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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Fredericia: The Name To Remember

As one of Australia’s most noteworthy design destinations for industry professionals and enthusiasts alike, Cult Design continues to impress with their extensive offering of the most revered furniture pieces from across the globe. With a particular focus on European design, Cult Design has long been known for bringing the best pieces of Danish designs to Australian shores.  This year, Cult Design is thrilled to welcome the Danish brand, Fredericia to the family. From the Spanish Collection by Børge Mogensen, an artful infusion of Iberian tradition with exemplary Danish functionality; the Ditzel Lounge Chair by Nanna Ditzel and Jørgen Ditzel, a contemporary take on the traditional easy chair; to the sculptural and expressive lighting designs from Space Copenhagen; Fredericia offers boundless design possibilities, time and time again.  Product-led and editorially curated, the Habitus Edit offers a unique perspective on the exceptional designers and brands across the Indo-Pacific region and beyond. Dive in and explore the Habitus Edit on Cult Design’s latest partnership with iconic Danish powerhouse, Fredericia. abc
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Luwist Spatial Designs a Row of Fun-Sized Affordable Homes

The Eureka House, designed by Luwist Spatial for Pertiwi Land, is a single storey, two-bedroom home that takes up a menial 38-square-metres. Despite its small-scale size, the home’s high ceilings let in copious light, making it feel larger than expected. Located just outside Bandung, the capital of Indonesia’s West Java province, the row of compact houses were purposely developed to deliver reasonably priced housing for young people and newlyweds entering the market. [caption id="attachment_115227" align="alignnone" width="1170"] An artists interpretation of the Eureka House[/caption] The white exterior of the Eureka House by Luwist Spatial. “Property prices in Indonesia keep rising constantly year after year. As a direct result, we see houses in Indonesia getting smaller and smaller. The younger generations could barely afford to buy their own houses,” says Luwist Spatial director Lukie Widya. While house prices in Indonesia are still among the most affordable in South East Asia, in 2017 Indonesia’s finance minister estimated that only 40 per cent of the population could afford to buy a home. This figure is expected to increase alongside the nation’s increasing wage disparity. As such, the demand for affordable housing in Indonesia is stronger than ever. The garden patio of Eureka house Roshihan, the property developer and owner of Pertiwi Land, first worked with Luwist Spatial almost 10 years ago. Since then, the team has worked on both his personal and his housing projects. He once again approached Luwist Spatial to assist on the project, giving it a brief for a compact two-bedroom home that still provided sufficient light, air, and typical living spaces, within reasonable cost. The high front façade of the Eureka House is pristine white and minimal. Upon entering, an open plan living, dining and kitchen area, extends from the front of the house to the backyard. Paired with the common area’s high ceiling, this space optimises light and airflow. High ceilings and the back patio in Eureka House by Luwist Spatial. “The open layout of the common area allows interaction between the inside and outside of the house. Someone reading a book on the backyard patio could still participate in a conversation with family members at the dining table or the living room sofa,” says Widya. The house is predominantly white to act as a canvas to the nearby environment, says Widya, incorporating the sky, ground and surrounding landscape. “You can see this come into play when the trees cast shadows on the house exterior,” he says. Orange chairs and table on the garden patio, in front of the white exterior of the Eureka House by Luwist Spatial. For young families or those needing an extra room, the house can also be adapted, with the high ceiling being able to accommodate a mezzanine level. “Through Eureka House, we hope to address the common misconception among Indonesians who think a good house has to be big and expensive,” says Widya. A bed with blue sheets and a mirror above it in Eureka House. The white exterior of the Eureka House by Luwist Spatial. The row of Eureka Houses by Luwist Spatial. ArchitectureLuwist Spatial Photography — Aldito Tagor We think you might like this Singaporean apartment by L Architectsabc
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2021 Sustainability Awards Shortlist Has Been Announced

