‘Best Place to Work for LGBTQ Equality’. As part of this agenda, Herman Miller has released a special edition Eames Hang-It-All with a special twist – the iconic, functional design piece has been reborn in a colourful rainbow palette, inspired by the LGBTQ+ Pride flag. Herman Miller is a business that sees how it can impact the wider community and is doing what it can to redesign the future. The Eames Pride Hang-It-All is just one example of creating a world where everyone can let their true colours fly, while making a statement about LGBTQ+ equality at home or in the office.  

“The appreciation of the small objects that are around us every day is what produces an appreciation of art.” – Charles Eames

 
  We think you might also like our story about marriage equalityabc
Architecture
Design Hunters

Top Reasons To Enter INDE.Awards 2021

Every year, the INDE.Awards acts as a barometer of our progress as an industry and a region, a platform through which the excellence from the last 18 months can be elevated, celebrated and recognised across the globe. Since the awards were first launched in 2017, they have attracted entries from across the Indo-Pacific, becoming the world’s only architecture awards program to encompass the entire region and its progressive and intuitive design vernacular. With the 2021 program officially underway, now is the time to join the INDE.Awards and ensure your project is recognised alongside the best in the region. Need even more convincing to submit your entry? Here are our top reasons to submit your project. [caption id="attachment_1043" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Albert Park Office and Depot, Harrison and White with Archier. Photography by Peter Bennetts[/caption] Represent Local Design The INDE.Awards is set apart by its commitment to the Indo-Pacific. As a global programme with local roots, our shortlisters and winners are a testament to the diversity of their geographic, cultural and architectural contexts. Through the awards, we explore that which brings us together and sets us apart, celebrating the similarities and differences which make our region truly great.  It is this commitment that positions INDE.Awards as the perfect platform for those throughout the region, allowing all entrants to represent their countries on the global stage. Join judges, ambassadors and a family of alumni who hail from right across the Indo-Pacific, where the shared pursuit of excellence creates a platform for celebrations. [caption id="attachment_1044" align="alignnone" width="1100"] The Work Project – Asia Square, Hassell. Photography by E.K. Yap[/caption] Global Recognition INDE.Awards offers the chance to tap into a truly regional network of print, digital and content driven media. Through these platforms, we have built an audience for INDE that is global in it’s reach, taking the best of local design and elevating it across the world.  These networks are extended thanks to our corporate and strategic partners, who tap into their own channels to share the INDE programme further and wider than ever before.  This is brought into a new dimension thanks to our Digital Gala, where a broadcast shared across a multi-layered suite of media ensures the INDE.Awards are shared right across the globe. Join the Community & be part of the Alumni The INDE community is unlike any other. Brought together by our shared passion for architecture and design, the INDE’s brings together designers, architects, industrial designers, career legends and progressive trail blazers in a yearly celebration of excellence. From entrants, shortlisters, winners, judges, ambassadors, partners and our ever-growing audience of design-aficionados, our community continues to set the standard for industry-wide recognition and celebrations. Interact with people and firms who are at the top of their game and make valuable connections with our partners. For those lucky few who receive the honour of INDE gold, the INDE alumni community opens up a community bonded by their achievements. Join the likes of John Wardle, Bates Smart, Koichi Takada and Partners Hill and be part of the INDE.Awards inner circle, where your success will continue to be celebrated in the years to come. Recognise your Team After 18 months of hard work and dedication, what better way to recognise and celebrate your team than taking home INDE gold? Pay homage to the projects that defined your 2020 and put your team up in lights with some of our industry’s best examining and showcasing their work through the shortlisting process. Be the best in your field and take to the stage as you accept the coveted INDE.Awards trophy for your category. Boost your Profile Winning an INDE.Award is a lasting legacy for any firm. Stepping onto the INDE stage brings a unique opportunity to get your project noticed across the globe, elevating your story, your team and your work to an audience of thousands. Don’t miss your opportunity to get noticed like never before, as all the eyes in the region turn to you.  [caption id="attachment_1046" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Sukasantai Farmstay, Goy Architects. Photography by Fabian Ong[/caption] Don’t miss out, entries close March 19th.abc
Architecture
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Contrasting Finishes Transform Bridge House

