About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Conversations

Riding The Wave

Habitus: What led you to where you are?

Salvador Farrajota: The path to starting my own practice is probably like many other architects; university, work experience and registration, then attempting some private work for family and friends while still being employed full time. I spent 10 years at Ellivo (Brisbane-based firm), starting out as a student through to becoming a registered architect. I gained experience in a variety of typologies working for a range of clients. It probably was not until my boss at the time, and mentor, approached me to help with his new family home that it clicked for me. After delivering predominately medium to large-scaled projects for many years, I felt that I needed a change and a new challenge.

What does home mean to you?

Somewhere I feel comfortable, that’s not too big but has something for everyone, and Brisbane is that for me. [caption id="attachment_111455" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Bayview Terrace, Wavell Heights[/caption]

How does your home reflect your passions, interests and creativity?

Brisbane is a great city. I’ve lived here for 18 years now and in the last half a dozen years in particular, I’ve seen the city develop into a vibrant and diverse place, particularly in the inner ring suburbs. Music/art/design and the general creative scene has been growing from strength to strength in which I immerse myself in whenever I can. [caption id="attachment_111453" align="alignnone" width="1170"] House 1, Tarragindi[/caption]

How do you balance personal and professional life?

Lots of lists, managing clients’ expectations and good communication have kept life reasonably balanced. As the portfolio of work slowly grows so does our profile and I’m in the process of growing the studio.

How do you split your time between work and play?

Anything that allows me to clear my mind. Riding custom motorcycles have become a passion in recent years. The custom design aspect of motorcycles is what drew me in initially and the lifestyle, the inclusive community and travel associated with it has kept me interested. [caption id="attachment_111447" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Prospect Terrace, Hamilton, Queensland. Photo by Andy Macpherson.[/caption]

What obstacles have you had to overcome?

It was a confidence thing for me. I knew that I would never be the best designer, so I focused on trying to become a well-rounded architect (and still working on it), particularly important as I’ve essentially been operating as a sole practitioner. Looking after your mental health is also important, I am passionate about my profession, but I don’t live to work. [caption id="attachment_111452" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Eldernell Terrace, Hamilton[/caption]

What’s something you wished you had known before setting out on this career path?

There are too many to list and it’s probably impossible to fully prepare yourself for anything anyway, but if I could pass on any advice to young architects, it would be to learn as much about as many things as possible, and if you can’t get these opportunities from your job, find somewhere else where you can.

Why do you believe culture, art and design are important?

It allows us to tell the story of a place, reflect on the past and look to the future. In my opinion, art and design as a reflection of culture are undefined, anyone can participate, and anyone can learn from those who create it. The Artificial theartificial.com.auabc
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ARC - Feature

A House Built Around Trees

Drawn to Austin Maynard Architects for the studio's unique approach to every project, the owners of Garden House have been blessed with a highly unique house in a dense neighbourhood of Melbourne. “The clients request for a sustainable, super modern, long-term family home that could change and adapt over time was debated at length throughout the project,” explains Andrew Maynard of Austin Maynard Design. As a result, the design of this house has been shaped in myriad ways by their in-depth investigation. At the outset, the team were met with several spatial and planning challenges. Firstly – the unusual nature of the site. “A ‘battle-axe’ block, with a long and narrow section at the street, opening out to a large garden block at the back meant that the original home at the front was just a small part of the story,” adds Andrew. The designer’s solution was to place the garage element at the front of the house and create a pedestrian laneway along the side of the property, which gave rise to an opportunity for a richly landscaped entrance, delivering visitors to the centre of the house (rather than via a long corridor). Secondly – the issue of massing. The clients desired a house that was humble in scale and as a result the architects have broken the house into a collection of smaller buildings, linked together with ‘bridge’ elements. “In addition, the garage building, facing the street, was designed to sit harmoniously within the context by referencing the scale and forms of the immediate neighbours – both single-storey pitch-roof dwellings.” To further reduce the overall scale, the link elements are clad in mirrored glass that reflects the garden, designed by Eckersley Garden Architecture, essentially disappearing as a result. The rest of the house is sited along the southern side of the garden area, to preserve the tree roots and greenery and to help break down the mass of the building through retaining and incorporating the established trees. “To reinforce the home-garden connection, all living spaces open out onto the north facing garden and internal light wells provide all spaces with a view and relationship to the lush greenery outside,” Andrew adds. Externally and internally the house has been fashioned out of environmentally sound and durable materials, and a series of sustainability features like a 26kwh Tesla battery which produces 100kwh per day. The average Australian house uses 19kwh of energy per day. Stylist Simone Haag has lent her synonymously personal and curated touch to the interiors. The clients, who were living in Darwin during the home’s conception and construction, were keen on a desert-inspired tonal palette inspired by their surroundings and their acquisition of a number of indigenous artworks. “The clients were very conscious in their decision-making,” explains Simone. “They wanted to avoid waste of any kind and definitely leaned towards selecting pieces that were about function, family and feeling versus anything flashy.” The earthy and sensible nature of the interior furnishings like the multi-textured dining chairs, tan-hued living room sofa and accessories serve to reinforce both the internal narrative and Austin Maynard’s architectural form. Austin Maynard Architects  maynardarchitects.com Photography by Derek Swalwell We think you might like this project in Sydney – Hideaway Home abc
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Ensuring The Kitchen Stands The Test Of Time

