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Rocks On Now Offers Piero Lissoni’s Vibrant Prism Collection

Characterised by their unique aesthetic and functional qualities, ceramic and porcelain surfaces are known for being the most versatile material. Their smooth tactile nature exudes a sleek sophistication, with its possibility of colours and patterns permitting creativity and flair in design. From wall and floor coverings to furnishing elements, including vanities, counters and tabletops, ceramic and porcelain surfaces are vast in their application, elevating any residential or commercial space. Prism, by Piero Lissoni, is a collection of harmonious colours, textures and sizes of porcelain and ceramic surfaces that evoke Italian culture in a contemporary manner. The curation of cool shades interacts in bright, sophisticated environments, while the warmer shades convey sensations of comfort and warmth — inspired by hand-trowelled resin, Prism creates multidimensional effects which give spaces depth and elegance. Piero Lissoni, the creator of this stunning collection, is an Italian architect and designer renowned for his contemporary furniture design. The establishment of multiple interdisciplinary studios since 1986: Lissoni Associati, Lissoni Architettura and Lissoni Inc has resulted in innovation and transformation in each of their sectors, exceeding the expectations of their global clients. His inspiration for the design concept of Prism was the way light refracts; a phenomenon that relies on dimension to create a spectrum of soft, yet vibrant hues. Hereby, the colour palette of the collection is extensive in its range, creativity and application. Not only does Prism offer distinction in its tones, but also has a unique multidimensionality; interactions of light with its resin effect further enhance the depth and graphic details of these ceramic and porcelain surfaces. The Prism collection comes in 13 colourways ranging from the lighter, softer Cord and Cotton to the deeper, elegant tones of Emerald and Midnight. All Prism surfaces can be mixed and matched to allow both simple combinations of colour as well as bolder contrasts. The versatility of Prism is further evident in its range of formats — decors, tiles and slabs in different sizes and geometric shapes are available to customise any space. Options of the Gradient, Brush, Mosaic Wiggle, Enigma, Mosaic Bead and Mosaic Q decors allow for creativity in design to decorate and feature walls or floors. Continuity is ensured with the modularity of 120x120cm porcelain floors tiles with 120x278cm porcelain slabs or 50x120cm wall tiles. In addition to the captivating aesthetic and tactile qualities of Prism are the functional benefits of ceramic and porcelain as the material of the collection. The surfaces are resistant to moisture, chemicals, acids, and UV, hereby offering unmatched durability. Its antibacterial properties and resistance to stains and mould also ensures that cleaning is straightforward and effortless. The Prism collection is also energy efficient, ecological and safe; the ceramic and porcelain surfaces are free of VOCS, PVC, formaldehyde & allergens. For over 20 years, Rocks On has been supplying exclusive, luxurious porcelain stoneware to the building industry, and now distributes Piero Lissoni’s stunning Prism collection for application in Australia. Rocks On supports only the highest quality, most technologically advanced products from around the globe, earning the respect of leading architects, designers and builders.

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Designed To Be Expressive: Shutter House by State of Kin

Alive with colour and energy, State of Kin’s Shutter House is an exemplar of the studio’s burgeoning talents and a message that bold colour can be both sophisticated and mature. “Shutter House is designed at its core to be expressive; it provokes you to look closer and longer at things – it does not hide,” says State of Kin. A red chair sits in the corner of the living room in State of Kin's Shutter House Externally, locally sourced timber makes up the battens that overlay the building’s concrete block structure. The shuttered façade can be closed to retain privacy while allowing light in, or opened entirely to provide unobstructed views of picturesque Lake Monger, or Keiermulu as it’s known by the local Noongar people. Inside, art and meticulously selected furnishings have been curated to exactingly suit each space. “The home is an exploration of tactility, a balance between powerful and gentle sensations and an experiential space throughout,” says State of Kin. “There is a balanced tension in this contrast that is simultaneously stunning and exciting but also feels calm.” The entrance foyer to State of Kin's Shutter House with a painting by Elle Campbell and rug by Patricia Urquiola for cc-tapis A large-scale linen artwork, Pool by Western Australian artist Elle Campbell lines the entrance. Opposite, a staircase extends to the first floor, and the double-height cement ceiling above creates a voluminous, striking space. Nearby, an abstract Fordite rug by Patricia Urquiola for cc-tapis rests on the white-speckled, black terrazzo floor. Urquiola's cc-tapis rugs feature throughout the house, including Rotazioni in the master bedroom and Visioni in the living room. “Strong, rectilinear forms and graphic geometric lines are softened and offset by strategically placed circles and curves,” says State of Kin. This contrast is directly evident in the strong lines of the geometric living room rug, paired with the curved, plush and minimal Gogan Sofa and the pastel tones of the featured art. A white couch and rug by Patricia Urquiola State of Kin's Shutter House A white couch and rug by Patricia Urquiola State of Kin's Shutter House In the master bedroom, another work by Campbell hangs in front of the bed. An iridescent and multi-chromatic crystal table designed for Glas Italia stands by. The cement ceiling is embraced once more in the bedroom, bringing a slightly industrial energy to the room to contrast with the soft furnishings. The master bedroom in A white couch and rug by Patricia Urquiola State of Kin's Shutter House The bathroom of Shutter House is uniquely vivid, with a ceiling of deep burnt orange, a colour that is replicated in the grout between the white tiles. Another of Urquiola’s iridescent pieces, the Shimmer Mirror, hangs above the sink reflecting light and geometric patterns from the tiles around the room. The use of colour is purposefully bold and has become a trademark of State of Kin directors Ara Salomone and Alessandra French since they began their studio. The dining table and a colourful artwork in State of Kin's Shutter House “We were still an emerging practice when we started the design for this project, and we had found in the past that clients would hesitate to explore the possibility of bold colour when it came to their homes,” says State of Kin. “We wanted to demonstrate that colour could in fact be sophisticated and mature, and that when juxtaposed against natural materials and a nuanced external palette could be highly successful.” “With Shutter House and Brick House being completed at the same time, they set a sort of a benchmark for us as a business to showcase our work and really push the boundaries,” says French. “It was a very fortunate and very exciting way to set the tone for what we want to showcase moving forward and from that, I think we've started to get some amazing clients that are really like-minded.” A pink modular sofa sits on Slinkie rug in State of Kin's Shutter House A white and brown kitchen in Shutter House by State of Kin's Project details Design, Architecture and Construction – State of Kin Landscape Designer – Tom Lucey Photographer – Jack Lovel and Sophie Pierce See more design inspiration from Patricia Urquiolaabc
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Melbourne Design Week Is Now Accepting Submissions for 2022!