With the close convenience of residing within metropolitan areas, townhouses are a logical solution for families who need the location of an inner-city apartment coupled with the space of a suburban property. The only issue is, as time goes on, that there is an increasing need for the restoration of the classic townhouse, as age continues to creep into these once glorious abodes. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="109249,109251"]   Bridge House, located in Sydney's inner west, has undergone a complete gutting and rebuild. Designed by architect Peter Valencic of dwp, together with Lot 1 Design on the interiors, the only feature that remains from the house’s past life is the front façade. Retained as a mirror to the neighbouring house, the façade is a fitting tribute to the house that preceded it. What stands now on the foundations is a welcoming home that sleeps a family of five, with the former, dark, cramped semi-detached house that occupied the block before remaining only in spirit. The two front rooms facing the street have been retained, while a double-height void opposite an internal courtyard makes an elegant transition between old and new.  At ground level, the space opens out into a large, light-filled open plan kitchen, living and dining room that spills out onto a deck and lawn. Immediately taken by the salience of the brick finish that dominates the ground floor, the kitchen is a juxtaposition of smooth and coarse material. The bricks were uncovered during the renovation and formed the genesis of the design, as told by Lot 1 principal Tammy Miconi. “Remnants of the bricks from the existing chimney in the internal courtyard were our starting point,” she says. Specially sourced recycled bricks sit alongside the old, continuing into the internal space. Bricks line the walls of the kitchen, and as a result the strong tactility of the material incited a restrained approach to the kitchen joinery detailing and finishes.  Ample storage was integrated despite full height cupboards being kept off the ceiling to continue the visual effect of the brick. Despite this, the modern aesthetic of the cabinetry and the classic industrial qualities of the brickwork complement each other brilliantly, with the end result a marriage of old and new. The seamless shelving in the living room is animated by objects rather than design flourishes. A dark timber-battened sliding door creates a visual link to the kitchen while cleverly concealing brooms, school bags and general clutter. A window seat and a servery are other invaluable features in the main living space. Upstairs plays host to the master bedroom and ensuite, two bedrooms and bathroom. Eliminating almost all signs of the house’s former entity, new blinds, sills, light fittings, carpet, cabinetry as well as fresh paint brings a much-needed facelift. Shades of white and grey line the walls combined with turquoise and black in the furniture choices, making a palette that invokes a sense of elegance, but also one of functionality.  The bathrooms of Bridge House are a culmination of timber finishes and ash grey tiles, with a hexagonal tiling pattern found in the main bathroom is a part of Acestone’s Mate range. Chrome tapware proves a crisp finish, and the finished product is one of quality and class. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="109274,109275"]   The Bridge House isn’t so much a restoration, it's an overhaul. Despite the mask that it addresses to the world outside, it lives in a different galaxy to the semi detached twin that lives next door. Lot 1 Design lot1design.com.au Photography by Prue Ruscoe We think you would like this church that was converted to a family home by DAH Architecture Dissection Information B&B Italia Stools – Space Furniture Island Bench Joinery Colour – Dulux Juvenile Kitchen Splash Back, Wollongong Blend – The Brick Pit Dining Table & Chairs – Koskela Tableware and glassware – Ondene B&B Italia Coffee Table – Space Furniture Soho Sofa – Life Interiors Lounge Chair – Spence & Lyda Side Table – Living Edge Agra RugArmadillo Missoni Cushions – Spence & Lyda & Tradition Catch Chair in bedroom – Cult Cappellini Gong Side Table in bedroom – Cult Urban Grey Porcelain Tiles in shower – Artedomus Porcelain Hexagonal Wall Tiles in bathroom – Di Lorenzo External Doors & Windows – Colorbond Dulux Monument External Wall Colour – Dulux Tranquil Retreat External Decking – Spotted Gum abc
Architecture
Around The World
Homes
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RJ House Wraps A Courtyard With Stacked Concrete Boxes