Any building project comes with an environmental cost and one of the worst offenders is the kitchen renovation. Cupboards are pulled out and sent to the tip, and working white goods often suffer a similar fate. For the past 15 years Cantilever has been tackling this problem one piece of architectural hardware at a time, and says the answer is relatively simple. “The best solution is designing it well from the start,” says Travis Dean, director of Cantilever. “One of our longevity principles is based around the idea that if a design is fit for purpose, fit for the space, uses quality materials and quality hardware, then it will be timeless and it won’t be pulled out and end up as landfill.” [gallery size="large" type="rectangular" ids="111308,111309"]   Cantilever source eZero fibreboard, water-based finishes, low-VOC materials and quality hardware for its projects, and minimises offcut wastage – an industry-wide issue – through clever design. So when the opportunity to showcase the EDIT kitchen system in Cosh Living’s new showroom in Melbourne came up, Dean approached V-ZUG, impressed by the Swiss appliance manufacturer’s sustainability credentials. “We look to brands that have a design aesthetic that links to our products but also have a philosophy that aligns from a sustainability point-of-view,” says Dean. “[V-ZUG run their] factory carbon neutral and they lead in certain features, like their steam ovens. Their dishwashers have some great sustainable features like capturing the water from the last cycle and using that to rinse on the next cycle – it’s smart.” There’s also a shared ethos in staying true to design-led propositions when it comes to functionality and understanding how people use their kitchens. For V-ZUG that means versatile products that feature intuitive interaction, such as the Supreme cooling fridges; or different programs suited to users’ needs, interests and skills – such as the Combi-Steam cooking range.   Analysing user behaviour to develop a product that will remain relevant in years to come extends to other aspects of the V-ZUG range that appeal to Cantilever: upgrading models via technology updates rather than physically replacing them, and relying on an understated look using V-ZUG’s signature black mirror glass finish to survive and transcend different style trends.   “I like that they don’t try to be the hero of the kitchen,” says Cantilever’s creative director, Kylie Forbes. “They are focused on a restrained simplicity in their design and that relates back to our own philosophy of design: having that refined, deliberate simplicity to give longevity to the aesthetic, but ultimately letting the use and the experience of the family be the hero.” The Cantilever-V-ZUG collaboration is a true reflection of those shared values and creates a kitchen that provides a lifetime of enjoyment in an environmentally friendly way.   Cantilever cantileverinteriors.com V-ZUG vzug.comabc
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Understanding The Dialect Of Design Elements

Habitus: What drew you to pursue a career in design?

Marisa Hang: My parents were refugee migrants from Cambodia, and when they first arrived in Australia my mother was working as a seamstress. From a young age, I was always with her in the garage while she was working, and it encouraged me to think creatively and explore form and materiality. A career in design was instilled in me from a young age and going down the path of interior design felt so visceral. I went into an interior design degree straight out of high school, where my knowledge and passion for design grew and I started to dabble in furniture design and completed a course in that also.

What is your design philosophy?

Be holistic. I always try to think about how elements within a space speak to one another. I try to be holistic in my approach and also take into consideration the smaller details of texture, smell, ambience, function, experience and context. Having a highly considered concept to be the basis of the design is of major importance. Understanding the context and history of the project and evolving that information into a fluid design is equally important. At K2LD we also have a studio vision statement of ‘nurture the future’. This is ingrained within all the projects we produce and it’s imperative when one’s aim is to design timeless projects that have a positive effect on the community. k2ld

What are some key considerations when designing a home?

How to efficiently utilise the space. This is important in order to create a good flow. Form, function, and longevity of design. If function is considered in a space, and how people will move throughout and use a space, then longevity of the design will be an outcome. So this is particularly important. Ambience and atmosphere: we try to consider what sort of a feeling we are aiming for in a space. Being empathetic towards the end-user is another key consideration. We ask ourselves how will they use the space? How will they adapt or how can we adapt the space? And how can this be the basis of a concept of home? Optimise the features of the home. For example, if it has particular access to daylight, views, repetition, connections etc.

What does living in design mean to you?

Design is all about creating intimate moments, which can be done in multiple ways. It could be through light or access to greenery, or a sense of calm from a tiling choice. I love good design that evokes emotions. A well-designed space will see a balance between function and aesthetic sensibility. If there is a dialogue between personal experiences and tastes then the design will feel right through attention to detail and the emotions they evoke, that is fundamental to good design. Design is such a personal experience and it’s about the balance of your own personal experiences and aesthetics. [caption id="attachment_111345" align="alignnone" width="1170"]k2ld The K2LD team[/caption]

What responsibilities do you feel are imperative for an architect/designer in the 21st century?

Inclusivity, sustainability and wellness. Design is about improving living standards and lifestyle. Its intent is to provide a solution that is unique and respectful to the client’s individuality. Having inclusivity, sustainability, and wellness at the forefront of how our industry will open the dialogue of how we can better our society and way of living. marisa hang

How have you seen needs and wants for residential interiors changing?

