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12 Stunning Kitchens In Gaggenau’s Kitchen of the Year

For over 300 years, Gaggenau has exuded an excellence that has made them a stand-out, a brand that has undeniably stood the test of time. For the first time, Gaggenau has gathered Australian projects worthy of the spotlight and these 12 projects do not disappoint. Each of the kitchens in this year's Kitchen of the Year award are the centre of home life, imbued with rich materiality and innovation, alongside appliances to match. From large family homes to penthouse apartments and more modest renovations, every project in this shortlist considers function, technology and beauty. A sentiment that jury member Sue Carr reiterates, "It doesn’t matter if it’s smaller, it doesn’t matter if it’s a developer. It’s all design." The shortlisted projects are:

Apartment Aria – Julia English Architects with McGregor Westlake Architects

[caption id="attachment_113699" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Tom Ferguson[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113700" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Tom Ferguson[/caption] This dwelling has been designed to best showcase the owner's art collection. As such, the ‘dark core’ – an exquisite line of dark-coloured joinery – was created both as a backdrop for the paintings and an overarching organisational plan for the interior. In order to maintain the continuous appeal of the joinery line from the lobby all the way to the master bedroom, it was crucial for the appliances to be carefully concealed by the veneer panels – or incorporated in a way that would be unobtrusive to the flow of the dark wall. And that is exactly why Gaggenau appliances were selected.

Blairgowrie Beach House – Studio Tom

[caption id="attachment_113701" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Derek Swalwell[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113702" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Derek Swalwell[/caption] Blairgowrie Beach House is a luxuriously minimalist contemporary residence designed to offer a relaxing respite and facilitate uninterrupted connection with the stunning ocean views. Highlighting the sweeping vistas, the interiors of the dwelling are tranquil, harmonious and restrained. The natural, pared-back colour and material palette creates a refined, yet warm and inviting ambience, while the concealed and integrated appliances compound the minimalist appeal.

Bondi Beach Apartment – Mathieson Architects

[caption id="attachment_113703" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Romello Pereira[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113704" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Romello Pereira[/caption] An alternative perspective on the traditional beach aesthetic, the Bondi Beach Apartment has been designed as a more international take on a summer retreat. The dwelling brings a sense of simplicity into the bustling beach-side setting with impressive scale, form, and materiality. The open plan kitchen – alongside the living area – is the heart of the home. The solid timber finish, stainless steel and monolithic granite island bring to the forefront the incredible craftsmanship of the fabricators and contribute to a relaxed atmosphere within the dwelling.

Fawkner House – Rob Mills Architecture & Interiors

[caption id="attachment_113705" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Dylan James[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113706" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Dylan James[/caption] The kitchen is the epicentre of the residence. The space is grounded by an impressive, three-metre-long bench with the layout and positioning of the appliances designed to be functional, seamless and luxurious. The natural colour scheme elevates the interiors and highlights the visual appeal of Gaggenau’s suite of products, which are strategically integrated throughout the space.

Fitzroy Project – Robert Nichol and Sons

[caption id="attachment_113709" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Damien Kook[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113710" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Damien Kook[/caption] Fitzroy Project sees an iconic 1850s bluestone building reunited into a single residence, after it had been converted into two independent dwellings. The rich materiality of the kitchen grounds the space, while adding a complementary layer to the heritage of the building. Separated from the living and dining rooms to allow for each area to retain its unique character, the kitchen is purposefully energetic.

Habitus Townhomes – DKO Architecture

[caption id="attachment_113711" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Timothy Kaye[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113712" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Timothy Kaye[/caption] Designed for longevity and with a diverse group of residents in mind, the interiors offer a much sought-after level of flexibility, while the striking yet natural material palette evokes a feeling of opulence and tranquillity all at once. In the kitchens, that translates into monolithic stone slabs balanced on stunning timber joinery in a pragmatic and sculptural manner. In keeping with the high-end, elevated feel of the dwellings, Gaggenau appliances were selected for their sleek and streamlined appearances.

Hall 20 – Smart Design Studio

[caption id="attachment_113713" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Romello Pereira[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113714" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Romello Pereira[/caption] In dramatic contrast with the subtle interiors of the Hall 20 project, this high-end dark kitchen offers a striking, monolith-like quality that’s theatrical, yet unimposing. The angled underside of the island bench is a highly-resolved take on the building’s splaying corners, while the stone columns are a nod to the order of architecture. The kitchen’s carefully curated spatial arrangement is further highlighted by the choice of premium kitchen appliances.

Japanese Inspired East St Kilda Kitchen – Rogerseller

[caption id="attachment_113715" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Caitlin Mills[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113716" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Caitlin Mills[/caption] This large, modern kitchen replaced an area previously occupied by two rooms to create a multi-functional space where the family can gather to cook, socialise and do schoolwork. Designed for a family of avid cooks, the kitchen is as beautiful as it is practical. The kitchen island in black brushed flamed granite incorporates a flush-mounted Gaggenau induction cooktop to create a spacious and easily accessible cooking area.