Now in their 15th year, the 2021 Sustainability Awards are perhaps more important than ever. The last 24 months, with widespread humanitarian and natural disasters, has given us a dire look into the future, and has positioned us – as stalwarts of an industry that emits masses of CO2 emissions – as a powerful impetus for change. This is perhaps why the 2021 Awards have received their highest ever number of entries, with a diversity and range that have yet to be surpassed in the 15 years these awards have run. As we unveil the shortlist for this year, we celebrate those architects, builders, designers, contractors and (important) clients who are committed to perpetually aiming higher in the world of sustainable built design. It is their innovation and commitment to change that continues to elevate design that is considered in its application and outstanding in its function. We congratulate not only our shortlist, but all our entrants on a fantastic year. This year, for the second year running, the Shortlist was chosen via our live (on Zoom) judging day – which was also once again, proudly supported by Alspec, who, along with our events and IT teams, have ensured that the day went off without a hitch. All up, this bodes very positively for the upcoming Gala Awards night on November 11 and will once again confirm the Architecture & Design Sustainability Awards as the paragon of sustainability awards in Australia’s built environment. Registrations for the Digital Gala are now open. We invite you to complete your free registration for the evening Awards, or purchase your full day ticket to experience both the Gala and the 2021 Sustainability Summit. Featuring keynotes from Abbie Galvin (NSW Government) and Angelique Edmonds (University of South Australia, School for Creating Change) and speakers from the likes of John Wardle Architects, Bates Smart, NMBW, fitzpatrick + partners and many more, the 2021 Summit brings you the latest knowledge around Sustainable design and architecture in an all-new dynamic digital event platform. Earn up to 5 formal CPD points, network with the speakers and go in the draw to win some amazing door prizes. Purchase your ticket here. So, now it’s time to announce the shortlist. 2021 Sustainability Awards shortlist   Adaptive Reuse Proudly partnered by Havwoods International [caption id="attachment_160623" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Goodman Headquarters – The Hayesbery. By Intermain with Woods Bagot. Image by Nicole England.[/caption] Clifton Hill House Winter Architecture Goodman Headquarters – The Hayesbery Intermain with Woods Bagot nettletontribe Brisbane studio nettletontribe Newman Heritage House Peter and Jan Newman with Gerard McCann Olderfleet Mirvac with Grimshaw Architects & Carr Smart Design Studio Smart Design Studio Commercial Architecture (Large) Proudly partnered by Interface [caption id="attachment_160624" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Dexus 180 Flinders St. By SJB. Image by Derek Swalwell[/caption] 51 Langridge SJB Dexus 180 Flinders St SJB Olderfleet Mirvac with Grimshaw & Carr Smart Design Studio Smart Design Studio Commercial Architecture (Small) Proudly partnered by Autex Acoustics [caption id="attachment_160625" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Rosby Cellar Door and Gallery. By Cameron Anderson Architect. Image by Amber Hooper.[/caption] Buckettys Brewery North by North CITIZEN Coffee Pavillion ZWEI Interiors Architecture Gurriny Yealamucka Health and Wellbeing Centre POD (People Oriented Design) with Coburn Architecture Ona Coffee Melbourne Breathe Rosby Cellar Door and Gallery Cameron Anderson Architects Sarah & Sebastian Russell & George Education & Research Proudly partnered by Alspec [caption id="attachment_160626" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Korayn Biralee Family Centre. By Brand Architects. Image by Blue Tree Studios[/caption] Ainsworth Building, Macquarie University Architectus Korayn Biralee Family Centre Brand Architects La Trobe University Sports Park Warren and Mahoney with MJMA Toronto Palmview State Primary and Special School FKG Group with MODE Design Corp Susan Wakil Health Building Billard Leece Partnership with Diller Scofidio + Renfro Emerging Sustainable Architect / Designer Proudly partnered by Cosentino [caption id="attachment_160627" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Work by Shannon Battisson (The Mill: Architecture + Design). Image by PJ Lily.[/caption] Anthrosite Anthrosite David Coates Sustainable Building & Design Mia Radic Talina Edwards Architecture Shannon Battisson The MILL: Architecture + Design TRIAS TRIAS   Green Building Material Proudly partnered by Big Ass Fans [caption id="attachment_160628" align="alignnone" width="1100"] SMaRT Apartment at Pavilions Residences. By Mirvac Design (Green Ceramics by Professor Veena Sahajwalla, UNSW). Image courtesy of Mirvac.[/caption] AMPAN Particle Board AMPAN Compostable Insulation Mycoeden & Urban Moments Contemporary Bamboo Cladded Villa House of Bamboo ECOPact and ECOPact Zero Holcim (Australia) MondoClad HVG Facades SMaRT apartment at Pavilions Residences Mirvac Design (Green Ceramics by Professor Veena Sahajwalla, UNSW) Lifetime Achievement Award Proudly partnered by BlueScope [caption id="attachment_160629" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Treetop House. By Peter Stutchbury Architecture. Image by Michael Nicholson.[/caption] Lang Walker Walker Corporation Nigel Richmond Bell ECOdesign Architects + Consultants Peter Stutchbury Peter Stutchbury Architecture Tone Wheeler Environa studio Multi-residential Dwelling Proudly partnered by Electrolux [caption id="attachment_160630" align="alignnone" width="1100"] La Trobe University North and South Apartments. By Jackson Clements Burrows Architects, Stantec & ASPECT Studios. Image by John Gollings.[/caption] Breese St by Milieu DKO Architecture & Breathe with Milieu Property Cremorne Duplex Hebden Architects Glen Iris Garden Homes ARKit La Trobe University North and South Apartments Jackson Clements Burrows Architects with Stantec & ASPECT Studios LIV Indigo Mirvac Design & BVN Miller Social Housing Stanton Dahl for the NSW Land and Housing Corporation Public Urban & Landscape [caption id="attachment_160631" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Gosford Leagues Club Park. By Turf Design Studio & Kevin (Uncle Gavi) Duncan. Image by Guy Wilkinson.[/caption] Cobar Miners Memorial Stephen Pearse Architect Gosford Leagues Club Park Turf Design Studio & Kevin (Uncle Gavi) Duncan Gunyama Park Aquatic and Recreation Centre Andrew Burges Architects with Grimshaw with the City of Sydney People Parkers Alexander Symes Architect with People Parkers Waterfall Valley Hut - Overland Track Green Design Architects   Single Dwelling (Alteration / Addition) Proudly partnered by Stormtech [caption id="attachment_160632" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Chelmer Flood House. By JDA Co. Image by Scott Burrows.[/caption] Chelmer Flood House JDA Co Hamilton Courtyard House Anthrosite Light House Alexander Symes Architect Little Loft House Light House Architecture and Science Sol House Anderson Architecture Suburban Sanctuary Adapt Architecture   Single Dwelling (New) Proudly partnered by Wattyl [caption id="attachment_160633" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Garden House. By Austin Maynard Architects. Image by Derek Swalwell.[/caption] Garden House Austin Maynard Architects LiveWorkShare House Bligh Graham Architects Off Grid FZ House Anderson Architecture Rainbow House Light House Architecture and Science The Adaptable Living Range Breathe Urban Green Home Build Sustainable Building & Design   Smart Building Ideas Proudly partnered by ASP Access Floors [caption id="attachment_160634" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Smart Design Studio. By Smart Design Studio. Image by Romello Pereira.[/caption] ForestOne Offices ICON Interiors Legacy Living Lab Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute with Fleetwood Building Solutions Olderfleet Mirvac, Grimshaw Architects & Carr Smart Design Studio Smart Design Studio Urban Green Home Build Sustainable Building & Design Women in Sustainability Proudly partnered by Siniat [caption id="attachment_160635" align="alignnone" width="1100"] Gurriny Yealamucka Health and Wellbeing Centre. By POD & Coburn Architecture. Image by Scott Burrows.[/caption] Arianna Brambilla The University of Sydney Belinda Allwood & Dr Shaneen Fantin POD (People Oriented Design) Bonnie Herring Breathe Milica Tumbas Lovell Chen Sara van der Meer HIP V. HYPE Tatiana Schonhobel Integral Group   Best of the Best Proudly partnered by Alspec (To be chosen on the Gala Awards night) Lastly, these awards would not be possible without the support of our partners and sponsors, who help make all this possible. The Sustainability Awards would like to thank our partners, strategic partners and trophy partner for their support of the 2021 program. For tickets to the Sustainability Awards Gala Night or for the Sustainability Summit, please click here.abc
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Midi Serves Up Brutalist Charm

