Habitus Loves… Ripple + Roll

Elana Castle rounds up her favourite rippled and rolled pieces inspired by the collision of human movement and natural form.

06 Jun 2014
Ripple

Created by: Benjamin Hubert

Why we love it: It’s exceptionally lightweight. The table’s impressive strength to weight ratio is the result of corrugating plywood through pressure lamination, an innovative process developed by Benjamin Hubert in collaboration with Canadian manufacturer Corelam. The underside of the table’s surface – which gently curves across its length and width – adds tensile strength to the structure. The legs – which features a hollow triangular profile – offers increased strength and rigidity in two directions. In addition, Ripple uses 80% less material (Sitka Spruce 0.8mm aircraft plywood) than a standard timber table.

Where you can get it: Great Dane Furniture

Cutting Edge

Created by: Martijn Rigters

Why we love it: Rigters has used an exceptionally complex hot wire, foam-cutting technique, to create a highly textured and unique sofa. Typically, this technique is focussed on creating very regulated forms by strictly controlling parameters, – like temperature, movement and cutting – along a linear path. However, Rigters has pushed the three dimensional potential of the process by combining a range of silhouettes and human movement to directly shape a rectangular block of EPS into an individualised object.

Where you can get it: Spazio Rossana Orlandi (Milan) and to order.

Hexi Wall

Created by: Thibaut SLD

Why we love it: The HEXI is a responsive wall made from 60 PVC and aluminium modules that fluctuate and move as people walk past. The animated elements are tracked and analysed by depth-sensing cameras. Discrete instructions are then sent to each of the motor-controlled modules, providing provide real-time feedback on the movement.

Where you can get it: Thibault

Pepe

Created by: Helene Steiner

Why we love it: Pepe is made – rather surprisingly – from paper-thin veneer. The veneer is only 0.5 mm thick and moistened on one side with glue which is then rolled into a tight pipe and pressed. The flexible process cleverly uses different pressing angles to make shaping in any direction possible. The result is a very lightweight, stable and elegant chair.

Where you can get it: Prototype. (In sampling phase)

Ripple Cabinet

Created by: Edward Johnson

Why we love it: Johnson has pushed the art of laminating in a new direction to create an elegant, clean and fluid form which lets the material add the details. His design was inspired by the action of dropping an object into water, the result of which sends concentric ripples outwards. In this case he was produced the effect on wood – a challenge in itself. The piece includes 12 hand cut dovetailed drawers which open with ease, releasing an aromatic aroma of Cedar.

Where you can get it: Edward Johnson Bespoke Furniture & Art

Ripple Effect Table

Created by: Jeonghwa Seo & Hanna Chung

Why we love it: Inspired by Eastern tea culture and “the Oriental mindset that small individual changes can impact the whole”, South Koreans Jeonghwa Seo and Hanna Chung have created a water-topped tea table that ripples in response to small movements.

Where you can get it: To order

Ripple Screen

Created by: Alvar Aalto

Why we love it: It’s a classic. The 2 metre, lacquered pine screen designed by Alvar Aalto makes for a perfectly discreet room divider or privacy partition.

Where you can get it: Artek

Steam 12 Bench

Created by: Bae Sehwa

Why we love it: The Steam Series features a range of products that represent Korean designer Bae Se Hwa’s unique vision to transform materials into geometrical forms through a steam bending technique. The Steam 12, composed of bent walnut, features curvaceous elements that organically support each other, mimicking the elegant flow and dynamic quality of a stream or silhouette of the mountains.

Where you can get it: Gallery Seomi