Melbourne Design Week (MDW) is calling on the Australian design community to reunite by once again welcoming applications from designers, galleries, retailers, and more for its 2022 event. [caption id="attachment_115118" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Modern Times at Melbourne Design Week 2021, photography by Elise Scott[/caption] “Melbourne Design Week is an event that brings together design practitioners, advocates, educators and industry. It’s a platform for robust dialogue imperative not only to creative practice, but to all aspects of society. There’s never been a more important time to reunite as a community to shape our future and shape a better world,” says National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) director, Tony Ellwood AM. MDW is approaching its sixth consecutive year, and although it’s somewhat dire to think that the next design week will be the third year that the program has contended with COVID-19, the organisers aren’t worried. The 2021 event came together as an incredible success, with more than 300 events taking place over one week. [caption id="attachment_115114" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Articolo, photography by Willem Dirk du Toit[/caption] Next year’s event will follow suit, hosting an 11-day program of talks, tours, workshops and exhibitions, alongside the coveted $20,000 Australian Furniture Design Award presented by the NGV and Stylecraft. Early confirmations already indicate a major ideas led 2022 program, that continues to explore the theme ‘Design the world you want’. [caption id="attachment_115120" align="alignnone" width="810"] The Nature Of An Island exhibition by Dale Hardiman and James Lemon at Melbourne Design Week 2021, photography by Sean Fennessy[/caption] Presentations from Cult Design, Living Edge and Mobilia will feature along with a range of presentations from leading Melbourne design studios. There will be exhibitions from the likes of Adam Goodrum and Arthur Seigneur, Adelaide duo Daniel Emma, and group shows from Sydney design gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert and Adelaide’s Jam Factory. “Design is an important and growing part of Victoria’s dynamic creative industries, it’s a major creator of jobs and a strong contributor to our state economy. But more than that, design shapes how we live, the way we experience our environment and how we connect with each other,” says minister for creative industries, Danny Pearson MP. [caption id="attachment_115116" align="alignnone" width="810"] Drift by Tom Fereday Melbourne Design Week 2021, photography by Kristoffer Paulson[/caption] “Melbourne Design Week celebrates the power of design, showcases local and international design innovators, and explores how we can design the world we want – a better, fairer more sustainable world,” he says. The program will run from Thursday 17 – Sunday 27 March, 2022. Submissions close on 23 September and it’s free to participate – so get moving! designweek.melbourne   Check out this year's Melbourne Design Week here.abc
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Clement Lee on What Makes a House a Home

