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This Prototype Kit-Home Could Change the Face of Affordable Housing

When Tribe Studio Architects’ principal Hannah Tribe designed a Bundeena holiday home for her family, the structure she conceived had an ulterior purpose as a kit-home prototype. “I built this house for my own family as a weekend escape from the city. My husband and I both have very busy work lives, and our boys are super-active. This is a place to unwind and take it slowly in the school holidays,” says Tribe. “It is also conceived as a kit home, to fill a gap in the market for affordable, sustainable, and well-designed alternatives to what’s currently available." The white wooden exterior of Tribe Studio Architect's Bundeena Kit-Home. The kit-home prototype, Tribe hopes, will address the demand for affordable housing in the midst of the climate crisis – all while proving that kit-homes don’t need to compromise on architectural integrity. “We were seeing lots of clients with the dream of a seachange or treechange, and they had architectural aspirations and great taste, but they were unable to manage a bespoke architectural experience. This is a house designed with economy and quality in mind, and it is easy to reconstruct and replicate,” says Tribe. Six blue-framed chairs surround a dining table in the open-plan living room/kitchen of Tribe Studio Architect's Bundeena Kit-Home. The three-bedroom weekend house is purposefully informal as the Tribe family “love to cook and entertain”, centred around a courtyard and prioritising open plan living, large kitchen and outdoor tables, and a central fireplace. “It has a kind of hose-out beach pavilion feeling, and until lockdown, it had always had a joyous full-of-friends-and-kids kind of feeling,” says Tribe. In enviable relaxed beach house fashion, the entry is suitably enhanced with an outdoor shower, laundry, bathroom and long towel rails. Two adults’ bedrooms and a kids’ room that can sleep up to six means the home is perfect for inviting friends to stay. Rather than have multiple levels, says Tribe, “it sits low in the landscape to fit in with the humble vernacular fisher-dwelling of the place”. This means that apart from being more accessible to people on a tight budget, the single-story step-free home is also accessible for people with physical disabilities and provides a suitable option for ageing owners as their mobility decreases. Despite a second storey having the potential for spectacular views, “reinforcing the local vernacular of single-storey timber cottages was important,” says Tribe. Tribe Studio, which has been awarded in the past for its sustainability innovations, ensured environmental measures were ubiquitous in the home. House orientation, double glazed windows, awnings to reduce solar gain and heavily insulated yet lightweight walls combine to passively heat and cool the home. Meanwhile, solar power and the provision for a future battery means the home has the potential for self-sustaining energy, and water is recycled in the toilets, washing machine and garden irrigation. An exterior shower on Tribe Studio Architect's Bundeena Kit-Home. The prototype is also a test for Tribe Studio to hone waste reduction from the “huge and unnecessary problem” of site waste. Inspired in part by Le Corbusier’s Dom-Ino House, Tribe’s kit-home prototype is a response to the “compelling but elusive dream” of using off-site and industrial techniques to provide mass housing. The vision for this house? To create an easily buildable, affordable architectural house, that supports local labour, reduces waste, is sustainable and can be adapted to a variety of locations. It’s a lot of boxes to tick, but if award-winning Tribe Studio Architects can pull it off, the future of this kit-home is likely to be a large success. A child and a dog look at a burger outside Tribe Studio's Kit-home prototype. A bedroom that looks onto the courtyard of Tribe Studio Architect's Bundeena Kit-home. A bedroom with salmon coloured built-ins that looks onto the courtyard of Tribe Studio Architect's Bundeena Kit-home. Project Details ArchitectsTribe Studio Architects  BuildingBallast Construction + George Payne EngineeringCantilever LandscapingChristopher Owen PhotographyKatherine Lu Want to see more from Tribe Studio? Check out this Victorian cottage restoration in Glebe.abc
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Greenery and Grace

