About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Cultivating a design instinct

Habitus Living: Tell us about your upbringing

Tamsin Johnson: I grew up in Melbourne the daughter of antique dealers so you can imagine the background! Beautiful things, mainly from Europe and the sub-continent. My parents were natural interior designers and aesthetes so it was imbued from the outset. My father had a special jovial levity that transmitted into the character of his business, his outlook and his passion for antiquity. My mother is indefatigably positive and a powerhouse of a worker, so it is inveterate. [caption id="attachment_119340" align="alignnone" width="810"] Tamsin Johnson's shop in Paddington[/caption]

How do you balance your personal and professional life?

Really these are probably indistinguishable or at least inseparable. Work is life. I am my work and I am myself always. I understand it's a privilege.

What does home mean to you?

Home is where the family and friends are. We can move, change buildings and physical circumstances but I can carry what I love about our lived space with me, it shouldn't stop really. Some objects will always be with us for comfort's sake but above all that it is my family. [caption id="attachment_119342" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Domain Road by Tamsin Johnson, photo by Sean Fennessy[/caption]

How does your home reflect your passions, interests and creativity?

We have moved a few times and the common thread is comfort. I love light, I love freshness, I love my home to be uplifting, stimulating and comforting in all respects. I'd hope my home, at any point in time, is the pinnacle of my work, my best expression at that point. I expect that this will always change of course.

What are your favourite things in your home?

My kids' rooms. For storytime, debriefing on the day and a cuddle.

What’s something you wished you had known before setting out on this career path?

I am not sure it's about 'knowing', it is rather about 'doing'. The latter begets the former after all.

What makes culture, art and design important to you?

I would have a lot of trouble being human without it! I feel people need all the perversity spewed out of the human mind to deal with all the perversity of life. It is an instinct after all, and instincts need to play out. [caption id="attachment_119346" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Woollahra townhouse[/caption]

How does art play into your work and your home?

I'd hope everything I entertain in my designs is 'artful' first and foremost. Fine art, however, can have anything from an arresting power to some other value like serenity, calamity, calmness or humour.

What was the first piece of art you bought?

A painterly portrait of a smoking man, I bought it with Patrick who is now my husband. We don't know the artist. Tamsin Johnson tamsinjohnson.com Tamsin Johnson is an ambassador for Melbourne Art Fair 2022, check out the program now, and drop in to see us at stand MP1 from 17-20 February 2022. [caption id="attachment_119343" align="alignnone" width="810"] South Yarra project[/caption] [caption id="attachment_119349" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Darling Point home[/caption] [caption id="attachment_119350" align="alignnone" width="810"] Potts Point project[/caption]abc
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Melbourne Art Fair releases a jam-packed program

With just under a month to go until the doors swing open at Melbourne Art Fair, we’re excited to see such a comprehensive line-up of talent, showcasing art in a multitude of experiential ways. Running from 17-20 February at Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, the show comprises 63 leading galleries from around Australia, presenting work for sale from emerging and established artists. In addition, a series of activations have been revealed including video works, large-scale installations, two experimental rooms and seven panels talks. On the announcement of the program, CEO and Fair Director, Maree Di Pasquale says: “the fair has never before presented such an extraordinary cross-section of work by the region’s most significant artists, from newly discovered talents to the most collectable in contemporary art.” [caption id="attachment_119333" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Nathalie Djurberg & Hans Berg, One Need Not be a House, The Brain Has Corridors, 2018, stop motion animation. Courtesy of the artist and Lisson Gallery.[/caption] Here are some of the highlights:

VIDEO

A slew of local and international artists has been invited to respond to the idea of ‘place’ as a thematic premise of a series of 11 contemporary works in moving image. VIDEO presented by Subtype, will showcase works that reflect on the lasting impressions by recent collective experiences. “The single-channel works selected for this year’s fair represent some of the boldest, most imaginative expressions of media art, conveying a sense of the remarkable breadth and depth for current experiments with the medium,” says Nina Miall, curator VIDEO and Curator QAGOMA International Art.