With a robust career in property that spans over four decades, two continents and a number of disciplines, Clement Lee has a uniquely multidimensional understanding of the way we live and interact within the built environment. His rich expertise blends a profound knowledge of town planning, architecture and property development, and has always been informed by keen appreciation of the role design plays in shaping the world around us - a quality that defined his educational choices, too. After completing studies in Architecture and Planning at The University of Melbourne, Clement moved to Malaysia where, alongside two partners, he founded an architecture practice. Having successfully grown the studio to a team of 130 people, he set out to combine his passion for design and his vision for the future. This desire led him to branch out into the world of property development - first in Malaysia, and then in Melbourne, where in 1993 he established Riverlee, an internationally acclaimed private development and asset group. Thriving on architectural excellence, sustainability, culture and creativity, Riverlee takes pride in immersing themselves in the communities they work with to honour the local heritage and truly understand the needs - both present and future - of the area. With the commitment to creating places centred around people, this family business fosters a sense of place and belonging in delivering design-led, visionary projects across a broad range of sectors. Caring deeply for the legacy left for generations to come, every project brings to life the values Clement himself has so thoroughly instilled over the last 28 years: design excellence, hard work, determination and strong vision for the future. Here, we sit down with the man who was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for service to architecture and to philanthropy in the 2019 Queen’s Birthday Honours to talk about the meaning of home, the significance of adjustable ergonomics - and why usability took centre stage in the kitchens at Seafarers, Riverlee’s recent award-winning project.

What does home mean to you? 

Home is family. It is the people and the environment that come together to transform a house into a home. To me, home is a place that’s comfortable, where you feel safe and can relax and enjoy with the people most important to you. Our home has always been a place for friends and family to gather and connect and that hasn’t changed from when we were young parents to now when our grandchildren come and stay.

How does your home reflect your passions, interests and creativity?

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright has always been a source of inspiration. I love architecture that uses natural materials to create an organic feel, integrating within its environment rather than juxtaposing it. I believe that man-made human form that reflects the elements of nature will always be timeless.

Why are kitchen spaces so important to the home?  

The kitchen is an integral part and heart of the home. It is an experiential space and so the design has to be equally beautiful and intelligent. Considerations such as storage, functionality and ergonomics are what makes a kitchen enjoyable. Each element should have a considered place that makes the space comfortable and effortless, as well as aesthetically pleasing. This design philosophy informs our approach at Riverlee and is implemented across all of our work. For the kitchens at our Seafarers project, for instance, we put front and centre the useability of the space, ensuring it is a place for eating, cooking and gathering.

How do you see kitchen design changing?

Design is so personal. Good design isn’t focused on the latest trends but reflects the style of the end user. Spaces should be flexible and adaptable to varying needs. I’d love to see a kitchen with adjustable ergonomics that can create a comfortable experience for no matter who is using the space.

What insights came out of the Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year awards?

The variety of designs and styles across the kitchens was something most important to note. It shows how diverse these spaces can look and feel. Each of the kitchens is so beautiful and unique in their own way, which made judging a more considered process.

View the unique kitchens shortlisted as part of this year’s Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year Design Contest here.

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Recapturing Victorian Design In A Modernist Era

Victorian era houses have a certain grace about them. They stand with conviction atop their block and provide a sleek and elegant living space that is engulfed with luxury. Wyoming, designed by Inarc Architects, combines Victorian glory with modernist design principles to create something truly remarkable. Wyoming is located in Studley Park, a place that was originally a supplier of goods to the City of Melbourne, that consisted of market gardens and small farms. The house hosted various cultural and festive occasions documented in local newspapers from the turn of the 20th century. Over time, the area that was once quintessentially Victorian in style, has lost much of its character. Inarc has maintained the original disposition of Wyoming through retaining parts of the existing dwelling. As a result, the house is an indicator of how modern architecture can complement what has preceded it. The owners of the house have lived within Wyoming’s walls for over a decade, and over time have carefully and thoughtfully masterminded a design brief. The focal point was for the Victorian persona of the house to remain, but to add a contemporary extension that allows for entertainment, aligning with its festive past. Inarc decided to create an addition that would account for the sloped topography of the house that is concordant with the existing home. Having owned the property for over a decade, the home’s residents were able to present Inarc with a deeply considered design brief. They requested a reimagining that would retain the character of the original Victorian architecture but bring the home into its modern context, creating an intersection between the old and the new that would allow for a more seamless living experience. A glazed link acts as a transitional circuit break between time periods and separates the new addition from the original dwelling. The garden entertaining areas are flanked by a cantilevered white steel blade canopy, devised by Inarc, which acts as a homage to Victorian era verandahs. The verandah, minimalist in character, has been put in place to unify the old and new building elevations. The new interiors remain true to their Victorian roots, evoking a sense of scale and luxury which marry with the flamboyance and ornament of the Victorian era rooms. High ceilings, endless openings and refined detailing make their own compatible statement and maintain an experiential consistency throughout the house. This scale is complimented by the home’s new flooring, where timber boards run vertically throughout the space. Creating a feeling of extended length, the European manufactured Hakwood flooring from George Fethers & Co reflects the home’s design narrative: the floor mimics the pale hues that form the home’s canvas, allowing for bright artworks and deep, jewel tones furnishings to make a statement. Selected in generous dimensions, the boards themselves echo the luxury found in the architecture and finishes of the project, where ornate ceiling mouldings and decorative architraves recall the grandiosity of the Victorian era. The interior textures and architectural techniques flow to the outdoor space, making Wyoming a transitional dwelling that allows for social gatherings throughout any season or time of day. Photography by Peter Clarkeabc
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The Natchural Alternative