It is a very surreal experience to step out of a condominium’s private lift and find oneself in a large, lofty space dedicated entirely to the ritual of welcome – particularly in land-scarce Singapore where every inch of space is treasured and given to more functional use. But this is the case with an apartment designed by Brewin Design Office. Its handsome foyer, conceived with exquisite material richness and artistic dexterity, is a fitting prelude to the rest of the 3,500-square-foot apartment. “It was a very tall order – a large budget and a one-liner brief saying the owner wanted uncompromised results,” says Robert Cheng, the founder of the firm that was engaged by a bachelorette in her thirties who lives here alone. “[It is a challenge], designing joinery and to know how far to push details without being excessive, to work with stone in bathrooms and the foyer to reach such minute tolerances, ensuring grains match for both timber and stone, etc.” The result matches the thoroughness in thought. The foyer’s green onyx surfaces pays homage to the condominium’s location near the Singapore Botanic Gardens, as well as the vantage from the nine-metre-long balcony into the estate’s lush central courtyard. It also complements the pastel-green Venetian plaster stucco that colours the canopy ceiling’s pyramidal form. Onyx engages well with light, of which there is plenty here. To add to the dramatic act, Cheng shaped the wall between the foyer and dining area into a luminous colonnade. In the common spaces, this tonality continues onto bespoke the custom-designed dining and coffee tabletops. Here, White Oak timber flooring fuses visually with the balcony’s bleached Oak timber floorboards that cover an existing sunken reflective pool, hence increasing usable terrace space. On the walls, Patricia Urquiola’s terracotta tiles for Mutina lend tactility and depth. Aside from the sophisticated material palette, Cheng ensured the plan was a working one. Sliding doors tuck away utilitarian spaces but also enhance spatial flow, and awkward bathroom layouts were adjusted. In one instance, the yoga room’s bathroom that extended all the way to the window was pushed back so that the space is now more rectilinear, conducive and sun-washed for stretching sessions. Cheng’s tasteful furniture selection adds the finishing touch. There are pieces by mid-century modern maestros Giuseppe Scapinelli, Jorge Zalszupin and Finn Juhl, lighting fixtures by Lindsey Alderman and Michael Anastassiades, sculptures by American designer and artist Ian Collings as well as Cheng’s bespoke designs, which contribute to creating a harmonious, meaningful and elegiac home. Project Details Interiors – Brewin Design Office Photography – Khoo Guo Jie We think you might like RJ House by Rakta Studioabc
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Where Science and Art Collide – Sue Carr on the Appeal of Design

When Sue Carr co-founded her first design studio in 1971, interior design was a mere afterthought in the overall design process. Five decades later, the perception around it has changed tremendously, and there is no doubt that Carr’s Founding Principal has played a crucial role in advancing its progress and giving the discipline the notoriety it deserves.

So magnificent is her contribution that in 2006 Sue was inducted in the Design Institute of Australia’s Hall of Fame in recognition of her visionary legacy. And just this year, she has been awarded an (AM) of the Order of Australia (General Division) for her meaningful service to interior design, education and women in business.

Sue’s incredibly accomplished, influential, and frankly unparalleled career, spans over five decades. As the Carr studio celebrates its 50th birthday, we ask the designer how it all started and what led her to where she is now. Even though Sue admits she wasn’t necessarily born into interior design and only developed an interest in the discipline when she began university, her upbringing certainly informed her future passion. “My entire childhood was geared towards a life in design; a life that would allow me to exercise my two greatest passions – science and art,” she explains.

She was immediately attracted to interior design. “It was about the science of how we live and interact with one another in the environments that surround us,” she says. This importance of fusing the discipline of everyday living with the art of producing well-designed spaces is what Sue was instantly captivated by. “Design was original, different and new; it was a field full of possibilities and potential,” she recalls.

Of course, this instantaneous fascination with interior design didn’t fade away. In fact, it’s hard not to draw parallels between what Sue found so alluring about design at the start with the qualities that now permeate the studio’s original and unique designs. Encompassing an integrated interior design and architectural offering, the practice prides itself in designing buildings from the inside out, always striving to enrich people’s lives. Sue’s own home very much embodies the studio’s design philosophy. “Timeless, light-filled spaces; contemporary, thoughtful detailing; pure, clean lines and a strong, simple design that responds to our needs,” she says of her private refuge. “Quality over quantity,” she says when we ask what home means to her. “It’s not about trends and what looks good; it’s about things that make us feel great and about choices that incorporate social and environmental sustainability.”   

Sue says that as our lives become busier, we want our homes to be our havens – and kitchens are at the heart of these sanctuaries. That’s why they must be not only beautiful but also efficient and practical. “Outside of one’s workspace, it’s where the majority of people spend most of their time. It is also the social hub of the home, and its purpose reveals the increased importance that cooking, food, and conversation has on our lives today.” Sue adds that the design of a kitchen should integrate with the house, so there are no obvious departures in materiality, aesthetics and design.