Martha Cove – DKO Architecture

[caption id="attachment_113717" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Damien Kook[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113718" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Damien Kook[/caption] The epicurean kitchen of the Mt Martha waterfront residence fuses clean geometric lines and restrained materiality to create a family space that’s effortless yet exciting. Reflecting the palette of the surrounding landscape, the interiors are finished in cool grey limestone, which contrasts with the textured timber joinery. The beautifully striking restraint of the project is clearly visible in the considered selection of appliances.

Mathoura Road Toorak – Carr

[caption id="attachment_113719" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Ross Honeysett[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113720" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Ross Honeysett[/caption] A considered choice of finishes with rich textures and inherent finesse has been incorporated throughout the dwelling, with the kitchens particularly stimulating for the sense. The kitchen spaces blend functionality with a symphony of textures, making cooking and entertaining an extraordinary experience.

Penthouse II – Lawless & Meyerson

[caption id="attachment_113721" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Dave Wheeler[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113722" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Dave Wheeler[/caption] In spite of its harbour setting, this sophisticated residence couldn’t be further away from the traditional coastal aesthetic. This refined, elegant and relaxing three-bedroom oasis is set in a unique location that boasts direct access to the beach, with its coastal context reflected in the sand-coloured palette. With 180-degree harbour views, the kitchen makes the most out of the iconic setting. The monolith island bench grounds the space, while connecting the open plan living area

St Huberts – Robson Rak

[caption id="attachment_113723" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Mark Roper[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113724" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Mark Roper[/caption] The residence was reconfigured and restored, with a modern addition to the dwelling seamlessly blending the old with the new. The kitchen epitomises the response to the wider design brief for the project by flawlessly integrating natural veneer, stone and steel, which reflect the materiality of a period home, with Gaggenau’s elegantly unostentatious state-of-the-art appliances.   From the shortlisted projects, a winner and runner up will be announced for both the Southern Region (VIC/TAS/SA/WA/NT), and the Northern Region (NSW/ACT/QLD), as well as a Commendation and the grand prize – the ‘Best of the Best’ winner, which will all be announced in October. In the meantime meet the jury and get insights into the judging process.abc
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Platforms And Atriums At Open Shut House

Housing a new extension and the original house on a long and narrow block, Open Shut House is home to two very distinct architectural stylings, connected by a central atrium. WALA was asked by the family to create a future-proofed home that would cater to the changing needs of each individual family member. The family had outgrown the house, and required an expansion on the functional offerings of the old house, as well as ensuring that any new addition respected the heritage character and scale of the period home, while being a clearly distinguishable yet connected entity. The original dwelling is now home to the children’s bedrooms, with the parent’s retreat transferred to the new. The hallways of the old house lead to the atrium, doubling as arteries to the heart, or in this instance the atrium. The building accounts for the topography of the site by cascading a series of tiered living spaces towards the backyard. The kitchen is more of a practical space as opposed to one of the entertaining proportions, before the floor level changes once more and the perception of space swells in the sunken living room and garden beyond. Skylights, large windows and courtyards draw daylight along the length of the buildings, while providing visual relief along the way. Due to the split levels and atrium, the inhabitants can still feel connected visually with each other throughout the house due to these openings. Conservation of the front house was imperative due to its significance as a building of the inter-war era. The new addition sought to preserve the front building’s heritage qualities by utilising the fall of the land to tuck itself behind and below the existing roofline, which is witnessed clearly from street view, respecting the scale and proportioning of the existing building and adjacent neighbouring dwellings. The new addition is unashamedly contemporary, a clear departure from the architecture of its predecessor in order to distinguish itself and create a counterpoint to the old building. The contemporary nature of the exterior is enhanced further with the material selection, with timber and charcoal powder-coated structure echoed throughout the house. Hints of marble and terrazzo combine with the timber to add an additional texture to a palette that is vastly different from the rendered brickwork of the existing abode. The tiered living spaces inherently allocate specific functions to each “platform” while still creating a seamless circulatory and visual flow from front to rear. Connections between indoor and outdoor are prevalent and these apertures soften the edges of each programmatic compartment. The new building is also a protective cocoon, sheltering its occupants from the noise of the outside world with its timber shutters and double-glazed pivots, while enhancing visual privacy. Despite looking completely disconnected from an outside point of view, Open Shut House fuses contemporary and art-deco stylings together via a shared space that enforces connection between family members, while allowing them to all live separately at their choosing with individual spaces. WALA has paired modern architecture’s values of increased natural light, chiaroscuro and an elegant palette with the white weatherboard, art-deco accented inter-war era dwelling, while using the site’s unique scale to its advantage, building the house around the composition of the block as opposed to levelling it out completely. Project Details Architecture – WALA Photography – Dave Kulesza We think you might like this house designed around an atrium in Queenslandabc
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Small But Serene: Less is More in Bokey Grant’s Calming MB Apartment

