About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

Interiors
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Contrasting Themes Glue Balnarring Beach House

Jeff Umansky is driving with his young family, circa 2019, on a drive along Victoria’s coastline. Location? Somewhere on the Mornington Peninsula. Mood? Ecstatic. The surroundings are an exquisite image of land, sky and sea, with the coastal country town of Balnarring providing context to the visual that is within eyeshot. The 11 Dimensions Architecture founder eventually decides to stop for directions, and makes a mental note. Balnarring Beach. The beaches’ golden sand, black rocks and roseate seaweed would inform the Umansky’s future family home that only lies steps from the beach, and is directly inspired by its locale. The design approach to the house was one of a democratic nature, with all family members involved in the composition of the dwelling. Moving from a cramped two-bedroom unit, the overarching view of all family members was the need for personal space, but to not lose the feeling of connection amongst one another. Umansky’s work in constructing the floorplan centred around the implementation of two airways for cross ventilation, that created transparency through the house. One can be sitting in the study and can see through to the open plan living space, similar to the children’s bedrooms, where the kids can easily view the master bedroom down the hallway. Despite the house being of large proportions, the transparency and openness offered by the floorplan ensure that none of the occupants feels isolated within the walls, and the mere viewing of another family member increases the idea of connection throughout the house. Balnarring Beach House creates an interplay between masculinity and femininity amongst its internal and external features. On the outside, the honest, rugged charcoal cladding that lines the outer shell of the house is contrasted with the rose-pink qualities of the outdoor shower’s tiles and the green hues offered by the flora planted in various corners of the block. The interior plays host to the charcoal timber across the rear wall within the open plan living space, which is contrasted by chalk-white walls and rugs, as well as soft linen window curtains. This theme rings true throughout the kitchen, with Umansky mirroring the wall cladding within the kitchen cabinetry and colligating it with a white granite benchtop and a curation of small plants. A small nook that encourages the occupants to read is of a similar nature to the outdoor shower, with rose-coloured cushions and a window providing views of the surrounding landscape giving all family members a place to unwind. The bathroom doesn’t juxtapose masculine and feminine features as obviously as other parts of the house, but the charcoal window frames and cream coloured bath and wall tiles carry the theme into the wet areas to carry a congruence of theme throughout all spaces of the house. Reflecting contemporary principles, all bedrooms are subtly connected to green spaces outside, thanks to Umansky crafting four separate courtyards. The house is broken up by these courtyards, with a private garden at the entrance of the house providing additional privacy for the family and their guests, as well as a place that can be utilised at all times of the day. Three courtyards placed at the northern, southern and eastern points of Balnarring Beach House are home to intense green settings that change throughout the seasons, making for an intriguing visual in these spaces all year round. Umansky says the courtyards were born from a desire to not create a side of the house that was of a utilitarian quality. In using all of the available space on the block, the architect was able to create a house that is an escape from the hustle and bustle that lies beyond its boundaries. Citing reassurance from renowned architect Clinton Murray, Umansky has been able to craft a family home that he and his kin can flourish within. The chiaroscuro-esque qualities of light and dark witnessed in both the interior and exterior of the domicile, coupled with the four courtyards and the beach that lies a few steps away from the front door is reason enough for the house to be a truly ideal living space. Umansky’s thoughtful implementation of cross-ventilation and the floorplan itself marries sustainability and personal connection, within a home that exercises intimacy despite the distance. 11 Dimensions Architects 11dimensions.com.au Photography by Christine Francis This project made the cover of issue #51 of Habitus, the Kitchen and Bathroom special, with its eye-catching pink outdoor shower.  abc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Furniture
Living