Adaptability; creating spaces for future endeavours is something that will continue to be important. In particular, since we have spent so much time at home in the last year. Having an adaptable home means we aren’t restricted to how we use any given space. Investing in vintage designer furniture will see a change in residential interiors.  The increase in multi-generational living arrangements will also have an effect on residential interiors, as you have to have that sense of community and close relationships. Designing for multi-generational living also speaks to adaptability as different generations have unique needs from their home. K2LD k2ld.com Photography by Griffin Simm We think you might like this interview with Jonathan Richards of Richards Stanisichabc
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DH - Feature

We Need To Celebrate The Built Legacy Of Iwan Iwanoff

Modernist, artistic and unique – there is a distinct character to an Iwan Iwanoff project, defined by a considered use of staggered concrete blocks with delicate detailing, and an astute relationship to the harsh climatic conditions. But it’s not until you look at the architect’s entire body of work that the progression across his career shines with a stark brightness. Iwan Iwanoff (1919-1986) was a modernist architect who worked prolifically throughout the mid-20th century in Perth, Western Australia. Yet, despite designing roughly 150 homes, alongside commercial and civic work, his notoriety has flown somewhat under the radar, with reverence of his work remaining on the fringes of public awareness.

Jack Lovel, pictured in the Featherby House, Karrinyup, 1970. Photo by Frances Adrijich

Growing up in Perth, and now based in Melbourne, architecture photographer Jack Lovel had been searching for a personal project where he could dictate his own brief and stretch his creativity. The idea to document Iwanoff’s body of work is one that should come as no surprise upon discovering that Jack was first introduced to the work of the late architect before he was even old enough to understand its impact. “I actually lived in the Jordanoff House. Some of my earliest memories are of the intricate detailing and layout of the home, which was one of Iwanoff ’s earliest projects,” he shares.

Jordanoff House, Claremont, Perth, 1954, Jack's childhood home and the genesis of his passion for capturing the legacy of Iwan Iwanoff

Since starting the photographic project back in 2016, Jack has set out to shine a light on this under-represented Australian architectural figure, “I really wanted to bring his work to a national audience and to help it garner the attention and respect I think it deserves in terms of its architectural history in Australia.” In the very early stages, Jack went through a period of intense research – “As soon as I fell on the idea, I just couldn’t stop” – trying to find out how many of Iwanoff ’s houses were still standing. Not only had many of them already been knocked down over the years, but there wasn’t a complete archive that captured all of the remaining projects.

Schmidt Lademann House, Floreat, Perth, 1958

Industrious and persistent, Jack managed to get his hands on a copy of the full list of built projects from Iwanoff’s studio, which served as an essential reference point, alongside many hours on Google Street View and trawling the archives of the Battye Library. In order to gain access to the properties, Jack sent out handwritten letters, explaining his personal connection and intention for the project. Doors started to open. While photography is a creative pursuit in itself, Jack’s vision was to showcase Iwanoff ’s work in its truest representation. “My whole intention is to celebrate his work and for my photos to be an accurate depiction. But even though I’m just the one documenting it, my project has really developed its own aesthetic,” he says.

Inside the Featherby House, Karrinyup, Perth, 1970

The environmental context of Perth plays an undeniable role in both Iwanoff’s architecture and Jack’s photographs of the architecture. “Iwanoff’s work was so heavily informed by the climate in Perth. It’s incredibly hot, there are these big blue skies, everything is very manicured and clean. The sheer intensity of the light creates a starkness that is very unique to this part of the world,” says Jack. The result is a visual aesthetic that responds to the same conditions that Iwanoff ’s architecture responds to, and which translates beautifully in the images.

One of Iwanoff’s most iconic homes – Marsala House, Dianella, Perth, 1976

Now that Jack has photographed nearly all of Iwanoff’s remaining projects, he’s still not ready to put the camera down. Not only will he continue to photograph these incredible projects, but a self-published book, Catching Light, was released in January 2021, available for purchase via his website, alongside launch exhibitions. To top it all off, the recently opened WA Museum Boola Bardip (designed by OMA and Hassell) has acquired several photographs for their permanent collection. Jack Lovel jacklovel.com Photography by Jack Lovel. Lead image, Tomich House, City Beach, 1969 This article originally appeared in issue #50 of Habitus magazine, subscribe now

Madaschi House, Dianella, Perth, 1969

 

Kessell House, Dianella, Perth, 1975, uses the trademark concrete blocks

 

Roberts House, City Beach, Perth, 1968

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The Man Behind Bathroom Design Evolution