Many of these qualities have been reflected in this year’s Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year Design Contest submissions. “The best-designed kitchens in the Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year awards represented a composition of fully integrated appliances, streamlined, crisp joinery, beautifully detailed materials and fixtures and importantly a layout that supported the requirements of its users,” she explains. The focus on the user’s needs is intertwined with the fact that spaces are becoming less and less defined, a change Sue is noticing in the kitchen design space. “As designers and architects, we have to work like problem-solvers. It’s about creating an environment that can enhance our life and adapt to the way our lifestyles are changing,” she says. “Laundries are now often integrated into the kitchen, and kitchens are now multi-functional spaces acting as workspaces, cooking spaces, social spaces, dining spaces. As a result, spaces will have to work harder to accommodate multiple uses by multiple people.”

Sue says that as appliances have become more streamlined and integration increases in popularity, the kitchen of the future will be very different. She uses the humble dining table as an example. “It has always been at the heart of the kitchen, a place for preparing food and eating it. But as the world changes, so will our needs. That means that the table of the future will be designed to do so much more: it’s our preparation surface, hob, dining table, workbench and children’s play area.” She concludes with a positive remark on the growing role of tech in the kitchen, “Technology will play its part too, helping to make us more confident cooks, while letting less food go to waste.”

Explore some of the best-designed kitchens shortlisted as part of this year’s Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year Design Contest here.

abc
Architecture
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Edsall Street Residence: Charming Heritage at the Front, Intimate Brutalism at the Back

Designed by Ritz & Ghougassian, the Edsall Street residence is set within Melbourne’s affluent neighbourhood of Malvern. With peaceful streets lined with large period homes and a bustling cafe lifestyle, this lush and prestigious area of the city is one of the most sought-after inner-city suburbs. The heritage frontage of the house speaks to the traditional architecture of the area and maintains a tranquil relationship with the leafy quality of the street. However, with its intricate wrought-iron detailing, the classic, white weatherboard and the sloping roof, this charming facade doesn’t necessarily reveal the minimalistic ode to light and materiality hiding behind the entryway. The heritage part of the building and the new structure have been purposefully kept separate to reinforce the sensation of transition and accentuate the serenity of the residence. In stark contrast to the decorative verandah detail, the contemporary part of the dwelling is highly minimalist. A masterpiece of considered materiality, simplicity of line and an incredibly mindful curation of natural light, the Japanese-inspired interior is airy, relaxing and secluded. Consistent with the materials used across the structure’s outer shell, the interiors of this intimate metropolitan retreat are a balance of concrete and timber – a combination that produces beautiful visual outcomes and introduces prominent, confident textures. The concrete blocks give the interiors a geometrical yet gentle character. At the same time, the warm tones of timber bring in a level of natural softness. While the heavy and brutalist quality of the concrete lends itself to producing solemn, almost dignified spaces, the use of timber perfectly balances out the seriousness of masonry. George Fethers’ 182.32 Blackbutt High Feature veneer from the Lingapal collection plays a pivotal role in co-creating this soft ambience. The beautifully neutral Blonde colour of the natural timber veneer compliments the other wooden elements throughout the house while providing a well-balanced contrast to the extensive concrete surfaces. Light in tone and pre-finished with two layers of clear, acrylic polyurethane coating to further highlight the natural structure and pronounced grain, the natural timber veneer panels bring an organic quality into their interactions with the surrounding harshness of the masonry. The added durability of the coating also improves the longevity profile of the panels, which reinforces the dwelling’s overwhelming sense of permanence. The simplicity of selected materials invites a pleasant and dynamic interaction with natural light. Rays of light move through the house, enabling the textures and angles to subtly shift throughout the day. That, in turn, further emphasises the incredibly captivating appeal of the striking juxtaposition that makes Edsall Street project a truly unique residence. Photography by Tom Blanchfordabc
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Fhiaba’s Classic Range Is the Ultimate Expression of Functional Luxury in the Kitchen