The Inherent Charm of Timeless Design

Great Dane is Australia’s most prominent curator of Scandinavian design and is widely responsible for the country’s long-lasting infatuation with the Nordic aesthetic. However, alongside the enduring allure of the Scandinavian form, Great Dane has been an active advocate of the vital attributes that underpin design practices from this part of the world. The cornerstones of considered, quality materials, craftsmanship, attention to detail and longevity of design define Great Dane’s offering and sustainability ethos. “Curating design pieces that have been mindfully crafted with care and attention, and that use sustainably sourced, prime grade materials, enables us to create a selection of furniture that offers timeless charm, unique character and structural stability,” explains Anton Assaad, the founder of Great Dane. “Our pieces are bound to stand the test of time and be lovingly passed from one generation to another. That wonderfully tangible connection through space and time is one of the most essential expressions of our sustainability principles: encourage people to buy beautifully crafted furniture they love and will keep for the rest of their lives – and beyond,” he adds. The commitment to offer the Australian consumer timeless, masterfully devised and carefully crafted Scandinavian designs is inherently linked to Great Dane’s long-lasting relationships with local master furniture makers whose values represent quality, longevity, profound appreciation of materiality – and a patient sense of purpose. Great Dane’s ongoing collaboration with Snedkergaarden, founded by two Danish furniture makers Finn Bruun and Erik Skovgaard, is the epitome of a shared vision rooted in the classic ethos of careful craft, prime quality and enduring design intent. [caption id="attachment_111844" align="alignnone" width="1200"] Darling Street | Interiors: Hecker Guthrie | Photography: Shannon McGrath[/caption] The furniture studio behind one of Great Dane’s all-time favourite design pieces – the Johansen Table – brings a unique level of attention to detail that permeates every facet of their process. From the selection of sustainable timber to the thoughtfully engineered simplicity of form, and the exquisite quality of the finishing details, Snedkergaarden’s methods illuminate the structure, colour and grain of the natural materials in every piece. Crafting the furniture to take on a patina, Snedkergaarden’s makers create objects that grow more charming and character-filled over time, increasing their long-lasting appeal. The versatile Johansen Table, available in rectangular, round and oval shapes, is an excellent expression of that intent. Inspired by the engineering magnificence of suspension bridges, Mads Johansen’s iconic design combines structural stability, the intricate materiality of meticulously curated wood grains, and a warm visual and tactile appeal that evokes the delightful emotion of shared moments experienced around the table. [caption id="attachment_111850" align="alignnone" width="1200"] Graffiti House | Architects: Durack Architects | Photography: Katherine Lu[/caption] With a similarly grounding and attentive devotion to the unrushed art of craft, Miyazaki Chair Factory has mastered the skill of creating wooden chairs to perfection since commencing operations in 1969. Cautiously appreciative of the importance of natural resources, Miyazaki Chair Factory makes all its chairs to order ensuring they only use the materials they need, when they need them. The craftsmen’s singular focus on wooden chairs offers extraordinary quality, attention and joy that can be experienced through every single piece created by the talented team. The DC09 chair is no different, hence its immense popularity in Great Dane showrooms. “DC09’s sculptural curves, impeccable detailing and organic shape have been consistently favoured by our clients, designers and design enthusiasts,” says Jon Holland, commercial manager of Great Dane. In a beautiful fusion between the intuitive appeal of Danish form and Japanese precision, DC09 fulfils Miyazaki Chair Factory’s concept of creating ‘chairs nobody else can make’. Expressing the utmost craftsmanship and commitment to materiality, the organic form of the design has been carved entirely from solid wood. The thinly shaved seat follows the gentle, ergonomic shape of the chair, combining elegant lightness with structural stability. This minimalistic form has been sculpted to complement the shape of a human body as the ultimate expression of lasting relevance, while the smooth tactility entices a touch, and showcases the stunning texture of the wood with each stroke. “Designed by the Danish-Japanese duo Inoda+Sveje and masterfully handmade by the Miyazaki Chair Factory, this artfully fashioned celebration of materiality invites a slower, more relaxed, almost contemplative experience and appreciation of its careful craftsmanship,” adds Jon. Further fostering Great Dane’s commitment to offering mindfully crafted pieces of furniture that will stand the test of time, the brand works closely with dk3 – Scandinavian furniture makers that masterfully combine the heritage of traditional carpentry with a modern aesthetic. With most pieces finished and surface treated by hand, dk3 invests a remarkable amount of attention and energy into carefully treating the organic materials they favour, ultimately highlighting its universal, enduring beauty. Ten Table, a dining table designed by dk3 founder Jacob Plejdrup in collaboration with Danish designer Christian Troels, is a classically beautiful, yet playfully modern expression of dk3’s love affair with the natural materiality of wood. With no straight lines, the curved shape of the table highlights the irregular, yet precisely ordered pattern of the grain. The surprising lightness of the cube-shaped base – or the pronounced grooves of the legs, depending on the model – introduces a more defined texture that leads the eye towards the tabletop. This organic fusion of natural beauty and an incredible level of detail combines traditional carpentry techniques with the simple elegance of modern design – the perfect recipe for a timeless object that can be passed from one generation to another, endlessly enriching the lives of those gathering around it and exponentially enhancing the appeal of the table itself. “Our hand-picked and carefully curated selection of Scandinavian designs highlights the timeless quality of patiently crafted objects, and the importance of a considered selection and mindful use of resources with a genuine appreciation of materiality,” says Anton. Great Dane offers consumers and designers an unquestionable opportunity to invest in quality furniture that encapsulates the elusive moments of daily life for generations to come. Visit one of the showrooms or the online store for a timeless display of master craftsmanship and exceptional design quality. Great Dane greatdanefurniture.com For commercial project enquiries, reach out to Jon Holland, Great Dane's commercial manager Step behind the scenes and experience a world of Scandinavian craftsmanship in a replay of Great Dane founder Anton Assaad talking at Super Design Festival Lead image: Carpenter’s Square House | Architects: Architects EAT | Photography: Derek Swalwell.abc
ADVERTORIALS
Bathroom
Design Products

Colour Time Featuring Rogerseller

Throughout its 125-year history, Rogerseller has brought innovation and a select group of local and internationally designed products to Australian shores. Rogerseller collections are curated with the contemporary bathroom in mind, as a place of comfort and high-end design. Alongside colour options to transform and lighten up every kind of bathroom space.

Pastel pops

Falper, Claybrook and Catalano headline a list of brands whose products incorporate pastel hues and statement colours for the modern bathroom. Falper’s products are the result of collaborations with industry professionals that infuse a unique identity into each item. The personalisation possibilities are nearly endless thanks to the range of colours and natural finishes across Falper’s Cristalplant and Ceramilux ranges. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="112412,112411"] Citing a British understanding of quality and craftsmanship, Claybrook’s range contains an assortment of colours and finishes tailor-made for any bathroom project. The new Terrazzo collection is particularly colourful and on- trend, perfect for contemporary Australian bathrooms. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="112407,112408"]