BEYOND

Six large-scale installations will activate the exhibition space. Responding to the notion of Djeembana/Place, curator Emily Cormack says the works set out to question “what this place is when we are without each other”? Expect to see sculptural interventions and tactile creations. For example, Sean Meilak’s Made for Melodrama, presented by Niagara Galleries (Melbourne), draws on the psychology of space, domestic and public environments. Through a lens of art history and design, cinematic environments are crafted including references to Surrealism and Italian furniture design. While the entrance foyer of the fair you can expect to see ambiguous tendrilled forms and interactive video works by Caroline Rothwell. Her Infinite Herbarium project, presented by Tolarno Galleries (Melbourne) is a multifaceted work, created in collaboration with Google Creative Lab Sydney, featuring images from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, and transformed by Google’s artificial intelligence and machine learning processes. [caption id="attachment_119330" align="alignnone" width="1170"] The Huxleys. Melting moments 2021. Giclee print. Courtesy of the artists and Murray White Room, Melbourne.[/caption]

PROJECT ROOMS

Two project rooms offer a non-commercial platform for artistic experimentation and performance. In 2022 artists from Gertrude Contemporary and LAST Collective will use the space to push boundaries.

Plus more

Catch live performances from The Huxleys and Steven Rhall, join Broadsheet for an up late series, grab a drink from the Glenfiddich x Jordan Gorgos pop-up bar and tune in to a series of talks.  

Visit melbourneartfair.com.au for full program details and to book tickets. Melbourne Art Fair will run from Thursday 17 – Sunday 20 February 2022.

Habitus is a proud media partner for Melbourne Art Fair – you can pop in and see us at the stand MP1 in the Galleries.abc
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The Future of Work is Here: Enter the Dynamic Workplace

For many workers, working from home during the pandemic and lockdowns has not been easy. However, after the initial shock, workers are now recognising the advantages of remote working, with many even questioning the need to go back to physical workplaces at all. With return-to-work roadmaps in place but end dates shifting into sight, there are rising expectations around flexibility – the ability to work at home or at the office at one’s own choosing. As the ecosystem of places where people will work continues to expand, workplace design will need to evolve to meet the changing needs of today’s workforce. Enter the dynamic workplace: a flexible solution that ensures workers are equipped to work wherever they are. Whether you are looking at splitting your time between your home and the office, sticking to remote working, or shifting to a downsized co-working model, it is clear that intuitive, adaptable and simple setups are key – which is where Wilkhahn, one of the leading names in high-quality office furniture, excels. Standing worldwide for design made in Germany, Wilkhahn is leading the charge when it comes to lasting solutions for a changing work environment. While the past few years have been about rapid change and quick-fixes, Wilkhahn’s furniture solutions create longevity through dynamism, offering everyone the chance to create a work environment that matches their new way of working.

Confair folding table

Desk-sharing and flexible teamwork are an integral part of daily work routines. The Confair folding table is a space-saving, moveable folding table that enables versatile usage of workspaces. When linked together with other Confair tables by snap connectors, project work tables can be transformed into large conference layouts without the use of any special tools. As options, cable channels, power supply connections and innovative techni-modules are available to provide advanced technological functionality.

Insit Screen

Dynamic workspaces must offer spaces for privacy and concentration. The Insit Screen was developed as a modular set of stand-alone panels and enclosures that can be combined with Wilkhahn’s multipurpose bench range. With a wide range of design options for agile furnishing, the Insit Screen can help partition spaces, divide up sectional seating, or provide places to withdraw to in open-plan offices.

Pep task chair

Marrying a refreshingly simple and stylish design with exceptional comfort, the ergonomic Pep task chair would not look out of place in the home or office. Featuring a moulded plywood unibody seat and backrest shell that is fully-padded on all sides, the Pep chair offers maximum comfort in a lightweight and compact design. The optional black polyamide armrests provide a comfortable place to rest your arms.

Stand-up

Whether at home or the office, breaks are valuable opportunities for physical activity and reflection that help the body and mind recover. Stand-up enables such recovery; this dynamic three-leg stool encourages users to swing their hips and engage their muscles while letting their minds wander. Available in nine colours, Stand-up’s tapered shape with its upholstered seat is fully covered in three-dimensional fabric and the black plastic base prevents slipping.