Rarely ostentatious in its appearance, contemporary luxury is seamless, intuitive and reliable, often flawlessly disappearing into its surroundings. Fhiaba’s sleek Classic Range is an incredibly fitting example of that functional yet restrained elegance in a household setting. While the smooth and streamlined appearance of the collection has been designed to allow seamless incorporation into the landscape of the kitchen and can be completely concealed, the capabilities it boasts position the appliances front and centre of the kitchen space. An undisputable stand out when it comes to functionality, design excellence and comfort, Fhiaba’s outstanding credentials put the brand right at the top of the range in the competitive universe of household appliances - and with good reason. Fhiaba is the only company with the technology that allows their fridges to manage three independent climate zones - a quality undoubtedly superior where food storage is concerned. A variety of built-in sensors ensure complete temperature accuracy, while the ProVent™ system evenly distributes cold air throughout the fridge by circulating it laterally. The incorporation of the triple cooling system called TriPro™ ensures that every ingredient and dish can benefit from an appropriate micro-climate, and three different settings for humidity control - low, medium and high - offer unique precision. In addition to that, the brand’s signature lateral refrigeration systems enable the user to benefit from the full depth of the internal compartments. Considering wine handling just as important, Fhiaba’s Classic Range comprises a range of wine cellar models. Streamlined and sleek from a visual point of view, the wine storing appliances have been designed to create the optimum conditions to satisfy even the most selective wine aficionados. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="113822,113823"] To foster a reliable storing environment, the brand pays particular attention to ensuring that factors such as temperature, humidity, light and vibrations don’t affect the conditions in which wine is preserved. Taking this precise level of control a step further, the cellars within the range feature Riserva storage compartments, which offer an option to modify the humidity levels to generate the right environment for wine aging over a long time. Fhiaba’s incredible attention to detail continues to shine through the selection of timber shelves, made exclusively for the brand from high-quality natural beechwood from the forests in Friuli. A magnificent result of Italian craftsmanship, the shelving has been designed to improve the visibility of the bottle labels and further enhance the conditions to preserve the wine. Fhiaba’s Classic Range is an exquisite expression of the brand’s commitment to functional excellence. Whether it’s the selection of refrigerators or wine cellars, the fresh yet unostentatious aesthetic coupled with incredible attention to detail, high-end technology and unique Italian craft result in exceptionally indulgent kitchen appliances that fuse comfort, functionality and beauty. Find out more about the collection that represents the pinnacle of food and wine preservation on Fhiaba’s website. abc
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Express Your Individuality with ILVE’s Design Your Own Configurator

Our homes are our place of respite — a carefully curated sanctuary that is an extension of our identity. The choices we make in decor and design, from the style of the stovetop to the colour of a door handle, are clearly an expression of our personality and preferences. Recognising this necessity of creativity and customisation, ILVE has extended its offering with the Design Your Own concept, allowing us to truly curate our personal sanctuaries. The foundation of ILVE has always been focused on creating custom appliances that can express the individuality of passionate home cooks. Now, through an extension of the Design Your Own configurator, ILVE permits further design flexibility and creates a totally unique experience for its customers and clients. With a multiplicity of colours, styles and sizing options, ILVE presents a way for people to customise appliances beyond what is normally possible in this sector. With over 60 years of heritage, the ILVE brand has been dedicated to bringing its unique brand of Italian hand craftsmanship to the passionate home and professional cooks of Australia. It is with this passion Eurolinx Australia announces the Design Your Own ILVE product configurator built exclusively for Australian homes.

Daniel Bertuccio, the Eurolinx Marketing Manager, explains that this configurator is “meticulously built with every possible scenario accounted for” and how it “gives our customers the ability to design their dream freestanding oven, visualising the product as it comes together with live pricing as you go through the build journey.”

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A further dimension of flexibility and creativity is permitted through using the universal RAL colour system; it is now possible to create an ILVE freestanding oven in any one of up to 213 colours. More than just a painted surface, ILVE custom colours are made in Italy using a baked enamel system, resulting in a high gloss and resilient finish. The choice of different styling in Copper, Brass, Chrome or Bronze in conjunction with the RAL colour selection, ensures that the final freestanding oven is an exciting centrepiece for every kitchen.

The configurator also allows the user to choose the required size and cooktop design of your oven, along with a matching range hood, and as indicated by Daniel Bertuccio, “From a 90cm Majestic in Capri Blue with Chrome Styling to a 150cm Professional Plus in Sand Yellow with a Teppanyaki Plate, the possibilities really do feel endless!”

Whether it be choosing a professional grade oven or a bright statement piece, ILVE’s freedom in creativity and customisation allows you to design the perfect appliance for your lifestyle. This unmatched flexibility further permits individuality to shine through, allowing the appliance to seamlessly fit in any home. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="114665,114669"] The online configurator has a unique User experience, designed to involve minimal steps and deliver utmost efficiency. Once the stepwise configuration process is complete, a design summary is generated detailing specific requirements which can then be taken to a local ILVE dealer. Alternatively, authorised agents using the B2B side of the platform, are able to walk through the design with your customer, confirming the price in real-time and place the order directly with ILVE’s internal systems. ILVE’s recognition of our homes as an extension of our identity has led to their unique Design Your Own configurator, giving people the freedom to create appliances that truly fit their personality and lifestyle.