Situated in Bandung city in Indonesia, RJ House by Rakta Studio is defined by a series of strong concrete forms. The semi-detached house faces east, with the stacking positioned in a sequence that creates a dynamic yet welcoming composition when entering the house. The materiality of the rough-finish concrete and precise edges is softened by timber screen detailing, adding a contrasting detail and depth. The brief from the client was for a home that is minimal, natural and earthy yet impactful. The reduced simplicity of the material palette speaks to this brief, comprising just three key elements – exposed concrete walls, timber and greenery. The transitions through the home are dictated by the dynamic composition of the stacked forms. A fishpond and vertical garden in the foyer set the tone, adding a tropical ambience. Timber screens again come into play, this time with a functional purpose of creating privacy and security, as well as providing shade. The house is planned around two internal courtyards, which bring natural light and cross-ventilation deep into the home: crucial for the hot, tropical Indonesian climate. As a centrepiece of the home, the courtyard also accommodates a semi-outdoor terrace space with an open timber pergola that allows unobstructed views and greenery to dominate. The interior planning is centred around fluid and open spaces for the family to gather, meet and dine. A large, expansive open-plan space is enclosed by a glass sliding door, which can open all the way up to create a seamless transition between inside and outside. Openness and connection are fostered in other ways, for example, the sides of the stair create transparency with open risers and a teak tread. Upstairs houses the more private spaces including the main bedroom, kids’ bedrooms, an informal living area and a prayer room. Rakta Studio Photography by KIE We think you would also like The Expandable House in Indonesia abc
Happenings
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Let the INDE.Awards 2021 begin…

Since its inception in 2017, the INDE.Awards has created a legacy of greatness, attracting the very best in architecture and design in our annual celebration of regional excellence. As the only awards program of its kind, the INDE.Awards is a uniting force for the Indo-Pacific, where winners, shortlisters and judges are chosen for their ability to speak to the diversity, ingenuity and progressiveness of our local region’s design identity. More than just an event, the INDEs are a community, where being shortlisted is an achievement and receiving an award is the pinnacle of success. It’s a time to shine on a local stage as well as gather recognition and enhance reputations on both regional and global platforms as well. Three singular opportunities which combine to extend relationships and make new ones. Following on from last year’s program – which saw a record number of submissions and the launch of our inaugural Digital Gala – 2021 will provide even more opportunities to celebrate: we’ll be welcoming back our physical INDE.Awards Gala, which will be held in tandem with a digital live stream; will expand the INDE offering with a full-day of knowledge seminars; and will put the future of our industry centerstage with a brand-new award category. Want to know more? Read on!

INDE.Awards 2021 Entries Open

Since opening entries in November 2020, this year’s INDE.Awards has already received an overwhelming response, with a large volume of projects already submitted. With an aim to make this year’s awards the most diverse yet, we look forward to welcoming even more submissions from right across the region right up until the awards close on 19 March 2021. Projects that have been completed from 1 September 2019 to 19 February 2021 will be accepted.

This year’s categories include...

The Building The Multi-Residential Building The Living Space The Work Space The Social Space The Shopping Space The Learning Space The Wellness Space The Design Studio The Influencer The Object The Prodigy The Luminary We will also be welcoming back our annual Best of the Best Award (awarded to the most outstanding project from across all categories) and are excited to introduce The Graduate, an award which will recognize a fifth year architecture student who shows outstanding promise in their chosen course.

Our Biggest Celebration Yet

The 2021 INDE.Awards will mark our first dual event format, where a black-tie ceremony in Sydney will be combined with a global live stream. For an event that continues to grow and expand across the region, the 2021 format allows for an unprecedented reach that ensures everyone can be part of the INDE community. The awards this year will be held in Sydney on Thursday August 5th. More information on tickets and the live stream will be released closer to the event.