WILKHAHN https://www.wilkhahn.com/en/

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Phoenix unveils new twists to its ultra-thin Axia collection

The Axia collection by Australian brand Phoenix revolutionises bathroom design with its ultra-thin minimalist tapware that is unlike anything on the market. Axia stands out for its modern and minimalist aesthetic, particularly its ultra-thin outlets and lever-less handle design. Launched in 2020, Axia is a fresh take on modern minimalism, meticulously crafted with crisp detail and a strong presence. The Phoenix R&D team worked over two years to hone the collection’s streamlined design, which has been lauded by the international design community. Designed to appeal to architecture fans, Axia is the recipient of a Red Dot Best of the Best Award, Good Design Award and iF Design Award. Now, in 2022, the team at Phoenix has further expanded the collection with the addition of two kitchen sink mixers – the Axia Hob Mixer Set Flexible Hose and Axia Hob Mixer Set Gooseneck. Both products continue Axia’s strong design aesthetic that enables architecture lovers to create a statement in the kitchen, while also enjoying the benefits of highly functional tapware. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="119256,119259"] The Axia Hob Mixer Set Flexible Hose includes the Axia Hob Sink Outlet Flexible and Axia Hob Mixer. The Axia Hob Sink Outlet Flexible is a stunning design suitable for any contemporary home, featuring a velvet touch, matte black silicone hose for style and flexibility, as well as a single function handpiece that detaches from the cradle for extended reach. The Axia Hob Mixer provides the perfect complement with its fine precision etched grooves for easy operation and control. The Axia Hob Mixer Set Gooseneck provides a more minimalist take. It is characterised by a delicately slim curved profile and features a 360° swivel spout for enhanced functionality. It also comes with the Axia Hob Mixer. Both new products are available in Chrome, Brushed Nickel and Matte Black finishes. Like the rest of the Axia collection, they also feature a high-quality standard mixer operation European cartridge, which comes with Phoenix’s lifetime warranty on the cartridge with 1-year labour and 7-year replacement for products or parts. [gallery type="rectangular" size="large" ids="119260,119261"] A trusted name for decades in bathroom and kitchen fittings, Phoenix was founded in Australia in 1989 and has since gained its reputation for precision, quality, and customer service. The Phoenix team designs, prototypes and refines every product inhouse.

Phoenix

phoenixtapware.com.auabc
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Melbourne Art Fair 2022: Trailblazing Indigenous Women in Australian Contemporary Art

Melbourne Art Fair 2022 will bring new and iconic work from artists represented by 63 of the region’s leading contemporary art galleries and Indigenous-owned Art Centres to the Denton Corker Marshall designed Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre in Melbourne’s South Wharf. As Australasia’s most progressive forum for contemporary art and ideas, Melbourne Art Fair continues its role in shaping the future of art in the region. With a focus on solo shows and works of scale and significance, this year’s Fair aims to highlight artists that are shifting the global conversation. In particular, it is celebrating trailblazing Indigenous Australian women who are making their mark in the contemporary art world. Featured artists include:

Kaylene Whisky (Roslyn Oxley9)

Kaylene Whiskey is a Yankunytjatjara artist from Indulkana, a remote Indigenous community in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands, South Australia, and the recipient of the Melbourne Art Foundation 2022 Commission. The artist’s strong connection to Indulkana and her Yankunytjatjara heritage is the foundation of the new single channel video work, responding to the Fair’s 2022 artistic program theme of ‘Djeembana/Place’. [caption id="attachment_119096" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Kaylene Whiskey in her studio | Courtesy of Iwantja Arts, Photography: Meg Hansen.[/caption]

Jenna Lee (MARS Gallery)

Jenna Lee is a Gulumerridjin (Larrakia), Wardaman and KarraJarri Saltwater woman with mixed Japanese, Chinese, Filipino and Anglo-Australian ancestry. Using art to explore and celebrate her many overlapping identities, Lee works across sculpture, installation, and body adornment. She also works with moving images, photography and projection in the digital medium. [caption id="attachment_119098" align="aligncenter" width="1170"] Jenna Lee | Grass Tree, 2020, Pages of Aboriginal Words and Place Names, black bookbinding thread, florist wire | Installation view - MARS Gallery. Courtesy of the artist and MARS Gallery[/caption]

Kyra Mancktelow (N. Smith Gallery)