When first-time homeowners Mary and Ben, both in their 20s, inherited this compact apartment from Mary’s grandmother, it was still in its original unchanged 1960s state. Sitting in Drummoyne, an Inner West Sydney suburb hugged by the Parramatta River, the building is defined by an understated blonde brick and black shingled exterior. Inside, the flat was originally compartmentalised with low, flat ceilings and a tight entrance sandwiched between the enclosed kitchen and a large laundry. Looking through window into MB Apartment After seeing Bokey Grant’s JJ House, the couple consulted with the Sydney-based firm and architect Jeffrey Grant on redesigning the apartment. “Mary and Ben didn’t have a normal prescriptive brief other than, ‘it needs some work’,” says Jeffrey, adding that the couple were happy to go on the “journey” that comes from trusting the design process. “By doing so, we unlocked the plan and discovered ways of reusing the space that added to their amenity and potential resale value,” says Jeffrey. The couple required a calm space and of course, an appropriate environment for their cat Moochi and sausage dog Kofta. “Given it was pretty free and open we responded to the character of the original building so that it had some reference to its shell rather than ignore it completely. This resonates in the spatial and detail design but also the choice in materials,” says Jeffrey. Looking out onto the balcony from the living room. Jeffrey remedied the original pokey entrance by thickening and curving the walls, mitigating the feel of thin, plasterboard walls. The kitchen was reoriented and opened up, connecting it to the living area and adding a visual connection from the entrance. The ceiling of the kitchen was lowered, meaning the living room ceiling, which retains the original stipple paint effect, expands upward. A simple sliding wall added between spaces allows Mary to use the rest of the apartment while Ben, a doctor who does shift work, can get to sleep without being woken by Mary or by the sun. Blackbutt flooring throughout warms the apartment’s palette, bringing a sense of calm. Sliding wall and small circular dining table, next to an open sliding door. The bathroom mimics the entry, with a curved shower recess. Locally-produced red terrazzo floors add a personal flair and wall tiles are recycled from a previous Bokey Grant Project, a sustainable and cost-saving solution. Curved bathroom wall with local red terazzo tiles. Despite the couple’s tight budget and tight space, MB Apartment is a prototype for effectively reimagining small spaces. Bedroom with sheer curtains and blackbutt floors. Project Details Architects: Bokey Grant Builder: Rise Architectural Builders Engineer: SDA Structures Photographer: Clinton Weaver   Enjoy this? You might like Mitsuori Architects' Tree Change House.abc
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In Praise of Shadows (and Light)

Molony Architects' Black Hill House extension in Ballarat underscores the merit in applying the architectural dictum “form follows function”. Despite having been initially designed with the living spaces oriented to the north, the original 1940’s bungalow presented a number of lifestyle problems. Dining table with black chairs “With the increase in traffic in the area and changing models of living, the living space lacked privacy and was disconnected with the site's secluded open outdoor space,” explains studio director Michael Moloney. As a result, Molony Architects have re-imagined the house by designing it from the inside out. “The clients' original brief was to renovate the existing living space on the north side and to create an addition of a master bedroom suite to the backyard. However, after investigating various options, we eventually decided to switch the living and master bedrooms spaces,” says Moloney. Kitchen island and circular dining table with black features. As a result, the existing living space has been transformed into a main bedroom, ensuite and walk-in robe and a new living space at the rear of the home now enjoys a direct connection to the private yard. The master bedroom's white bedding and forest-green curtains. The new kitchen acts as a 'light scoop' or 'light periscope' with a double-height space that pops up above the roofline to draw in northern light. The contemporary addition is linked to the house in a way that retains the integrity of the original roof form and is aligned with the hallway of the existing house. Upon entering through the home’s original entry, a separate, formal living space comes into view through double glass doors. A stepped down linkway connects the original house (which contains the bedrooms, bathrooms and a new study nook) to the extension which sits closer to the backyard's natural ground level. The linkway also creates a new informal entry into the addition for guests’ unannounced drop-ins. Hallway with reading nook and shelves. By separating the new works and setting them back from the original building with a linkway, the team also created two small courtyards that have improved light and ventilation access in the house. “Minimising the size of the linkway reduced the impact of the new work on the integrity of the existing building,” says Michael. “This strategy also allowed the new work to be conceived as a separate architectural component with its own identity, that respects the scale or the original with be being constrained by the architectural language rules of the original.” The interiors follow the principle of designing from the inside out and each room focuses squarely on the day-to-day experiences of each room. The team limited the material palette to concrete, timber, cement sheet, bagged brick, and painted steel. “We were interested in expanding on the rich dark-stained timber features of the existing house and turned to “In Praise of Shadows”, Jun'ichirō Tanizaki’s essay on aesthetics, to help guide our approach to light and materiality,” says Michael. Green and white tiled bathroom. “The book talks about an appreciation of the quality of shadow, the contrast of light and dark, and how low sheen materials create subtlety in an interior environment.” As a result the preference was for textured, matte materials over anything too shiny, thereby creating an overall ambience of calm and warmth as well as a sense of the house being handcrafted. The extension's exterior verandah with deck chairs and table. Project Details Architects – Moloney Architects Builder – D&H Building Photography – Ben Hosking Styling – Hilgar We think you might like this interview with Hogg & Lambabc
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An Apartment That Balances Live And Work