Metallic muses

Catalano’s Colori collection gives new possibilities for personalising the bathroom, from basins to toilets and bidets. Colori is available in gloss white, matte white, matte cement grey, matte black, silver or gold, so you can choose to add subtle texture or make a strong statement. [caption id="attachment_112413" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Catalano Colori - Green Lux 40 Washbasin Gold & White[/caption] For those looking for a more natural, honest finish to their bathroom products, Fantini and Rogerseller’s own bathroom pieces are perfect, all combined with premium manufacturing practices. [caption id="attachment_112418" align="alignnone" width="3796"] Rogerseller Natural Elements - Standard Up & Down Bath Waste[/caption] Rogerseller’s Natural Elements range of finishes captures the textures and hues of raw, organic materials. The five finishes – chrome, graphite, matte black, brushed nickel and brushed gold – match perfectly to materials such as timber and natural stone, combining to create rich, tactile environments with a contemporary elegance. Fantini has been featuring colours in tapware design since 1977 when the iconic, pop art-inspired I Balocchi collection was born in collaboration with designers Paolo Pedrizzetti and Davide Mercatali. Today’s colour range spans from timeless matte black and matte white, sophisticated PVD matte copper, british gold and matte gun metal, to refinedgold plus and polished nickel. [caption id="attachment_112416" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Fantini Colori | Nickel PVD, Matt Gun Metal PVD, Matt Copper PVD, Matt British Gold PVD[/caption] Whether going left of centre with a pastel hue, or combining a classic metallic with other finishes, Rogerseller has a complete range of colours to lighten up your bathroom.
Rogerseller rogerseller.com.au [caption id="attachment_112419" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Catalano Colori[/caption]abc
Editors Picks
HAP - Feature
Happenings

Cultivating Connection With Habitus #51

[caption id="attachment_112499" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Birchgrove House by TZG. Photo by Nicole England.[/caption]   Kitchens and bathrooms have long been heralded as the key spaces of value for a property going up for sale. But it’s a value that reduces them to their mere financial returns. What about the things that transcend such a calculated purview? The satisfaction that comes from cooking in a kitchen where everything has just the perfect spot, all within reach. The way a cupboard handle feels when being opened. The ease of bedtime baths with the kids when the space has been configured in the right way. Or simply the joy that a beautiful handmade tile can bring when looking at it every day. [caption id="attachment_112493" align="alignnone" width="1170"] This bathroom in Ballarat by Moby Architecture is all about creating a private cocoon. Photo by Rhiannon Taylor.[/caption]   A well-resolved, highly detailed and considered kitchen and bathroom can add a lot more to your life than the obvious monetary returns or resale value. They can create a sense of ease, and moments of calm in everyday life – qualities that should not be understated as the world emerges from a global pandemic. It’s these less overt characteristics that make a kitchen or bathroom unique for each person using it, and these are what we investigate in this year’s annual Kitchen & Bathroom Special of Habitus magazine. From kitchens that inspire connection, or are designed to blend seamlessly in the home, to bathroom inspirations taken from tropical resorts, every story in the pages of this issue considers how kitchens and bathrooms can cultivate a way of life rooted in design. [caption id="attachment_112494" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Ripple House by FMD Architects. Photo by Peter Bennetts.[/caption]   Featured in this issue are bathrooms and kitchens designed by FMD Architects, Onion, HYLA Architects, Moby Architecture and Studio Prineas. We have profiles with DKO's Michael Drescher, a home tour with Marc Tan and Amy Lim of Studio Periphery and we visit the new Home of the Arts gallery ahead of its big launch with CEO Criena Gehrke. Projects cover the gamut from a home by Brian Zulaikha of TZG in Sydney, to a contemporary landed home in Singapore by Park + Associates. Order your copy of Habitus #51 today and subscribe by 31 August 2021 for your chance to WIN a Didier Liqueur table. Aleesha Callahan Editorabc
Architecture

The Places where we Live

The 2021 INDE.Awards shortlist for The Living Space is an exemplar group. Each and every one ticks every box for style, form and function with detail and design finesse at their heart. Houses with views inside and out vie with homes that offer sanctuary and serenity – and everything in between. This year it appears that every project is a winner. As supporter of The Living Space, Gaggenau knows all about being the best.  With products that speak of luxury and outstanding functionality, Gaggenau understands what it takes to create spaces that are future ready for life today. [caption id="attachment_10472" align="alignnone" width="980"] Federal House. Photography: Ben Hosking[/caption] Olya Yemchenko, Senior Brand Communications Manager of Gaggenau Australia reflects on the shortlist and the future of residential design in the Indo-Pacific commenting, “Today’s residential design places greater emphasis on sustainability, whether this is the interaction between house and garden, renewable electricity or choice of materials. Consideration has been given from boundary to boundary, providing a holistic experience of a home. The created spaces feel much more generous regardless of their physical footprint. What stands out is the use of raw, natural surfaces from exposed brickwork, natural stone palettes to timber, steel and glass. All the little details come together to create a full picture.” [caption id="attachment_10514" align="alignnone" width="980"] Garden House. Photography: Derek Swalwell[/caption] As inspirational as these homes are, there is a continuum between the group and that is their tailormade design for those who live within the walls. More and more our homes not only reflect ourselves and our lives but the way we wish to live now. Yemchenko explains, “We have previously emphasised that when looking to design The Living Space, the end result is informed by many factors – incorporating the individual needs of the occupant’s lifestyle and aesthetic proclivities. It is really inspiring to see how residences today are taking on the form of their own enclosed oasis, where individuals have the ability to fully immerse themselves within their home environment. Embodying the essence of a private retreat.” [caption id="attachment_10500" align="alignnone" width="980"] Striated House at Rajagiriya. Photography: Ganidu Balasuriya[/caption] While each home in the shortlist exemplifies great residential design, there were a few that caught Yemchenko's eye as stand outs and they are, “Federal House where the dark finishes contrast with the space, greenery and vastness of the outside world. Garden House is a residence that perfectly marries the transition between indoor and outdoor living and Striated House where space and light is amplified.” .