A Quandamooka artist with links to the Mardigan people of Cunnamulla, Kyra Mancktelow’s multidisciplinary practice investigates legacies of colonialism, posing important questions, such as how we remember and acknowledge Indigenous histories, through the mediums of printmaking, ceramics, and sculpture. [caption id="attachment_119099" align="aligncenter" width="1170"] Kyra Mancktelow | born under a tree II–VII, 2021, Earthenware, pigment, lead glaze, woven natural fibres, emu feathers, fired 3 times, dimensions variable[/caption]

Maree Clarke (Vivien Anderson Gallery)

Maree Clarke, a Mutti Mutti, Yorta Yorta, Wamba Wamba, Boonwurrung woman from Mildura in northwest Victoria, is a multi-disciplinary artist living and working in Melbourne with a career spanning over thirty years as an artist, curator and Artistic Director working with, nurturing and promoting the diversity of contemporary southeast Aboriginal artists. [caption id="attachment_119100" align="aligncenter" width="1170"] Maree Clarke | River Reed Necklaces, installation view Tarnanthi, Art Gallery of South Australia[/caption]

Patsy Mudgedell (Warlayirti Artists)

Born at Ruby Plains Station in Western Australia and growing up in Balgo Hills Mission, Patsy Mudgedell’s paintings are richly textured, depicting bush food found in her mother’s Country, near Mangkayi, south of Balgo, as well as Ruby Plains Station where she was born. Her works on paper tell stories of contemporary community life. [caption id="attachment_119101" align="aligncenter" width="1170"] Patsy Mudgedell | Untitled (Luurnpa) at Wirrimanu Pound, acrylic on linen, 2950x1800mm[/caption]

Helen Ganalmirriwuy (Milingimbi Art and Culture)

Helen Ganalmirriwuy was born in Galiwin’ku (Elcho Island) and grew up on Langarra. Ganalmirriwuy has been weaving since she was a young girl and today is celebrated as a master weaver and accomplished artist. [caption id="attachment_119103" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Dupun with Garrawurra body paint designs | Nicky Djawutjawuku, Helen Ganalmirriwuy and Helen Milminydjarrk, ochre on eucalyptus hollow logs, 152 x 20 x 20 cm, 197 x 20 x 20cm, 155 x 20 x 20 cm. Photo: Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection. © the artist[/caption] From February 17–20, a program of conversations, special projects, video art, large-scale installations, commissions, and performance will support the exhibition and sale of art from the most stimulating contemporary artists working today. The gallery list represents the most comprehensive overview of the Australian art market at any art fair, drawing from the well-known as well as the emerging. Set to be the first Australian art fair since the start of the pandemic, Melbourne Art Fair 2022 is once again connecting galleries and their artists with collectors and the art-loving public, resuming its role as the meeting place of the art world. What you need to know

Melbourne Art Fair

melbourneartfair.com.auabc
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Innovative glazing elevates this seafront jewel

Situated on 20 acres of environmentally distinctive land surround by water, the Boat Shed is a spectacular riverfront building surrounded by water views. The house itself features one bedroom, a generous living area upstairs, a 250m2 carport and entertaining area, and boat port downstairs, with an abundance of natural light elevating the interior. The builder Prior Builders and window and door fabricator KR Installations worked closely with the homeowner to realise the vision for the Boat Shed, which was to maximise the surrounding views and bring the environment’s natural beauty into the home. To achieve this, the design of the home focuses on glazing with large, expansive windows and glazed roof section sourced from Schüco’s range of advanced window systems. Proudly distributed in Australia by Capral Aluminium, Schüco is a renowned International brand that produces innovative window, door and facade systems that are made in harmony with the environment. Featured in this project are Schüco ASS 39 PD.NI, an aluminium sliding door designed to maximise panoramic views by concealing both the outer frame and sliding sashes into the building structure; and Schüco AWS 65, a thermally-insulated window system that is used in fixed, awning and tilt and turn styles throughout the home. The large expanse of roof glazing situated at the house’s central point took full advantage of Schüco’s unique capacities. The sheer size of the window panels required care and ingenuity during installation. While most double-glazed systems available in Australia allow for glass up to 25–28mm thick, Schüco supports double glazing, at a hefty 42mm (12mm internal and 10mm external, with a 20mm argon gap). With the panels reaching 450kg, cranes, manoeuvring devices and specialised trolleys were used to move the large window panels through a challenging waterfront building site. Fortunately, Schüco’s internally glazed system proved advantageous as it allowed the fabricator to glaze internally. This overcame the logistical challenge of installing glazing from the outside on windows that overhang water. On a site continually buffeted by high winds, this rock-solid window system enabled the fabricator to achieve a seamless result from inside to outside, and provides residents with a feeling of safety. Meeting the tight energy requirements with such large expanses of glass in such a small house was another challenge faced by the project team. Schüco are known for extremely high-performance products that excel in watertightness and thermal efficiency. The Schüco AWS 65 windows used in this project are thermally broken with a very low air infiltration rate, which means they leak less air and insulate the home more effectively, without sacrificing aesthetics or design. Working on a waterfront property can be demanding, but Schüco was the clear choice for an unforgiving natural environment of genuine beauty. The large expanse of Schüco windows show off the home’s breathtaking views, while the product’s unique capabilities made a challenging build possible.