Setting out with the brief of making an efficient live and work set-up for a couple in Sydney’s bustling Glebe, designer Nicholas Gurney has renovated a 71-square-metre, two-bedroom home into an adept apartment with one bedroom, two bathrooms and an office. Aptly named Yin and Yang, the project balances work/life spaces by linking rather than demarcating them. The entry portal transports you from the commotion of the city into a calming black hole, before opening onto the kitchen and lounge areas. A large translucent partition wall veils the office; it’s the only barrier between work and life, and it’s a flexible one. A large window in the office space overlooks the Modernist Bidura Children’s Court (which is to be controversially demolished). To Nicholas, the apartment draws the character of this building inside. “It sort of feels like you’re in a brutalist building yourself when you’re looking at that one.” Within the living space, a fuchsia gallery wall becomes a backdrop for minimalist artworks. Intoxicating the senses, the gallery area features textured matting and mirrors, visually clearing the mind as the owners move from the more public spaces into the bedroom’s solitude. Although the usual instinct is to separate life and work, the entry portal, partition and gallery walls create thresholds that acclimatise the occupants and facilitate movement between work/life spaces without overwhelming. The redesign draws influence from the couple’s Venezuelan heritage, with the exposed concrete ceiling and sleek, uncluttered lines of the spaces a reference to Caracas’ mid-century style architecture. Functionally speaking, the new layout responds to the need for increased flexibility during day-to-day use. The partition door and the bedroom door provide layered soundproofing when one person is working, while the other is sleeping. And when both are awake, the partition opens up encouraging back-and-forth movement between work, cooking and living. [caption id="attachment_113564" align="alignnone" width="1170"] A fuschia gallery wall adds an unexpected pop[/caption] The office and lounge both have a Chinchorro (a traditional South American woven hammock), enabling restful siestas suspended above the floor. Custom joinery provides niches to create mini displays, surrounding the owners with the things they love – Star Wars figurines take pride of place in the office. Nicholas has a curious relationship to his industrial design background. Although he’s not against new, purpose-specific designs, he prefers to inventively apply pre-owned and vintage pieces. A compact timber wall-chair tucks behind the entry door, specifically placed so shoes can be comfortably removed despite the tight space. Pre-owned furnishings – two vintage leather armchairs resting atop a tactile earthy-coloured rug – demonstrate that being sustainable can also inject character. In terms of materiality, a restrained palette means the same finishes are adopted across multiple zones. As a result, the spaces bleed soothingly into each other, lending a harmonious consistency. Dark timber flooring runs throughout with the exception of the mosaic-tiled bathrooms. Materials create a duality and even start to mirror each other. The exposed concrete ceiling gazes down upon the concrete kitchen benchtop. The matte black plywood of the kitchen and lounge is mimicked in the office, though inversed to white. Lighting nestles functionally into precise nooks. Nicholas explains, “The space never feels lit, it’s just that the things you need are illuminated.” Without ceiling space available, a six-metre strip light lines the partition wall and is a conduit for the lighting and complex speaker system throughout the home. The architecturally integrated lighting creates an atmospheric quality that respects the time of day. Natural light dapples into the lounge and kitchen from the floor-to-ceiling balcony window and bounces off the black cabinetry during the day. At night the glimmering city lights integrate with the ambience.

“There’s a more interesting way to work from home than just putting the office in the worst room of the house.”

Nicholas is proud the home is “just so right” for this pair but acknowledges it doesn’t happen without gutsy clients who are prepared to sacrifice the usual things, like a couch. “Too often owners are designing their homes for the next person who will buy the property,” says Nicholas. Instead, a uniquely personal home has been created by designing for the owners’ lifestyle. In light of the pandemic, it’s as important as ever to consider the personal way of creating a home perfectly suited to an occupant’s needs, which this renovation highlights. Nicholas reiterates, “There’s a more interesting way to work from home than just putting the office in the worst room of the house.” Much of life is spent working, thus work can’t help but seep into personal time. The Yin and Yang apartment considers work/life balance as a choice to transition between spaces that meet life’s needs holistically, so that home can be equally enjoyed as much during work, as in leisure time. Nicholas Gurney nicholasgurney.com.au Photography by Terence Chin This project originally appeared in issue #50 of Habitus, the Anniversary Specialabc
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Watts Up With ADesignStudio’s Alex Fitzpatrick?