Set within a ground-floor tenancy of a bespoke commercial tower, designed by MA Architects, Midi is a coffee shop oozing understated character. Designed by Sans-Arc Studio, Midi draws on the brutalist aesthetic of the base build, with natural elements injected for a refined finish. Sans-Arc worked closely with the clients, the owners of the ever-popular coffee spot Burnside in Collingwood. “The concept for Midi was based on the success of the model that we have here at Burnside. We didn’t want to overextend ourselves or reinvent the wheel. But we did want another version, a more grown-up version,” shares Jona Gunn, co-founder of Burnside and Midi, alongside business partner Chris Handley. Working from the back of house outwards, the project carefully considers the service areas as the first port of call. “Function was paramount to us, there was no compromising that. The space needed to be contemporary but functional,” says Jona, adding, “Our brief was very broad. But they managed to distinguish what we wanted based on what we did and didn't tell them." While the brief was somewhat loose, Sans-Arc Studio Director Matiya Marovich says, “We wanted to take the laid-back vibe of Burnside, but still create something unique that uses the brutalist bones as a jumping-off point.” The shell that the team was working within features a stainless steel entry portal and window details, with a terrazzo floor. This set the tone for the material palette, which also included polished plaster to the walls as a nod to the building’s concrete façade and recycled spotted gum to bring in a warm element. “We worked with the existing materiality, adding a pop of colour in the teal fabric on the bench seat,” says Matiya. The recycled spotted gum timber used on the counter grounds the space and was a necessary inclusion, as Jona says, it needed “something natural to offset all the concrete”. Finding just the right pieces and thicknesses of timber was a challenge but one which Matiya and his team relished. Playing on light and texture, Midi is a small project with a design that speaks just loudly enough, exuding lots of details without overwhelming the senses. It’s unpretentious, just like the service and food offering. Reflecting on the process, Matiya shares that they were, “Some of the best clients and I’ve come to realise how important the right clients are, they make the process fun and enjoyable”. Midi has reopened and is serving takeaway coffee and food in Richmond. Project Details Interior design – Sans-Arc Studio Builder – Frameworks Photography – Dan Prestonabc
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Antoniolupi Gives us the Luxury of Customisation with the Borghi Collection