ILVE

ilve.com.auabc
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Angular Artistry: A Showcase of Sculptural Furniture

But this isn’t just a functional role: today, art is no longer relegated to the walls. Enlightened Living provides an unparalleled range of modern furniture, championing brands at the forefront of the latest design and technological advances: every product is a piece of art or sculpture in its own right. Enlightened Living (formerly ECC Lighting and Furniture) boasts an impressive range of indoor and outdoor lighting and furniture. Skilled at sourcing products for project briefs of all scales, the team at Enlightened Living have successfully established lasting relationships with architects, designers, and clients throughout Australia. From lighting to furniture and everything in between, Enlightened Living celebrates the best of international design: pieces as sculptural as they are functional. Comfort in Curvature | BO Sofa by Piet Boon   The Piet Boon furniture range is tied together by a sense of generous proportionality and extraordinary comfort: and the BO Sofa is the perfect exemplar. With 12 elements to create the perfect complement to your social setting, the rounded edges and extended curves of BO make a flexible, organic seating option. Available to be upholstered in one of the fabrics or leathers in Piet Boon’s extensive range, BO is a luxurious sofa to artfully decorate any interior space. Elongated Elegance | Coco Pendant by Jacco Maris Jacco Maris light designs are notable for their ability to generate maximum impact with a minimal number of materials. In collaboration with Wesly Boom, Coco is a simply formed, smoothly curved ceiling light. This piece is crafted from translucent Corian® illuminated by the built-in LED element, with customisable metal or coloured suspension brackets. Coco is available in three different sizes, to suit intimate environments and grand spaces alike. With each Jacco Maris piece handcrafted in studio, there is always the possibility for bespoke design alterations to be made. Asymmetry in Action | Converse Coffee Table by Linteloo Designed by Linteloo, we introduce the Converse Coffee Table. Linteloo designed the pieces in his brand in response to the early nineties’ trends, particularly the rise of minimalism. This table offers exceptional versatility and perfect proportionality. With a variety of visual directions, it is asymmetrical yet entirely functional. The Converse Coffee Table is subtle maximalism at its finest: a bold, modern shape rendered in classic materials. These three pieces offer only a tiny glimpse into Enlightened Living’s range. With international connections and expansive style options, there are endless opportunities to furnish your project with Enlightened Living. Enlightened Living enlightened living.com.au abc
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Mates Who Build Together Stay Together

When Tim Fyffe’s construction company built Patrick Jost’s home about six years ago, it didn’t take long for the pair to become good friends. In the years since, Fyffe and Jost have bonded over their love of fishing and the odd “session on the Kingies” outside Port Phillip Heads, so it came as no surprise that Fyffe asked Jost Architects to design both his family home in Richmond and his beach house. The Heritage front of The Richmond House by Jost Architects Halfway up Richmond Hill, the Richmond House accommodates Tim and Nat Fyffe and their two young children. The original heritage brick home sits on a small and restrictive site with a heritage overlay, meaning the front façade and the two front bedrooms at street level were retained from the original building. Camouflaged with mirrored cladding and glazing that reflects the sky and streetscape around, Jost ensured the upper levels would not dominate the existing building or impact the heritage streetscape. An old lean-to out the back was replaced with a three-level addition, navigating the site’s steep slope. Internally, the living areas revolve around a central open staircase of steel, concrete and timber, that allows natural light and ventilation to flow through the home. “Internal finishes such as the retained pressed red face brickwork, black steel, hard plaster walls and an amazing exposed timber board-formed concrete ceiling perfectly suit the industrial aesthetic of the suburb,” says Jost. It’s easy to see the respect Jost has for Fyffe when he tells me how Bacchus Constructions “is renowned for delivering highly detailed architectural houses”. It’s this mutual respect that saw parts of the design become a collaboration between the two — just one example being the concrete ceiling that has been imprinted with wood grain, adding texture and warmth through the organic finish. “The acid-washed cedar formwork in-situ concrete ceilings are pretty amazing. I had suggested using concrete floor slabs to squeeze the roof deck in vertically and Tim ramped it up with the finish. The acid creates a more expressed grain which comes out clearly in the concrete,” Jost tells me. The pair’s friendship also allowed Jost to pitch interesting spur-of-the-moment ideas. When double glazing for the front window was delivered with the wrong finish, Jost suggested it be used to cover the back door instead. “I very rarely design on the fly like that but it ended up almost being the perfect detail that completed the end of the building,” says Jost. The home’s finishes were selected by the clients, along with a little help from Melbourne-based design practice Hecker Guthrie. Before having children, the Fyffe’s had spent a few New Year's Eves on the roof of the original house and they noted the amazing view of the skyline in their brief. To make the most of the special outlook, Jost incorporated a leafy rooftop deck that offers uninhibited views to the MCG and the city in one direction and Richmond Hill and St Ignatius Church in the other. The friends sit in the sunshine on the rooftop deck of The Richmond House. “The roof deck is a special part of the house where at night the city and MCG lights illuminate a spectacular view. It is so close and the photos don’t do it justice,” says Jost. The rooftop deck of The Richmond House. “When we were shooting the house, we had an amazing sunset with the whole city lit up and a giant flock of black cockatoos flew by,” he adds. Project Details Architecture — Jost Architects Construction — Bacchus Constructions Photography — Derek Swalwell Enjoy reading about The Richmond House? You might also like Stealth House in Sydney by Bijl Architectureabc
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It’s Easy to Fall for the “Look” – In Conversation with Neil Burley