Introducing the INDE.Summit

This year, we look forward to taking our program to even greater heights with our inaugural INDE.Summit to be held the day of our gala event. We will bring together expert practitioners to talk about and discuss the matters that concern the wider architectural community now. The INDE.Summit will be a knowledge-based experience that will inform and connect all those who attend. We look forward to seeing your work in the INDE.Awards and meeting you at the INDE.Summit where design will live and breathe on the local, regional and global stages.   ICYMI, here's the INDE.Awards 2020 Digital Gala, for your viewing pleasure and at your leisure!abc
Architecture
Homes
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Ruby Ridge House Is The Unassuming Beauty Of The South Island

Ruby Ridge House, located in Wanaka, New Zealand, gives nothing away to the street outside. Seemingly just the dark facade of a monolithic volume, perched on an elevated site in a new subdivision overlooking Lake Wanaka, the house saves all the pleasure for the people who reside within its walls, with sublime views and a breathtaking interior. Designed by Condon Scott Architects – an award winning, Wanaka-based practice – the house is situated on a challenging, wedge-like site that borders two suburban streets. With a mono-pitched roof and cedar-dressed exterior, the design directs the observer’s view towards the landscape in the distance as opposed to the house itself, allowing the homeowners to enjoy their space. Two types of cedar cladding – one dark stained, the other warm – accentuate the lines of the windows and roof. Boardform concrete juxtaposes with the timber, and the material palette spills into the interiors, providing a visual consistency inside and out. Wanaka is exposed to volatile winds as well as extreme cold in the winter months. The climate can be unforgiving, and the designers of the house had to not only take this into account, but counter it. The challenge of the climate was obvious, says Barry Condon, director of Condon Scott Architects, but through meticulous planning, they were able to design the house to block out the wind for the residents. “We wanted to create some outdoor shelter as the site can experience strong seasonal on shore winds. To counteract this, we have designed a series of internal courtyards so the occupants can retreat back into these spaces on windy days, effectively using the house as a windbreak whilst still maintaining a visual connection to the view.” The living space is configured around the courtyards that are sheltered, private, and flow seamlessly from the interiors, with the body of the house acting as both a windbreak and a visual barrier. Linked through stacking aluminum sliders, these courtyards are an extension of the living space and can be enjoyed year-round, with a concrete outdoor fireplace for cooler nights. The front deck flows easily from the living area, with the French oak floorboards appearing to merge with the Kwila decking. Living spaces and bedrooms are located in the sun-soaked northern wing of the house, where the view is at its best. In the southern wing, the architect has allocated space for the garaging, guest bunkrooms and ancillary spaces. The view was the site’s big-ticket item when design production commenced, Barry shares. “It was a challenging site to work with, but we knew the view would be paramount to the design. From the moment of entry into the foyer at the rear of the house, the space compresses and you are drawn through into the living room, with your eye focused on the mountains and lake beyond.” Condon Scott Architects condonscott.nz Photography by Simon Devitt Ruby Ridge House by Condon Scott Architects | Archipro Project of the Month from Condon Scott on Vimeo.abc
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Fixed & Fitted

