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Issue 60 - The Kitchen and Bathroom Issue

Issue 60

The Kitchen and Bathroom Issue

HABITUS has always stood ahead of the rest with a dedicated Kitchen and Bathroom issue of exemplar standards. For issue 60 we have taken it up a notch with our Guest Editor the extraordinary, queen of kitchen design, Sarah-Jane Pyke of Arent&Pyke, speaking directly to Kitchen and Bathroom design with some increadable insights.

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And the winner is… The Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes
CultureSarah Hetherington

And the winner is… The Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes

The 2024 Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prize exhibition has surpassed usual expectations, with winners recently announced at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.


Often controversial and occasionally repetitive, the annual Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prize exhibition overall feels reinvigorated in 2024. Whilst the Archibald itself features some curious portraits, the Wynne and Sulman always make for compelling viewing.

The Archibald Prize is awarded annually to the best portrait, ‘preferentially of some man or woman distinguished in art, letters, science or politics, painted by any artist resident in Australasia’. Since 1921, the prize has been judged by the Trustees of the Gallery and, in 2024, 54 finalists were selected out of 1005 entries with notable inclusions by Angus McDonald, Anna Mould, Meagan Pelham and Tsering Hannaford.

This year the Archibald Prize was awarded to Kurrajong-based artist, Laura Jones, for her thoughtful portrait of Australian author and passionate conservationist, Tim Winton. Jones is the twelfth female to be awarded the prize in its 103-year history, noting she hopes that it “inspires more young girls to pursue a career in the Australian art world.” Jones’ choice of Winton as a subject reflects their shared interest in the environment, after first meeting in 2017 at an advocacy event for the Great Barrier Reef. The tonally rich work itself marks a maturity in Jones’ practice: loosely yet confidently rendered, Winton’s portrait reveals a man of certain intensity, looking into the distance, deep in thought. 

Winner Archibald Prize 2024, Laura Jones ‘Tim Winton’, oil on linen, 198 x 152.5cm, image courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW, Jenni Carter.

Similarly, the Wynne Prize is also judged by the Trustees, and comprises ‘landscape painting of Australian scenery, or figure sculpture.’ The 2024 edition features 41 finalists selected out of 738 entries, and presents a dynamic snapshot, particularly of Indigenous art from around the country being made now. 

The 2024 Wynne Prize was awarded to Yolŋu artist, Djakaŋu Yunupiŋu, for her dazzling larrakitj (bark painting) Nyalala gurmilili. The work relates to the north-easternmost part of Arnhem Land, in the Northern Territory, that receives the first light as the sun rises in the east. Yunupiŋu paints the tale of the Djulpan, Yirritja spirit women who are a constellation – the Pleiades, or seven sisters. Interestingly, the bark is the largest to have ever been entered in the Wynne Prize, and the first time a bark has been awarded the winner.

Winner Wynne Prize 2024, Djakaŋu Yunupiŋu ‘Nyalala gurmilili’, natural pigments on bark, 263 x 154cm, image courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW, Jenni Carter.

Other highlights of the Wynne Prize include Jason Phu’s tribute to Sydney titled my really beautiful wonderful city wow; Jude Rae’s evocative painting The Miracle of the Trees depicting regeneration after bushfires; and Papunya Tula artist Bobby West Tjupurrula’s optically mesmerising painting of Palipalintja in Western Australia where the Tingari ancestral figures travelled over the Western Desert, shaping country. 

Lastly, but by no means least, the Sulman Prize is for ‘subject painting, genre painting or a mural project,’ and in 2024 has been selected and judged by Sydney-based artist, Tom Polo. Polo has chosen 40 finalists out of 628 entries, with the winning entry given to Naomi Kantjurinya respected community Elder and artist at Tjala Arts in Amata on the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY Lands), in South Australia. Her black and white painting, Minyma mamu tjuta, tells the story of mamu or good and evil spirits. Impressive paintings by Mark Maurangi Carrol, Ivan Namirrkki, Kenny Pittock and Laura Jones are also highlights. 

Winner Sulman Prize 2024, Naomi Kantjuriny ‘Minyma mamu tjuta’, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 197 x 153.5cm, image courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW, Jenni Carter.

While not involved in the selection of the finalists, Head Curator of Australian Art, Wayne Tunnicliffe, has deftly and elegantly curated the exhibition. Of the presentation, Tunnicliffe states: “A terrific group of works to work with – fresh and full of energy. Interestingly, this year features over 50 per cent of first-time finalists on average across the exhibitions; a mix of younger artists and more mature, cultural thought-leaders. The works found their own places within the spaces and created a dialogue with each other.” The result is stimulating and a joyful experience whereby discoveries are to be made and insightful connections between seemingly disparate artists’ works are to be considered anew. 

As Australia’s most celebrated art prize, the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman inevitably always sparks lively conversation between artists, the art community and audiences alike. The 2024 exhibition is no exception – there is much to be enjoyed and experienced. 

Art Gallery NSW
artgallery.nsw.gov.au

Installation view, ‘Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes 2024’, photograph courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW, Jenni Carter.

Keep reading: Sydney Biennale 2024


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Sarah Hetherington

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Issue 60 - The Kitchen and Bathroom Issue

Issue 60

The Kitchen and Bathroom Issue

HABITUS has always stood ahead of the rest with a dedicated Kitchen and Bathroom issue of exemplar standards. For issue 60 we have taken it up a notch with our Guest Editor the extraordinary, queen of kitchen design, Sarah-Jane Pyke of Arent&Pyke, speaking directly to Kitchen and Bathroom design with some increadable insights.

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