There's no doubt that Caroma Vogue's new collection is an impeccable embodiment of relaxing respite, luxurious indulgence and refined aesthetic. Unsurprisingly, we wanted to find out what inspired this exquisite range and understand the design process behind it. Our exclusive talk with the designer at the heart of the brand's latest offering provides a glimpse into how the collection came to be - and why it's the perfect response to the needs of the modern consumer. With each product meticulously designed to help construct a lush spa experience in the privacy of a home, and the newly introduced colour palette offering unparalleled opportunities for creative self-expression and customisation, the collection provides a powerful personal and long-lasting appeal. That unique combination makes it irresistibly suitable for today's society - and Luke Di Michiel explains why: 'The concept of the bathroom as a sanctuary to escape the pressures of the outside world has shifted consumer expectations and changed the rule book for bathroom design going forward.' The shift in bathroom design means a much greater focus on personalisation, hygiene and technological integration. 'With our ability to design holistic bathroom collections and recent technological innovations through Caroma Smart Command, Caroma is in a great position to lead this new bathroom revolution,' he adds. [gallery columns="2" size="full" ids="110143,110144"] So, how did this exquisite range come to life? 'The design intent was to bring to life complete bathroom collections that provide a clear and considered language across the product range,' explains Luke. 'At the same time, we wanted to provide a level of customisation that will allow our consumers to impart their own personal touch and style,' he adds. This future-forward idea of combining Caroma's signature high-end design language with the ability to personalise came down to a couple of crucial elements. 'The refined thin edges and contemporary proportions of both the Urbane II and Liano II collections ensure that all products seamlessly integrate together to support the overall aesthetic,' Luke elaborates. 'The choice of colour finishes and optional round and square cover plates and showerheads empower the consumer to personalise their own unique style and preferences. ' The unique colourways, finishes and textures shine within the bathroom environment, elevating the space beyond its purely functional purpose by creating an air of a sophisticated refuge. Luke explains the comprehensive design process behind the colour palette: 'We engaged a wide range of industry specialists as well as premium retailers to help develop our unique colour finish palette,' he says. 'We identified a key opportunity in the market to develop premium PVD matte finishes that deliver on both durability with their hardwearing, non-marking finish as well as providing a luxurious and contemporary look and feel.' [gallery columns="2" size="full" ids="110139,110140"] With its thin edge profile and considered proportions, the Urbane II basin mixer is an excellent testament to the collection's methodical and thought-out design process. And it also happens to be Luke's favourite. 'The unique rotation of the handle eliminates the traditional cut-out area at the back of the handle and instead resolves in a clean straight line with the mixer body,' Luke explains his affinity for this particular piece. And while Caroma's collection will undoubtedly enjoy a timeless appeal for years to come, Vogue offers a solution that ensures the range is bound to remain en vogue even as the colours and finishes change with time. 'With colour finishes and designs set to evolve and change over time, our unique Caroma EasySwitch system ensures that we can respond to and drive new trends whilst providing our customers with a simple and cost-effective way to update their bathrooms into the future,' Luke says. [gallery columns="2" size="full" ids="110148,110147"] With Caroma's signature designs, the breadth of the new collections - and the incorporation of colourful touch-points such as seat hinge caps, flush buttons and bottle traps, Urbane II and Liano II promise the ultimate personalisation capability, careful attention to detail and unmatched quality that will transform any bathroom into an indulgent, personal sanctuary. Find out more at the Caroma website.abc
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The 2021 INDE.Awards Jury – Exemplars Of Design