Customisation is the key to designing the perfect interior. Its requisites of tailoring, experimentation and creativity results in spaces with personality. Homes with a bespoke quality are luxurious; they’re prosperous in distinction and exclusivity, have cohesion and express character. Customisation permits attention to the details and intricacies of design, transforming interiors into unique sanctuaries attuned to our tastes and lifestyles. Constantly evolving to exceed our expectations of interior design, antoniolupi has extended its Borghi collection to ensure that customisation is at the forefront of our homes. Through enriching this line with new materials, colours and products, antoniolupi offers the luxury of personalisation, giving us a multiplicity of bathroom solutions. Signed by Tuscans Gumdesign, the Borghi collection takes inspiration from Bolgheri — an enchanting village in Maremma, Tuscany. The aesthetic and tactile qualities of the Borghi collection recalls olive trees, wine and alluring horizons. This line is renowned for its unique materiality. In September 2021, The Borghi sink was recognised by the Elle Decor International Design Awards as winner of the Bathroom category, highlighting that “the peculiarity is the cork base, natural or toasted, which supports sinks in Cristalmood, a transparent resin patented by the brand”, further emphasising how “material experimentation and Italian tradition come together in an original combination in this line of freestanding sinks.” In addition to the materials of cork and Cristalmood, is now the option of Colormood — antoniolupi’s new ecological resin with a soft touch finish. As a material with its unique, velvety tactile and aesthetic quality, it combines flawlessly with the natural material of cork and the transparency of Cristalmood. This extension permits customisation, personalisation and luxury in bathrooms through four combinations:
  • Cork base and Cristalmood sink
  • Cork base and Colormood sink
  • Colormood base and Cristalmood sink
Both base and sink in Colormood with the option of using the same or combining two different colours. This evolved, enriched Borghi collection also includes two new products: a freestanding bathtub and a countertop sink, both made of Cristalmood. Characterised by its feeling of suspension in space, the Borghi bathtub has a narrow base, subtle edges and capacious volume that make it light and enchanting. The distinctive chromatic personality and reflective transparency of its Cristalmood material ensure the bathroom environment is enchanting, expressive and luxurious. A protagonist of the space, the Borghi freestanding bathtub is perfect in its curvature and iconic in its essence. The Borghi countertop sink is almost a small-scale reproduction of this captivating bathtub, with an oval shape with a narrow base creating that distinctive floating effect. Its Cristalmood material permits a unique experience as light and water bend, reflect and refract off the resin sink. Its balanced, modern character offers exclusivity and expression, giving bathrooms a bespoke quality. All Borghi bathtubs and sinks are available in the entire range of Cristalmood and in antoniolupi’s rich colourways: Mostato, Barrique, Vespero and Notturno. To further evoke the enchanting village of Bolgheri, this collection is offered in Gran Cru, Oleo and Ceruleo — colourways which have a distinctive depth and nuance as they recall the shades of olive trees, wine and the deep blue of the skies and sea. Sophisticated and exuberant, this extensive range in colour choices permits maximum customisation and personalisation in the bathroom. Antoniolupi’s continual evolution and enrichment only affirms its renowned credibility as a leading manufacturer of bathroom ware. Through the extension of the Borghi collection, antoniolupi offers designers and home owners the luxury of customisation — the multiplicity of materials, products and colourways allows us to truly attune our homes to our personality and lifestyle. For more information on the highly customisable Borghi Collection contact info@antoniolupidesign.com.au

