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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Armadillo x House Of Grey Issue A Gentle Reminder For Us All

How often do you get to experience the blissful stillness of being wholly immersed in nature? Not often enough, Armadillo reminds us with the release of its latest collection of consciously designed and sustainably produced rugs, Ellipse. Conceived by collaboration between the Australian-born, globally eminent rug brand and London-based design practice House of Grey, the new range takes us on a journey of textures, from the raw and organic to the sensual and refined. Bringing organic forms, tones and textures into home interiors, the Ellipse collection stands to satisfy that insatiable yearning to be with nature. To celebrate the launch of the collaboration collection, Armadillo has unveiled an immersive campaign, bringing Ellipse to life in an experiential installation of multiple terrains, underpinned by a philosophy of designing spaces that cultivate a gentler pace of life. Surrounded by authentic elements of nature transposed into the industrial-esque urban setting of the warehouse next door to Armadillo’s Sydney showroom, each of the collections’ five rugs — Etoile, Terra, Palus, Umbra and Perilune — becomes a unique work of art. Further to the physical campaign installation, an enchanting cinematic short film shot by award-winning Australian director Glendyn Ivin, captures the moving landscape and tactile presence of the collection, while a digital rendition of the installation opens the experience up to the internet’s infinite reach. Designed to incite visual and tactile exploration as well as moments of introspection, a pared back essentiality defines the collections’ overarching aesthetic. Easy on the eyes and tempting to touch, Ellipse is Armadillo's most materially adventurous range of rugs to date, featuring handcrafted premium jute, New Zealand wool and pure silk. In true Armadillo form, no compromise has been made between ethics and aesthetics in the making and unveiling of this incredible collection. Shining a light on the synergy between nature and Armadillo’s altruistic philosophy of design as a doorway to a better future, the Ellipse campaign and accompanying collection resound the principles of sustainability and wellbeing in design. “Our intention is to remind people that by making conscious choices and weaving organic elements into the home, we can satisfy that insatiable craving for nature,” explains Armadillo’s managing director, James Watts. Evidencing that the brand’s commitment to sustainability is more than just a matter of lip service, all living elements utilised in the campaign have subsequently been replanted, reused or recycled, leaving an as light an eco-footprint as possible. Rhythm of Nature rhythmofnature.armadillo-co.com Armadillo armadillo-co.com Immersive campaign photography by Daniel Goode. Ellipse collection photography by Emma Lee, styling by Louisa Grey. abc
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Modern Luxury: Easy Living Without Compromise

Developed by custom home builder, Mazzei, in collaboration with architect Dan Webster of Webster Architecture, Ferndale Road pushes the boundaries of modern residential design, and sets the bar for customised, premium living just that bit higher. The impressive facade that offers a glimpse into the front sitting area sets the tone for this unique home. Yet, it’s what is behind the full height custom timber door that makes living here a delight. “Liveability is really important and so while the exterior of a home is vital, we spend the majority of time on the inside of the home,” explains Dan. “Connection between spaces, and flexibility in how different parts of the home are used is crucial to its longevity. And this is what we design for – long-term homes for families that grow and change over time.” While the first floor has been fitted out with three bedrooms, a study and rumpus room, the ground floor is where daily life happens. Developed for ultimate convenience and the bespoke preferences of the occupants, the home is fitted out with V-ZUG kitchen appliances: a combi-steam oven and combair oven, an induction cooktop, rangehood and dishwasher. All defined by deluxe aesthetics and intelligent yet simple usability. “A couple of years ago, we decided to assess our appliance manufacturers to find a brand that would align with the type of homes we wanted to build: premium, custom and high-end. With their technology, usability, aesthetic and bespoke capabilities, V-ZUG stood out above everyone else,” says Zeb Woodhatch, director at Mazzei. Renowned for its boutique luxury appliances, V-ZUG caters for a consumer who is after an intelligent yet easy-to-use appliance system with stand-out visual expression. “While the sleek look of the ovens and cooktops blends in with the interior aesthetics, the ease of use and function is exceptional,” says Dan of V-ZUG’s unique blend of form and performance. Even though the appliances are straightforward to use, they allow for flexibility to achieve more advanced cooking outcomes – a perfect choice for consumers with varying degrees of enthusiasm, skill or appetite to learn; and a superior option for a custom dwelling, built around the inhabitants' specific needs. Providing a unique combination of ease of use, flexibility and timeless visual appeal, V-ZUG is the must-have for a premium space that's designed for personal taste, ultimate convenience - and for years to come. V-ZUG vzug.com.auabc
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12 Leading Ladies in Design