As the only regional awards programme in the Indo-Pacific, the INDE.Awards recognises the breadth of talent from the many countries in our region. To support the diversity of projects and practices that enter the Awards the 16-person jury who will ultimately decide the category winners is integral on every level. Within the jury there are practitioners whose experience spans multiple genre from many geographic locations around the world. Each is an exemplar in their sphere however, en masse, they are formidable group – local heroes with global identities on the world stage of architecture and design. Speaking to jury members, both returning to judge again this year and first-time jurors, we asked for their comments and perspective through their involvement with this year’s INDE.Awards. Below are some thoughts from returning jurors Chan Ee Mun, Architect, WOHA, Luke Yeung, Principal, Architectkidd and Shashi Caan, Founding Partner, SC Collective. [caption id="attachment_9526" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Chan Ee Mun[/caption] What do you find the best aspect of being a jury member as you are returning to judge again this year? Chan Ee Mun: Witnessing the exciting and progressive works taking place in the Indo-Pac region. Seeing evolving trends and new developments in works by the design talents scattered across the region. Luke Yeung: The continuity I think is unique. Having been involved in the jury for four years, you can really see the bigger picture of design, developments that are happening and evolving and the benchmarks for design excellence in the region. But then at the same time, there are some projects that dare to think differently, countering our tendency to follow the familiar path. This could be another way for designers to come up with insights that enable them to change design expectations, another way to make progress and create new insight in design. Shashi Caan: With the ravages of the pandemic experience, more than ever, we have all needed a sense of community and continuity. With Indesign’s commitment to both, along with a sharp focus on design excellence, returning as juror this year has been profoundly reassuring. [caption id="attachment_9523" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Luke Yeung[/caption] For you, what is the most interesting part of the programme that you are involved with, from you past experience? Chan Ee Mun: Identifying new non-traditional categories that are not easily pigeonholed into more traditional architecture or interior design works. Luke Yeung: The diversity of the projects makes reviewing them challenging but also the most interesting. You have projects from Bangladesh, Vietnam and Australia so how to really understand them?  So, I hope the successful projects will provide as much information about the place of the project in order to really communicate how they are making positive contributions towards their surrounding environment and space. Shashi Caan: For me, the INDE.Awards represent one of the highest benchmarks of design creativity and brilliance. It is inspirational to annually connect with these qualities with Indesign. [caption id="attachment_9524" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Shashi Caan[/caption] What is it about the INDE.Awards that you find makes the programme an exemplar? Chan Ee Mun: Its focus on a particular region that is diverse. Its inclusivity to achieve that end. Luke Yeung: There are a lot of international design awards out there these days, but what I find about the INDE.Awards that is different is that it is both international and regional specific. The Indo-Pacific region is rapidly changing and new conditions are emerging particularly in Asian cities and that impacts how we are designing buildings and environments for them. I think the designers that are being recognised here are the ones who fully engage in these challenges and not just following the program and brief but are questioning them and that is leading to some interesting new results. Shashi Caan: Organisation, quality and breadth of submitted work, along with exceptional standards and, of course, all the people – internal team as well as jurors, winners and INDE.Awards stakeholders.   And from new jurors this year, Jeff Copolov, Director, Bates Smart, Brodie Neill, Founder and Industrial Designer, Brodie Neill and Tonya Hinde, Principal I Design Lead, BLP – some words on the INDE.Awards and their participation. [caption id="attachment_9527" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Jeff Copolov[/caption] What are you looking forward to as a juror this year on the 2021 INDE.Awards? Jeff Copolov: To be captivated by the rich and diverse pool of talent in our region and to partake in a debate on the qualities that make for outstanding design with a group of the most eminent and talented practitioners. What could be more rewarding? Brodie Neill: I am looking forward to analysing all the submissions, probing into each and every project and evaluating them against the exceptionally high standards they set out to achieve.  I am looking forward to sharing my thoughts with my fellow judges. I am sure we might not all agree all of the time, but I appreciate the different points of view gathered for this important occasion. Tonya Hinde: After so much time indoors last year, I’m looking forward to being presented with design outcomes to better the human experience. The INDE.Awards program covers the Indo- Pacific region,  so I’m keen to see how the entries respond to the human condition and differences in local, varying climates. [caption id="attachment_9535" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Tonya Hinde[/caption] What are your expectations of the role? Jeff Copolov: As a practising designer you can’t help but view the world of design through your own prism; the act of judging forces me to think openly, generously, and expansively to look beyond my comfort zone and thereby add to my personal growth through the insights and talents of others. Brodie Neill: It will be a tough task to see who takes top honours.  I anticipate the calibre to be high, diverse in discipline and rich in quality. It’s not going to be easy but there can only be one winner. Tonya Hinde: As a juror alongside some of the most progressive thought leaders from the design and built environment industry, I’m proud to bring my expertise in human-focused design to the juror panel. I see this role as important in celebrating innovative design that contributes to our collective wellbeing and I look forward to collegiate debate, exuberant opinions and some fun. [caption id="attachment_9521" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Brodie Neill[/caption] What are your thoughts on the INDE.Awards as a programme that encompasses the Indo-Pacific region? Jeff Copolov: In a period when our physical borders have closed how exciting it is to reach beyond our horizons and dip into the vibrant design communities of the Indo-Pacific region; to share a common dialogue in search of design excellence. Brodie Neill: It’s an exciting programme across a wide region encompassing many cultures and climates.  With this diversity come many factors when considering projects of exceptional merit. Tonya Hinde: The INDE.Awards is a programme that rewards originality and promotes innovation. Bringing together the most collaborative and inventive minds within the Indo-Pacific region provides a catalyst for ground-breaking design that has the power to challenge the norm and imagine better environments for all. [caption id="attachment_9534" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Florian Heinzelmann & Daliana Suryawinata[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9533" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Praveen Nahar[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9532" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Raj Nandan[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9531" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Leone Lorrimer[/caption] The eclectic group of architects and designers that comprise the jury for the 2021 INDE.Awards are, Brodie Neill – Founder & Industrial Designer (Australia/UK) Chan Ee Mun – Architect, WOHA (Singapore) Florian Heinzelmann & Daliana Suryawinata – Founder and Directors, SHAU (Indonesia) James Calder – Global Director, User Strategy, ERA-co (Australia) Jan Utzon – Architect, Utzon Architects (Denmark) Jeff Copolov – Director, Bates Smart (Australia) Judy Cheung – Co-founder, Cheungvogl (Hong Kong) Leone Lorrimer – National Practice Leader, GHDWoodhead (Australia) Liam Timms – Fund Manager, International Towers (Australia) Luke Yeung – Principal, Architectkidd (Thailand) Peta Heffernan – Director, Liminal Studio (Australia) Praveen Nahar – Director, India National Institute of Design (India) Raj Nandan – Founder and CEO, Indesign Media Asia Pacific (Australia) Shashi Caan – Founding Partner, SC Collective (USA/UK) Tonya Hinde, Principal I Design Lead, BLP (Australia) [caption id="attachment_9530" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Peta Heffernan[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9529" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Judy Cheung[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9528" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Liam Timms[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9525" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Jan Utzon[/caption] [caption id="attachment_9522" align="alignnone" width="1100"] James Calder[/caption] Our jury is a microcosm of the world of architecture and design and, as leaders in their field, they are eminently qualified to judge the incredible talent that abounds in our region. It’s going to be exciting and we look forward to the announcement of the winners at the gala party in Sydney on Thursday 5th August. See you there.abc
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Living