What is it about lighting that is just so… mystifying? Within design disciplines, lighting design is arguably the most challenging; its technological complexities are possibly the most pronounced; its rate of innovation is easily the most rapid. This unique disposition presumably reflects the profound impact lighting design has upon our lives. It’s the stimulus that most influences human perception, it regulates our waking and sleeping cycles, it even has a part to play in the production of serotonin and dopamine – leading, ultimately, to its stronghold on our psychophysical wellbeing. Curious and intricate and overwhelming, indeed … you need only ask a lighting designer. Which is exactly what I did –– “Lighting sparked my curiosity after I finished university,” Alex Fitzpatrick tells me. “I felt the world of lighting was overwhelming – with so many moving parts.” It was this inherent and beguiling complexity that, he continues, “pushed me to start my journey towards ADesignStudio." "Over the last ten years, I have been constantly learning about light – how it affects a space, how it makes people feel, the ins-and-outs of LED and about hiding light, playing with shadows, all the while making sure you can seamlessly dim the fitting down to zero...” [caption id="attachment_113550" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Rohan Venn[/caption] Discover ADesignStudio Founded and helmed by Fitzpatrick, ADesignStudio’s lighting design and manufacturing practice are now entering its second decade – one slated to enjoy even greater local and international accolade, landmark projects and collaborations with figureheads of our global industry. In recent years, the studio has successfully launched lines at Salone in Milan, produced installations for the likes of Lane Crawford in Hong Kong and created custom portfolios for an impressive lineup of hotels, private residences, commercial and civic spaces working with the country’s celebrated architecture firms. But illustrious accomplishments aside, for Fitzpatrick, ADesignStudio’s attitude remains humble. “In the early days I had set up my studio in my grandad’s garage and, then, from one of the rooms out of my home,” says Fitzpatrick of his studio’s modest beginnings, adding, “That worked for about a year or so until it took over. About three years ago I moved into the space where I am now – a small workshop where we do a lot of our assembly with a studio upstairs.” [caption id="attachment_113551" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Photo by Rohan Venn[/caption] From here, the expansion of workspace has allowed Fitzpatrick to pursue a similar expansion in design scale: “We are near completion on a new light fitting where we have designed the whole system including the electronic design and functionality. We have built-in many functions to address the issues that customers currently face so as to improve user experience. I am looking forward to revealing the products and, I hope, people will connect with them on both an aesthetic and functional level.” ‘Aesthetic’, ‘functional’ – when speaking with Fitzpatrick, you’ll find him returning to these two words. They lie behind his abiding appreciation of lighting masters like Castiglioni where, during stints at Euroluce, Fitzpatrick discovered the combined power of form-meets-narrative-meets-function. [caption id="attachment_113552" align="alignnone" width="1170"] ADesignStudio's Flat White collection[/caption] Part playful, part inquisitive, this approach strikes balances between the poetic and the scientific – ancient crafts of glassblowing and metalwork combine with ultra-modern LED componentry – in collections such as the debut Light Garden’s (2011) geometric take on shivelight or ADesignStudio’s latest release Greenway (2021), an ode to Australia’s historic maritime architecture wrought in crackled handblown glass. “I like people to feel they have a connection with either the story or the functionality of the product – it doesn’t matter how big or small,” he says. “An example of this happening was with a client who purchased our Greenway fittings. We started to discuss the Greenway range and she told me she immediately connected with the fittings as her grandmother used to live near the lighthouse in Vaucluse, which was the inspiration for this particular collection. For this client, the fittings connected her with fond memories of visiting her grandmother. For me, it’s about creating these connections – even if it’s just for one person.” ADesignStudio adesignstudio.com.au Portrait by Rohan Venn We think you might like this story about Nuura, a Nordic lighting brandabc
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Fusing Two Eras Together

Breathing new life into an existing Edwardian gem, Rowena Parade sees the combining of crisp contemporary gestures together with a retained heritage character. Located in the tightly woven residential fabric of Melbourne’s Richmond, Techne’s expansion and renovation works bring an embracing pull of the surrounding landscape and garden settings inward, altering and elevating the experience of the home. In combining the old and new, Techne director Nick Travers notes, “It was important we celebrated the home’s history, but also to maximise the site’s potential with the most fitting contemporary extension.” Through opening up to the rear, the existing formal elements remain in place in the front of the home, while the new emerges as a connected series of living zones, opening to the outdoors.

“It was important we celebrated the home’s history, but also to maximise the site’s potential with the most fitting contemporary extension.”

As a key to combining the old with the new, Techne ensured the crafted and handmade elements of the original ornate stylings remained celebrated and restored. The existing planning and its formality then reinforce areas of private retreat and create a natural hierarchy internally. Intentionally, integrated elements are only in the new, leaving the existing as an expression of its era. Temporary and moveable furniture and additions then allow original cornicing and mouldings to be expressed as a key part of the narrative of the home, past and present. In altering the home to allow for connection at its core, the focus was on the new addition as a place to gather and bring everyone together. Responding to the client’s brief, Nick says, “It needed to be a space that would allow (them) to live, work and entertain within the same zone.” The proposal for a floating pavilion became that answer. The new form becomes a glass-encased volume that engages with the natural elements, and through its transparency and being wrapped in steel and glass vertical elements, becomes flooded with natural light and moving shadows throughout the day. In describing the addition, Nick says, “To strengthen the connection to the outdoors, we strategically added skylights and floor-to-ceiling windows to allow glimpses of neighbouring tree canopy and urban surroundings from any viewpoint in the extension.” The differences between the old and new are clearly defined as the ornate and decorative transitions into the more streamlined and crisply detailed. As the hero of the home, the kitchen culminates through its expressed natural stone, together with the warming timber, both ahead and wrapping around the joinery elements. Through a focus on how the new extends the narrative of the old, and a keen focus on drawing connections between the built and the natural, Rowena Parade beautifully balances time and openness. Project Details  Architecture and interiors – Techne Photography – Tom Blachford We think you might like this hi-tech pub by Techne abc
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Have you got your FREE ticket to the INDE.Summit?