The Geometric Elegance of the Rilievo Collection

The frantic pace of today’s world makes the space and time dedicated to oneself of the utmost importance. Gessi has made a tradition of creating extraordinary bathroom products that inspire the sensation of wellbeing and tranquility. Rilievo is a new collection that embodies all the elements of elegance, designed to create a sentiment of wellness and relaxation. The Rilievo collection was designed with inspiration from the concept of a circle inscribed within a square, and this idea is depicted upon all elements of the range. From the rounded body on the back of the tap to the square on its base; when seen from the side, the same pattern is repeated on the lower part of the taps, and the handle itself again features the pattern in an elegantly discreet way. This attention to detail reflects the craftsmanship inherit to Gessi’s collections. The smooth corners of the collection exude a sense of designer chic, designed to celebrate connections between light and shadow, and allow for a premium bathroom experience of relaxation and serenity. The hybrid nature of the design – with its meeting of the curved and the straight – makes Rilievo a perfect fit for bathroom aesthetics of all kinds. Whether a modernist and minimal bathroom of clean straight lines, or a decorative traditional space of curves, the Rilievo range will complement the space without intruding. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="108790,108789"] The timeless and nimble aesthetic of the Rilievo range suit residential and hospitality spaces alike, bringing to mind the history of Italian design, while delivering the peak performance of contemporary bathroom design. Available in a range of finishes and colours, Rilievo’s smooth contours and sleek geometric lines echo the purity of Italian design, and will suit a bathroom of any style. Gessi’s Rilievo collection is available in Australia through Abey. Abey abey.com.au abc
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Transforming Bathrooms into Spa-like Retreats

A space designed for beauty and function, bathrooms are an oasis for the body and mind – where texture and materiality are as personal as the daily rituals of self-care themselves. Once relegated to luxurious retreats that have wellbeing at their core, a spa-like bathroom in the home with lustrous finishes has become more desirable than ever. Indulging in a sanctuary, where natural light filters through to a deep-set sculptured bathtub or a rain shower overhead, is growing in tandem with increased time at home. Be it a sleek, contemporary design of dark hues or a palette of natural textures, a bathroom that speaks to our individuality, desires and wellbeing changes the way bathrooms in our homes nurtures the soul. With a deep understanding of what luxury living means today, Caroma has been weaving beauty, function and practicality in design-driven bathrooms for over 75 years. Without missing a beat, their new Vogue collection delivers on industry-leading technology with customisable options that allow for personalisation. Still, for the ultimate spa-like bathroom at home, it’s how texture, materiality and form are entwined.

Define your colour palette

Neutral, earthy tones are synonymous with calm and relaxation, which is why it is often found in places of solitude. But that’s not to say that colour doesn’t have its place, far from it. Darker hues when contrasted with a light, softer palette can create a tranquil setting. Complete the look with Caroma’s Urbane II and Liana II range of tapware, accessories and showers that came in Chrome, PVD (Brushed Brass, Brushed Nickel, Gunmetal) and Electroplated (Matte Black) tones.

Bring the outdoors in

Lush foliage and natural light have a resounding effect on people’s overall wellbeing, and it is the ultimate in creating a spa-like bathroom. A glass feature window that looks out into a garden, skylights above and mirrors that bounce light around the room all draw the outdoors in. Whatever the space – big or small – succulents and pot plants are one of the easiest ways to instantly transform a bathroom.

Natural textures 

Using rich wooden textures paired with natural stone (marble, granite, slate) evokes tranquillity. Caroma’s Vogue collection of chrome, brushed brass and brushed nickel, lends itself beautifully to timber finishes accented by natural, raw materials. A timber vanity with a natural stone basin and brushed brass tapware is an enduring favourite – and for cohesiveness throughout the bathroom, the same finishing can be used within the sanitaryware, accessories and shower.

Luxuriously indulgent

Freestanding bathtubs, rain showers and sculptured stone basins bring an indulgent flare to any bathroom. Yet, the real sense of luxury comes down to the details of how a tile feels underfoot, how a plush towel drapes over a heated railing, and how the lighting shifts with the mood of the day. To complete the look and feel of a spa-like sanctuary, introduce art, woven baskets, soft towels and essential oils and candles. As more time is spent at home, finding ways to nurture the soul has become paramount. Redefining the bathroom, and bringing that tranquil spa-like retreat is part of the transformation in how people are living within their homes. Discover the full Caroma Vogue collection.abc
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This Workers Cottage Come Family Home Retains Its Charm