The Living Space

Proudly partnered by Gaggenau [caption id="attachment_10492" align="alignnone" width="980"] Limestone House. Photography: Dianna Snape[/caption] 8 Yard House Studio Bright Australia Coopworth FMD Architects Australia Cumulus House Chris Connell Design Australia Envelope House ASOLIDPLAN with Solid Architects LLP Singapore Evelyn Myers Ellyett Australia Federal House Edition Office Australia Garden House Austin Maynard Architects Australia K House Renato D'Ettore Architects Australia Limestone House John Wardle Architects Australia PONY WOWOWA Architecture Australia Striated House at Rajagiriya Palinda Kannangara Architects Sri Lanka Terracotta House Austin Maynard Architects Australia . Be there as the INDE.Award winners are announced. Register for your 2021 digital ticket. #indeawards Hero image credit: Coopworth. Photography: Dianna Snapeabc
Design Hunters

Exceptional Design Studios

Throughout our region the variety of studios within the architecture and design community is almost limitless. The shortlisted practices in The Design Studio in this year’s INDE.Awards differ in size and make up, offering and output, structure and process but the continuum is exemplary work enhanced but collaboration and connectivity both in the studio and outside with other creatives. Each studio in this category is a leader, sure of itself and its power to produce outstanding projects for a client that will enhance the reputation of the studio. [caption id="attachment_11375" align="alignnone" width="980"] Russell & George. Photography: Sean Fennessy[/caption] To create the very best in design is uppermost in the minds of all the practitioners in The Design Studio, as it is for the supporter of the category, Woven Image. Since its establishment in 1987, Woven Image has been at the forefront of design providing commercial textiles and acoustic finishes for walls, ceilings and space dividing for the interior. As the company looks to the future through innovative products, so too do those shortlisted for The Design Studio as they represent their own particular practice models developed through experience and over time. Alan Heath, Sales Manager, Woven Image perused The Design Studio shortlist and commented, “The design studios that are represented in the INDE.Awards are all exceptional practitioners. We can see that design is alive and well in our region and that connection and collaboration are foremost. All the shortlist practices are responding to their local and indeed a global environment but it's obvious that collectively they are providing great design for their clients and community. [caption id="attachment_11376" align="alignnone" width="980"] Christopher Boots Studio. Photography: Guy Lavoipierre[/caption] So many of the practices are design leaders in their country and throughout our region and each is to be congratulated for the work they produce, Heath, observed, “The inspiration that comes from the shortlist is the variation of designs and the differences between the material use in the architecture. The shortlist and their projects oscillate from hard concrete and glass through to timber and earthy tones and the use of monochrome is fabulous as is the multi-colour school in India.” Asked if there were particular practices that stood out from the group, Heath mentioned three practices in particular. “Standouts for me were Russell & George. There is a fantastic look and feel to their designs and the material ceiling and the multi-coloured baffles in retail projects are just wonderful. Another stand out is Christopher Boots for his lighting that utilises crystals that are fantastically intricate. And, of course Alexander & Co, who designed the newly renovated Harbord Hotel in Freshwater – which is our local! [caption id="attachment_11374" align="alignnone" width="980"] Alexander &CO. Photography: Anson Smart[/caption] Now we know the shortlist, the next event will be the announcement of the winners in Sydney on 5 August at the INDE.Awards gala and Heath commented, “I’m looking forward to face-to-face networking and celebrating the amazing achievements of the A & D community throughout the Indo-Pacific region, both to make up for last year and in celebration of this year.” .

The Design Studio

Proudly partnered by Woven Image [caption id="attachment_11377" align="alignnone" width="980"] RAW Architecture (Realrich Architecture Workshop). Photography: Bacteria Photography[/caption] Alexander &CO.  Australia B.E Architecture Australia Christopher Boots Studio Australia Myers Ellyett Australia Nathan Yong Design Singapore OKU space Australia Park + Associates Singapore RAW Architecture (Realrich Architecture Workshop) Indonesia Rocco Design Architects Associates Hong Kong & China Russell & George Australia Sanjay Puri Architects India Smart Design Studio Australia . Be there as the INDE.Award winners are announced. Register for your 2021 digital ticket. #indeawardsabc
Interiors
Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

Carthona House By Daniel Boddam Studio Looks Quite Contrary

Taken at a glance from its suburban streetscape, Carthona House could be two neighbouring abodes; a humble red brick heritage home and a contemporary black box standing side by side yet worlds apart, in character and expression. When in fact, the dual forms – one part heritage Australian federation bungalow; one part contemporary nod to Brazilian modernism – consummate as one whole house. The latter volume is a modern and elemental recent addition to the former, by Daniel Boddam Studio. The clients engaged the eponymous studio of Sydney/Byron Bay based architect-designer Daniel Boddam to realise a breathable, light-filled and well-crafted addition to a humble, Federation-era red brick bungalow. The brief specs fit the description of your typical residential Australian alterations and additions project, seeking extended living space with a seamless flow between indoors and out. Meanwhile, the project’s more obscure design objectives included maximising the clients’ lifestyles; maintaining a sense of comfort; ease and flexibility conducive to family life; and a sympathetic approach that respects the historic legacy of the house. Daniel’s curiosity in the dualities of form inspired a ‘complement by contrast’ approach between old and new. The traditional qualities of the Federation-style frontage are boldly juxtaposed by the striking blackened silhouette of the extension. As incongruous as the old and new aspects of Carthona House appear on the façade, the interiors are quite the contrary. The principal living spaces embrace a warm and relaxed tone. Luxe and hand-crafted materials come together with expressed bagged brick walls and charred timber cladding offset by the crisp articulation of a honed marble and matte lacquered cabinetry. Relaxed furnishings, combining Australian and iconic European pieces, harmonise with the clients’ coveted collection of art and objects. Upstairs, a private sanctuary offers district and city views, with operable Yakisugi charred screens opening the interior to the elements. The garage roof is topped with a pebbled succulent garden, creating a pleasant outlook from the master suite and encouraging wildlife to interact with the architecture. Throughout, spaces are thoughtfully composed to celebrate the elemental experiences of living, bathing, dressing and sleeping. While the palette is intentionally restrained, subtle nuances create curious moments of grain and tactility, with a focus on the hand-crafted and artisanal. Informed by Brazilian modernist architecture, with which the client has a deep connection, “the extension has been designed as a crafted lantern”, says Daniel. “The façades open and close as breathable skins allowing for sunlight or shadows, privacy or connection”. Open volumes and voids allow dappled, dancing light to be cast through the interior, tethering the experience of home to natural circadian rhythms; a poetic and resonant quality. Project credits Architecture and interiors by Daniel Boddam Studio Decoration by Carolina Hughes Elliott Styling by Studio CD Built by To The Mil Photography by Pablo Veiga abc
Design Hunters
Design Stories
DH - Feature
Editors Picks
People