The Ushering In Of A New Era For B&B

When a new collaborator comes into the fold of any brand, alterations, no matter how subtle, will occur. Human nature and our experiences subconsciously shape us, and ultimately reflect our work and our trademarks and characteristics. When Piero Lissoni became the new Artistic Director of B&B Italia, his aim was to take the direction of the Italian furniture company into a different place. With the introduction of the Borea collection, B&B’s first ever outdoor collection, it's clear to see the brand’s direction under Lissoni is certainly one of innovation and intelligence. b&B italia borea outside Borea is a complete and eclectic collection of outdoor seats and tables designed by Lissoni. Encompassing a vast range full of multiple designs, B&B ensures it has covered all bases in the outdoor furniture department with this collection. The collection includes two-and three-seater sofas, an oversized armchair, a low small armchair and a dining chair, all with stackable aluminium structures painted in dove grey, sage, clay and anthracite colours. Available from June via Space Furniture, the pieces stackable, manoeuvrable and most unique of all, consider the planet through a new sustainable approach. b&b italia outdoors Comfort is ensured by generous cushions, which are not only soft and relaxing but were also developed to be sustainable. The padding on the Borea range is made with a polyester fibre filling made from recycled PET plastic bottles. The recycled polyester fibre is used for the upholstery, its covers’ waterproof canvas and the yarn used for the stitching and zips. Recycling one kilogram of PET produces 930-grams of new material, a fibre with exceptional softness, elasticity and durability, which is entirely circular and fully recycled. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="110154,110155,110156,110157"] All pieces within the collection possess the same tubular metal structures that are jointless, meaning a fluid and seamless design that echoes throughout. The metal bending processes take advantage of techniques typically used in the aeronautical sector and transport them into the world of outdoor furniture bringing life to a collection with an unmistakable style. All furniture in the collection can be completely disassembled in order to move easily or give it a new life. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y425ozXVVM[/embed] The dining tables reflect the characteristics and colours of the seats within the Borea collection, but Lissoni has opted for steel as opposed to aluminium to support the tops, which consist of teak and glazed lava stone. The lava stone comes from the slopes of Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) and is available in large rectangular tiles, coloured in sage, clay and ocean blue, that fit seamlessly with the whole collection. The glazed surface is made with a special material obtained by recycling the glass of discarded TV and PC monitors, applied directly to the stone through an exclusive manufacturing process – just another way that B&B Italia is bringing a circular approach to the brand. b&b italia borea outdoor setting The low tables are designed to complement the sofas and chairs and have the same tops composed of glazed lava stone tiles. The tables are available in two sizes, with structures in steel rod painted in dove grey, sage, clay and anthracite. The collection is enriched and completed by a series of round tables that offer multiple support solutions. The Borea coffee tables, which come in three sizes and heights, have thin structures in dove-gray, sage, clay and anthracite painted steel rod and are available with tops in glazed lava stone in sage, clay and ocean blue colours. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="110159,110160"] The full Borea range will be available in June at Space Furniture, in both their showrooms and online. Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.auabc
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The Pioneers Of Fabric Care, Designed For Today And Tomorrow

Within the realm of household appliances, we look towards products that combine first-class innovation and superior design function, with the environment in mind.  This is where V-ZUG comes in.  More than meets the eye, every product under the V-ZUG name is designed with the intention of bringing the best experiences of everyday living. Both a leader and an innovator, the household name continuously provides the world with the best in Swiss engineering excellence. For the past century, they have committed themselves to providing exemplary lifestyles solutions that not only consider the needs of the individual using them, but also the world in which we live in. Designed for the ultimate in care, the Fabric Care line from V-ZUG combines high level functionality and premium attention to detail. The Adora V6000 range showcases first-class innovation: the AdoraWash V6000 is the first in Australia to receive a 51/2 star energy rating, making it a superior choice for your fabrics and the future. The revered RefreshButler delivers market leading energy efficiency, while caring for your finest garments. Providing a gentle solution to refresh, sanitise and dry your favourite pieces, it provides a revolutionary solution for fabric care and hygiene.  Product-led and editorially curated, the Habitus Edit offers a unique perspective on the exceptional designers and brands across the Indo-Pacific region and beyond. Dive in and explore the Habitus Edit on Fabric Care from V-ZUG.abc
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A Hidden Oasis