Over the last five years, the INDE.Awards has been a pioneer of architecture and design in the Indo Pacific. For 2021, we’ve taken this a step further: putting together a full day of knowledge and learning - led by industry experts from across the region. What’s more, in light of the recent lockdowns and restrictions sweeping the Indo-Pacific, we’re proud to announce that the INDE.Summit is now 100% FREE and digital for all attendees, ensuring we can come together and connect no matter where we are in the world.  That’s right - you’ll get to join 4 CPD accredited panels powered by the best and most exciting names in architecture and design. You’ll network, ask questions, vote in polls and interact with partners in an immersive digital setting. That’s a full day of connection, learning and inspiration, entirely free, and delivered directly to you.  Join the likes of Woods Bagot, fjmtstudio, SJB, Kaunitz Yeung Architecture, Crown Group, Milieu Property, Era-Co, Gensler and many more to hear unique perspectives on cutting-edge topics that forecast the future of architecture, design and the built environment.  Register now for your free ticket and hear the latest on affordable housing, discover the new frontier on sustainability, reflect on the intersection of culture and architecture and debate just what the future of the workplace will be. Don’t miss your chance to attend the year’s most anticipated knowledge event!

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Access 4 dynamic sessions  Your free ticket gives you access to four topics. From affordable housing and the future of workplace, to the latest in sustainability and connecting architecture to cultural identities, this is your ticket to the latest knowledge in our field.  Hear from brain trust of over 20 thought leaders from across the Indo-Pacific The INDE.Summit is committed to connecting the Indo-Pacific region, so we have speakers from all corners, giving you broad and relevant perspectives to what it means to work in architecture and design in your context today. Hear from industry experts including: Iwan Sunito (Crown Group), Rosemary Kirkby (Rosemary Kirkby & Associates), Richard Francis-Jones (fjmtstudio), Emma Telfer (Assemble), Michael Mossman (USYD), Nayan Parekh (Gensler), Shannon Peach (Milieu), Amanda Stanaway (Woods Bagot), James Calder (ERA-co), Palinda Kannangara (Palinda Kannangara Architects) AND MORE! Easy viewing online, anywhere you have an internet connection  While there is nothing better than coming together with your peers, the INDE.Summit offers a digital event experience that is the next best thing. Join in on sessions from wherever you have an internet connection. Ask questions, vote in polls and network with other attendees in this unique digital format that puts you in conversation with the best of local and regional industry experts. Formal CPD points for Australian architects If you are an Australian architect, you have the ability to earn up to four formal CPD points while enjoying INDE.Summit.   PLUS a ticket to the INDE.Awards Digital Gala celebration To top it all off, your INDE.Summit ticket will also grant you access to the INDE.Awards Digital Gala! Be there to celebrate with your peers as your 2021 INDE.Awards winners are announced.  GET MY FREE TICKET NOW  

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inde summit collage Explore how the Indo-Pacific region’s architects and designers are responding to and innovating in the face of critical global and local challenges at INDE.Summit. One ticket grants you access to the full summit programme to ensure you’re present for each knowledge-driven moment. The theme of this year’s Summit is Develop/Undevelop, where we explore the paradoxes and necessities that posit questions around what architecture’s place is in making a difference for the wellbeing of the populace and our fragile environment.  9:00am AEST Welcome Address Jan Henderson (INDE.Awards)    9:15am AEST Finding & Financing Sustainability: Indo-Pacific Built Environment Case Studies [caption id="attachment_10732" align="alignnone" width="300"] Nature Discovery Park, by LAAB Architects with PLandscape & Speirs Major, photo by Otto Ng of LAAB Architects[/caption] In this session we look to sustainable developments that balance place, budget and regulation to achieve outstanding results. What can we learn from these international examples, and how can those insights be applied closer to home? Stephen Cairns (Future Cities Laboratory), Dr Jeremy Smith (Irving Smith Architects),  Iwan Sunito (Crown Group), Emma Teifer (Assemble)   10:45am AEST Ecosystems of Commercial Space in the Indo-Pacific [caption id="attachment_11470" align="alignnone" width="300"] Collins Arch, by Woods Bagot & SHoP Architects, photo by Trevor Mein[/caption] How are we using commercial spaces in 2021 and beyond? Where does the value of commercial space lie for building owners, property and facility managers, designers and the end user? We survey the global currents influences the evolution of commercial space across the region.  James Calder (ERA-co), Mike Day (Roberts Day), Nayan Parekh (Gensler Singapore), Rosemary Kirkby (Rosemary Kirkby & Assoc.), Simone Oliver (Architectus), Tom Owens (Gensler Sydney)   12:15pm AEST  Manifesting Culture, Place & Identity in the Indo-Pacific [caption id="attachment_11476" align="alignnone" width="300"] The Rajasthan School, by Sanjay Puri Architects, photo by Dinesh Mehta[/caption] This session explores our lived experience of culture, place and identity, while also questioning how we can marry traditional architectural/cultural vernaculars with more contemporary design methods in an authentic and meaningful way.  Akshat Bhatt (Architecture Discipline), Richard Francis-Jones (fjmtstudio), Leone Lorrimer (GHDWoodhead), Michael Mossman (University of Sydney), Goy Zhenru (Goy Architects)    1:45pm AEST  The Housing Balance: Design, Community & Economy in the Indo-Pacific [caption id="attachment_11208" align="alignnone" width="300"] Terracotta House, by Austin Maynard Architects, photo by Derek Swalwell[/caption] How can housing build resilient communities and environments while also combating competing forces of affordability, culture, climate and construction?  Palinda Kannangara (Palinda Kannangara Architects), David Kaunitz (Kaunitz Yeung Architecture), Shannon Peach (Milieu), Amanda Stanaway (Woods Bagot),  Gabrielle Suhr (SJB), Ka Wai Yeung (Kaunitz Yeung Architecture).   We hope to see you at INDE.Summit on August 5th from 9am (AEST) To read more visit: www.indeawards.com/summit    GET MY FREE TICKET NOWabc
Architecture
Homes