A lack of transparency, reticent labelling of ingredients and a high number of chemicals in their favourite skincare products began to irk friends Adam, Carmelle and Lewis. The trio eventually reached a point where they weren’t seeing the changes they wanted in the skincare industry — so they decided to take change upon themselves. So began Natch Essentials, a collection of premium natural skincare products based on meticulous research of the highest quality ingredients that are good for bodies and for the environment. “Since inception, our mission is to share positive influence and educate people on the harm chemical-based products can have on our wellbeing and shine light on natural alternatives,” say the founders. “It is our commitment to create premium, yet affordable products, with a social and environmental conscience.” Entirely Australian owned and manufactured products, Natch’s approach to sustainability shows a true care for people and for the local environment, being free from parabens, chemicals, and synthetics. The design intent and depth of thought behind each product is evident in each aspect of Natch, from their ingredients through to their packaging. Shipping materials are made from 100% recycled or organic products and the simple sage green and eucalyptus packaging are made from recyclable materials — all while looking spectacularly minimalist on a bathroom vanity or bedside table. Currently, their natural haircare range is packaged in 100% post-consumer recycled plastics and the founders are moving to roll this out across their products. “Our mission is to remove virgin plastics and materials from the Natch Essentials brand. We have an ongoing commitment towards our future goal of being carbon neutral at a minimum and giving back more than we take,” say the founders. Their process - from materials through to manufacturing - is also entirely cruelty free, vegan and made in Melbourne. For consumers, opting to support brands that are clear in their sustainable choices is a simple way to vote with their dollars to encourage businesses to make a sustainable contribution. All scents and products of Natch are genderless, and for complete transparency, all ingredients are listed on their products and on their website, not just as alienating chemical terms. Natch’s natural deodorant, for example, is formed of ingredients like coconut oil, carnauba wax, shea butter and vanilla fragrance. Sage-coloured Natch containers of natural deodorant. Rather than simply making skin feel good, the natural blends are also specifically formulated to give long-term health benefits and improve mood. Aloe vera, for example, is a main component of Natch Body Wash and is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and ability to increase the healing time of scarring and burns.  Also included is mandarin oil, which acts as a stress reliever, and cedarwood, which promotes serotonin release to positively enhance mood. The Natural Lip Balm, on the other hand, sees castor oil and jojoba combine to moisturise and nourish, along with antioxidant rich rosemary leaf extract and refreshing peppermint. With transparency, quality and beautiful design at the core of the company, Natch Essentials is set to revolutionise how the skincare industry can impact our environment and our health and wellbeing.abc
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Caring for the Environment That Inspires Us

In a world where the transient, the fleeting and the insubstantial occupy minds and screens, objects that express timeless authenticity provide an anchor point in our lives. They create space to rest, connect and nourish our relationships. Where colours, forms and textures echo the landscape in which we live, there arises a tangible sense of belonging to place that is deeply comforting. In bringing to life designs that celebrate and embody the natural environment of Australia, King takes a stewardship approach to the source of its inspiration. Careful consideration is given not only to the way a piece will occupy space, but also to the footprint that lies behind it. Sustainability has always been front of mind for King, with an approach that prioritises longevity and durability, and a minimised ecological impact. The work of the hands is elevated, the eye of the artisan is emphasised, and a custodianship ethos prevails in materials curation. King takes a responsible approach to design, materiality and manufacture so its items can be cherished for a lifetime – and beyond. “We always endeavour to specify materials that will last and that we know will perform for years, ageing gracefully,” David Hardwick, King Global Head of Product, says. “Further to that, we look for low environmental impact in production, minimal waste in manufacturing and the ability to be re-purposed or recycled at end of life.” [caption id="attachment_114204" align="alignnone" width="1170"] King Global Head of Product, David Hardwick[/caption] When a customer falls in love with a King item it is a relationship for life, as the company commits to repairing and refurbishing its furniture even from generation to generation of owners, and if necessary, taking it back at end-of-life. Design always considers the lifespans of each material or component, ensuring those parts likely to endure the hardest wear can be easily replaced. The fundamental values of the business permeate every facet of the decision-making process. King has intimate knowledge of all the inputs involved in each item and pursues ongoing innovation in the areas of sourcing and ecologically benign production processes. An example is the banana silk used in the  Lonsdale range of hand-loomed rugs. “Banana silk came from working with our artisan rug-makers,” Hardwick explains. “Its lovely sheen, luxurious touch and the way the light plays off the fibres across different weaving styles made it immediately attractive.” [caption id="attachment_114205" align="alignnone" width="1170"] King Lonsdale Banana Silk Rug (Charcoal)[/caption] Respect for the materials extends into tailoring the product development process, with the King designers working closely with the production team to ensure raw material is optimised wherever possible. King recognises waste has both an environmental cost and a financial cost. “We take the position that a product is never finished. We insist on continual improvement of each item to optimise material use and improve performance with feedback loops from both customers and production teams,” Hardwick says. “We’re also constantly analysing the waste streams in production, seeking opportunities to re-use or re-purpose where possible.” An illustration of this deep ecological consideration is a current project designing a range of tableware that will use offcuts from large porcelain sheets used in manufacturing the King Dining Table collection. [caption id="attachment_115043" align="alignnone" width="1170"] King Living Quay Dining 8 Seater[/caption] King uses feedback from customers to continually advance its understanding of how materials and components perform. This also feeds into the innovation mindset that is fundamental to its business. There is a research and development workshop connected to the Sydney design studio and an R&D team within the Shanghai manufacturing facility. A rite of passage for young designers joining the company is working under the stewardship of senior designers and fabricators in the Sydney studio. This sharing of experience ensures the emerging generation of master craftspeople continue the proud lineage of artisan skills. “The work of skilled artisans is crucial to the quality of the final piece, not just in refinement but informing the product development process,” Hardwick says. “Experimentation is always a key part of the development process. An artisan’s innate understanding of materials allows us to push the boundaries and innovate but still stay true to the qualities and capabilities of the materials we work with.” [caption id="attachment_114202" align="alignnone" width="1170"] King Moore Park Showroom[/caption] King has always been ahead of its times in its sustainability ethos – and the wider society is now becoming attuned. “There is definitely a developing sense of the impacts of consumerism and fast fashion on an environmental and also social level,” Hardwick says. “I think businesses that are not just conscious of this but pro-actively demonstrate tangible initiatives to address this positively will have a better chance of success.” King often hears stories from customers about having their first King piece handed down from their parents. “Creating furniture that lasts is at the foundation of the business and is carried through everything we do,” Hardwick says. “The furniture is often seen as part of the family and has so much history imbued in the product.”abc
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A Downsizer’s Dream