Sue Carr’s Brilliant Career Honoured

A stellar career has been recognised in this year’s Queens Birthday Honours List. Sue Carr has been awarded an (AM) of the Order of Australia (General Division) for significant service to interior design, to education and to women in business. On receiving the news of her appointment Sue responded, “When I co-founded my first design practice fifty years ago, I did so with the firm belief that interior design could stand alongside architecture as an equal contributor to the built form. For interior designers, it is about space, form and light, the sensory experience, the materiality, and the subliminal parts rather than the obvious or the superficial.” Throughout her 50-year career, Sue Carr has been an instigator of change and an icon of the design community in Australia, receiving a multitude of accolades in recognition of this. In a time when women were seldom on a building site, Sue was leading her own revolution, and in doing so, has helped pave the way for women in architecture and design today. As Founder of Carr, her eponymous architecture and design practice, Sue has guided her team through five decades of sometimes tumultuous economic and political upheaval in Australia, adapting to the circumstances of the day and always becoming stronger. Now in 2021, the business is perfectly positioned and Carr is recognised as one of the most respected practices in the country. Sue established her first design studio, Inarc, in Melbourne on 10th May 1971. At that time interior design was regarded more as an after-thought rather than integral to a project but Sue had very different ideas, constantly evolving the business and moving forward creating exemplar projects through the relentless pursuit of quality. [caption id="attachment_112437" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Courtyard House, photo by John Gollings[/caption]   From Inarc and the transition of the practice to Carr, the studio has become a force within the architecture and design community. Transitioning from solely interiors, the studio today encompasses an integrated interior design and architectural service where both disciplines, along with the business team, work together as equals. Over the past 50 years, Sue has achieved something that many before her have only dared to dream – longevity in her profession, a successful practice and, through the force of her presence, the ability to change the face of an industry. As Sue herself says, “We’re very fortunate in Australia, where success can be possible through passion and hard work – something I've always applied to what I do. No matter what it is.” [caption id="attachment_112438" align="alignnone" width="1170"] House Around A Pond, photo by Timothy Kaye[/caption]   In so many ways Sue has been a driving force within the changing face of design. Her talent and determination have paved the way for her success concurrently ensuring that the design industry she loves has also been brought to greater prominence. Her presence, skill and determination have, in no small part, led the way for the acceptance of woman in a once, primarily male-dominated profession. We are in awe of the triumphs Sue has achieved over the years and the heights that she has attained and this award is another indicator of the esteem in which she is held by her peers, the architecture and design community as a whole and indeed the wider public. Our heartfelt congratulations Sue. Rather than the crowning glory to an incredible career, this award must be the impetus to keep doing what you do best, design and lead, as without you, our industry would be very different indeed. Trailblazers such as yourself are brave and strong and you are indeed a guiding light for all who attempt to follow in your footsteps. Sue Carr has been a great friend of Indesign Media for many years and participated in the inaugural INDE.Awards jury and subsequent years, only relinquishing the role in 2021 to concentrate on the celebrations of Carr’s 50-year anniversary and now, of course, this singular honour. We think you might like this story about Carr's Red Hill Farm House project [caption id="attachment_112439" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Mathoura Road, photo by Ross Honeysett[/caption]abc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Accessories
Design Products
Home Technology
Kitchen
Premium

Our Verdict: A Home Coffee Machine Is So Worth It And This One’s The Best

The process of finding the right coffee machine for your home has a reputation for being complex, often leaving us wondering if they’re really worth it. The innumerable variety of features and styles indeed overwhelms and overcomplicates this search. But to the coffee connoisseur, it’s simple. For a heavenly brew, all you need is quality, consistency, ease and style.

Is a home coffee machine really worth it?

Perhaps the search isn’t so complicated after all — Winning Appliances brings the perfected technique of coffee-making from Italy to Australian homes, with La Marzocco’s Linea Mini. With this home espresso machine, morning coffee is more than just a routine; it’s an experience of luxury, decadence and sensory fulfilment in the comfort of your own home. No trips required. In fact, investing in a coffee machine significantly reduces the average adult’s coffee expenditure, while elevating taste and experience. Drinking two $4.50 cafe coffees every day amounts to over $3200 a year — a cost almost four times the price of a high-end, automatic espresso machine, like La Marzocco’s Linea Mini, over an average lifespan of eight years. Perhaps the La Marzocco Linea Mini not only satisfies, but exceeds beyond all the expectations of a coffee connoisseur, showing that home coffee machines can be a worthwhile investment.

La Marzocco Linea Mini: What's the fuss about?