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Hardware Done Differently

Established in 2015, Australian brand Spiggy was created to bring a fresh perspective to the local architectural hardware scene. With founder Colin Wright at the helm, Spiggy has continued to define and redefine the role of architectural hardware as we know it. Enthusiastic, passionate and driven, Colin talks us through his contribution to the Australian hardware landscape. [caption id="attachment_115287" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Colin Wright. Spiggy Founder and Director.[/caption] Habitus: How did the brand begin? Colin: I worked as a designer in the UK prior to relocating here to Australia – when I arrived, I noticed that the choices for handles here were pretty limited. I saw a gap in the market for something more creative, something design-driven and better suited to the stunning architectural projects that I was seeing in Australia. Habitus: Who were your first few collaborative partners? How did they influence your development? I first approached Philip Watts of Philip Watts Design. I had used his products in the UK and wanted to see if we could represent him over on this side of the world. They had just started to expand throughout Europe, the Middle East and the USA, so the timing was perfect and we secured distribution for Australia, New Zealand and the South East Asia region. Our first project together was for a collection of bespoke handles that really crossed borders from design to production – the collection was based on a sketched brief from a designer in Moscow and installed at NZ’s largest private residence in the Bay of Islands for a Russian oligarch. I spent the next few years searching for another brand to represent, something more architectural to contrast with the more sculptural form of Philip Watts Design. I was determined for us not to be just another supplier of handles. I didn’t want to just stock us up with brands – the focus had to be based around design and designers. [caption id="attachment_115308" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Branch (Left) and Starburst (Right) by Philip Watts Design.[/caption] Habitus: It seems like that first connection really set the tone for the brand. How did you keep up the momentum from there? I eventually discovered an up-and-coming brand of the time, called Buster + Punch. Headed up by Buster Minale, an architect and custom motorbike enthusiast, I really connected with his creative process: using the techniques developed when building his motorbikes, he could transform ordinary hardware into something extraordinary. The brand has since transformed the design industry, with a growing collection of products quite literally achieving icon status. Sadly, such success is inevitably followed by many copies – while Buster + Punch continued to create new design icons, I became even more determined to represent authentic design.
Our latest collections epitomise this strategy and include products designed by globally recognised architects and designers. From architectural greats such as Arne Jacobsen, Frank Gehry and Norman Foster, to some of the world’s most influential product designers such as Tom Dixon, Jaime Hayon and Karim Rashid. We are also keen to add some local names to our portfolio and would welcome enquiries from Australian designers to create new collections in alignment with our suppliers. Habitus: What do you see as Spiggy’s mission and purpose? Our mission is simple: to provide an exceptional collection of authentically designed hardware, created by some of the worlds most renowned designers, transforming the doors of the design conscious. Our purpose is equally simple: to supply authentic, designer doorware for Australia’s finest architectural projects. [caption id="attachment_115309" align="alignnone" width="1170"] H 383 R8 by Perkins & Wills for Fusital. Photography credits: Fusital.[/caption] Habitus: There’s a lot of clarity in that mission and purpose. Simple to articulate, but certainly much more difficult to achieve in practice! How do you think this has driven Spiggy to be different to other brands in the hardware landscape? Traditional hardware suppliers tend to represent numerous brands. While this gives you an overwhelming selection, the products tend to be significantly varied in terms of quality and standards. At Spiggy, we have carefully selected the brands that we represent to provide a broad selection of products for a variety of applications, ensuring that every product is designed by reputable creatives and produced to the very highest quality. Keeping our brand offering to a minimum also means that we can really specialise in the brands that we represent. Habitus: How do the designers and brands under the Spiggy name reflect its core values? They are authentic, creative and dare to be different. In the same way that we have reconsidered the retail experience for handles (our new Brisbane showroom designed by Alcorn Middleton), the brands that we represent approach the design of a new handle from an entirely different perspective, starting from a blank page with every new product. As designer Tom Dixon notes, door handles have “a particularly difficult and hyper-functional set of challenges, because they’ve evolved rather than being designed.” [caption id="attachment_115301" align="alignnone" width="1170"] FAT Lever Handle by Tom Dixon for d line. Photography credits: Tom Dixon x d line.[/caption]
Habitus: In your opinion, what is the role and importance of exceptionally designed hardware products in our present context of architecture & design? Architecture is predominantly visual. We admire the design, we can see the texture, the scale, the light, the shade. Handles, however, are the first touch point to any architectural piece, so as well as visually working with the scheme, they will also make an immediate connection with the user. It is therefore vital that both the aesthetics and kinetic qualities of the handle are carefully considered to appeal to our senses. Does it look exceptional? Does it feel exceptional? How does it make you feel when you touch or use the handle? Habitus: That kinetic connection really is key to interacting with architecture – it can be so visceral. What do you envision for the future of Spiggy within the Australian architecture and design landscape? Spiggy will continue to be a ‘boutique’ hardware supplier. We are not interested in being measured by the number of products that we represent. Instead, we will continue to remain true to our core values of providing authentic, exceptionally designed, quality products, appealing to a distinguished architectural and design client base. Spiggy spiggy.com.au [caption id="attachment_115292" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Creative Process. Photography credits: d line.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115307" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Door Knob in Brass by Buster+Punch. Photography credits: Buster+Punch.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115289" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Boole by dnd. Photography credits: dnd.[/caption]
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Minimalist Palette Shapes Bell Street House

Bell Street House, designed by Techñe Architecture + Interior Design, allows for smart accentuations of colour against a monochromatic canvas. Minimalist in quality and industrially influenced, the house combines rugged materials with a feeling of warmth that reverberates through the entire space. In approaching the Richmond home, Techñe looked to create a project that was both family home and an entertainer’s space, where tactility and openness would be a versatile base for a vibrant city life. To achieve this, the practice envisioned a completely reconfigured floor plan, growing the internal footprint by allowing for cohesive movement between spaces. The practice created a larger, open plan living areas bookended with large windows and doors that open into front and rear courtyards. Drawing the outside in, these seamless connections between indoor and out create an expanded living space, while also saturating the home’s interiors in natural light. When it came to finishes and furnishings, Techñe drew on the architectural vernacular of the home’s surrounds, where rendered brickwork and steel fixtures pay homage to the warehouse style buildings that litter Richmond. Matte black fixtures and stone further the industrial nuances, with an honest material curation a striking characteristic of the house itself. Balancing this materiality is strong use of timber, where warm oak and painted white panelling works alongside sleek marble and plush carpets to bring the softness required in a family home. Leaning into the home’s biophilic feel, Techñe have provided the clients with an outdoor kitchen, ensuring that entertaining is possible throughout the entire home. Matte charcoal laminate and grey stone are a continuation of the interior palette, while vertical gardens and an abundance of greenery create an urban oasis in the heart of the city. The interior flooring is made of timber, with a pale quality that exudes elegance and class, while remaining congruent with the materials curated for Bell Street House. George FethersOak White Wash by Lignapal were selected for the kitchen joinery, with their premium finish and durable qualities suitable for a home that is able to withstand the various adversities that come with the incessant foot traffic of family residences. The Bell Street House champions the beauty of minimalism, that acknowledges the suburb the house resides within. With a thoughtful selection of materials that are durable and sleek, Techne have created a vastly more open floor plan that gives the family the ability to grow together and entertain guests within the space. Photography by Tom Blanchfordabc
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Redefined Lines And Living