Crossing cultures, oceans and design disciplines, this list is just a small example of some of the outstanding women in design that are making their mark. Adele McNab For architect Adele McNab, when it comes to her selection criteria for taking on a project, Adele’s sole specification is that “the clients have their heart in the project.” Her belief is that, with an emotionally invested client and a collaborative project team on board, architecture can achieve anything – from increasing the efficiency of everyday lives to improving the health and wellbeing of residents and users; from making living in our cities more affordable to making our built environment more sustainable. Read the full story here   Cushla McFadden / TomMarkHenry While Cushla McFadden prides TomMarkHenry’s ability to flex to the client’s needs and wishes – rather than rolling out the same design time after time – in her own work she continues to return to early influences like Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson and Le Corbusier for inspiration. “I’ve always been influenced by modernism and quite minimal design,” she says. “It was a nice reflection piece doing my own home to see that that is still very much the case.” Read the full story here   Anna Fahey and Bailey Meredith / Baina For two years, Anna and Bailey worked together before the conversation of collaboration became too loud to ignore any longer and the foundation for luxury towel brand Baina was born. From the early days of friendship they had often spoken about someday creating a brand, though they’d always imagined it would be strongly tied to fashion. But as is often the case with life and experience their plans evolved. Read the full story here   Sook Kim / Teeland Architects “I believe that design has to work on a practical level as well as achieving an aesthetic beauty,” Sook says. “For example in a home, the kitchen, bathroom and laundry are important. If these spaces are well designed, then it can be such a pleasure to spend time in these spaces. The daily ritual of bathing and preparing food can become a wonderful experience.” Read the full story here   Mims Radford / Good Things Store Founder of ethical, slow design online shop Good Things Store Mims Radford shares: “It would bring me so much joy to see our fast world tilt towards kinder, slower, better ways of consuming. We are starting to see glimpses of it, but it still feels like a bandwagon to jump on, rather than the norm. I know we can’t change the whole world, but I totally believe as consumers the power is in our hands, and if I can change the way a consumer buys just one thing through Good Things, that’s a vote for change.” Read the full story here   Agatha Carolina and Chrisye Octaviani / Bitte Design Studio Bitte was set up by peers Agatha Carolina and Chrisye Octaviani in 2012, having studied together. Today as creative partners they lead a team of five including three interior designers, a senior architect and a product designer to undertake a range of interior and architecture projects. “Our personal experience is that we started Bitte from the bottom. It is like walking on the staircase. We need to start from the very bottom to reach the top. That way we can appreciate more, and the most important thing is we can get more control of things because we’ve overcome all those steps before,” says Chrisye Octaviani. Read the full story here   Arianna Lelli Mami and Chiara Di Pinto / Studiopepe Milan-based interior designers Studiopepe have built a global following with an approach that features bold colours and striking geometries. “We like working with classic shapes and creating variations on archetypes using materials and colours to reinterpret a project or piece rather than [inventing] unusual forms,” says Chiara. “The result of this is a very simple, yet very refined design that could be from the Art Deco era or the 80s, but still looks contemporary.” Read the full story here   Hedy Ritterman / Artist Hedy Ritterman is an installation and photographic artist based in Melbourne. We toured her home where each object and artefact is curated, ready to be captured on film. A founding member of the cultural collective, Contemporary Collective, with a number of individual and group exhibitions, Hedy’s home is a visual and tactile environment. “My approach is to photograph what I see, not trick things up to create the right image,” she says. Read the full story here   Katie Lockhart / Interior designer New Zealand designer Katie Lockhart’s first foray into design was in a covetable role as design assistant to Karen Walker. She then Katie traded it in to pursue new experiences abroad, and it was her time in Milan that she considers as her true design education. “The editor of Casa Da Abitare at the time showed me around her newly renovated house. She had a yoga room with tatami mats. I had never seen anything like this,” she remembers. “I loved how Italians could dream up realities.” Read the full story here   We think you might like to read this book review of Ground-Breaking architecture by female architects.abc
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Meet The Leading Ladies Of Sydney’s Art Scene

For anyone secretly longing for an ‘in’ to Sydney’s contemporary art scene, Art Month Sydney 2021 serves as the ultimate open ticket. This year’s rendition of the annual local arts festival, which runs from March 4 through 28, comprises a treasure trove of installations, exhibitions, workshops and talks aptly curated to stir the art lover in all of us and reinvigorate the arts, post the sector-stifling pandemic of late. Well-rounded and provocative, the festival program is the fruit of the inclusive agenda, conscientious curation and dedication to the cause of Emma O’Neill, Gina Mobayed and Rhianna Walcott et al. We spoke to Emma, Gina and Rhianna about the unique paths that define their successful curatorial careers; each of their roles in putting Art Month Sydney 2021 together; and what makes for their favourite exhibited pieces or the things that we must see/do.