Schüco

schuco.capral.com.auabc
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Skye is the limit as Pikos puts V-ZUG Excellence into action

“I'm a believer that everything we put in an apartment should just work seamlessly and not stand out as the feature”, says Pedro Pikos, managing director of Pikos. “It needs to work with all the other elements you have in your design of an apartment.” The group’s latest development in Kangaroo Point is no exception, with ample evidence of that goal of effortless integration having been front of mind throughout the project, which smoothly marries Conrad Gargett architecture with interiors by SentioCo. When it came to selecting an appliance partner, V-ZUG was the clear choice for several reasons. “We know, as a developer, that you actually spend 70 per cent of your time in the kitchen, we realise the significance of togetherness, for a family, for a couple, and it all stems from how we interact within the kitchen,” says Pikos. “It’s a process of not excluding anyone, including the person that's cooking; if you are entertaining, they need to be in the centre of it not locked away. So the kitchen needs to be a showpiece as well as being functional and the V-ZUG appliances – not only with their colour range – but just how functional they were with the vacuum drawers, the flexibility with the Combi-steam ovens, it all just works seamlessly. Another key consideration was the development’s target demographic. Based on 30 years’ experience observing and responding to trends in multi-res, Pikos made a conscious decision to sculpt Skye by Pikos around a single buyer – the downsizer. Pikos says this cohort is increasingly health focused and informed, including being aware of the benefits of cooking with steam or sous-vide. “We're starting to become more conscious of what is more healthy and what is not as healthy,” says Pikos. “So those health and wellness options in cooking were something that I thought were quite unique to V-ZUG.” The brand’s sector-leading green credentials are a further appeal for the target resident. “We're dealing with a demographic where all of those issues, both environmental issues as well as health issues are top of mind. And we found V-ZUG catered more to that type of buyer who was conscious of it than any other product.” These various factors have seen the apartments feature a range of products from the Swiss manufacturer, including Adora washing machines, Refresh Butlers and Supreme Cooler fridges as well as the aforementioned vacuum drawers and the Combi-steam ovens. It’s also one of the first developments in Australia to feature V-ZUG’s new Excellence line, which has been more than five years in the making and takes the company’s reputation for timeless design and superior functionality to new heights. New features include a pioneering user interface, auto-doors and carbon neutral production. The environmental approach at Skye by Pikos deserves mention too, starting a three-tower form which allows breezes and natural light to penetrate on three sides of each apartment. Given that another developer’s earlier DA for the site included 128 units and Pikos have reduced that to 68, this was no small decision. A significant green wall then moderates the western sun in lieu of solid solutions which would block the breeze – and the views. It's a generosity that is evident at the macro level – with a rooftop restaurant and pool so that the public can enjoy the spectacular views of Brisbane as well – and at the micro with timeless, future-proofed interiors. Pikos says the target buyer is not interested in renovating anymore, and V-ZUG’s understated design helped achieve the aesthetic longevity the developers we’re aiming for. “Everything is finished to a very high end, because that buyer is quite discerning,” says Pikos. “You need to be able to look at it in five years’ time and it still has to have a place in modern architecture and design – yet it needs to be comfortable. It has to be elegant.” Skye by Pikos’s focus on meeting the needs and expectations of its market with quality details and purposeful technology solutions reflects the passion and commitment of all involved. It’s a masterclass in lifestyle excellence.   V-ZUG vzug.com Pikos pikos.com  abc
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Sandcastle rises from the sloping shores of Sydney Harbour