For many of us, our homes exist as an escape from the outside world. A place to retreat and relax, where the chaos of city life and the stress of work can be left outside our front door. Hideaway House is a home that epitomises the residential retreat. Nestled amongst native bushland on a sloping site that overlooks a gently winding creek, its location promises instant relaxation – yet is located only eight kilometres from Sydney’s bustling city centre. For architect Mark Szczerbicki (of Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio), the brief was to create a home that was an ode to its surrounds: drawing from the colours, textures and topography of the site to create a symbiosis between the built and the natural environments. The block itself presented a series of design challenges. The steep slope coupled with an irregular footprint necessitated creating a home formed from a series of cascading configurations, where terraced levels trace the terrain down to the lowest, subterranean floor. From the front of the block, the home’s contours sweep away from the streetscape, with much of its volume tucked behind a dramatic, small black façade. As the street slips away, the home opens up, transporting residents and guests alike to a private escape with views of the nearby bay. Inside, the location of the home continues to inform the space’s design. Colours are drawn from the surrounding flora, while a material palette of cedar, timber veneer and brass pay homage to the natural landscape. Windows, lightwells and skylights frame sweeping views and tranquil vistas, while drawing in pools of natural light. Oversized sliding doors and floor-to-ceiling glazed facades help to zone the home into multiple internal and external spaces, creating segments that allow for a pragmatic mix of family and private spaces. The result is a place that reflects the way the family live. The children’s bedrooms can access the home’s theatre on one side and open up to the gardens on the other, while the master suite offers its own cocoon of privacy and spectacular outlook through a cantilever structure that sits over the pool and looks beyond to the bushland. This thoughtful approach to design is echoed through the selection of furniture used throughout the home, where pieces from King's collection epitomise a home that is at once open, homely and welcoming. In the living room, the Jasper II Sofa, Seymour Mid Armchair (fixed) and Bongo Ottoman provide outstanding seating solutions, where generous proportions and soft fabrics allow for instant relaxation. The modular shape of the Jasper also works to frame the space and echo the snaking façade, while its flexibility and inbuilt storage provides the practicality required for a family of five. On the exterior terrace, the King Cove Sofa and Quay Dining Table and Chairs allow for alfresco dinners and larger parties, creating zones of comfort that can facilitate all levels of entertaining. These pieces draw from the natural hues of the interior palette, creating a continuity in design that creates a seamless connection between outside and in.   Just as the home’s design offers an architectural solution to family life, the furnishings are reflections of the way in which the inhabitants connect, interact and relax. Charles Wilson, an industrial designer who has collaborated on a number of King designs, speaks to this visceral approach to design, “King furniture centres around the mantra of creating products that people can live and grow within,” he says, “those iconic, memory-evoking furniture pieces that bring a sense of comfort to any room they reside within.” The key to creating design such as this is to meticulously balance form and function, working within the parameters of humanity to produce considered solutions to everyday life. “Taking comfort and ergonomics seriously means the furniture is designed to support the individual and consider how they feel when they interact with it,” notes Wilson. Importantly, each design is part of a process of evolution, where product, approach and inspiration feeds off its own archive, offering opportunities for product series that can adapt and grow as human needs and habits change. “The King design team take comfort and ergonomics very seriously. They think about how a product makes you feel, how it supports you and facilitates your daily life,” Wilson says. “Without this level of investment and concern it’s impossible to reach the levels of finishing and finesse that King are able to achieve.” Hideaway House is a holistic embodiment of this thinking demonstrating how the built structure and the manufactured form make people feel. It offers its residents a space to escape and retreat, transitioning them away from the city into a world of their own, where thoughtful architecture and considered design has created a luxury family retreat. . Architect: Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio Photographer: Tom Ferguson Builder: Ferrocon Landscaping: Melissa Wilson Landscape Architect Styling: Liz Szczerbicki (Mark Szczerbicki Design Studio)      abc
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Witty Meets Whimsy In Glebe House By Tribe Studio