Emma O’Neill

As festival director, Emma wears the pants in 2021. It’s the 30 year old’s debut year in the role and perhaps the most important one ever in Art Month Sydney’s 10 years running — a challenge to which she has risen with poise and prowess. But who is she? “I began with a love of words and art and was lucky enough to combine both passions,” she shares. With a professional bio that reads ‘writer, editor and marketing consultant’, Emma didn’t exactly set out for an arts career. Beginning in publishing, it was a stint at Christie’s, assisting at Bazaar Art Jakarta, in 2015 that incited her passion to make art more accessible to all, setting her on the path to her esteemed position today. Between then and now, most notably, Emma has been a writer and editorial assistant for Art Asia Pacific Magazine in Hong Kong, held a two-year tenure as editor for Art Collector magazine and, starting in 2018, established herself as the marketing and communications manager for Art Month Sydney. “Moving from the magazine to behind the festival was a chance to bear witness to the power of public programming,” she tells us. “I get a real thrill from creating opportunities for people to connect with contemporary art and artists.” Here’s what else she shared...

What differentiates Art Month Sydney 2021 from previous years?

Events this year are slower and more intimate, paying respect to social distancing and leaning into the reduced pace and less hectic social lives we’ve all adopted because of COVID-19. There are greater opportunities for people to interact and connect with the art, artists and galleries involved. There’s also a lot of excitement from galleries and the community… and that’s really gratifying to experience. With a dynamic new group of artists and curators lending their expertise and more reasons than ever to support the arts, we are proud to be bringing the festival into the new decade and celebrating the city’s vibrant art scene at this pivotal moment.

What has been your aspiration in curating the program?

Art Month is all about inspiring people to take the next step in their journey as a lover/collector of art, whatever that is. With this in mind, I programmed to highlight the richness of contemporary art not only in inner Sydney, but the greater Sydney area. I wanted it to be a celebration of diversity and to show people to pockets of Sydney’s art scene that they may not have seen — and then use the program to curate their own journey.

Top 5 Art Month Sydney 2021 events to see/do

Sullivan+Strumpf x Sydney Dance Company performance exhibition 3pm-4pm Saturday 6 March Sullivan+Strumpf Edible Adventure: Forage to feast 6.30pm Wednesday 24 March Galerie pompom $150 Art at Night walking tours Varied hours over the course of 4-28 March Here, there and everywhere Clay Date: A collaborative ephemeral clay sculpture workshop 1pm-4.30pm Sunday 14 March Gallery Lane Cove $30 Collector’s Space: You Never Forget Your First 10am-3pm Thursdays through Sundays between 4-28 March 17b Oxford Street, Paddington  

Gina Mobayed

At 36 years old, Gina is the youngest regional gallery director to have been appointed in Australia, which is kind of a big deal. In fact, the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery director is so revered amongst her peers that, as festival director, Emma O’Neill appointed her as curator of the Collector’s Space for Art Month Sydney 2021 — Gina’s rendition of this perennial festival highlight, You Never Forget Your First, has garnered much anticipation.

What has been your aspiration in curating the Collector’s Space?

Sydney has a few well-known collectors and they have been prominent for a while, so they tend to be the ones that get talked about a lot. Coming from a regional perspective, I’ve wanted to introduce Sydney to collectors from outside of the city and its mainstream arts scene and to start new conversations about collecting.  

Gina Mobayed [presents] an exhibition which offers a unique and rare insight into some of Sydney’s most interesting and adventurous private art collections” — Rhianna Walcott, Artereal Gallery

 

Favourite 3 pieces from the exhibition

Lee Godie Egyptian Girls, date unknown Mixed media on canvas 42 x 54.5cm Collection of Evan Hughes Timothy Cook Kulama 2007 natural ochres on paper 88 x 69cm Collection of Michelle Newton Gemma Smith Adaptable (Pink/Yellow) 2006 Acrylic on aircraft plywood 65cm x 50cm Collection of Jasper Knight and Isabell Toland  

Rhianna Walcott

Rhianna has been coveting a curatorial career since she was just 15. Evidently it’s paid off. Now in her early 30s, this year she celebrates ten years at Artereal Gallery, where she is currently associate director. Through Artereal — a stalwart participating gallery — Rhianna has been involved in Art Month Sydney since its inauguration. In more recent years, her involvement has stepped up a notch, since taking a seat as an official board member for the festival.