Set on a quiet street in Melbourne’s Thornbury, an Edwardian cottage has been transformed into a light-filled, tranquil and functional family home. The brief from the owners was set around retaining as much of the original charm of the cottage as possible. But as is the downfall of many workers cottages, they are often dark, pokey and not adequate for modern living. Bringing function, natural light and a sense of openness are exactly what Melbourne-based design studio Pierce Widera has achieved through the renovation. Part of the redesign included a reconfiguration of the spatial planning and layout, adding an ensuite to the main bedroom at the front of the house. Two bedrooms, a bathroom and a concealed laundry are then stacked along the length of the home before opening up to an open space living area. The back of the house, with its airy openness, is benefitted by high ceiling and generous windows, drenching the space in natural light. The new living area is afforded even more generosity of space by a connection to an outdoor terrace. In keeping with the brief to create a tranquil and fresh family home, the material palette has been kept understated and minimalist. Neutral tones of light timbers, warm greys and whites create a gentle backdrop for family life to unfold. While the same finishes have been used all throughout to create continuity. Where possible views to greenery have been incorporated – through the bathroom, and from the kitchen. Adding a peaceful connection to nature. Pierce Widera piercewidera.com.au Photography by Sean Fennessy Dissection Information Internal walls – Dulux Natural White Exterior – Dulux Lexicon 1/4 Strength Grey modular sofa – Globewest ‘Felix Curve’ Modula Sofa in Luna Grey Rug – Armadillo ‘Pampas’ Rug in Quartz Coffee table – District ‘Offset’ Coffee Table in Natural Oak Armchair – District ‘Isabella’ Chair in Natural Leather Artwork – Forman Picture Framing – Artist Susan Trigg Lamp – CCSS Dining table – Globewest ‘Bok’ Table in Oak Barstool – District ‘Zampa’ Counter Stool in Black Kitchen benchtops – Artedomus Maximum Thin Porcelain in Argento Kitchen splashback – Viridian ‘Mirastar’ Kitchen tapware – Abey Gessi – Oxygene sink mixer in Brushed Nickel Kitchen appliances – Smeg oven, cooktop and fridge Bathroom wall tiles – Artedomus INAX Sugie Mosaic in Hanten Bathroom floor tiles – Signorino Tapware – Phoenix Vivid Slimline series in Brushed Nickel Bathroom sink – Caroma Cube Undercounter Basin Freestanding bath – Kaldewei Vaio Duo Oval Bath with Overflow & Multi-fill We think you would enjoy this minimalist home by Studio Prineas abc
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Pureflor: The Australian Made Cleaning Solution Your Floor Deserves

As we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, the need to support local business is imperative. Polyflor's latest effort in the cleaning sphere, Pureflor, is an eco-friendly, Australian made cleaning solution that is both clean and safe to use on all hard and soft surfaces. Available in both a hard floor solution for benches, ceilings and floors, and a soft surface spray bottle for carpet, curtains and upholstery, Pureflor is the versatile, non-toxic home cleaner for the Australian family home. Pureflor is pH neutral, and contains only natural ingredients specially developed in a concentrated formulation. The cleaning solution removes the of toughest stains by breaking down and destroying the organic elements that cause the stains, soils and odours at their source. The result of extensive research and engineering, Pureflor has been launched as Polyflor’s premium cleaning solution. Being aware of the need for a product that is tough on stains while being chemical free, Polyflor's team have developed a product that is suited for the modern day that causes no harm to the environment, due to being 100% biodegradable. Pureflor proudly carries the Australian Made, Australian Grown logo. Dedicated solely to manufacturing and engineering nationally, Polyflor's products are proof of the quality and ingenuity of local business, and are an easy and eco-friendly way to not only clean your surfaces, but to give Australian industry a helping hand. Despite its strong cleaning power, Pureflor is soap free, meaning no soap scum build up. The unique recipe for Pureflor has been formulated with plant based enzymes that will not negatively affect the natural and good bacteria of your surfaces. The pH neutral and phosphate nature of the product will not damage your surfaces while you clean them, with the powerful and eco-positive formulated enzymes simply breaking down the organic material of the stain. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yVTHtNq030&t=17s[/embed] With a home-grown product that is environmentally friendly and chemical free, Pureflor by Polyflor is the cleaning solution your surfaces deserve, made in a way that our manufacturing industry needs. Polyflor polyflor.com.auabc
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Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