Consummating in an artfully executed family home – complete with a self-contained studio, private gym and accommodations for two to work comfortably, at full capacity, from home – the restoration of Glebe House by Tribe Studio is characterised by unconventional design manoeuvres and a modern, respectfully tongue-in-cheek take on Victorian artifice. “I’ve known the client since school,” says architect Hannah Tribe, giving context to the origins of the renovation project. “We hadn’t really stayed in touch,” she explains. While she had embarked on a career in architecture and, in 2003, established herself as the principal of her own practice Tribe Studio, based in Sydney’s Surry Hills; the client had gone galavanting around the world, spending the decades passed as an expat living and working in Germany and Singapore. That all changed when, during the making of their homecoming plans, the client – who’d, since their school days, evolved into a family of four – came across Tribe Studio while searching for an architect to design the place that they would call home, in Sydney. “Our clients wanted to create a family home, where life orbits around the kitchen,” as Tribe recalls, “but also to create dual WFH spaces, for him and her, at opposite ends of the house, and a self-contained flat, also within the footprint of the house, that can accommodate friends and family for extended stays from overseas.” The clients’ WFH requirements weren’t exactly run-of-the-mill either. With the couple comprising one part professional and one part personal trainer, their brief included gym amenities as well as a home office. There was also the added consideration that both spaces needed to be client-facing in function. With both clients working from home, the design successfully creates separate working areas for each. One works from a dedicated office in the front room with a substantial bespoke, pivoting study desk attached to the custom light pole. “The desk moves so that he can have meetings across the desk, create a blank backdrop for video conferencing, or sit in the window seat with the sun on his back like a cat,” says Hannah. From the gym, at the rear of the site, the clients’ other half operates a private training business. The gym has separate access from the lane, and screened windows onto the back lane energise this formerly utilitarian public space. “While the gym is small in plan, it has soaring ceilings and large windows look onto small, curated gardens,” says Tribe. Further to having the programmatic specs of a powerhouse, the clients’ brief sought to extend the house, creating space enough to accommodate their family, professional and personal lives; honour the heritage detail of the original c.1890s architecture; and shed substandard additions that had been made to the structure throughout the course of its lifetime to date. “When we convert heritage houses to meet contemporary life, we often see the beautiful old cellular rooms of the house becoming bedrooms,” says Hannah, describing the antithesis of the plan for Glebe House. Although it often makes a lot of sense, “this is an easy, knee-jerk planning response,” she says. “In this instance, we were determined to keep the gracious old rooms as living spaces and frame views the length of the site, through old living, to the contemporary kitchen all the way through the courtyard and shaded outdoor living and lane.” “The original house was so impeccably built and so detailed and rich. It had all been painted white and felt a bit sad,” says Hannah. “Our goal was to take the spirit of the Victorian design and work out how to manifest that spirit in 2021.” Exaggerated proportions, decorative motifs, and material artifice – details that reigned supreme in Victorian architectural vernacular – express themselves in modern light throughout Tribe Studio’s witty design response. So as not to violate its original fabric, the architects opted not to chase the walls of the original dwelling to take electricity. Instead, Tribe developed a playful dialogue of light poles, which act “like an oversized conduit”, to deliver the modern comforts of electricity and data throughout the renovated abode. Painted in colours pulled from the palette of a favourite Francis Bacon painting, the finished light poles adorn the interiors with a whimsical sense of character. Internal walls are ragged, in grey, for a soft finish, that offsets the playfully hued light poles and makes original decorative mouldings pop. Making one exception to the ardent preservation and restoration of the heritage volume, Tribe Studio cut away a portion of the original roof geometry, in order to draw natural light into the centre of the plan. The new parts of the house are comparatively modest in their expression; presenting as little more than stripped back versions of arched brick walls, painted white in finish. Artwork becomes a conduit for displays of the clients’ personal expression throughout the interior design. “We like to work with clients’ existing art collections, and also love to be involved in expanding their collections to be contemporaneous with the house construction. Together, they are a telling cultural artefact,” says Hannah. Through Tribe’s exacting eye and artful finesse, a curated art selection – featuring works by contemporaries including Abdul Abdullah, Caroline Rothwell, Julian Meagher and Debra Dawes – culminates in an atmosphere that is altogether candid and calming, articulated with a distinctive quirk. Tribe Studio tribestudio.com.au Photography by Katherine Lu abc
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Subtle Curvatures Lay Platform For Arc Side House

Arc Side is a three-storey residence that has been significantly renovated by Jolson Architecture and Interiors. Initially completed at the turn of the century for its current owners, the house was transformed meticulously by the Melbourne-based practice with the help of Leone Constructions. The original design created by Cox Carmichael in 2001 sustained the inspiration for Jolson.  With the simple, sweeping curves and inverted arch of the original concrete façade widely referenced throughout the new design. Retaining the roof and building envelope, internal walls and floors were removed to allow for more fluid and interconnected spaces. The façade was simplified by Jolson, allowing for the curves to become a subtle feature within every space, be it the gentle curved polished plaster walls, or the forms of the ceilings. Jolson’s extensive repertoire of bespoke homes typically are orthogonal in form, with defined corners and edges a trademark of the firm’s design. Arc Side represents an unprecedented project undertaken by the team, with the subtle curvature of the façade and the fascinating spiral staircase a highlight of the house’s new look. Mindful of not only creating appropriate spaces for their clients, Jolson allowed for a more timeless aesthetic that will reign true through generations. With the large residence spread over three levels the spaces are far from overwhelming. The kitchen and living areas located on the top level take advantage of the views and light, while the master suite is on the middle level. Jolson did not only strategically zone these levels to allow for family and guests, but also manipulated the spaces, with cleverly concealed sliding doors creating flexible spaces and privacy when required. A sky garden embedded on the roof of the house, couples the practicality of a vegetable garden and secluded privacy from other residences. Given the vibrancy of the immediate environment, the palette of materials and colours were deliberately restrained and understated. After careful consideration Hakwood, a Dutch-designed timber flooring option provided the bespoke solution, crafted in a custom colour and installed in a random width format. Emerging from its metaphorical cocoon once concealed in, Arc Side has become a home that fills out its walls with conviction. Becoming the catalyst for Jolson to explore beyond its typical hallmarks, the residence is truly a home.  Inspired by its origins it has become a true marvel of modern architecture, which is testament to this design firm. George Fethers provides bespoke solutions for any project, and works closely with designers to forge the ultimate in both standard and bespoke flooring options. Find out more at George Fethers & Co. Photography by Lucas Allenabc