What’s on at Artereal Gallery for Art Month Sydney 2021?

We’re excited to present a solo exhibition of new works by renowned video artist Hayden Fowler. Titled 'Captive Born’, the exhibition presents a new body of work that continues the artist's exploration of the myriad ways industrialised humanity and the natural world connect, particularly in this epoch of irreversible human environmental impact. We’re also hosting a program of specially curated events on Saturday 20 March from 10am-12pm. The day will feature an installation by Patrizia Biondi and readings from poet Eunice Adada, followed by a panel talking in which writer and cultural commentator Neha Kale is joined by Saha Jones, Lisa Paulsen and exhibiting artist Patrizia Biondi for a discussion on the importance of ethical art collecting in a climate crisis.

Top 3 Art Month Sydney 2021 events to see/do

Collector’s Space: You Never Forget Your First 10am-3pm Thursdays through Sundays between 4-28 March 17b Oxford Street, Paddington Parramatta Artist Studios x Paramount House Hotel 7am-4pm Monday through Sunday between 4-28 March Paramount House Hotel, Surry Hills Virtual Forest Bath walk 7pm-8pm Friday 5 March I.C.E. Parramatta

Art Month Sydney plays an integral role in celebrating the extraordinary individuals and organisations that shape the city of Sydney’s art ecosystem and this year just might be its best yet. It comes at the perfect time to tempt Sydney-siders back into galleries, encouraging the wider community to reconnect with the city’s creative industries — consider us there! Art Month Sydney artmonthsydney.com.au   We think you might also like to read The Secret Lives (And Private Collections) Of Art Addictsabc
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The Pebble Side Tables by jam Are As Practical As They Are Stylish

Equal parts functional and sculptural, and crafted with the finest materials including Australian timbers, the Pebble Side Tables by jam are a suitable addition to any living space. Designed by Andrew Carvolth, the tables are the result of a reductive design process, in which the design itself seeks to soften the form of a standard table. The conventions of a standard table do not feature within the Pebble design, with its smooth, round edging a subtle statement made by the designer, to rewrite the conventions of the customary table. Imbued with a strong sense of materiality, the Pebble Side Tables reveal the warmth, colour and grain of solid timber.  Available in either Tasmanian Oak, Blackwood or American White Ash with blue lacquer, the ‘Pebbles’ are a testament to great design and local manufacture. Timber, expertly sourced, cut and treated, and smooth to the touch. Drawing on over 45 years experience, jam by JamFactory presents a uniquely Australian designed and made collection of furniture, lighting and objects.  Jam collaborates with a diverse array of local designers, makers and fabricators, combining traditional skills with modern manufacturing. This mix of individual creativity and skill combined with an emphasis on materials and processes shapes a distinctive voice in Australian design.  All Pebble Side Tables are backed by a three year structural warranty, and the promise of Australian manufacturing that ensures the material and craftsmanship is something you can trust. Delivery times range between 8-10 weeks within Australia. To order or to browse, head over to j-a-m.com.au/collection/pebble.abc
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Cosentino Collaboration Challenges Design Boundaries

Sleek and lightweight compared to its heavy counterparts, Dekton® by Cosentino offers the versatility to cover every surface in the household, but can also double as an exterior, in this instance for a waterfall.  A breathtaking, 22-metre man-made waterfall – the biggest of its kind in the southern hemisphere – is the result of an exciting collaboration between Cosentino and Australian designers Waterforms International, for the new Waterfall luxury residential development by Crown Group in Waterloo, Sydney. cosentino waterfall 2 A recognised leader in design innovation, Cosentino is known for its collaborations with local and international designers seeking to challenge design norms and reframe the boundaries of what’s possible.  Kate Deakin-Bell, Marketing for Cosentino Oceania, said that the company’s desire to challenge the norm has been a part of Cosentino’s DNA for generations. “Just because it hasn’t been done before doesn’t mean it can’t be – that’s always been Cosentino’s philosophy,” she said.  “This project excited us on many levels – the waterfall is not only staggeringly beautiful and jaw-dropping in its scale, but it plays an important role in the urban greening revolution happening in Australia.” [gallery type="rectangular" size="medium" ids="108738,108736"]   Inspired by the lush tropical landscapes of Indonesia, the one-of-a-kind waterfall is located on the building’s facade where it’s set amid a lush vertical garden of over 5,000 tropical plants. The installation is designed to give urban dwellers the chance to connect with nature in their daily lives in order to boost wellbeing. The waterfall was initially to be made from granite, but the traditional material’s design limitations quickly became apparent – it was too heavy, high-maintenance and unsightly joints would be on display. Dekton® provided the perfect alternative. cosentino waterfall 4 “One of the great things about Dekton® is the size of the sheets, which means fewer joints,” says Dirk Slotboom, Managing Director of Waterforms International. “It’s also lightweight, maintenance-free, impervious to water and had the exact texture we wanted here. It really is a superior product and we’d certainly use it again in other projects requiring a lightweight, easy-maintenance material.” “There’s a growing shift towards biophilia in design – the idea that buildings that allow us to interact with nature, whether it’s the feel of grass underfoot or the sound of water – make us happier and healthier. This project brings that concept to life for the local community, and we’re thrilled to be part of it,” says Kate. Cosentino’s full interview with Waterforms International regarding the collaboration is featured below. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4PA6Zp7oAk&feature=youtu.be[/embed]abc
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Cantilever and Kett Celebrate The Seamless Experience of Togetherness with EDIT