Founded in Florence, Italy, La Marzocco transformed coffee-making through their goal of designing and manufacturing the finest coffee equipment. Undoubtedly achieved, La Marzocoo coffee machines have an exceptional reputation and worldwide presence, with Winning Appliances now distributing the new La Marzocco Home range in Australia, offering you powerful, precise technology that fits on the kitchen benchtop. The dual-boiler system of the Linea Mini permits brewing of a shot and steaming milk simultaneously, without compromising the temperature or texture of either component. A built-in water reservoir that holds 2.5 litres of water allows for multiple rounds of espresso experimentation before needing to be refilled, while the integrated brew group and thermal stability system ensure consistency for each cup. With control over the internal brewing temperature through an integrated adjustment wheel, you truly have the freedom to try different flavour profiles and create a cup, perfectly tailored to your preferences. Further, LED barista lights illuminate the drip tray and allow vision of your coffee as it’s brewing. However, if you’re looking for experimentation, La Marzocco’s pairing of the Linea Mini with the Lux D grinder will instil you with the confidence of an experienced barista. This features an On-Demand Dosing System and 61mm flat burrs that can produce 18 grams of coffee in just 10 seconds. Stepless grind adjustment provides more control over your brewing, allowing you to experiment with espresso shot time or volume. This package not only includes both the Linea Mini and Lux D grinder, but also a month of free coffee beans, 12-month service, BWT water filter jug, espresso and cappuccino cups and, additionally, installation and coffee training. Not only that, the machine is gorgeous; with six finishes to choose from, it brings style, exuberance and elevation to any home. Clearly the verdict is simple — the La Marzocco Linea Mini, offered by Winning Appliances, proves to be the perfect and most worthwhile choice for your home coffee machine investment, promising quality, consistency, ease and style. Its innovative design ensures sensory indulgence, permitting an experience of luxury in the comfort of your kitchen. Winning Appliances winningappliances.com.au abc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Furniture
Living

Stylecraft Presents J5 Credenza: a Minimalist Masterpiece Carved with Light

When James Howe was handed a camera on his first journalistic assignment in the Northern Territory a few years back, he had no idea how to operate it - nor that the photographic medium would inform some of his future work as a furniture designer. Looking at his latest piece - the refined, minimalist, yet multidimensional J5 Credenza - it is easy to see how James' fascination with light has influenced his design process. 'During my time in the UK, I joined the Oxford University Photography Association where I started learning photography basics - like aperture, shutter speed and ISO - and how to use those parameters to create a photo,' James starts when I ask him about the inspiration behind Credenza. 'I became really interested in how light interacts with an object, in different qualities of harsh and soft light and in how a camera can capture the relationship between light and shade.' He describes the allure of the medium and goes on to explain the inadvertent effect of this sensibility on his design practice - so beautifully pertinent in the J5 collection, 'when I designed J4 Tables, I found the way light interacted with that particular profile really interesting. And so with the J5 Cabinet - and later with the J5 Credenza - I really wanted for the piece to be simple but dramatic in the way it interacted with light. That's why I've avoided things like handles - the doors and the drawers are pushed open - I wanted it to articulate the very core essence of the design aesthetic.' Previously incorporated in the J5 Cabinet, the signature chevron fluting of the J5 Credenza creates a natural spectacle of light and shade, uncovering new facets of the design as the lighting within the space changes and adding a level of depth to an intentionally minimalist timber silhouette. 'I wanted to create a really minimal piece. I'd always been interested in combining materials - like acrylic and timber or Danish cord and steel - but in this instance, I was interested in the purity of a timber only piece. I wanted to create an object that was pared back to the simplest expression of its design aesthetic. For me, that was the fluting on the doors,' explains James. The intricate, carved with precision pattern conceals an inventive drawer-within-drawer storage solution that offers intuitive functionality and allows the user to achieve a clean and well-organised spatial outcome.

'I wanted to create an object that was pared back to the simplest expression of its designaesthetic. For me, that was the fluting on the doors,' explains James.

The gracefully practical simplicity of the J5 Credenza is also a tangible link to James' upbringing - and the affinity to minimalism and order instilled in him amongst the chaos of family life. 'Even though it's probably not something I was aware of at the time, I had some design role models throughout my childhood. My grandfather, who was Dutch, had a wonderful design aesthetic. He was an incredibly ordered person and in his house everything had a place. But his home wasn't only highly organised - it also looked beautiful. It was that degree of order and minimalism I wanted to emulate,' says James. This pursuit of order and intentionality is what ultimately - and instantaneously - attracted the designer to Børge Mogensen's J39 chair as well, marking the all-important transition into furniture design for him. 'The J39 Chair just brought together all of the things that I was craving - it was beautiful and deeply considered in terms of how it was designed, but it also had a sense of real order about it. The kind of order that I always wanted to pursue but didn't really know how to find,' James tells me about the tremendous impact this idea of beautiful order had on him at the very start of his endeavour - and to this day can be seen permeating some of his work, including the J5 collection. The minimalist profile, incredible attention to detail and unique softness that characterises the J5 designs is also what enchanted Stylecraft in the first place. And what started as a combination of immense talent and stage fright is now a successful partnership between like-minded design professionals. 'I was shortlisted as a finalist for the Australian Furniture Design Award back in 2017 with my Rushcutters Bench. As part of that, we had to present our pieces to a panel of judges at the Jam Factory in Adelaide. The prize for the award was $20,000 plus a partnership with Stylecraft to produce a piece of furniture,' James describes the inception of his relationship with Stylecraft. Even though the designer froze once on stage and didn't take the financial prize home that day, he met Tony Russell - the Brand Director at Stylecraft - and decided that he would try to make the partnership with Stylecraft happen anyway. 'I asked Tony if he was interested in working together, and he invited me to pop by and talk to him in Melbourne the next time I was up there. We talked for a couple of years, every now and then, and when I was doing Denfair in 2019, he dropped by and saw the J5 Cabinet. The Stylecraft team really liked it and decided they wanted to launch it,' James recalls. Following its success, James and Stylecraft continued their partnership which resulted in the release of J5 Credenza - and will no doubt produce many more stunning designs in the future. Fusing the functionality of a clever storage solution with the elegant softness of its pared-back, striking aesthetic, the J5 Credenza is available with Stylecraft alongside the J5 Cabinet. With its highly considered and intentional profile, and the utmost attention to detail resolving both in the intricate fluting and the cleverly concealed drawers, the latest addition to the J5 collection is bound to visually elevate any interior - and enrich the lives of its users, James hopes. 'It's important for me that my work elicits an emotional response in the people who interact with it because that's what drew me into design in the first place,' he concludes.