Tucked away in the leafy and sought-after Sydney suburb of Point Piper, Sandcastle is a luxury home that makes the most of its sloping site and stellar harbour views. Built on a bed of sand on a block that slopes forty-five degrees, it took considerable engineering to overcome the fluidity of the foundation. Rather than using retaining walls, Luigi Rosselli Architects opted instead to use horizontal layers of geofabric to wrap the ground layer by layer – a method generally used to stabilise sand dunes. The sand that was excavated from the site was then used to landscape the terrain and was covered with native grasses and plants once construction was completed. Named for the sand it was built on, its towering stature above the street below and its sandy-coloured, slim handmade masonry, Sandcastle is a truly coastal home. The bricks also make up perforated sections of the wall, providing screening from the sun without minimising the building’s structural integrity. The interior of the three-storey home, designed by Alwill Interiors, prioritises open plan, light breezy spaces and is completed with meticulously chosen furniture. The communal areas see a kitchen, living and dining room open through large sliding glass doors onto a balcony overlooking the harbour. Aarhus Chairs are paired with a yellow-upholstered tubular metal Cappellini armchair and a black marbled Tama coffee table by Walter Knoll, which is privy to the harbour breeze. The living and dining areas are delineated by a central fireplace – providing simultaneous connection and separation between the spaces. In another corner of a living area, an Eames chair considers the view of boats bobbing on the harbour outside. Bespoke cabinetry and finishes provide the ultimate luxury. An in-built desk upstairs protrudes from pale wooden shelving and is accompanied by a Night owl table lamp by Fritz Hansen and another tubular chrome chair. Throughout the house, statement art brings energy and colour. Above a charcoal lounge hangs a monochromatic bright blue work by Stephen Normandy and near the dining table is a work by Paul Davies. Sandcastle is a home that prioritises perfect detailing, flawless design and above all, its world-class views. Project team Architecture – Luigi Rosselli Architects Interiors – Alwill Interiors Photography – Prue Ruscoe abc
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The Zig Zag House: A New Design Story Unfolds