The kitchen is the space where plans for the day ahead are discussed, the events of the day just past recounted - and the stories between friends and families exchanged. More often than not, it's the kitchen that facilitates a meaningful intersection of opinions and creates an opportunity to exchange ideas. With the shared character and bonding role of the space in mind, the design process behind EDIT couldn't be more fitting. Created by the design-focused kitchen manufacturer Cantilever in collaboration with furniture design studio Kett, the process was a genuine meeting of the minds, opinions and perspective. 'The collaborative part of the process, that constant dialogue, is always the most exciting part of what we do,' says Travis Dean, Managing Director of Cantilever. 'Because we all have our opinions of how things should or shouldn't be done, you need to be challenged to push through and create new opportunities. And that's been one of the great threads of this project,' he adds. That inherently collaborative approach, and readiness to embrace other perspectives and ways of thinking translate into an inviting space that's convenient, seamless and intuitive. While by no means invisible with its stunning rounded finishes and natural material and colour palettes, EDIT blends in with the habits of the occupants, bringing the focus to those meaningful shared routines and daily encounters. Kylie Forbes, the Creative Director at Cantilever, talks to the idea of the kitchen being so functional it simply disappears during those day-to-day activities: 'We want our clients to inhabit the space and almost forget that it was designed to be effortless,' she explains. 'We want for people to be absorbed in the recipe they're making, or the people they're talking to. We want for the family to be the hero of the space.' [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="108698,108699"] Simultaneously, this boutique kitchen's robust materiality grounds the space, bringing the focus to its physicality and the tangible connection to everyday rituals - an essential aspect of dwellings where occupants can thrive and nurture relationships in the post-digital world. Justin Hutchinson, Kett's Design Director, explains the vital connection between physicality and importance of daily rituals EDIT celebrates: 'Not only are we living in a world where we're losing the essence of the physicality of the things around us,' says Justin, pointing to the evolution from a vinyl, through a CD to a digital file as an example. 'In many ways, we're living in the times where things that bring meaning to our lives are disappearing. This collaboration was very much about returning to that tangible quality that we've lost - and through that, we wanted to bring back the importance of those daily rituals,' he explains. Conceived out of an incredible collaboration and designed to foster innate connections forged within a kitchen space, EDIT is a refined design solution that promises a tactile and seamless experience of togetherness. Cantilever cantileverinteriors.com/edit-kitchenabc
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Aesop’s New Store In Singapore Goes Au Naturel