Designer and client were one and the same for Dover Townhouses. Adam Stapleton of Dood Studio developed the neighbouring residences so that he and his brother could raise their young families in proximity. The brief for the two four-bedroom townhouses stipulated warm, well-lit spaces to accommodate entertaining, juxtaposed with focus space to allow working from home. The layout distinguishes the busier areas of the home downstairs from the peaceful sleeping zone upstairs. Similarly, the rear of the home is open plan and connected, conducive to family time, while the study is positioned away from the hustle and bustle towards the front where natural light streams in via the double-glazed window. Dover Townhouses is nestled into a heritage zone and Dood Studio responded to the streetscape specifically through adopting the silhouette of a classic single fronted Victorian dwelling, complementing the surrounding buildings. The spacing of the gables between the two homes replicates the architectural rhythm of the setting. Though its form is in keeping with its neighbours, the façades on the two homes have a contemporary character. A darker chestnut cladding around the entry contrasts with the bleached battens floating above, creating a sense of depth. Hours of persistent detailing with respect to spacing, joins and fixing of the battens has achieved a monolithic quality. Upon entry, guests are warmly welcomed into the home by a light spaciousness prompted by the raked ceiling. The materials selected lend a soft cohesiveness that connects zones of the home. While timber cladding punctuates the exterior façade, it also informs the interior experience through oak flooring, timber light fittings, a tailored desk and bedheads. Natural light interacts with marble, tiling and the lush textures of handpicked furnishings to produce reflective nebulous qualities that shimmer throughout. Lines guide the eye around the home, setting the rhythm of these dwellings. The stable crisp lines of flooring, cladding and cabinetry partner with ephemeral lines created by shadows that bounce off curtains and furniture twitching gently as natural light transitions, like a conductor’s wand. Angled windows frame interspersed glimpses of greenery whether travelling from up to downstairs, or gazing out the kitchen’s glass splashback. Dover Townhouses does not use lines to visually or physically delineate space from space, or dwelling from dwelling. Rather this project forms a tapestry of woven lines that harmonise, achieving a relationship between the dwellings that celebrates living in proximity to others – delightfully blurring lines between family, friend, neighbour, mine and yours. Project Details Architecture – Dood Studio Photography – Tatjana Plitt abc
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Unwind in the Elegance of the Perfect Outdoor Sofa

With the arrival of Spring comes a chance to refresh and uplift. Its warm days and pleasant evenings welcome us outdoors — we see gatherings on the patio, lounging on balconies, verandas, gardens or sunrooms. With the easing of current circumstances, soon we’ll be out more and there’s no better time to invest in outdoor furniture. Versatile, comfortable and refreshing, the Nodi sofa is the perfect option to uplift outdoor living spaces. Extending on the already distinctive Nodi collection, this beautiful new release from Tribu is a lounge series that is unique in its modern, yet timeless, personality. The Belgian brand, Tribu, is characterised by the delicate detailing and elegant radiance of its luxury outdoor furniture. Pioneered in the early nineties was its philosophy that the terrace and garden should be seen as extensions of the house — this vision, strengthened by its years of experience has led to Tribu’s internationally acclaimed reputation, with distributors in over 70 countries. The contemporary quality, distinctive purity and individual modernism of their outdoor furniture are unmatched as only the finest designers are selected for Tribu. The modular Nodi sofa was designed by Yabu Pushelberg — we can see how the soft contours and simple intricacies of their aesthetics are evident in Nodi’s form. The sofa has a distinct curved profile, but a subtle personality, ensuring that it uplifts and refreshes outdoor spaces without dominating them. Glenn Pushelberg says, “The beauty of Nodi and its modularity is that there’s an arched back and a rhythm that is quite pretty over two or three-seater sofa shapes. That flexibility makes it unique and it gives a lot of variety to the way you want to use it.” The stainless steel frame of the Nodi sofa cradles seat cushions and creates an interesting rhythm from every angle. Its soft and airy outdoor cushioning promotes indulgence and relaxation, with its woven backrests further complimenting the sofa’s overall elegance. Consisting of three seating elements, four-seat depths and two types of back cushions, the Nodi modular sofa is extremely versatile. Multiple configurations are possible — from a formal three-seater to casual daybeds or an extra-large corner sofa, the adaptability is unmatched. The Nodi sofa can be further personalised as there is a choice between two frame colours: white and wengé, and any of Tribu’s 130 fabrics. The open weaving in Canax® not only gives a unique lightness and transparency to the design but ensures durability as the Nodi sofa refreshes our outdoor spaces. Canax® is a combination of natural hemp and synthetic fibres, providing significant strength and stability. The PVC also makes Canax® stain repellent, UV stable and resistant to water, frost, heat, mildew and mould. Thanks to its new-generation cushion filling, the Nodi sofa’s cushions have similar qualities and high durability — they are resistant to water, UV, mildew and mould — meaning there’s no need to bring them inside when it rains. The modular Nodi sofa is manufactured with the highest quality of materials and craftsmanship here in Australia by Cosh Living. An Australian family-owned furniture business, Cosh Living intimately understands our lifestyle and the harsh climate, ensuring that we are only offered the finest outdoor furniture. Tribu’s Nodi sofa permits luxury style, comfort, versatility and durability — it’s the perfect piece to uplift and refresh our outdoor living spaces.