Stylecraft

stylecraft.com.au

James Howe

jameshowe.com.au Photography: Peter Ryle | Stylist: Nat Turnbull abc
Primary Slider
Design Hunters
Conversations

Building A Case For Multi-Generational Living

With the Federal Budget released last month, much of the spotlight is on the money being poured into aged care, in light of the Royal CommissionAs the ageing community continues its evolution towards being integrated into wider society, multi-generational households are on the rise nationwide, with the introduction of a Capital Gains Tax (CGT) exemption for the building of granny flats and tiny homes on Australian properties to be introduced by the Commonwealth on July 1 2021, provided it passes through Parliament. The projected increase in multi-generational housing is a flow-on effect from the COVID-19 pandemic, and it looks set to continue its rise, according to Hatch RobertsDay. While the residence at the rear of some blocks is typically reserved for the grandparents, the economic fallout of the pandemic has meant a lot of youngsters have moved back into the family home as a result. Hatch RobertsDay Principal Craig Christensen says there are many factors for this occurrence. [caption id="attachment_112394" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Vicki's Place by Curious Practice is programmed as a suburban multi-generational home in a way that focuses on how the clients want to occupy space, rather than procuring a checklist of rooms. Photo by Katherine Lu.[/caption]   “Some of the multi-generational housing increase can be attributed to the impact of COVID on the employment of young Australians and an increasingly expensive housing market,” he says. “We already saw a significant portion of young Australians move back home to live with their families last year due to these impacts. It is also becoming more common for younger generations to stay at home longer and for extended families to live in the same household.” A study conducted by the University of New South Wales found that 20 per cent of Australians live in a multi-generational household, with that number increasing to 25 per cent for Sydneysiders. Interestingly, the study was completed in January 2020, two months before the pandemic. With children staying home and the CGT exemption expected to be introduced, Christensen believes the percentage will only continue to climb. “Living in a multi-generational house is likely to rise in the coming years. The population is getting older and there is a growing need for options that can better serve ageing Australians, particularly given the fact that a large proportion desire ageing in place and living with their families.” Upon completion of the UNSW study, Senior Research Fellow Dr Edgar Liu said the national aged care debacle was a telling factor in the popularity of multi-generational housing, with a desire to keep close connection with loved ones a big reason for the shift away from ageing communities. [caption id="attachment_112395" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Mixed Use House by Matt Gibson A+D, in Melbourne, is a five-storey, multi-generational domicile that provides a window into the future of what fully fledged multi-generational living arrangements can look like. Photo by Shannon McGrath.[/caption]   “There’s an aversion to moving into aged care for obvious reasons we see now, with the Aged Care Royal Commission, and policy-wise, the government doesn’t want people to move into institutions; they want people to live in the general community. So, more families are considering providing that care and support themselves,” he says in an article with the UNSW’s media arm. The tax exemption is encouraging families to build granny flats, with a 2019 report carried out by property specialists CoreLogic and Archistar revealing the construction of a granny flat on an Australian block of land could increase a house’s value by up to 30 per cent. While the report is from 2019, with the continual rise of house prices post-pandemic, the increase in property value could potentially be higher in 2021 and beyond. [caption id="attachment_112477" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Mixed Use House by Matt Gibson A+D Mixed Use House by Matt Gibson A+D. Photo by Shannon McGrath.[/caption] Hatch RobertsDay’s own research found that 583,440 properties in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane alone could build an additional self-contained unit of at least 60sqm. Christensen says that Australian’s can expect to see a growing trend whereby grandparents move into a granny flat or tiny house on their property – or a self-contained floor of the main house – while kids move into the main house with their families. “Part of the Government’s 2021-22 budget will be to provide a capital gains tax exemption for granny flat arrangements. This will certainly lead to an increase in multigenerational households, as it removes a barrier for families to build granny flats on properties for their older family members.” [caption id="attachment_112397" align="alignnone" width="1100"] In Mermaid Multi House by Partners Hill with Hogg & Lamb, external arcades replace internal corridors between rooms, exemplifying how a typical suburban site can be reconfigured to facilitate multiple occupants and their diverse lifestyles. Photo by Shantanu Starick.[/caption]   Keeping a close bond with family members is the main reason for the growth in multi-generational housing. Grandparents can spend more time with grandkids, as opposed to living away from the family hub in a different community. With the budget announced by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg this week, Christensen says we can expect the CGT exemption for granny flats and tiny homes to pass through the House of Reps in an effort to boost the economy, provide jobs and give all family generations the ability to live under the one roof. So, how might design respond to the rise of multi-generational living, in Australia? We’d love to hear your thoughts editorialteam@indesign.com.au [caption id="attachment_112398" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Mermaid Multi House by Partners Hill with Hogg & Lamb. Photo by Shantanu Starick.[/caption]   Lead image, Vicki's Place by Curious Practice, photo by Katherine Lu We think you might like this multi-generational project in Singaporeabc
Design Accessories
Design Products
Furniture
Header Slider
Living