House RV Realises Life At Its Peak In Sydney’s Inner East

As much as they tend to be nice, well-to-do neighbourhoods, Sydney’s eastern suburbs are notoriously hilly. And, on occasion poor planning exacerbates tough topology. Located in Bellevue Hill and subject to a driveway rising five metres above the street to the garage, House RV was one such hindered case. Until its transformation by Sydney-based practice Plus Minus Design, that is. Aside from the steep landscape, the client’s primary contention point with the driveway was that it consumed virtually all the outdoor space belonging to the home, leaving the residents with little in the way of a front yard or garden. Through consultation with Phillip Arnold of Plus Minus Design, the clients determined that this problem could be resolved prior to purchasing. “The aim of the brief was to reorganise the front yard to create a tranquil garden and to make gentle yet practical modifications to the house’s layout,” says Phillip. Internally, the house had undergone several ill-considered renovations, rendering the internal plan haphazard, although the underlying structure was in reasonably sound condition. First things first, Phillip relocated the garage to the street level, inserted a retaining wall along the outside edge of the former driveway, and extended a new garden across its roof. The former garage has been transformed into a covered outdoor space, opening out to the pool. The existing landscape was enhanced and soft landscaping in the front yard increased by more than 260 percent, providing new amenity and improving the streetscape. Internally, the architect’s approach was to make as few alterations to the existing structure as possible. The relationship between living spaces and the garden was improved with the main room opening into the tree canopy. The living room ceiling was raised and a floating wall dropped from the skylight shaft, dividing the living and dining spaces while enhancing the sense of scale within. With modest finishes and detailing, Phillip’s approach kept the square metre rate well below the locale’s standard market rates for alterations and additions. As well as being kind to the clients’ budget, Plus Minus Design’s considered and modest structural interventions ensured that energy embodied in the original house form was not needlessly transferred to landfill. “We believe that doing less is as much as a design choice as an environmental choice and a response to budget,” says Phillip. With its plan reconfigured, forging new connections to site and surrounds, House RV has been wholly transformed. Plus Minus Design plusminusdesign.com.au Photography by Mary Gaudin abc
Architecture
Editors Picks
Homes
Interiors

Where Angles Guide Daylight’s Dance

House James in Gymea NSW is home to a young family. They commissioned Henry Berresford of Berresford Architecture to take the dim, contained structure and reinvent it as a light, connected and low maintenance home fit for hosting friends. The existing house was devoid of spatial variation. Henry’s design introduces transitions between the comforting upper spaces and the entertaining levels below. With an elevated ceiling plane, the kitchen height scales on entry to the living area, ushering in natural light from above. Despite opening the layout and doing away with walls and rooms, the project has achieved an additional bedroom, bathroom and reading room. Henry’s design hierarchy unfolds from a horizontal datum taken from the line of the carport roof. The lower level is wrapped by decking that mediates internal entertaining areas with the garden. The upper level rests upon the plinth as an almost sculptural form. Perpendicular lines of the façade frame the skyline, connection points of materials guiding the gaze. With its barestone cladding and protruding square windows, the upper form is reminiscent of a brutalist aesthetic in its interactions with angled light. The awnings play with both sun and shadow throughout the day. These sundials of House James set an honest pace for the home, completing the connection to nature. Here low maintenance material selection also adheres to passive sustainability principles. The floorplan faces north directing most of the glazing used. Heat relief is provided by deep, powder-coated aluminium sunhoods on the northern windows, which take the sting out of the summer sun while allowing winter light to seep in. From timber flooring, to the white-tiled splashback and marble benchtop, a varied materiality adds to the home’s tactile nature. Indoors, every opportunity to connect to the outdoors is leveraged. Above the kitchen sink, an inset timber window offers a glimpse of greenery, while crisp timber flooring extends the reach of the external tree branches inside. Along the north boundary a magnolia tree was pining for attention, and by being retained, it is celebrated as a focal point of the new design. House James can be safely taken at face value. It is elegant in its simplicity and environmentally conscious in its modesty, with a character that manifests itself in light and movement. House James is a fitting example of the honest aesthetic that Berresford Architecture observes. Project Details Architecture – Berresford Architecture Builder – Clockwork constructions Engineering – Greenview Consulting Styling – Koskela Photography – Andy Macpherson Studio abc
Happenings
What's On