Cosh Living

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Subscribe to Habitus Magazine For Your Chance to WIN!

Subscribe to Habitus magazine to win your very own Austere Floor Lamp by Belgian lighting manufacturer Trizo21, from Great Dane Furniture. The floor lamp has almost no visible hardware, allowing the light to take up minimal amounts of space and integrate smoothly into an interior without compromising the overall style. Designed by Hans Verstuyft, the Austere is seen as a single line with no frills. Completely stripped of excess in its aesthetic, it offers complete coverage and the ultimate discretion, with an ethereal silhouette. It is design in its purest form. Subtle and practical, the Austere Floor Lamp is suitable for a kitchen, reading area, bedroom or living space – bringing a modern and minimalist touch.

Subscribe to Habitus for the chance to win now

 
*Entries are open to Australian residents only who subscribe to Habitus magazine and habitusliving.com eNewsletter and complete the game of skill (see below) during the competition period. Prize is valued at $1,795 and cannot be redeemed or exchanged for cash. The entries will be judged, and the winner(s) will be determined, at or around 6th December 20213:00pm AEST on 6/12/2021 at the ‘Promotors’ Office. For full terms and conditions visit habitusliving.com
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A Digital Escape With These 5 Virtual Tours

While COVID-19 hasn’t brought much great news, it has at least sped up the adoption of virtual tours, exhibitions and events. And while Melbourne, Sydney and Auckland residents currently in lockdown may be frustrated with an inability to do pretty much anything communal right now, at least that social and event-shaped hole in our hearts can be filled with a plethora of online discovery. 

Greg Burgess Studio & Walsh Street Boyd House (Melbourne)

The Robin Boyd Foundation is producing a whole lot of great virtual reality tours at the moment. Currently you’re able to discover the Greg Burgess Studio in Richmond and the Walsh Street Boyd House in South Yarra, but keep an eye out for a series of Robin Boyd designed houses, including Manning Clark House in Canberra.  [caption id="attachment_115051" align="alignnone" width="1170"]The birds-eye 3D view of the Manning Clark floor plan from its virtual tour. Virtual view of Manning Clark House[/caption] The Greg Burgess Studio virtual reality tour lets you take a peek into the former bronze foundry at 10 York St in industrial Richmond. The tour incorporates video interviews with Greg Burgess filmed in the 10 York St studio, alongside small facts, such as the history and origin of the artwork throughout the workshop. Little easter eggs, such as where Greg Burgess’ RAIA Gold Medal is kept pop up around the tour. [caption id="attachment_115052" align="alignnone" width="1033"]A video pop up in the Greg Burgess Studio Virtual Tour A video pop up in the Greg Burgess Studio virtual tour[/caption] Similarly, the Walsh Street Boyd House virtual reality tour lets you move around the South Yarra house and find out more about both architectural and personal features of the home. [caption id="attachment_115050" align="alignnone" width="1170"]A small video pop up with a girl on it as part of the Walsh Street Virtual Tour A video pop up in the Walsh Street virtual tour[/caption]

Garden Aotearoa, Ars Electronica Festival 2021 (New Zealand)

Garden Aotearoa is on right now as part of the international Ars Electronica 2021 festival. Taking place in 80 locations around the globe, the event truly transcends location. “Ars Electronica Garden Aotearoa explores how the digital world connects with the physical world,” says Associate Professor Uwe Rieger, director of the University of Auckland’s arc/sec Lab for Cyber-Physical Architecture and Interactive Systems and one of the event’s key organisers. The festival includes a Cyber Gallery that allows visitors to interact with each other and the installations. It also features Lightsense, an interactive XR installation by the arc/sec Lab for Cyber-Physical Architecture and Interactive Systems. Lightsense AI has learnt thousands of poems, allowing it to communicate and start conversations with the audience. [caption id="attachment_115057" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Lightsense at Garden Aotearoa[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115058" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Lightsense at Garden Aotearoa[/caption]

White Rabbit Gallery (Sydney)

See how the gallery is transformed as you move through virtual tours of Sydney’s White Rabbit Gallery’s last five exhibitions. Discover the Chippendale gallery’s Supernatural (2018-2019) exhibition, contrasting ancient Chinese art where painters displayed images of pristine rivers and mist-shrouded mountains with visions of now and the future where skies are choked with smog and rivers are polluted. More recent exhibitions Then (2019-2020) and And Now (2020-2021) are also available to explore. [caption id="attachment_115061" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Supernatural exhibition at White Rabbit Gallery[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115062" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Then exhibition at White Rabbit Gallery[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115059" align="alignnone" width="1170"] And Now exhibition at White Rabbit Gallery[/caption]