“After many years of living in Sydney, the owners of Wagstaffe House had a desire to live among the trees, in the sun, overlooking the water,” says Kurt Chip, co-founder of buckandsimple architects. “The owners are downsizers, leaving the city for a gentler pace. They wanted a new stage of their life and they wanted it to be nice enough, and accessible enough, that the kids would visit them. Their ideal outcome was to live in a home that performed well environmentally, that was beautiful and a joy to live in.” The couple settled on a dramatic site in Wagstaffe, at the southernmost tip of the Central Coast; a heavily treed, idyllic area where the national park extends through to the water’s edge. The site boasted a compelling connection to the natural surrounds but the challenge of a steep topography. “The steep site meant we were going to be elevated, and detached from the earth,” adds Kurt. “To solve this, we created an artificial ground plane up in the air, and we used brick to feel solid, to look natural, to have mass and hold the warmth when the sun hit it.” As a result, the house has real gravitas in its siting but yet also feels appropriately grounded. In addition, given that the brief called for a home relatively modest in scale in comparison to the size of the plot (275-square-metres vs site size of 728-square-metres), buckandsimple was in a position to be flexible in the positioning of the building upon it. In response, they “twisted the layout” towards the view and the northern aspect. Wagstaffe House is essentially divided into two lightweight wings, fashioned from recycled Blackbutt. The “private” master bedroom wing is separated by an elevated courtyard from the main 'public' living areas, with both enjoying uninterrupted views. The courtyard is protected from the elements and adds additional privacy. “The lightweight wings float above the ground plane and express their large pitched forms to the view,” continues Kurt. Functional and lesser-used spaces, like the guest rooms, the study and laundry are located on the southern façade, facing away from the view. There is also a half-buried, lower ground floor, which comprises a garage, storage areas and an overflow workroom constructed from recycled brick. Architecturally, it’s the oversized eaves that draw one’s eye, which open up to the majestic views. “The eaves also keep the walls out of the weather and control the amount solar penetration onto the floor,” adds Kurt when talking about the house’s integrated sustainability considerations. “There is an exposed concrete slab throughout the entire top floor and by controlling the amount of sun with the eaves, the thermal mass works well to regulate the temperature in both summer and winter.” To increase climactic performance, the team also added extra windows at the rear and side of habitable rooms to encourage additional cross ventilation and to negate any negative glare effects. In addition, there are photovoltaic cells on the roof. Materially, this house has an intentionally restrained palette. “We had a few materials that were selected early on, based on merit,” explains Kurt. “Recycled brick for the permanency and how the texture and colour would fit into the landscape. Recycled Blackbutt as it’s locally sourced and acts as a carbon bank, and concrete floors for practicality and thermal performance and the muted palette.” The team has created an inherent sophistication in balancing the other materials and finishes. The combination of white-painted v-jointed pine, white painted rafters, tumbled brass tapware and terrazzo tile in the bathroom all sit in harmony with the considered and crafted use of timber. Project Details Architecture and interiors – buck&simple Photography – Simon Whitbread We think you might like this story with homes that feature brickabc
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Straight From Salone