Discover architecture’s best for 2021 at this year’s INDE.Awards

You’re invited to our annual celebration of Indo-Pacific architecture and design! Each year, the architecture and design community from across the Indo-Pacific come together to pay homage to the best of the best. On the evening of the INDE.Awards annual Gala, they celebrate the projects, people and products that have stood above the rest and catapulted our region onto the world stage. For 2021, we’re giving you an exclusive invitation to join us on our night of nights, putting you in the front row as our industry’s most coveted awards are received. Be there as we unveil the best in workspace, hospitality, multi-residential design, product design and so much more. See who takes home the prestigious prodigy and luminary awards and be the first to know who is announced as the much-anticipated best of the best accolade. Join the likes of Woods Bagot, Edition Office, State of Kin, Smart Design Studio, Gensler, Grimshaw, Billard Leece Partnership, Fender Katsalidis, DKO, Breathe Architecture, John Wardle, Palinda Kannangara, Alexander &CO, Bates Smart, YSG, COX Architecture, Russell & George and so many more for an evening unlike any other. Best of all - your ticket is absolutely free and you’ll be able to join from wherever you are in the globe. Reserve your place here and be there as history is made. INDE.Awards Digital Gala Virtual Experience Thursday, August 5th 2021 7:30pm AEST Hosted by Peter Colquhoun and the INDE team Reserve my ticket

Want even more from Indo-Pacific design?

Why not join us for our inaugural INDE.Summit - a full day programme packed-full of regional architectural perspectives that precedes the Awards. Be there on August 5th from 9am (AEST) and tune into 4 ground-breaking panel discussions exploring topics such as financing sustainability, housing affordability, culture and identity in architecture and the future of commercial space. You’ll hear from our industry’s most exciting minds for a truly diverse deep-dive into the topics of tomorrow in an all-new dynamic event format. Reserve my free ticket INDE.Awards would like to thank our Platinum Partner Zenith for their ongoing support of Indo-Pacific design and stewardship of the Best of the Best category. INDE.Awards also thanks all of our category partners: Alspec, AHEC, Autex, Bosch, Gaggenau, Grohe, Haworth, Herman Miller, Milliken-Ontera, Neolith, Stormtech, Tappeti, Wilkhahn and Woven Image.abc
Kitchen
Finishes
Design Products
Bathroom

Whitelight: Texture and Tonality of Natural Stone

Influenced by the beauty of the landscapes that surround us, Caesarstone presents the new Whitelight Collection: a range of four light, neutral colours to bring a sense of calm into a residence. “We're longing for that connection to the outdoors and a sense of calm,” adds Caesarstone Brand Manager, Emma Bush. “The Whitelight Collection evokes the essence of wellness and serenity; it brings a beautiful, long-lasting piece of the earth into the heart of our homes.” [caption id="attachment_113075" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Arabetto™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption] Creating a new dimension for indoor spaces, the Whitelight Collection is versatile by nature with expert engineering that puts design longevity at the forefront. Each colour is a refined presentation of timeless simplicity, the perfect base for your kitchen, bathroom, laundry and beyond. The new Arabetto™ colourway represents the timeless evolution of the classic arabescatto marble look. With subtle grey veins interwoven throughout with hints of jade and copper tones blanketing a white, polished surface, Arabetto™ is a marble that will never go out of style. Capturing the natural beauty of marble, Aterra Blanca™ consists of a misty white base, elevated with soft strokes of earthy hues throughout the stone. Throughout the day, Aterra Blanca™ radiates a translucent glow to brighten up any space. [caption id="attachment_113080" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Calacatta Maximus™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption] Driven by the texture and tones of sandstone and travertine, Adamina™ redefines the magnificence of a golden sand dune. Designed to settle calmly into the modern Australian kitchen, Adamina™ brings the essence of natural wonders to the heart of the home. Influenced by the minerals in nature and the revival of Calacatta veining, Calacatta Maximus™ is sophisticated simplicity at its finest. Featuring a subtle natural finish, this unique colourway consists of a surface terrain that reveals a complex layer of soft greys and delicate copper veins that elevate the stone’s clean, white base. Caesarstone’s new Whitelight Collection additionally includes a range of Caesarstone’s beloved classic designs. Vivid White™ offers a luxurious stillness and clarity only found in the stone of the Greek Island of Thassos in the Aegean Sea. This colourway is perfect for open-plan living and airy spaces, with a reflective surface that bounces light throughout the room. [caption id="attachment_113083" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Statuario Maxima™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption] Inspired by marble and reminiscent of the great Renaissance statues, Statuario Maximus™ features a warm white base with sweeping veins and mineral grey contrasts. This colour is the perfect canvas for designs that emulate earthy, neutral tones and pops of natural brightness. White Attica™ reflects the individuality and character of the natural world. A crisp white base with striking blue-black veins, the intricacies and subtle colours underlying the white stone come alive in this movement-filled tone. White Attica is the ideal statement piece in minimalist surroundings, and it provides a bold contrast when paired with darker finishes. Empira White™ is a vivid white marble base with subtle green-black veins. A sophisticated combination of beauty and functionality, this colourway plays with tonal shadows while remaining a neutral complement to your desired interior styling. Suitable for a range of interior applications and backed by a 10-year limited warranty, the Whitelight Collection is available in 20mm thick standard size slabs. Caesarstone caesarstone.com.au [caption id="attachment_113081" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Empire White™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113079" align="alignnone" width="1170"] White Attica™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_113084" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Vivid White™. Whitelight Collection by Caesarstone.[/caption]abc