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Issue 59 - The Life Outside Issue

Issue 59

The Life Outside Issue

Introducing the Life Outside issue of Habitus magazine. With life increasingly being absorbed into a digital space, there is never a more important moment to hold something tangible. In this context, the power of nature to have a physiological impact on our sense of wellbeing has never been more important. So how can we cultivate the benefits of the our natural environment in the most intimate of places – our homes? This was the question that helped to bring this issue of Habitus to life.

A Product of

Dutch Quarter by Sally Caroline is illustrious in its European setting
HomesSaskia Neacsu

Dutch Quarter by Sally Caroline is illustrious in its European setting

Other

Housing collectible artworks and avant-garde antiquities, motifs and music rooms, Dutch Quarter by Sally Caroline is a residence designed to evoke luxury.


With an ethos for ‘tailoring to life’s rituals,’ Sally Caroline designed the Dutch Quarter for a nomadic family of four. The house embodies the ebullient and convivial nature of the young family of globetrotters, leveraging their personalities and vibrant energy to reveal a light-filled and refined house that is anything but ephemeral.

Located in Amsterdam, the land of bikes and canals, the Dutch Quarter sits flanked by green space. Sally Caroline’s interior atelier has sourced pieces for the residence to bring both vintage and contemporary touches.

Upon entering the Dutch Quarter, the vestibule has been designed around a collectible, understated console by French designer Jean-Baptiste Fastrez, which is complemented by a ‘Secret Mirror’ from Swedish design studio Front. The latter’s elongated octagonal design playfully reveals a sculptural dimension to the entrance.

Moving through to the music room, which houses an extensive record collection enveloped within two vintage bookcases by Vittorio Introini, a handcrafted leather dresser and a vintage Camaleonda sofa reimagined in Dedar fabric also feature. The ground level is dedicated to family moments – board games and movie nights are the name of the game.

A dividing glass screen then separates the movie room and the family lounge. Neutral textures, pops of colour and intricate furniture details are all lovingly gathered from continental Europe, the United Kingdom and the United States – a nod to the client’s wanderlust ways.

Related: Bronte Beach House by Tom Mark Henry

Ascending the staircase, the master bedroom boasts verdant views of Vondelpark. The Art Deco fixtures and furnishing elevate the space, most notably with the Cloud chandelier hovering above and commissioned artwork by Australian artist Stephen John Clark that adorns the wall.

The walnut joinery and chocolate-tinted glass door fittings in the walk-in-robe evoke a sensual and regal atmosphere, juxtaposing the light-filled, eccentric spaces throughout the quarters, and enhancing the privacy and lavishness of the room through subtle warmth and muted tones.

The bedrooms were designed to be analogous yet vastly different in their interiors, as they reflect the individual and unique personalities of the twins. The Danish credenzas were custom-illustrated by UK artist Tess Newall; inspired by the 1940s Bemelmans Bar murals, each unit speaks to the twins’ shared sense of adventure with motifs personalised to each child. An original 1960s illuminated flower mirror by Emil Steynar hangs prominently above each credenza. With their delicate details and soft glow, these Austrian mid-century finds create a dreamlike vibe in each bedroom.

Sally Caroline
sallycaroline.com

Photography
Kasia Gatkowska

Next up: Tamsin Johnson’s European-inspired parfumerie in Sydney


About the Author

Saskia Neacsu

Tags

AmsterdamDutch QuartereuropeHome ArchitectureHouse ArchitectureInterior DesigninteriorsNetherlandsResidential ArchitectureSally Caroline


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Issue 59 - The Life Outside Issue

Issue 59

The Life Outside Issue

Introducing the Life Outside issue of Habitus magazine. With life increasingly being absorbed into a digital space, there is never a more important moment to hold something tangible. In this context, the power of nature to have a physiological impact on our sense of wellbeing has never been more important. So how can we cultivate the benefits of the our natural environment in the most intimate of places – our homes? This was the question that helped to bring this issue of Habitus to life.

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