It doesn’t matter if one steps into an Aesop store without intending to buy anything from the skin care brand. An Aesop retail space is a destination unto itself, designed to persuade with artless charm. Gentle spaces, beguiling scents and invitations, both spoken and unspoken, to reimagine daily ablutions are all part of the package. Beyond all this is also a rather noble intent: “Every Aesop store is designed with sensitivity to its context, each telling a story unique to its location,” says Selwyn Low, Director at FARM. The Singapore design studio was appointed to design Aesop’s latest store at ION Orchard. For their second project for Aesop, FARM took inspiration from the sleepy nutmeg orchards that once grew where Singapore’s main shopping belt, Orchard Road, now stretches. Sweeping curves at the entrance of the store embrace customers into the belly of the interior where a seamless flow of spaces continues throughout the curved plan. An understated wash of earthen tones provides a suitably calming backdrop. “We developed a family of textures and tones by applying a sand-based coating across various materials such as cast concrete, stucco paint and epoxy to unify them, creating a seamless and controlled palette in the space,” says Low. Shelving in the store references the patient process of drying nutmeg and mace where spices originally rested in shallow porous metal trays set on timber racks. Here, galvanised steel and solid unvarnished timber provide the elemental frame on which products are displayed. The intention was to invert the relationship of the vertical and horizontal structural members of the nutmeg drying racks. “Rather than slotting lightweight metal trays into chunky timber plinths, teak planks are supported by perforated folded metal sheets,” Low describes. Holding court at the centre of the store is a basin for customers to sample different products—an integral part of the Aesop experience. FARM set out to elevate the process of washing and cleansing. Instead of a concave receptacle, the basin is expressed as a counter of sorts. A flat top of perforated steel allows water to flow through the permeable surface and disappear almost magically. Aesop ION provides a reprieve from the bustling mall it sits within, a welcome alternative to the hyped-up, fast-paced ways of shopping in Singapore. As for that customer who didn’t intend to buy anything? It’s likely he changed his mind.
Photography by Khoo Guo Jie
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The Habitus Edit On Design Classics For The Home-Workplace

In this edition of The Habitus Edit, we look at some of the most esteemed design icons that the world has grown to know and love. These icons are not only defined by great design, but their ability to seamlessly blend the comforts of residential living and the functional workspace for the modern employee.  Featuring chairs, desks and storage units from revered brands including Herman Miller, Vitra, Design Within Reach and Laker, the design possibilities are endless with Living Edge.  Product-led and editorially curated, the Habitus Edit offers a unique perspective on the exceptional designers and brands across the Into-Pacific region. Dive in and explore the Habitus Edit on Design Classics For A New Era of Work today. abc
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Bringing Colour To The Bathroom: 2021 Forecast

As the desire to create inspired spaces grows in tandem with more time being spent at home, a renewed appreciation for colour is transforming the way we live. For 2021, colour forecasts are about creating environments to sink into, where comfort and contentment are delivered through deep, luxurious tones that ebb and flow between cool, textured tones to rich and moody palettes. When it comes to design, colours are brought to life through their interplay with textures, where fabrics, metals and natural materials add depth and personality, taking browns and oranges to copper and brass or finding hints of cerulean in the way light reflects off a particular cut of timber. As an authority on the world of colour, this year Dulux have released their annual Colour Trends, a forecast that leans into a year that is very much about recovering from the year before. Categorising the colours into trends of Retreat, Nourish and Reset – the trend report paints a picture of spa-like spaces, offering a roadmap for how we can redefine our relationship with our home, office and leisure spaces. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the bathroom, where the traditional whites and neutrals are giving way to bold colour combinations, tranquil palettes, and natural tones. When paired with lustrous finishes from Caroma's bathroom range, bathrooms are becoming even more of a retreat experience, where colour, texture and materiality offer new and exciting ways to create a unique sanctuary. A leading name in design-driven bathrooms for over 75 years, Caroma's deep understanding of luxury living plays out in their premium Vogue collection of bathroom products. Industry-leading technology and customisable options allow for personalisation and self-expression. Chrome, black, brushed nickel, gunmetal and brushed brass – Caroma's Vogue collection weaves effortlessly with the colour palettes for 2021, with a colourway perfect for every design aesthetic.

Retreat 

While many of us are desperately looking for ways to escape the house, the retreat palette encourages us to reconnect with those very spaces, tapping into the romance of nostalgia to have us recreate spaces that feel comfortable and safe. Think warm neutrals and rich blues, colours that you can layer on top of each other to create a welcoming environment. When drawing these colours into the bathroom, deepen the palette and create texture with fixtures and finishes in matte black. Offering a touch of edge that will draw out the deep base notes of your home’s colours, the black will transform your bathroom into a private world of your own. For an earthier palette that utilises deep dusty reds, switch out the black for a brushed nickel finish, where the metallised finish will create a synchronicity between colour and texture to enrich the bathroom space. [caption id="attachment_108974" align="alignnone" width="1170"] DULUX AUSTRALIA. DULUX COLOUR FORECAST 2021, RETREAT PALETTE. STYLIST: BREE LEECH PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE BAKER[/caption]