Auckland Art Gallery

The Auckland Art Gallery lets you virtually walk through two exhibitions. Choose between different tour experiences, including a family tour, a curator’s highlight tour, an in-depth exhibition experience with extended information. The Enchanted Worlds: Hokusai, Hiroshige and the Art of Edo Japan virtual tour is an exhibition that, for the first time, shows New Zealand paintings created by masters of the floating world from the Edo era.  [caption id="attachment_115064" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Virtual tour of Enchanted Worlds: Hokusai, Hiroshige and the Art of Edo Japan, courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115063" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Virtual tour of Enchanted Worlds: Hokusai, Hiroshige and the Art of Edo Japan, courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki[/caption] Toi Tū Toi Ora: Contemporary Māori Art virtual tour is the largest exhibition in the 132-year history of Auckland Art gallery with over 300 artworks by 110 Māori artists. [caption id="attachment_115056" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Virtual tour of Toi Tū Toi Ora: Contemporary Māori Art, courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki[/caption] [caption id="attachment_115055" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Virtual tour of Toi Tū Toi Ora: Contemporary Māori Art, courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki[/caption]

QAGOMA (Brisbane)

A range of exhibitions at the Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art QAGOMA. Wander through I, object, an exhibition exploring the complex and varying relationships that Indigenous Australians have to cultural objects, or discover Work Work Work, an exhibition that brings together artworks from across the globe that explore ideas of labour.abc
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Sydney Design Week Is Hyperconnected For 2021

Featuring a stellar line-up of Australian and international designers, the Powerhouse Museum’s Sydney Design Week is moving online to present six sessions based on hyperconnectivity. “That idea of hyperconnectivity came out of last year and I decided to really lean into what we learnt in 2020. Now that we’re coming out of the pandemic, let’s not forget the lesson,” says Sydney Design Week creative director Stephen Todd. [caption id="attachment_115157" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Director of Sydney Design Week Stephen Todd, photography by Anthony Amos Stephen Todd, photography by Anthony Amos[/caption] Todd is no stranger to facing the lessons of 2020. Just as the commissions went out for last year’s Sydney Design Week, he was in New York for the Rem Koolhaas exhibition Countryside, The Future at the Guggenheim. “We started hearing about a virus and everyone thought, ‘Oh it’s fine, it’ll go away’,” says Todd, who at the time was a consultant for Sydney Design Week. Of course, COVID-19 persisted and the original program was significantly hindered. A year on and although the Powerhouse Museum planned for a physical event for the 2021 Sydney Design Week, the city’s current wave of COVID-19 once again obstructed those plans – but Todd, who is now creative director of the event, has an alternative devised. A very condensed version of the original program has been conceived, which Todd says will display “the very essence” of the design week. [caption id="attachment_115158" align="alignnone" width="1170"] A model by Studio Bouroullec[/caption] While forming the theme of the talks, hyperconnectivity also forms the program’s model of hyperconnected international communication, something which was further embraced in 2020. “It seems to me that one of the strongest things that we learnt last year was that even in the depths of isolation, we are intrinsically connected. Especially those in the creative industries, people found ways to keep working. People found ways to keep communicating,” says Todd. “We were very agile and very adept at navigating that situation as horrible and as heartbreaking as it was.” [caption id="attachment_115156" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Lockheed Lounge by Marc Newson[/caption] While it’s hard for Todd to choose a talk he’s most excited for, he does speak animatedly about his session with UK-based designer Marc Newson. “Marc Newson has a very particular connection to Sydney, because he grew up here and studied here, and also the Powerhouse holds the world’s largest collection of his work,” says Todd. Coincidentally, he tells me, it is the 20th anniversary of Newson’s first museum retrospective show, Design Works, which originally showed at the Powerhouse. “So it’s kind of an anniversary conversation, in a way,” says Todd. Drawing on the museum’s history with Newson, the discussion will be an informal insight into Newson’s process that is “intelligent but not intellectual”, according to Todd. They plan to discuss some of his most recognisable designs, before looking at his more recent works, including limited edition pieces that he shows at Gagosian Gallery in New York and Galerie Kreo in Paris. “It’ll be really getting the designer insight into his own thinking and experiences,” says Todd. [caption id="attachment_115159" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Lighting design by Lindsey Adelman[/caption] Another session close to Todd’s heart is Workplace As Community. The livestream will bring together Lindsey Adelman of Lindsey Adelman Studio, David Flack of Flack Studio, and Yasmine Ghoniem of YSG. “It’s going to be a conversation about their work, but also about the way they work. People have this image of the interior designer or the designer as elitist and off in their own world, and that’s not what that person is anymore,” says Todd. “The strength of the Powerhouse is being able to facilitate a meeting of these creators,” he says. Book Your Sydney Design Week Sessions Today: Imagining Music Jonathan Zawada (AU) 16 September, 12-12:30pm ‘Discovered’ Designers For Tomorrow Sarah Douglass (UK), Mac Collins (UK), Adam Markowitz (AU), Ivana Taylor (AU) 16 September, 7-7:45pm Workplace As Community Lindsey Adelman (US), David Flack (AU), Yasmine Ghoniem (AU) 17 September, 10-10:45am Urban Transformers Tina Pang (HK), Gary Change (HK), Jennifer Mcmaster (AU) 17 September, 11:30am-12:15pm Public Space Ronan Bouroullec (FR) 17 September, 6-6:30pm Design Works Marc Newson (UK) 17 September, 7-8pm sydneydesign.maas.museumabc