Designed by Nathanael Preston and Daniel Lane of Preston Lane Architects in close partnership with James Hardie, this distinctive concept transforms the established frame of a single fronted Edwardian terrace into a thoughtfully-designed dwelling that fuses a sense of place, shelter and connection to its surroundings. The metamorphous two-storey extension elevates the original structure, filling the long yet narrow site with harmonious volumes. Gently raised out of its rectangular configuration, the house capitalises on northern light and establishes a welcoming connection with the laneway that runs along its northern edge, while offering privacy and an enveloping ambience of respite. To bring this visually arresting project to life, the architectural duo behind the concept utilised Hardie™ Fine Texture Cladding, James Hardie’s new generation building material. The hypothetical nature of the endeavour and the material’s innovative properties inspired them to boldly push the boundaries of the product's potential applications. “What we discovered is that the lightweight, user-friendly panels can be used to create some new and really interesting concepts,” Preston explains. The monolithic, accordion-like northern facade of the building is undoubtedly one of them. Generously hovering over the glazing of the ground-floor kitchen and living area that maintains a visual connection with the laneway, the opaque materiality of the fibre cement facade thoughtfully shields the second-story bedroom from its surroundings. Remarkable in its simplicity, the seemingly complex contour of the facade has been achieved by arranging the 600mm fibre cement panels at 90 degrees and using the new Hardie™ 9mm Aluminium External Slimline Corner, one of James Hardie’s new architecturally-designed accessories. It’s the combination of Hardie™ Fine Texture Cladding’s folding form and its fine, luminous finish that enables the surface to capture the shadows as the sun moves across the multi-dimensional exterior, generating a sense of dynamism that so pertinently defines the concept. Around the corner, across the eastern wall of the extension, the accordion-like facade transitions into a much more gentle expression of the architectural rhythm. Here, the flat wall facing the garden boasts a subtle v-groove generated by the interconnecting shiplaps of each panel. By replacing one of the panels with a full-height window, Preston Lane Architects open the bedroom to the views of the neighbourhood, while fostering a sense of seclusion that encloses the dwelling’s private quarters. While the external wall overlooking the yard is defined by a sense of subtlety, the cascading rhythm of the northern facade is carried through the exterior wall on the ground floor. Here, a contemporary blend of high-quality glass and Hardie™ Fine Texture Cladding panels - smaller in size and painted darker grey - gracefully translates the folds of the upper storey on a smaller scale. Gently protruding into the garden area, the glazed section of the ground-floor envelope reveals a home office - a conscious nod to the fact the way we work has changed. “Given the recent experience of lockdown, particularly in Victoria and New South Wales, we wanted to integrate a study that would have a view out and be a space that everyone would want to work from,” Lane says. Housing the laneway-facing work area and providing the backdrop to the garden’s greenery, the materiality of the ground-floor cladding relates back to the amalgamation of the urban textures that surround the Zig Zag House - like the laneway’s charming cobble stones or the red brick walls. In that, the innovative design reinforces the hypothetical dwelling’s sense of cohesion and connection with its Melbourne locale. In harnessing the seemingly limitless design possibilities of James Hardie’s innovative fibre cement cladding, the architectural practice has conceived a residential oasis that’s amicably integrated within its local community. Through a fusion of clever spatial solutions that blend openness, privacy and sense of play, Zig Zag House invites incidental interactions from passers-by, while ensuring a desired level of separation. “For us, good design means being comfortable inside but also being aware of the sky and the landscape around you while feeling that you are part of a community,” Preston says. He adds that for the passers-by, interacting with the architecture of the house provides an evolving and curious sense of connection. The resulting concept is a testament to the simplicity of form that underpins Hardie™ Fine Texture Cladding’s astounding versatility, and the striking visual impact the fibre cement panels can help generate. And as the product comes pre-sealed, ready to paint and easy to install, this aspirational design makes it easy to believe that adapting any innovative concept in real life would be just as simple. Architects and designers who would like to experience this innovative product first hand, can order a free sample kit. Alongside a selection of cladding pieces, the kit comes with the samples of some of the architect-designed accessories - including the Hardie™ 9mm Aluminium External Slimline Corner used by Preston Lane Architects in the Zig Zag House design. James Hardie jameshardie.com.au abc
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ARC - Feature

This arty apartment is anything but cookie-cutter

With a penchant for music and art, the homeowners of this five-room HDB flat wanted a home that would intrigue and inspire. With that, they engaged the help of MONOCOT to create a home that would capture their personalities in a refined and well-thought-out manner. The initial brief was to go beyond the cookie-cutter. The homeowners asked for “moments of surprise and playfulness” throughout the interiors. The living room exemplifies this design language, with its bare walls (to accommodate the homeowners’ growing art collection), and a curated furniture collection. Here, the designers made do without bulky built-ins, and instead, relied on a restrained material and colour palette to bring out the character of the place. The homeowners have “whimsical taste” and this is evident in their choice of furniture pieces. The coffee table, for example, is an upcycled crate that’s been restored to good condition. Another highlight is the customised television console. The MONOCOT team explained that it was inspired by a piece that wasn’t available in Singapore. As such, they decided to build something similar, keeping in mind that it was to be used to house the audio system and record collection. This design language continues in the kitchen. A half-height wall separates it from the dining area and also acts as a large serving counter. The designers clad its sides in terracotta tiles, giving the space an earthy and grounded look that complements both the kitchen and dining area. Inside the kitchen itself, a combination of plywood on the cabinets, and stainless steel on the countertops and backsplash creates a beautiful dichotomy of matte and polished surfaces. Both the homeowners often need to work from home so it was important that they have a dedicated home office. To meet this requirement, one of the bedrooms has been converted into a study, complete with a glass wall divider to enhance the flat’s bright and open feel. The flat’s original parquet flooring (which runs throughout the living room and bedrooms) has been retained. The door leading to the master bedroom opens to reveal a short walkway. But instead of just a standard corridor, the walls are actually formed by the wardrobe. This unique layout gives an added layer of privacy, and separates the sleeping space from the dressing area and the ensuite bathroom. It’s also interesting to note that the upper portion of the corridor “wall” has been left open for ventilation and potted plants. Turning a corner leads to the bedroom proper. This is a simple space dedicated to sleep, with no unwanted distractions. Warm wood textures and the greenery above set the mood for ultimate rest and relaxation. Equally important are the bathrooms in this home. Both rooms have been overhauled, but the ensuite bathroom is definitely a highlight. Here, the designers built a divider to cordon off the shower stall, but cut out a circular window for a playful touch. Kit kat mosaic tiles run across the walls, bringing texture and personality to this space. The use of unexpected materials throughout this home lends to its charm. Together with the carefully considered design elements, this is a home that evokes a sense of playfulness with whimsical and pleasant surprises. MONOCOT monocotstudio.com Photography by Studio Peripheryabc
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Subscribe to Habitus magazine and you could win a work of art!