Milan Design Week is one of the annual highlights of the global design calendar – but the pandemic and global lockdowns put the star-studded event on hiatus for 18 months. This year, however, the world’s biggest celebration of design returns to Milan, eschewing the regular April dates to run 5-10 September. Salone del Mobile will take place, as always, at the sprawling Rho Fiera showground. Unsurprisingly, the event has been scaled back and reimagined for our new normal. Curated by Milanese architect Stefano Boeri – who has dubbed this year’s edition ‘Supersalone’ – it will still present some of the most exciting new launches of the year. Unlike in previous years, however, where companies and brands would create their own immersive exhibition spaces, Supersalone will be presented within a flexible, modular wall system created by designers Andrea Caputo and Lukas Wegwerth. This framework will allow brands to display products in a variety of ways to create a “library of design” – and it will be recycled after the show. [caption id="attachment_115014" align="alignnone" width="810"] Taula table designed by Patricia Urquiola for Salvatori[/caption] The other major shift is in ticketing for the event – visitors will have to purchase tickets online for a specific timed slot ahead of attending and are limited to one ticket per order. They will also need to provide evidence of vaccination or a negative test for entry. Many other showrooms and galleries across Milan are taking a similar approach to ticketing and entrance – meaning visitors will need to be more organised this year than ever before. Whether you’re planning a visit or experiencing the event remotely, read on to discover the must-see exhibitions, installations, and launches taking place at Salone del Mobile and across the city this month. Andreu World (Supersalone) Spanish furniture brand Andreu World, available through KE-ZU in Australia, is showcasing new pieces from two of the biggest names in design at Supersalone. A new chair in collaboration with Philippe Starck, and the innovative Nuez Lounge BIO by Patricia Urquiola. Constructed from 100 per cent natural origin thermopolymer, the innovative lounge is biodegradable and compostable. Nanimarquina (Supersalone) Barcelona-based Nanimarquina, available through Cult Design, is renowned for its exquisite designer rugs – and this year they are expanding with a dedicated contract division. The inaugural contract collection, Formula Contract, allows specifiers to choose from five different models in 30 colours to create more than 250 possible combinations for indoor and outdoor spaces. The Lost Graduation Show (Supersalone) Global lockdowns meant that many recent design graduates missed out on the opportunity to showcase their work to the public. This exciting exhibition brings together 170 projects from students who graduated in the past two years, encompassing 48 schools from 22 different countries – and it’s the best place to spot new talent. Arper (Supersalone) Italian brand Arper, available at Stylecraft, will be launching several new pieces at Supersalone. Highlights include the brand’s first solid timber lounge chair, Kata by Altherr Désile Park, and the Aston Club collection of seating by Jean-Marie Massaud. The collections will also be exhibited at the Arper showroom in Via Pantano 3, which will be extended with a pop-up space. Tom Dixon
[caption id="attachment_115009" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Tom Dixon and Prolicht Melt Large Chandelier, Tom Dixon Cork Table and Fat Chairs[/caption]
Tom Dixon has a big presence in Milan – not least thanks to The Manzini, the brand’s restaurant, showroom, and shop. This year, the brand will be using the space to showcase its latest collections, which celebrate its signature sculptural forms and expressive materiality. For more Tom Dixon, head to the Valextra showroom. Tom Dixon and Austrian lighting specialists Prolicht have teamed up with the luxury leather goods brand to create an exhibition that pays homage to the Milanese masters of design. Tom Dixon is available through Living Edge. Knoll In response to the changes in the way we live and work over the past year, Knoll (available through dedece) has created a special setting in its showroom that presents solutions for the home in a post-pandemic world. The Grasshopper family of tables for either the traditional workplace or home office by Piero Lissoni is a particularly timely collection. These new collections will be showcased alongside some of the brand’s iconic pieces by the likes of Mies van der Rohe and Florence Knoll. [caption id="attachment_115010" align="alignnone" width="810"] KN06 armchair, designed by Piero Lissoni for Knoll. Photo by Federico Cedrone[/caption] Cassina
[caption id="attachment_115011" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Cassina showroom, Milan, featuring the Sengu table and Dudet armchair by Patricia Urquiola. Photo by Valentina Sommariva[/caption]
Workplace and hospitality environments have perhaps experienced the most change throughout the pandemic, and so it’s no surprise that many of the new furniture pieces from Cassina are focused largely on these two sectors, with some crossover to the home. Expect launches from some of the design world’s biggest names, including Michael Anastassiades, Jeffrey Bernett, Philippe Starck and Patricia Urquiola. Cassina is available in Australia at Mobilia. Carl Hansen & Søn This classic Danish brand, represented by Cult Design, launches three new designs during Fuorisalone – the T-chair by Ole Wanscher, the Plico chair by Fabricius Kasthom, and Ilse Crawford’s take on Hans J. Wegner’s iconic masterpieces. There will also be an exhibition celebrating the design of Kaare Klint, known as the father of Danish Design. Salvatori [caption id="attachment_115006" align="alignnone" width="810"] Salvatori showroom, Milan[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_159861" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Taula table by Patricia Urquiola in the Salvatori showroom, designed by Piero Lissoni[/caption]
Discover new collections in stone by Patricia Urquiola, Stephen Burks, Piero Lissoni, and Elisa Ossino in the Salvatori showroom in the heart of Brera, which has been recently redesigned by Piero Lissoni. Richard Yasmine Like many in the global design scene, Lebanese interior designer Richard Yasmine will be unable to physically attend Milan this year – so, he will be streaming live from his studio for the entire event. An enormous LED screen will present the designer at life size, talking about how his work blurs the boundary between the physical and digital worlds. A Beach in the Baroque After close to two years of global lockdowns and social distancing, there’s no question that we are all looking for a bit of fun – and this installation by Portuguese design studio Aires Mateus is a celebration of people coming back together. The main courtyard of Palazzo Litta will be transformed with a colourful “super cabin” that evokes beachside huts and contrasts dramatically with the historic architectural setting. salonemilano.itfuorisalone.itabc
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Lean Into Contemporary Refinement And Relaxation: Sit by jam