With an exhilarating career that has taken Neil Burley from architecture and graphic design to interior design and furniture, the founder of architecture and interiors practice Burley Katon Halliday and furniture store Anibou is undoubtedly one of the prominent Renaissance men of the Australian design scene. This extraordinary fluidity in mastering a variety of disciplines and design genres has seen him stimulate and excite the national design arena in a myriad of ways. Having dropped out of the architecture degree he started in 1961 at the University of NSW to pursue his passion for graphic design, young Neil already considered the transition between fields natural. “There’s a very strong relationship between some elements of any type of design,” he explains. “Graphic design may just be two dimensional, but good layout is very much like rational planning in architecture.” This ability to appreciate the intricate parallels between various design genres enabled him to morph his flourishing graphic design business into a broader operation, including interior and product design. That’s how Neil Burley Design was born. Neil continued to develop the practice, which was renamed to Burley Katon Halliday in 1989 to acknowledge the involvement of Neil’s partners: David Katon and Ian Halliday. The same year, Neil’s interest in furniture culminated in the establishment of Anibou. The store originated as a distributor of European materials and products, only to grow into a renowned platform for emerging and established local designers, who – it was obvious to Neil at the time – were significantly underrepresented. While Anibou is not under Neil’s leadership anymore, the premise he so intentionally set in motion almost two decades ago continues to define the store’s direction. Taking into consideration Neil’s multifaceted design expertise, profound appreciation of local talent and the distinct sense of pragmatism he’s developed throughout his career, it is only fitting he found himself a part of an esteemed panel of judges in the inaugural edition of Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year Design Contest. “Food preparation is really the heart of any place where people live,” he explains. With his sensible approach to the role of a home – which for him is synonymous with safety, protection and easy access to the outside while using minimum energy – his thoughts on kitchen design trends are practical too. “While many of the entries were large and luxurious, I’m still more interested in a kitchen’s relationship to the rest of the house than trends,” he says. “Easily the biggest change of the last 30 years is that the kitchen, and therefore the cook, is now very seldom locked off in a separate room but is central to where most living takes place,” says Neil. “I really doubt that this will reverse,” he predicts. Neil adds that he hopes we see greater emphasis on durability of both appliances and finishes. “It’s too easy to fall for a ‘look’ and overlook maintenance,” he sums up, highlighting the inherently functional character of the kitchen space. View the full shortlist of Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year 2021 projects here.abc
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The Colours That Will Shape Our Homes Next Year

Responding to humanity’s current era of uncertainty, one in which the home has become expected to accommodate all aspects of our personal lives, education and work, the Dulux Colour Forecast has predicted three palettes to shape the tones of our walls, fittings and furnishings in the year to come. The forecast is determined by collaborative research between Dulux colour and communication manager, Andrea Lucena-Orr, colour forecaster and stylist, Bree Leech, and the Dulux Colour Marketing Group. The outcome? Tones that inspire feelings of authenticity, empowerment and hope, to reflect what humans have been looking for in recent times. “The impact of the pandemic is undeniable; it is the predominant influence on everything, from global trends to domestic concerns,” says Lucena-Orr. “Naturally, it has impacted the Dulux Colour Forecast 2022 too, and the resultant palettes highlight the colours we need as a collective community and as individuals: calm, optimism and empowerment.”