Nourish

A nature-inspired bathroom of classic white and earthy tones is perfect for those who prefer a minimal look. Rediscover your connection to the outdoors and bring in simple, textural and nurturing hues to create a calming oasis. Experiment with mossy, sage greens, turmeric and citrus hues which can be elevated by selecting products that juxtapose the natural with the luxurious. In Caroma’s new Urbane II range, the brushed brass colourway promises to inject a sumptuous finish into the bathroom space. Creating a statement look that will draw the eye to the oversized showerhead or sleek curved tapware, the brass works perfectly with a more paired back design aesthetic, where the overally look is soft, nurturing and wholly relaxing. [caption id="attachment_108975" align="alignnone" width="1170"] DULUX AUSTRALIA.
DULUX COLOUR FORECAST 2021, NOURISH PALETTE.
STYLIST: BREE LEECH
PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE BAKER[/caption]

Reset

Dulux's Reset palette plays on stronger colours, allowing a more playful side to the bathroom retreat.  Inspired by tones of the 70s, this trend is all about creating energy and vibrancy through design, where bold statements and sweeping shapes give us an opportunity to embrace all that comes our way. In spaces that embrace this aesthetic, there can be a tendency to overwork or overdo a space in a way that becomes visually chaotic and unappealing. When finishing off a bathroom, the Urbane II colour finish in chrome brings a traditional aspect to a more retro space. Allowing the statement colours or décor to sing, chrome finishes provide a sleek, classic touch, ensuring the space doesn’t become overly kitsch. If you’re wanting an option that is a bit different, a gunmetal finish offers the timelessness of chrome with a darker, more satin finish. Perfect for drawing out darker tones in your bathroom space, the gunmetal creates a tactility that can soften a vibrant design. When harmonised with white, vibrant pops of fun retro colour's Daintree and Hot Cillie give a bold, vibrant statement, while Light Ceramic and Treeless have a softer side. Mix it up with Caroma's Vogue collection – Urbane II or Liano II range – for a personalised bathroom experience. [caption id="attachment_108976" align="alignnone" width="1170"] DULUX AUSTRALIA. DULUX COLOUR FORECAST 2021, RESET PALETTE. STYLIST: BREE LEECH PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE BAKER[/caption] Colour has a transformative power that allows for spaces within the home to feel, and the bathroom is no exception. Whether it be bold, striking colours or calming natural hues, bathrooms through colour, become a space to retreat, nourish and reset. Whatever your preference, the Caroma Vogue Collection  – Urbane II or Liano II range – offers a personalised bathroom experience, allowing you to create spaces that are completely and utterly your own. Discover the full Caroma Vogue collection.abc
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Planning For Drainage Perfection

One of the biggest mistakes made during the planning phase of commercial and residential construction projects is to overlook drainage requirements. Under-estimating its importance, builders and designers often leave this task until most of the construction is complete. This is a mistake. The ramifications of drains that are non-compliant or not fit-for-purpose can be serious. Inappropriate systems have the potential to not only cause structural issues and invite problems like mould and bacterial growth, but also affect the broader environment. They can contribute to salinity, erosion, and reduced water quality; and have a negative impact on aquatic biodiversity. The solution to these potential problems – the pathway to drainage perfection – is planning. When it comes to drainage, designers and specifiers need to choose wisely; they need to consider it during the earliest stages of planning. Location & style In the search for drainage perfection, location is the first consideration. Builders and designers should ensure there is enough space to accommodate all drains and that there is adequate access to the greater plumbing and drainage systems. Importantly, the location also determines the most appropriate drain type: a traditional drain with a single, centralised drainage point or a linear drain such as those offered by specialist drainage solutions provider, Stormtech?   Linear drains are particularly suited to locations on indoor/outdoor divides. Featuring a low profile and streamlined body that allows level plane drainage beside the door frame, they also boast a contemporary, streamlined design. On top of that, linear drains can be placed anywhere in the wet area, and only require two-way floor grading toward the channel, as opposed to the four-way grading required by traditional grates. When installing them, however, it is essential to allow for either multiple outlets or a deeper channel, depending on the situation. Regulations Having chosen an appropriate drainage type, the next step involves sourcing a product that is of the highest quality and meets all the relevant regulations. In Australia, these include AS 3740:2010, AS 4654.2:2012, and the Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA) 2016. An industry leader, Stormtech is a long-time member of the Standards Australia Committee and has played an important role in the formulation of regulations concerning several plumbing products, including linear drainage. Specifiers can rest assured that all its drainage products meet all industry standards and are of the highest quality. Indeed, they are suitable for those seeking ‘drainage perfection’. Stormtech stormtech.com.auabc
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Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Studio Prineas Surprise And Delight With This Federation House Addition

The story of CNR Virginia, one of Studio Prineas’ most recently completed houses, begins just as so many other quintessential Australian residential alts&ads projects do. Taking place in an up-and-coming suburb of Sydney's inner-west—in this case, Kensington—it centres on an aesthetically charming yet pragmatically antiquated federation house and a contemporary young family of four. The family engaged the locally-based architecture and design practice Studio Prineas to restore the classically beautiful existing abode whilst sympathetically marrying it with contemporary finesse and render it fit for modern family life. The heritage facade of the renovated federation house in inner-west Sydney is undisturbed by the alterations and additions made by Studio Prineas at the property's rear  

The rear addition is intentionally designed to exist in juxtaposition with the original federation house while not disturbing the heritage façade in any way.