As we put the finishing touches on the next issue of Habitus – the Art issue, out 3 March – we’re over the moon to share there is an incredible prize up for grabs for one lucky person who subscribes before 15 April 2022. The Winter Place by Miranda Russell is a captivating painting, framed in black Australian Oak, the 194 x 138cm artwork is valued at $9,200. [caption id="attachment_119218" align="alignnone" width="810"] The Winter Place installed at a McKimm project, photo by Dave Kulesza[/caption] When describing her approach to painting, Miranda shares, “My works are an intimate expression of my place in the world and can best be understood as an intuitive response to my surroundings. A raw and honest dialogue of form, colour, memory and landscape together expresses imagery within which I escape from reality. My paintings provide me with great calm and simplicity in an often-chaotic world.” This incredible prize is courtesy of Studio Gallery – see it in the flesh at the Habitus stand at Melbourne Art Fair, 17-20 February, 2022.

Subscribe to Habitus for the chance to win now

Entries are open to Australian residents only who subscribe to Habitus magazine and habitusliving.com eNewsletter and complete the game of skill (see below) during the competition period. Prize is valued at $9,200 and cannot be redeemed or exchanged for cash. The entries will be judged, and the winner(s) will be determined, at or around 3:00pm AEST on 15/04/2022 at the ‘Promotors’ Office. For full terms and conditions visit habitusliving.com/legal-privacy
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ARC - Feature

Living in a kaleidoscope of light

Standing in a forest, peering at the sky through the unpredictable angles created by branches and leaves, dappled light sneaks through. Living under those glorious sprinkles of natural light is life in this home. An expansive Voronoi-patterned canopy floats above this residence that houses two brothers and their families. Located in the historic Indian city of Karnal, Haryana, this near net-zero project is designed by Zero Energy Design, aka ZED Lab. Their brief was to create a home that embodied both living with and for nature. The form takes inspiration from the traditional Indian ‘Haveli’ or manor house. The two wings are punctuated by ‘chowks’ or courtyards, while the concept for the multipurpose halls draws on architectural elements of ‘Chhartris’ — elevated dome-shaped pavilions traditional to Indian architecture. The roof extends to provide outdoor shade, with floor-to-ceiling, glazed sliding doors, reminiscent of mid-century California-style glass homes that blur the lines of indoor and outdoor zones. Similarly, large open doorways have each interior room coalescing into the next. The effect is one of living in space, rather than the confinement of a conventional room.   The home maintains its own dual-personality, with the structure of one wing a mirror image of the other. Just as the courtyards mimic each other, so do the pools they frame, heightening the surreal sense of reflection.   Materiality including tactile marble floors, alongside the warmth of timber ceilings, set the soothing tempo that creates an ambience of barefoot luxury. The courtyard’s microclimate participates in a relay of sustainability. Over a day the pools' heat sink absorbs heat during the day, and then releases it at night. The evapotranspiration from the pools also nourishes the surrounding plants. The project is oriented with areas for night use directed south-west, while daytime spaces face north-east. The canopy hovering above the building provides a 50 per cent reduction in direct radiation to the upper floor. House Under Shadows is a project that understands the importance of bathing in ephemeral moments of beauty at home. To achieve this, ZED Lab has given form to some of nature’s most basic elements – light and shade. Featuring the Voronoi-patterned canopy alongside the reflective properties of surfaces and water bodies, this project offers a kaleidoscopic lens that emphasises natural beauty. However, the real joy of this design is that it not only frames nature artfully, but responsibly, it looks after it too. Project Details Architecture – ZED Lab Photography – Andre J. Fanthome We think you might like this project in India, Envelope by Studio IAADabc