With a range of seating and table styles rendered in a variety of timber and powder-coasted finishes, Sit heroes contemporary lines and the beauty of simplicity.  Sitting should not be a complicated act, but too often, it is. No one is a stranger to this feeling: the immediate comfort of sitting down flooding your body, then being abruptly overcome by a slightly-too flat seat, a narrow armrest or a frail leg. Jam’s Sit Range tackles all this with class and refinement to spare. Combining the subtle warmth of natural timber with the integrity of powder-coated steel, the Sit range is always comfortable and always stylish. The Sit Range was designed for jam by renowned Australian designers Daniel Emma. The collection features a Stool, a Bar Stool, a Bench Seat, a Chair and Table, all designed to be mixed and matched as a set, or in complementary colours. Each piece is available in either White Ash or Blackwood timber, with a dashing range of powder-coated steel colours, in addition to the possibility for custom finishes. Sit Chair With a classic shape, generous square seat and endlessly comfortable, rounded back support, the Sit Chair is the perfect seating solution. Whatever the desired style, there’s a variety of timber and powder-coat colour combinations to suit. Sit Stool The Sit Stool features a curved seat atop a sturdy, welded steel frame. Standing at a humble 460mm tall, the Sit Stool is a subtle piece that complements every interior with the comfort of natural timber. Sit Stool redefines the conventional stool profile with a design that withstands the test of time. Sit Bar Stool The Bar Stool also employs the contemporary oblong seat shape, reflecting a considered approach to balancing modern linearity with ergonomic function. Standing taller than the Sit Stool, this piece has a striking silhouette and is versatile in application: from a domestic breakfast bar or nook to a commercial dining area or casual meeting space, the Bar Stool makes itself at home. Sit Bench Seat The Bench Seat makes a refined statement. With an elongated, rounded rectangle seat and a sleek 4-legged metal support, the Bench Seat invites us to converse, collaborate and relax together. The Bench Seat is multifunctional in a domestic setting, equally at home under a dining table as it is at the foot of a bed or along an entry hallway. Sit Table Elegant in its simplicity, the Sit Table is the perfect complement to the seating collection of the Sit range. The Sit Table features a circular tabletop rendered in a luxurious thickness with beveled edges, and a subtle 4-legged base. Every piece is lovingly manufactured in JamFactory’s Adelaide-based studio, with the additional expertise of local metal-workers. This means that each Sit piece is built to withstand frequent use over time: with integrity of construction a priority for JamFactory, you can rest assured that the range will stand up to the high traffic of domestic and commercial applications. Jam Factory j-a-m.com.au  abc
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Dream Living At Federal House – INDE.Awards 2021