La Casa Rosa Is A Work Of Craft

It takes serious skill to realise a house as resolved as Luigi Rosselli’s latest residential project, La Casa Rosa. Located in Bronte, a coveted beachside suburb in Sydney’s inner-east, a quaint, neogothic-style residence finds itself as the subject of this Alts&Ads project; which sought to replace previous rear additions to the cottage and provide a young family with a home fit for their dreams, complete with a new living space, study and master suite. A Victorian-era neogothic-style cottage in the Sydney suburb of Bronte is the subject of this Alts&Ads project. When called upon to provide the cottage—an architectural relic of Queen Victoria’s reign—its new lease on life, architect Luigi Rosselli approached the project in true neogothic spirit, championing the skill and craft of the builder over and above the architects’ conceptualisation. Gathering together a team of esteemed local craftspeople, each highly skilled in their respective trades, Luigi, the project’s design architect, played a role perhaps best described as choreographer of craft. Working alongside him, Will Dangar oversaw the landscaping, aided by his creative stonemason, Nazih; Juliette Arent and Genevieve Hromas of interior design studio Arent & Pyke brought their love of intricate detail and the input of their talented team; Callum Coombe lent his skill in forming a brise-soleil of otherwise redundant terracotta roof tiles that he first honed in the construction of The Beehive2, also by Luigi Rosselli; Buildability Constructions assembled a crew of fine carpenters and formworkers; and we must not forget the amazing Stiven of Sydney Joinery, whose refined joinery is an integral feature of every room, together with the Architecture Stone Concept’s stonemasonry. La Casa Rosa is named after a holiday villa Luigi recalls from childhood, located on a hilltop overlooking Lago Maggiore (Italy) and named La Casa Rosa for its washed pink render. Thoughtfully designed and executed with precision and tact, no waste was made in the construction of La Casa Rosa, which is named after a holiday villa Luigi recalls from childhood, located on a hilltop overlooking Lago Maggiore (Italy) and named La Casa Rosa for its washed pink render. For one thing: the house is not large. It boasts no unnecessary rooms or superfluous gadgetry. “We made no alterations to the existing rooms at the front of the original house, and the new additions to the rear are well proportioned in relation to that structure,” explains Luigi. Also carefully preserved was the existing 1980s pool and the dense backyard vegetation that enriches the outdoor milieu with its organic, even unkempt, texture. The existing 1980s pool and the dense backyard vegetation were preserved and retained in the renovation works. Recycled roof tiles were employed to construct the brise soleil and the terracotta roof tiles to the front of the house would have been retained — “had the roofer not been so zealous in convincing the client to replace them,” says Luigi. Second-hand timber windows were inserted to the Victorian front façade and all demolition materials were specified for reuse or recycling. This house is air conditioning free; instead ceiling fans are employed for mechanical cooling in combination with good insulation, large eaves, and sun shading to all windows. Trees and water help to cool the backyard space. Through the short winter months heating is provided by hydronic panels. La Casa Rosa is air conditioning free. Ceiling fans are employed for mechanical cooling in combination with good insulation, large eaves, and sun shading to all windows. The new structure to the rear of the property is constructed in pink concrete, achieved by adding a mineral pigment to the whole thickness of the material. The name of the pigment, ‘Flamingo’ fits well with the two concrete feet on the ground and long cantilevered neck of the rear elevation. For Luigi, La Casa Rosa holds many happy memories his ‘young age’, “hopefully La Nuova Casa Rosa will hold similar joys for the two young children who will grow up there,” he says. Luigi Rosselli Architects luigirosselli.com Photography by Prue Ruscoe We think you might also like Homage to Oscar by Luigi Rosselli Architects abc