  “The CNR Virginia home is all about the marriage of heritage and contemporary and, as such, the layout has volumes of contrast throughout,” says Studio Prineas’ principal, Eva-Marie Prineas, of the resulting family home. Demarcated by a sunken floor level and distinctively contemporary vernacular, the rear addition is intentionally designed to exist in juxtaposition with the original federation house while not disturbing the heritage façade in any way. The new addition is an ‘L’ shape internal plan that encompasses the kitchen, living and dining, and also interlocks with the swimming pool area. Though distinct in materiality, the playful volumes of the rear extension are reminiscent of those of the original structure in form. These lofty spaces subtly reference the grand scale of the Federation-era rooms in the original home. Borrowed scenery becomes the backyard of CNR Virginia, thanks to the property’s fortuitous position, which backs onto a golf course with lush surrounds.  

Borrowed scenery becomes the backyard of CNR Virginia, thanks to the property’s fortuitous position, which backs onto a golf course with lush surrounds.

  Borrowed scenery becomes the backyard of CNR Virginia, thanks to the property’s fortuitous position, which backs onto a golf course with lush surrounds. Studio Prineas replaced the rear solid fence with a metal palisade, allowing the garden to assume the grounds and bushlands beyond its fence line.  

The integration of the backyard, pool and outdoor dining with the indoor kitchen and living spaces has become the source of year-round enjoyment for the young family.

  “This sense of expanding horizons was also employed in our design of the swimming pool,” says Eva-Marie. “With the Sydney climate being well-suited to generous use of glazing, and the home’s location playing an integral role in the overall design, we used fixed glazing to the house as pool fencing on two sides. In doing so, we were able to create a completely uninterrupted and expansive view of the outdoors.” The lofty interior spaces of the addition designed by Studio Prineas subtly reference the grand scale of the rooms in the original federation house. Finding a seamless unison between old and new is a common architectural challenge. In CNR Virginia, Studio Prineas has masterfully achieved such a result through an expressed acknowledgement and profound respect for the existing federation house and the way in which the many differences between ‘then’ and ‘now’ are embraced and conserved through design.  

The lofty spaces of the addition subtly reference the grand scale of the rooms in the original federation house.

  A thoughtful selection of sustainable materials substantiates the studio’s conservational approach to design. “We always choose locally made materials and furnishings when we can,” says Eva-Marie. In the case of CNR Virginia, recycled bricks were sourced from a nearby brickyard in Alexandria, Sydney, and the deck is made of Blackbutt, an Australian hardwood. Having resided in their federation house turned contemporary family home for just over a year now, Studio Prineas’ clients are decidedly pleased with how the project has turned out. “They’ve shared their appreciation for how the rear addition is concealed from the street, saying that guests are often surprised when they walk through the doors,” says Eva-Marie. More importantly, from a lifestyle perspective, word is the integration of the backyard, pool and outdoor dining with the indoor kitchen and living spaces has become the source of year-round enjoyment. Studio Prineas studioprineas.com.au Photography by Chris Warnes Dissections Recycled brick for new external walls Cedar weatherboards with clear deck oil finish for new external walls 30 x 30 cedar battens with clear deck oil finish Blackbutt decking with clear deck oil finish Bizazza mosaic Black Vetricolour 20 Dulux Domino for existing external walls Dulux Vivid White for interior walls Better Tiles Ceramic Mosaic tile 23 x 23mm White Paperock Black kitchen joinery Platinum honed grey marble kitchen benchtop Astrawalker bathroom tapware in matte black Rogerseller Strap Series bathroom accessories in matte black Inlite Delta deep stair adjustable downlight in white Inlite Delta HELI 1 LED WW wall light in white Cult Louis Poulsen AJ50 wall light in black Jardan Nook sofas Koskela Quadrant sofa, Brolga Armchairs, and Ames Vibrant Living Rug Project 82 and Mark Tuckey coffee tables We think you might also like House Lincoln by THOSE Architectsabc