The Living Space category in the INDE.Awards is always overflowing with exceptional home design and in 2021 this was no different. From a wide array of entries there could still only be one winner and it went to the incredibly deserving Federal House by Edition Office. The Living Space category is supported by Gaggenau, which has proudly been a founding partner since the inception of the INDE.Awards. Gaggenau is a brand with an undeniable legacy of quality and design nous, and as such, it is perfectly placed as a partner of this category, pushing the ideal of our homes being a place of sanctuary. Olya Yemchenko, Senior Brand Communications Manager, Gaggenau, Australia commented, “When looking to design The Living Space, the end result is informed by many factors – incorporating the individual needs of the occupant’s lifestyle and aesthetic proclivities. It is a delicate balance of creating a welcoming, visually-pleasing space that responds with intelligence to its local context and culture. Gaggenau design represents a symbiosis of tradition and the avant-garde. Each intuitive, unique interaction, even those beyond the minimalist interface, reward the touch, sight and ultimately taste. The design is more than what you see, it is what you touch and feel. We understand that it is the sum of all the parts that creates the full picture, providing a holistic experience for a life, a culture or a home. This is why Gaggenau has continued to support the INDE.Awards and The Living Space since its inception.” Federal House expresses an honest understanding of shelter. With no air-conditioning, all spaces are naturally cooled with cross ventilation, and cool air is drawn from the pool’s surface, through the cloister fern garden and into the upper living spaces. The Federal House is a vessel for its owners to both inhabit and enable the experience of place and time – a sanctuary. The project nestles into the folding hills of its hinterland site in northern NSW, acting as an experiential container of place and a conditioning object, while being consciously aware of its outsider status within the traditional ownership and legacy of this landscape. Yemchenko added her thoughts about the project, “Federal House was one of the projects that stood out for me from the outset. The way the dark finishes contrast with the space, the greenery and the vastness of the outside world, creating a sense of tranquility. The use of organic materials and various textured finishes are drawing on the natural surrounds. The open plan living, kitchen and dining create an inviting feeling, a desire to congregate. While descending down the stairs to the pool below creates privacy in other areas of the home. It beautifully responds to the client brief, playing on our various senses and offering a true sanctuary.” Federal House is modest, yet breathtaking and highlights that bigger doesn’t always mean better. Congratulations to Edition Office on taking out The Living Space, supported by Gaggenau. Photography: Ben Hosking https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4siEJAhajIabc
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Power to the People

Through the perspective of hindsight, it should come as no surprise that Criena Gehrke has found herself in the position of CEO of Home of the Arts (HOTA), a cultural precinct that is reshaping the Gold Coast. Having a performing arts background, Gehrke started her career working for theatre companies, before trying her hand at being an artist agent. This was followed by many years working in strategy, policy, funding and community engagement for government, all of which has stood her in good stead in her current role. The catalyst that lured Gehrke and her family to the sunny climes of Queensland eight years ago was just that – the sun. After many years of raising a family in Melbourne, Gehrke wanted to get back to her home state and align the weather with her sunny disposition. She just didn’t expect to stay so long. “I threw my hat in the ring to come to the Gold Coast on a short-term contract as a consultant with council to develop their culture strategy, which was a 10-year vision and road map for arts and cultural development,” shares Gehrke. While the Gold Coast might not instantly come to mind as a well-heeled epicentre of cultural cache, Gehrke has seen first-hand the dedication that the council and leadership have in investing in arts and culture for the city. “It’s not just the cultural infrastructure like the HOTA precinct, but there is also an investment in artists and audiences. There is a pioneering spirit and deep understanding that if we get it right, it will have a long-term benefit and a legacy for future generations,” she says. The doors have officially swung open to the ARM Architecture-designed gallery, and that audience approach has remained firmly in the foreground. [caption id="attachment_114955" align="alignnone" width="810"] (L-R) Michael Zavros, Zeus/Zavros 2018, oil on canvas. Nell, Let There Be Robe 2012. Both gifted by the citizens of the Gold Coast  to future generations 2017 and 2018[/caption] The project, its programming and the entire precinct is envisioned as a reimagining of popular culture, or “surfing with jellyfish” as Gehrke eloquently personifies it. Accessibility is a key word, which is reflected in the programming, “It’s populist in its best and purest sense; it’s understandable. But it’s incredibly high quality and it’s very sophisticated”. The passion that Gehrke expresses for the value and influence that art can have on society is undeniable. She sees her role – and in fact the whole precinct – as a way to connect community with the human experience. [caption id="attachment_114956" align="alignnone" width="810"] Alex Seton, Last Resort 1 and 2 2014, carved Wombeyan marble, steel, and theatre lights. Gifted by the citizens of the Gold Coast to future generations 2015[/caption] “Our currency is humanity itself. It’s about connection. It’s about storytelling, It’s about history. Society looks to artists, creatives, and designers to have a vision and human response to help us understand the world in which we live.” Having such a big hand in creating a home for art to flourish suits Gehrke and her positivity to a tee, and it’s one that she relishes. “I have literally got the best job.” While the Home of the Arts is intended to be a welcoming ‘home’ for people from all walks of life, Gehrke’s own home is a place of adventurous expression. “Sometimes I wonder whether we’re frightened of design or colour. Reflecting your personality can actually bring a bit of joy into your life,” she says. For Gehrke that exuberance shines in a double-height wall of Versace patterned wallpaper that greets her at home every day. Home of the Arts hota.com.au Photography by Andy Macpherson This article originally appeared in issue #51 of Habitus – subscribe to receive Habitus magazine straight to your door nowabc