Restore

Comforting, luxurious and natural, the Restore palette is determined by earth-based colours and whites and neutrals with warm undertones. The selection is driven by the concept of interiors as a cocoon and a place to practice wellness and self-care rituals, according to Lucena-Orr. “We seek comfort above all else, are choosing less however making better choices, driving our appreciation of the power of simplicity. Minimal but meaningful,” adds Lucena-Orr.  Using hues like Dulux Natural Flora and New Penny along with soft furnishings and elements of stone and ceramics, tactility plays a major role in this palette, highlighting textural interplay between natural materials.

Flourish

Bold, decadent and somewhat hedonistic, the Flourish palette provides a dramatic statement. The colours of deep Dulux Kenepuru Sound blue, grounding Basic Coral and warm Red Terra, says Lucena-Orr, celebrate the human potential for creativity and expression. Being slightly more adventurous and inventive than Restore, Flourish is rich, sensual and a little surprising, thanks to pops of Gold Vintage. “These colours can reflect that uncertainty doesn’t always equate to a loss of power when it comes to our ability to celebrate life,” says Lucena-Orr. The rich tones of the Dulux Colour Forecast Flourish palette

Wonder

Last, but certainly not least, Wonder is playful yet also embraces a hint of serenity. The light, fun and experimental palette is reminiscent of bright spring bouquets, and includes a variety of pastels such as Dulux Pinkham, Ice Lemon and Celery Green. “Expressing our reconnection with the natural world and the sheer joy of Spring and Summer, of light and warmth, the Wonder palette is uplifting and hopeful,” says Lucena-Orr. Pastels and playful accessories determine the Dulux Colour Forecast Wonder palette. Styling — Bree Leech Photography — Lisa Cohenabc
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Light as a Pebble: Arper’s Eco-Conscious Adell range

The Adell collection's natural presence and gentle rounded curves are “plush yet supportive, substantial yet lightweight,” according to Barcelona-based designers Lievore + Altherr Desile Park. Featuring a curved shell that is manufactured from 80 per cent recycled polypropylene, the materials are intentional, allowing long-lasting and ergonomic designs, while also considering the cost. After significant consideration, polypropylene became the designers' obvious choice for a few reasons. An olive green polypropylene Adell lounge chair by Arper is surrounded by green folliage. “It is a robust and durable material that is great for outdoor use, it is a perfect base for upholstery, and, versus wood, it is a much more affordable option for fabrication. Plus, the slight flex in the polypropylene makes the overall effect more comfortable instead of the rigidity of wood,” say the designers. By delving into material research, Lievore + Altherr Desile Park worked consciously to find the most sustainable way to use the materials. Initially, the designers considered using bioplastic, but discovered it came with “an entirely different set of concerns”. Instead, the studio decided the most sustainable way forward would be to use recycled polypropylene. Adell’s polypropylene shell is formed with an organic texture that evokes the concentric patterns of a tree trunk’s rings. This allows surface scratches to dissolve in the texture, rather than look like wear, extending the life of the chairs. A person's hand sits on top of an Adell by Arper lounge chair. “The shell shape can be created in post-industrial polypropylene, which means it can be both recycled and reused,” say the designers. Due to the customisable nature of the collection, the pieces’ pure materials can be fully disassembled — “the only way to ensure it is fully recyclable”. The chair was designed to fill a “more lightweight and comfortable” niche missing in Arper’s previous offering. Taking a 360-degree approach to the design, Lievore + Altherr Desile Park aimed to create a system that adapts to different uses, expressions and price points. The chair comes in a variety of tones that were specifically chosen to reflect organic materials – think olive green, bark-toned brown and ivory – rather than artificial colours. Different upholstery options are also available, allowing the chair to be imagined in varying environments. The fully upholstered version, for example, would suit hotels, restaurants or airport lounges. The extra soft front cover elicits a more relaxed mood, suited to homes or co-working spaces. The durability of the polypropylene shell on its own makes it suitable for education or healthcare environments where surfaces must be easily cleanable, and finally, the soft cushion option is ideal for outdoor gardens. The legs are also interchangeable, with four leg, sled and timber base options. “Adell’s singular, friendly shape suggests an effortless use in all sectors, but is especially well suited to relaxed seating areas,” say the designers. In Australia, Arper’s Adell collection is exclusively available at Stylecraft. Arper is one of Stylecraft’s longest-running European brand partners, having forged a relationship that has spanned two decades. Enjoy this article? You might also like our article on Stylecraft's J5 Credenza.abc
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Miriam Fanning On Living Design, Rather Than Doing It