Remarkably Different, Remarkably Markian

With a deep love for craft, design excellence and meaningful relationships, Markian values a sense of individuality above all. The Markian way of life is defined by exceptional detail and refined artistry through a curated range of unique furniture pieces, rugs, fine art and design accessories. A joint venture between two families, the Australian-born brand is deeply influenced by its decade’s worth of professional experience, industry knowledge and an undying passion for beautiful living. Founders, Andrew and Justin Barrett lead the way with over 50 years experience in commercial interiors as the heads of the Barrett Group, an interior fit-out and bespoke joinery manufacturer. The other founders Roz de Waal and Christopher McKenzie lead Markian with their creative direction and design aesthetic, also founders of Unlmtd Design Agency and Armour Atelier, Chris and Roz have been pushing brands, spaces and projects to their limits for some time now. Named after their fathers, Mark de Wall and Ian Barrett, Markian’s legacy is deeply embedded into the DNA of every piece crafted under the brand. In addition to Roz’s impressive design repertoire, the Brisbane-based creative has recently been announced as a finalist in this year’s Vibrant Visions in Design (VIVID) competition. VIVID is one of Australia’s longest-running design competitions, marking its 18th anniversary in 2021. Highly regarded as the premier awards destination for emerging Australian designers, this annual competition shines a spotlight on the new wave of thinkers and innovators in the landscapes of furniture, lighting and object design. Roz has been awarded nine finalist spots under the Furniture Design, Concept Design and Colour Design categories. A testament to her creative ingenuity and passion for challenging the status quo, Roz brings an exemplary amount of expertise to Markian and beyond. Together, the Markian team brings a refreshed perspective and inimitable authenticity to the world of interiors. Influenced by timeless elegance and artful design that seeks to push boundaries of creativity, Markian will always be inspiring and remarkably different. Vieira The VIEIRA range is the brand’s inaugural collection, which explores the concept of invisible threads and strands that connect us across time and our environments. Inspired by travel and the experiences within, VIEIRA, meaning scallop in Spanish, is intricate and perfectly imperfect. The range of bespoke furniture, rugs, objects and fine art draw their forms from nature’s linearity and their colours from the hues of native flowers from Australia and South Africa. With nine colourways and a range of creative, tactile materials, each VIEIRA piece inspires waves of déjà vu, reminiscent of organic beauty. Unique to Markian is the Marblo by Markian material. Marblo by Markian represents the brand’s belief in endless design possibilities through alternative, sustainable materials. A notable feat in challenging familiar materials, this solid surface is a result of Markian’s innovative production process and daring spirit. Featuring nine colourways and a variety of options, Marblo by Markian is unlike any other. As Roz passionately describes Marblo by Markian: “If solid surface was ice-cream, we have designed a new flavour – La Macelleria style (my favourite Brisbane Gelateria) with quality ingredients, great Aussie manufacturing and pure innovation.” Ray Low The Ray Low table is the perfect example of the intersection of delicacy with functionality. Shell-like in form but refined in finish, Ray is embodied by a perfect semi-circle mirrored with elegant fluted edges. Cleverly obscuring a deeply functional creative intention, the smoothly finished tabletop becomes a lid, revealing ample storage space inside the table. Additionally, the Marblo by Markian insert tray is a beautiful detachable detail. Ferdinand The Ferdinand club chair is a stylish option for a wide range of occasional and commercial spaces. The colourful piece – available in eighteen different options – blends old world charm with modern materiality. Finished with a curvilinear timber veneer shell in the VIEIRA scallop shape, Ferdinand features a luxurious leather seat base, and customisable fabric across the padded backrest. Offering superb functionality and a debonair design, Ferdinand is equipped with a long Marblo by Markian blade that glides seamlessly into the back of the chair. And it's multi-functional in that it can be used as a side table or removed to create a base for anything from a grazing platter to a laptop stand. Interior Objects In collaboration with an exceptional mix of Australian artists, Markian has developed a range of luxurious linens, an artisanal fragrance and textural tableware. Imbued with a sense of understated grandeur and natural elegance, these pieces are characteristic of the exceptional quality Markian offers. In collaboration with Julie Smeros, Markian introduces an exquisite range of porcelain tableware, perfectly designed to complement the linen tablecloths and serviettes, creating an elegant dining experience. To complete the experience is the brand’s premier fragrance, 1957. This intricate fragrance pays homage to 1950s glamour and unexpected surprises with a scent that is both rich and refreshing. Featuring notes of Australian Blue Gum, Pomelo, Diva Cucumber and a touch of French Lavender, 1957 has been meticulously refined to create an unforgettable experience. As lovers of fine art, Markian proudly presents a collection of artworks by a range of exceptional Australian artists. The extraordinary collection features pieces such as Roman Longinnou’s large-scale photographic montage series, ‘The Materialisms,’ Caroline Collom’s captivating abstract pieces, and Jessi Wong’s series of contemporary interpretations of Chinese scroll paintings. Bringing the VIERA collection right down to the smallest scale, these collaborations showcase the versatility of Markian’s creative aspirations. Handmade Rugs Adding to the extensive portfolio of design accessories is a collaboration with Designer Rugs. In partnership with the pioneering brand of handmade rugs, the duo presents Mies and Marcel: two hand-tufted vibrant rugs inspired by the original Vieira range and Ray table. Made in Malaysia, this collection showcases carved New Zealand wool detailing, coral-cut pile and a blend of 75 per cent New Zealand wool and 25 per cent wool. The handcrafted Tretford Range is a collection that is modern, luxurious and intriguing all at once. Inspired by fluid shapes and sculptural curves of Vieira and Ray collections, the rugs have six shapes and nine colourways to suit any interior style. More than meets the eye, the Tretford range also actively reduces airborne dust and allergens, achieved through a rigorous construction process, making it an exceptional touch for your living space. Step into the Markian world. Markian markian.com.au  abc