With over two decades of design practice fueled by the ambition to produce bespoke results that enhance her clients’ lives, Miriam Fanning is one of the most respected and influential figures in the Australian design industry. Sparked by the enduring love of drawing nurtured throughout her childhood, Miriam’s remarkable career has seen her involved in a broad range of Australian and international projects, which - alongside her travels throughout Europe and America - informed her interest in retail and hospitality environments. Today, the renowned designer, keynote speaker and recipient of some of the most prestigious international industry awards heads up a multi-disciplinary studio, Mim Design. As the Founder and Principal Interior Designer of the practice, Miriam seeks a profound sense of design and rational use of purpose for each project, be it a commercial interior, a high-end hotel or a multi-residential dwelling. [caption id="attachment_114900" align="alignnone" width="1170"] The Bowers, Manly| Interiors | Mim Design[/caption] With a broad array of magnificent designs within their portfolio, this year the award-winning studio commemorates its 21-year legacy with a publication celebrating its most memorable projects and collaborations. With hand-drawn sketches, interviews with Mim Design collaborators and essays by acclaimed design author Karen McCartney, “Works” provides a glimpse into the intimate relationship between the studio and their clients and offers a suggestion on what the future holds for the Australian design industry. While we eagerly await the release of the retrospective, Miriam talks to us about the most pertinent turning point of her career, how the pandemic has given us a greater understanding of our needs - and what “living” rather than “doing” design means.

Habitus: Tell us about what led you to where you are now.

Growing up, I was always encouraged to keep busy and enjoy life rather than sit still, and this family value manifested itself in a love of drawing, which opened my mind to the visual world from a very early age. This is where it all started, from studying to then working in a large architectural firm and then starting my own practice, which was the most significant turning point in my career. I had a young child at the time, and my intention was to work as a design consultant, affording me the freedom of flexible hours and the diversity I craved. It’s always a risk going out on your own, so it was a leap of faith, however I was very fortunate and within weeks I landed my first project working on a resort in North Queensland. Before I knew it, my independent consultancy grew into a studio — we’ve continued to grow incrementally since then, and now have a team of 30 dedicated professionals. [caption id="attachment_114892" align="alignnone" width="1170"] The Bowers, Manly| Interiors | Mim Design[/caption]

How does your home reflect your passions, interests and creativity?

I “live design” rather than “do design” and am a big believer in loving what you do and doing what you love. I’m fortunate enough to be in a position where that’s possible, and, as such, my home certainly reflects my passions, interests and creativity. I’m an avid art collector and quite enjoy picking up a brush when I have a moment of spare time — I love to surround myself with beautiful pieces that bring me and my family joy. I also take pride in helping to guide my clients through their own art-collector journey because I know what a wonderful experience it is to understand what kind of art moves you and how to use it within a space. Our home is comfortable, relaxing, and most definitely not precious. [caption id="attachment_114895" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Coastal Pavillion | Interiors | Mim Design[/caption]

How do you see kitchen design changing?

Trends are something to be avoided as they come and go with little long-lasting impact or substance. However, design — including kitchen design — will, of course, continue to evolve, and in the next five to ten years, we’re sure to feel the impact of the pandemic in the way we experience the world through design. From a residential perspective, it’s safe to say we value our homes more than before, and this alone will see an increased focus on life-enhancing design. This could be as simple as creating more spaces for leisure and quiet time, or conversely, more productive environments. The pandemic has given us a greater understanding of our needs, and our homes will need to work harder as a result. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="114903,114902"]

Why are kitchen spaces so important to the home?

Kitchens often act as a central axis or ‘heart’ of the home, connecting to other spaces effortlessly and fostering a sense of togetherness and warmth. These are spaces that help define a personality within a home as they can be customised, crafted and planned to suit and reflect the philosophy of the home and the way we live. [caption id="attachment_114897" align="alignnone" width="1170"] NNH Residence | Interiors | Mim Design[/caption] What trends came out of the Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year awards? I would not say we saw trends this year. I would like to say that we were immersed in an array of leading-edge design projects. Each was original, authentic and holistic in their approach to deliver a strong philosophy connecting with the interior and external environment, whilst ensuring the technical and practical application was paramount in delivering a strong design standing the test of time. In turn, creating designs for now and the future, defeating all trends. View the full shortlist of Gaggenau Kitchen of the Year 2021 projects here.  And if you’re interested in the publication that celebrates 21 years of Mim Design’s practice, Ahead of it’s launch on September 20, “Works” is now available for pre-order at mimdesign.com.au/works-by-mim-designabc